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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Jan 13, 1967

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Array IS THERE REALLY A PRESIDENTIAL RACE?
AMS hopes to nominate candidates for UBC president
have been "shot down in flames".
AMS president Peter Braund said Thursday: "Since
council voted down the motion last Monday there is no
chance of the AMS nominating any presidential candidates
"My personal idea was to discuss criteria for the candidates, then look around for possible candidates and
throw their names into the ring."
Braund told the Ubyssey Nov. 25 the AMS would
define selection criteria and make several nominations in
January.
Braund then cited criteria he would like to see the
nominating committee use.
"The new president must be renowned in the field.
He must have favorable relationships with faculty and
students and must be articulate enough to deal with the
provincial government."
"Most important is that he must come from within
Canada, but_not necessarily from UBC," said Braund.
Kings must fall but presidential candidates tumble in double lime.
John Galbraith, Canadian-born economist
and Harvard professor, Thursday told The
Ubyssey in a telephone interview from
Switzerland there was no possibility that he
would ever consider or accept the job of
UBC president.
Galbraith is reported to be prominent in
UBC faculty and staff discussions concerning the next possible president.
Two downtown newspapers claimed Gal-
braitht was being considered for the job.
"The suggestion that Galbraith leave his
present post at Harvard University and his
status in the U.S. is not as far-fetched as it
seems," claimed The Province.
Vol. XLVIII, No. 35      VANCOUVER, BC, FRIDAY. JANUARY 13,  1967
2l4-|916
The Sun came closer by calling Galbraith
a "long-shot."
Galbraith was traced by The Ubyssey
from Harvard to Chalet Tannegee, Gistad,
Switzerland.
When asked about the presidency, he
exclaimed: "It's the first time I've heard of
it."
"I haven't given it a single thought," he
said.
"Years ago I decided that I would not
enter this relatively limited field but turn
to other areas of endeavor.
"Flattered as I am, I can assure you that
I never have and don't in the future intend
to take on the presidency of UBC," Galbraith
concluded.
Galbraith is the second "candidate" who
has denied to The Ubyssey all rumors that
they are interested in UBC president John
Maid <^aJctX,- ob.
On Tuesday chairman of the Economic
Council of Canada Dr. James Deutsch refuted
Vancouver news reports that he wanted or
had been approached concerning the job.
Arts president
fumbles again
By CHARLOTTE HAIRE
Arts undergraduate society president George Roberts came under
fire from his council Thursday for
not doing anything.
Roberts, absent from the arts
council meeting, was accused of inaction and irresponsibility.
He was cited as responsible for
the "locker and money" mess.
(Nothing has been done to collect
money for looker rentals, and students who paid are demanding
refunds.)
Councillors say there has never
been an audit of arts money. No
one on council has a key to the
office, and money has disappeared
from desk drawers, a councillor
said.
Roberts has missed five consecutive meetings since he took office
in early November.
"On behalf of the council, I
would like to say that we are disgruntled with Robert's presidency
and feel that he has not acted up
to his responsibilities as president
of this council," said council member Guido Botto.
The council also complained
about Robert's self-appointment as
signing officer, an action they say
is illegal.
They then discussed having an
audit done, or a full financial report by Roberts on the period since
he took office. The copy of past
AUS president Don Wise's report
on finances was never handed in.
Wise resigned after he was found
ineligible in November because he
was a graduate student.
Acting president Vic Hamm outlined four questions to be dealt with
by council:
• "What has Roberts done to
justify his existence as arts undergraduate president?
• "Why hasn't Roberts done
anything?
• "Shall we attempt to find a
solution to this problem?
• "Where the hell is he?"
"The  council   is   going  to   give
George a week to justify himself
after which time, if council is not
satisfied, steps will be taken to remove him from his post according
to the constitution," Botto said.
Arts undergraduate council will
meet next Thursday to decide further action.
Shrunken council no use
AMS president Peter Braund is fed
up.
He said so Thursday night after only
eight voting members of the student
council turned up at a special meeting.
No business was transacted at the
meeting because of the lack of a 13-
member quorum.
"It's the first time we've lacked a
quorum since September," Braund
said. "I'm very disappointed. We nearly always get 20 out of 45, but I have
never called a special meeting before
and the Monday night habit seems to
be ingrained in the council."
The councillors present discussed
the upcoming education week Jan.
23-27, and the projected trip to the
provincial legislature in Victoria.
Xi&^^r^&immmi^tm^^cj^^imwzmmzism
— powoll hargrave photo
"THOUSANDS  SPLASH   past  with  sopping   hair.   Thousands   more   wait
under concrete  umbrellas.   But  I  stand  alone,  one  silent,  stoned  drip."
WHAT'S HAPPENING INSIDE
Mate quits page    4
Mass tramping   page    3
Skiers win first page 15
Skinny cow snafu page    2
Poetry and more . page friday
Peer Gynt reviewed pf 3 Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, January  13,   1967
Skinny cows cause fuss
Cash allows profs study
—even 8,000 miles apart
LET'S HAVE a little nip-pie, pleads Aggie
in   cow-milking   contest   Thursday.   There
was just no udder way they could win.
Moral force aids
Canada's greatest
Do you have physical vigor, moral force
of character and ability to serve, work with
and lead others?
No, this is not the supreme blorg's call
to aid the fight against centennial committees
and flag stitchers.
The Ubyssey has openings for dedicated
helpers.
Anyone who thinks he can write, type,
or stay up late can join the best university
paper in Canada right now.
We are in the basement of north Brock.
Come to us, great helpers. Lend us your
minds.
A fourth-year agriculture student says he
will petition the provincial department of
agriculture to end "atrocious treatment" of
animals used by UBC's agriculture faculty.
John Manval, a specialist in animal husbandry said Thursday he was disgusted by
the cruelty shown by agriculture students
who forced four emaciated cows from the
university barns to toe milked by complete
novices.
"I can't understand it," he said. "The cows
were led through the pouring rain to an unfamiliar shelter, where people who had
obviously never touched a cow before were
allowed to milk them.
"I have never seen a more flagrant case of
mistreatment of animals.
"I suppose it was some sort of undergraduate prank," he said.
Spokesmen for the argriculture undergraduate society could not be contacted for
comment.
...but we won
Pubster milkers and drinkers liquidated
opposition teams from four faculties in a
cow-milking and beer-drinking contest Thursday.
Three novice milkers, led by farmer
Powell Hargrave, swamped teams from engineering, forestry, phys ed and agriculture,
drawing four bottles full. Forestry, engineers,
and phys ed followed; with the sponsoring
aggies bringing up the tail end.
The Pubsters managed to defeat the udder
teams despite an attempt by the aggies to
provide the team with a dry cow.
■ "It just goes to show that teaters never
prosper," remarked one interested bystander.
Pubsters also defeated boat race teams
from phys ed, engineering and agriculture.
FEES  POUR IN
"Thicker and faster", the money
pours in.
This is the way assistant accountant
N. A. Housden described the rate at
which second term fees have been
arriving.
Jan. 16 is the deadline for payment
of all second term fees.
"Right now I can say that we're on
top of the job and we've been working
morning and evening to keep it that
way," said Housden.
Eight thousand miles separate them.
Yet aided by a $6,500 grant
from the Asia Foundation,
Professor R. S. Milne and
Professor K. J. Ratnam, political science heads at the universities of British Columbia
and Singapore respectively,
are conducting a joint research project irito the political development of Sabah.
Sabah consists of the two
Malaysian states of North
Borneo and Sarawak which
form part of the Malaysian
Federation.
The study will concentrate
on elections, the growth of
political parties and the political changes resulting from
the shift from colonial status
to independence within the
Malaysian Federation.
R. S. MILNE
. 8,000 miles
Fat girl has slim chance
NEW YORK. (CUP) — The intelligent but fat high
school girl has one-third less chance of getting into an
American college than her intelligent-but-thin classmate,
a recent public health study indicates.
The study, made by the Harvard School of Public
Health, also reveals fat boys have a slightly better chance
than fat girls of getting into college. But they still have
a tougher time gaining admission than thin boys of comparable intelligence.
PAYMENT
of Second-Term Fees
A student whose second-term fees are not fully paid by
January 16, 1967, will be assessed a late payment fee of
$20.00: this fee will be increased to $30.00 after January
31, 1967. A student not fully paid by February 15, 1967
will be excluded from classes and his registration cancelled.
If reinstatement is approved by the Registrar a $10.00
reinstatement fee plus the late fee of $30.00 together with
all other outstanding fees will be required'.
FORMAL
AMD
SEMI-FORMAL
rental and nalet
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JANUARY 14
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Mid-Season
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100 laps of
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NEW PRICES
AGRODOME
Time Trials 7:30. Races 8:30
Adults $1.50, Students $1.00
Child under 12 FREE with Adults
THE LIONS DEN
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PHONE 681-2934
YEAR END SALE
Ends January 31, 1967
Store-wide Clearance of all Regular Stack
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Regular to $115.00
Suit« - Group 2
Regular to
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Top Coats
Regular to
85.00
Rain Coat*
Ragular to
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Duff to Coats
Regular to
49.50
Blazers (small
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Regular to
45.00
Lined Casual
Jocfcots
Rogular to
29.95
(82.88
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21.98
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Pullo™- - Nationally      Cordial. - Nationally      Slocks - •" "rtiw «"<*
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1/3 to 1/2 OFF 1/3 to 1/2 OFF lncU. "*■*••. Day.
ate. ilus 28 to 42.
1/4 OFF All Slacks
Soon Shirts - rogular to tt.95
short 8i long sloovos
83.49   3 for $10.00
DrossShirts • short and long sloovos.
whit. & colours - rogular to 18.95      $2.99   3 for 18.78
Tins- larga assartsunt - rogular to $3.50      $1.19   3 for $3.33
Fancy Yosts ■ assarted altos - regular to $14.95      1/3 OFF
151
impkbAirk
Set your sight in College
with glasses
from...
OPTICAL DEPT.
LONDON 8*DRUGS
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Limited
TWO CONVENIENT LOCATIONS ONLY
Vancouver
677 Granville
Opp. THE BAY
681-6174
New Westminster
675 Columbia
Opp. Army A Navy
LA 1-0751 Friday, January 13,  1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
MARCH, OR BUSSED?
Students tromp, briefly
UBC students hit the road again next
week.
This time they are going to the provincial
legislature buildings in birdland.
AMS president Peter Braund called
Thursday for 200 U1BC students to support
the B.C. Assembly of Students' plan to pre-
setn the needs of B.C. higher education to the
minister of education and members of the
assembly in Victoria.
Last time UBC students marched was
January, 1966, when 3,000 strode concernedly to the Association of Universities and
Colleges of Canada convention at the Bay-
shore Inn.
More than 1,000 students, from four universities, B.C. Institute of Technology, Vancouver City College, nursing schools and high
schools will mass on legislature steps in the
BCAS march.
Object of the mass action is to present
LESLIE PETERSON
. . will get briefs
seven briefs to the provincial government
outlining the specific requirements of each
institution.
"This is the most significant student manifestation of concern since the Back-Mac
march of 1963," said Braund.
It is the first mass action taken by the
newly formed BCAS since its November
convention.
Demands in the briefs will include a
long-range provincial government commitment on help with fees, shorter courses for
nurses, improvement in conditions at BCIT
and student involvement in university government.
Education action week at UBC will run
from Jan. 23-28 to build up enthusiasm for
the event.
The UBC delegation will leave the university by bus at 10:00 a.m. Friday.
Each of the marchers will be asked to
contribute $2 for transportation costs.
The rest of the cost will be covered by
the AMS.
"We expect it to cost us from $750 to
$1,200," said Braund.
The delegation is expected to arrive at
the University of "Victoria campus at 1:30
p.m.
The march will begin at 2:30 p.m. and
will arrive at the legislature about 3:45 p.m.
BCAS has invited education minister
Leslie Peterson, opposition leader Robert
Strachan and Liberal leader Ray Perrault to
address the group.
Peterson will be presented with the briefs
in a ceremony on the steps of the legislature.
BCAS president Frank Flynn and representatives of all groups involved will go into
Peterson's office to discuss proposals outlined
in the briefs.
The throng outside will be harangued by
relays of student speakers until Flynn re-
emerges.
The group will then march back to the
starting point and board the buses for Vancouver.
Braund said he wants a large turnout to
impress the MLA's because "half of them
are not aware of the problems of higher
education."
KERCHOKE GOES the bubbly down throat of cartoonist
Rae Moster, with aid from Lynne DeCew. Two drew their
way to the Ottawa Journal trophy for best editorial
cartoons among Canadian university newspapers.
SCIENCEMEN CLOCK IN
Sealing of a time capsule is one of the events scheduled
for science week which begins Monday.
The time capsule is the centennial project of SUS.
Dr. Volkoff will speak at the ceremony Wednesday noon
beside the cairn on main mall.
Other events include a science vs. nurses hockey game
on Monday, a student-professor coffee party Tuesday in
Brock, and a pep meet Thursday noon in Hebb theatre
featuring a psychedelic band and various  skits.
Last event is a pub crawl Friday afternoon.
Trustees told to back down Sick Broctor replaced
Burnaby school trustee Bill Daly was
told Thursday to retract alleged slanderous
statement or face a libel suit by the B.C.
Assembly of Students.
"If the Burnaby Courier does not give
space for a rebuttal and Daly does not
make a public retraction of his remarks,
the BCAS will go ahead with plans for a
libel suit against him," said AMS president
Peter Braund.
He was referring to statements made by
Daly calling the BCAS a "questionable
organization using communist tactics".
Daly was opposed to mailing assembly
literature to Burnaby high school students.
"It could very readily be a tool to use
a student newspaper for propaganda of any
description," he said.
The BCAS calls the body set up in each
institution a secretariat-
Daly felt the term was objectionable
because "it is used in communist countries
and foreign to our way of life".
UBC science president Frank Flynn,
Chairman of BCAS, and Braund consulted
the AMS lawyer Wednesday.
They reported the lawyer said Daly's
statements could be "construed as libelous".
Braund said their lawyer had two suggestions concerning the matter.
"The BCAS can ask the Burnaby
Courier for equal space for a rebuttal to
Daly's remarks," said Braund.
"The BCAS can send a letter to Daly
which would include an outline of the
BCAS program, which Daly has not read,
and demand a public retraction."
Daly said he would not make further
statements concerning the case until he
has seen his lawyer.
A spokesman for the Courier said it
has not been contacted to print a rebuttal.
"Whether we offer space depends on
what they want to say," she said.
A familiar face is missing from Brock hall this term.
John Wilson, Brock Hall Proctor for the past three years,
suffered a heart attack just before the Christmas holidays.
His duties were taken on by George Chapman, an employee
at the university for ten years.
Chapman comes to Brock from the Frederick Lasserre building.   He started at Brock Tuesday.
Chapman described his job as "nice but hectic."
"You really have to be able to get along with people in
this job."
Housing gets $9.6 million
The provincial government has given UBC permission to
borrow $9.6 million for construction of married student residences.
UBC will borrow $4.6 million from Central Mortgage and
Housing and the Bank of Montreal.
It was also authorized to obtain $5 million, with a maximum of six per cent interest, pending receipt of funds from
the Three University's Capital Fund.
University of Victoria was authorized to borrow $3 million
on the same terms.
IN FLOODED FLORENCE*:
LSURE, MORALMAN WAS HERE! __
LOOK AT ALL THIS WATER/WTA
now he puts amies on
NAT/YES IN AFRICA!
* _r fr     ■      a   - - _.
HMHER MAJESTY'S'
ERvlCE.'ALlLTTERFROrfl
LIZ! THANKS, BOY, VOUJ
CAN (JO NOW; THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout tho university your
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinion! are
the editor's and not of the AMS or the university. Member, Canadian
University Press. Founding member. Pacific Student Press. Authariied
second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of
postage in cash.
The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review.
City editor, 224-3916. Other calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo, Page
Friday, loc. 24; features, sports, loc. 23; advertising, loc. 26. Night calls,
731-7019.
Winner Canadian University Press Trophies for general
excellence and editorial cartoons.
JANUARY 13, 1967
Exam fubar:
In the past, whenever someone wanted to justify the
examination system as a way to assess academic progress, the final and substantive reason for retaining
exams has been administrative practicality.
You can't grade people and measure their intellectual awareness in any other efficient way, the old deans
cry. But all the while they admit examinations and
their absurd setting bears no relationship to the mind
or to one's perception of reality.
Finally, we know you can't assess people with
exams either, after the Christmas fubars: geography
100, the ever-present computer bollixes, sociology 325
and the lack of first class marks in arts.
Since the Christmas mess, and bearing in mind the
injustices exams cause every year, the problems caused
by them can be assessed without the administrative red
herring, and alternatives must be found.
First, one's performance on an examination has
nothing to do with learning, unless the object of the
exam is to see how well one performs in such an
artificial   situation.
Exams provide no time for reflection and no time
for research—both of which are what a scholar is about.
A scholar is not defined as one who can field, the most
tricky questions the fastest—he is the man who can
ponder what he knows, seek new relationships, evolve
new perceptions of the world and formulate new
^analyses of what is known.
The direction is always toward what is not yet
known.
Two hours spent in a stuffy or frigid hall filling
blanks with magnetic graphite doesn't measure the
capacity to think.
Three hours scribbling a remembered version of
text once read as a response to a question requiring
some analysis doesn't measure awarness.
The problem for the university is that all alternatives—and many have been proposed by scholars at
UBC and elsewhere — presuppose a teaching method
other than lectures and notetaking.
The examination fubar is another reason why the
university made a sound decision when it endorsed an
arts revision. The need for a new way to teach is
further proof of the inadequacy of examinations—as if
the Christmas fubar was not enough.
We cannot propose any flip editorial answers. But
the answers must be found.
Armies? Foo.
Somehow, unification of the Canadian armed forces
crept into our letters, and somehow we can't take the
whole issue seriously.
Canada keeps token peace forces in a couple of
trouble spots, and trains thousands of men, only to
discharge them some unproductive years later.
In today's kind of warfare, armies are useless —
unless you're attempting to commit genocide in somebody else's jungle.
So Canada feeds a lot of guys who can't cope outside a comfortable authoritarian military, calls it an
armed force, and a gaggle of admirals yelp when their
tradition is needled by the government's unification idea.
We're getting pretty tired of listening to old admirals
and generals howls and we weary of such an irrelevant
topic.
Now, what is relevant would be total dissolution of
Canada's armed force, as a small token by a medium-
sized nation in the interest of world peace.
Atlanta to Memphis
GABOR MATE:
'Ubyssey trivial; I quit1
EDITOR: John Kelsey
Managing   ..-.._   .     Richard Blair
News        Carol Wilson
City - -    - -      Danny Stoffman
Photo .-      Powell Hargrave
Page Friday •. _     Claudia Gwinn
Focus    .-   .    Rosemary Hyman
Sports      -. Sue Gransby
Ass't News Al Birnie
Ass't City .- -_ _. Tom Morris
CUP -_-  Bert Hill
Kris Emmott looked for graffitti.
Val Thom looked for proctors and
others. Morris got Galbraith off
Alpine slopes. Charlotte Haire
listened closely. Norman Gidney,
John Appleby, Joan Fogarty, Murray McMillan, Boni Lee and Val
Zuker reported. "We're a little
gem," said Kelsey. Pio Uran, Mike
Jessen, Marg Fairweather and Tony
Hodge sported. Kurt Hilger, Derrek
Webb, Chris Blake, Al Harvey,
Dennis Gans and Don Kydd photoed.
Triumph party — week tomorrow.
Come  down  for details.
This, loyal fans—both of
you—is my last regular column for The Ubyssey. My
leaving is hardly of cosmic
importance; in fact — except
for a smaller number of
vituperative letters to the
editor — the difference will
scarcely be noticeable in the
pages of "the greatest college
paper in Canada."
But my quitting, although
the result of a personal decision, is concerned as much
with' the nature of The
Ubyssey as with purely personal factors — and for this
reason. I feel compelled to
provide an explanation.
• •   •
The Ubyssey, despite what
its self-laudatory editorials so
glibly assert, is not a good
newspaper. It is not good,
and it is not even mediocre
—it is trivial. For the most
part it is concerned with
trivia, with matters that
are unimportant, insignificant, and unreal. It contains
no message, no information
which has the slightest bearing on issues which are important, significant, and real
in this world. It says nothing
which is at all relevant to the
life of any one of us.
No one is less ignorant for
having read The Ubyssey, and
no one is more ignorant for
not having done so. The best
college paper in Canada is
but another escape from
reality in a society which already uses too many easy
escapes. Because it is an escape from reality, it is also
an escape from truth, for it
is falsehood to present an unreal picture of the world.
• •   •
The belief that "Joe Student" wants to read trivia,
that he needs an escape from
the "rigors of university life"
is not a valid moral justification, but a convenient myth
to rationalize our snobbery
and our inaction. This "Joe
Student" does not exists—and
even if he did, one does not
supply unlimited quantities
of opium to a drug addict
merely because the latter
feels a craving for a mind-
soothing, stupefying drug.
Winning the Southam trophy for six years is not an
achievement The Ubyssey's
staff should be proud of. The
selection is made by the men
who publish the lie-filled,
hypocritical, trivia-concerned
propaganda sheets known as
the daily papers — instead of
pride, we should all feel
shame that such men have
found our work worthy of
honor.
Unfortunately I cannot
claim any personal exemption from the same and from
the responsibility. No less
than anyone, I have contributed to the never-never land
world view that The Ubyssey
unconsciously or consciously
helps to foster. For the sake
of personal recognition, and
as a personal escape from
reality, I have compromised
the truths I believe in by
contributing to a paper that I
have long known to be trivial,
irrelevant, and thus often
directly harmful.
• •   •
Although   I   have   enjoyed
writing them, my humorous
articles — humorous at least
by intent — have been mostly
a gimmick to draw attention
to my political views. But I
know now, as I perhaps knew
a long time ago, that gimmicks are no substitute for
reality, and that there are no
gimmicks to reality.
People might accept you
more easily if you can evoke
the occasional laugh — but
they will not accept what
you see — what you know —
to be the truth. And they
will accept you only because
you have compromised and
somehow intimated that the
truth is not, after, very important.
• •    •
There are some who will
fight truth until they die as
human beings, and with these
you need not laugh and compromise — they are incapable
of accepting truth. Those ignorant fools, for example,
who know nothing of the history and politics of Viet Nam
nor of the nature of our society's involvement in that
and other conflicts, those
idiots who possess not a fact,
not a shred of historical evidence, and who are content
to parrot lies, slogans, and
more empty slogans and lies
to protect their full bellies—
with these you need not laugh
and compromise, for they are
incapable of accepting truth.
(Are you sick, friend, of constantly hearing about that
war? Go ahead and retch
then, or turn your eyes, and
tell yourself that you are not
a murderer.) And those ani
mals who can behold the picture of the bleeding and
scorched flesh of a Vietnamese child and then, even
as a "joke", carry a "bomb
the Cong" banner — with
these insensitive, sadistic,
civilized cannibals you need
not laugh and compromise,
for they will not recognize
truth until it visits them in
the form of burning napalm
clinging to the backs of
THEIR children. You can
have pity for these unfeeling, dehumanized products of
our society, but you need not
compromise with them.
• •   •
But there are some, perhaps, a minority, who have
not been sufficiently brainwashed to cloud their vision
of reality. And with these I
can laugh freely, and mock at
all the absurdity and hypocrisy' that abounds in the
world — but these people
need no gimmicks to lead
them to reality. They need
no compromises, no trivia, no
irrelevancies. They need not
occasional glimpses of the
truth buried in utter trash—
they demand truth itself.
The Ubyssey, I know, will
not provide this truth — so
I am leaving The Ubyssey.
Others are leaving too, and
there are some who remain
only because they lack the
courage to act on their beliefs and kick hypocritical,
meaningless success in the
face. As I have rationalized
until now, they will continue
to rationalize their compromised position.
• -•   •
A few of us will bring out
a new publication in a few
weeks. It will be read by far
fewer people than The Ubyssey, but at least it will not
be a compromise of our consciences.
T am aware, finally, that
many will think this last
column to be overdramatic,
overemotional, extreme, and
extremely ridiculous. But you
see, loyal fans, you can't
please everyone.
Maple Leaves
til ,  ^ >^Jr5-V/w>»_,  .;■■-. ^"-ggS5*!*-; fe*t^3
Pf
... a weekly magazine of
comment and reviews.
True north not so free
NOV. 18, 1966
ON THE COVER: "I see
you got your brand new
leopard skin pill box
hat," said Adam evenly.    Drawing  by Rae.
editor: claudia gwinn
assistants: judy bing
al(rim) birnie
sue richter
cartoons: gordon fiddler
rae moster
A quick synopsis of
today's copy shows all
the symptoms of centennial fever, especially
among the ranks of the
Canadian poets.
Even if you're not appreciative of the contrivances of literary jargon
don't overlook their
abundant presence herein. They're worthy of the
time if only to see the
giant steps taken since
the doggerel of Thomas
D'Arcy McGee.
As an outsider looking
out from the middle it
appears that even the
cool youth are aware that
this country is growing
up and that the family
album is filled with
mementoes that aren't
entirely to be ignored.
Its history isn't that
dull nor are its attempts
at the arts minimal or
ineffective.
Until recently the impression has been that
Canada's achievements
were good but not as
good as some one elses.
Maybe the magic word
centennial will revolutionize  that  attitude.
At the risk of being
sentimental thanks to
Mate the Great for services rendered. He has
decided to put all his efforts into Words for the
Internationalists.
This time of the term
is nearly always a
vacuum. But the next
few weeks will sweep up
the campus in things to
do. Watch pf for info on
the Contemporary Arts
Festival and yet another
jaunt to Rosario for Academic Symposium.
Griffin's poems express
understanding, love of Canada
without overlooking failures
:^|^||i
By CHARLIE BOYLAN
This  is   Canada's   Centennial  year.  To some  of  the /
sophisticated      intellectuals
and   assorted    literati—   so
what?
Is anyone so naive as to
believe Canada is the "true
north, strong and free"?
Aside from the few thousand
or so Indians and Eskimos
still ghettoed in the worst
slums in North America
(take a trip to Port Edwards
for a start), everyone knows
this country is bought body
and soul by the yanks.
Confederation and other
poems by Harold Griffin.
Published    by    Common-
weal.h Fund, Vancouver.
Price $1.50. Available at
Co-op, Duthie and UBC
Bookstores.
Some millions of Canadians, however, still feel an
identity of their own. They
wrestle with the vast geography of our land—miners,
surveyors, loggers, fishermen, farmers, cattlemen, oil
riggers, construction workers — as Canadians have
done or the past hundred
years.
The true nature of our
country is also brought
home by the growing insistence of Quebecois for
national equality with English-Canada.
Even in the most Americanized urban centres of
English Canada, large numbers of workers are demanding independent Canadian
unions. And many students
are questioning the future
they will have in our
country.
Not just a few Canadians
are fed up with being dragged along with Lyndon B.'s
napalm foreign policy and
watching Idly while Canada's natural heritage is
shipped south for a yankee
dollar.
It is within this social and
political setting of our
Centennial that Griffin's
first volume of poetry, Confederation, is a welcomed
addition to our literature.
For those of you who reject poetry with a philosophy ("message stuff), forget it. There are no verbal
jig-saws or eight-line quests
for a week-end's piece of
tail in Griffin's poetry.
What he offers is the
thought and feeling of a man
sensitive to our history and
Untolerant of the tyranny
imposed by that history upon so many of its people.
The central image of the
title poem, for example, is
the quest of the two nations
in Canada to independence
in a country overwhelmed
by its geography.
At St. Denis
The vision flamed in patriot
wrath
Nor was it lost at St. Eustache.
Rekindled at Batoche,
The bright horizons blazed;
Almost it. was attained.
ifs time,
xesurgent in a people's heart
It cannot be denied.
The best poem in Confederation, is "Cuba."
Griffin had visited Cuba
under Machado and under
Castro. With long rhythmic
lines that demand reading
aloud, the poet traces and
inter-relates the history of
Cuba and Canada. Both
lands suffered the injustice
of the '30's.
Of Cuba:
And all across this land
Where seed sown to the son
and rain
Could swell to lavish harvest,
Hunger walked with you
from childhood
Amid the sugar cane.
And of Canada:
Arid beyond,
Where the icy fingers of the
tundra keep
Their clutch upon the land,
Hiding the legacy of oil
Bequeathed by immemorial
seas,
The tortured rocks
Writhe with congealed
minerals
Within their swollen veins.
So much wealth to fill the
wants of man
And still, in those years,
On the plains where the wheat
Grows green in spring to
golden,
In the grain bowl
There was also hunger.
The poem traces the common ancestry of the native
people:
Like ours, your ancient people
came
By ice-girt corridors
In the wake of melting snows
Trickling across an empty
continent
Until at last
Some distant generation stood
No longer strangers in the
land they made their own.
And the common adversary of our "independence:
We who also have seen
The eagle, reared to the
pursuit ot happiness,
Descend from his shining
height
And grow predatory,
Forgetting the bondage of his
earlier years.
Within his clutch he holds
The jungle realms of empires
Where the jaguar god
Mocks the living heart
Torn out of peoples
Immolated on his pyramid of
wealth.
But the poet claims the
Cuban revolution, "Leaving
the eagle shrieking in the
wind", will not go unnoticed
in Canada.
Between your land and mine
Are the bonds of brotherhood,
The immutable ties of the
continent.
The rest of Griffin's
poems, like "Cuba," express
his understanding and love
for Canada, its vast geography and its hard-working
people. There is little of the
lyric and nothing of satire
in his poems.
But for a good collection
of narrative and descriptive
poems embodying faith in
people and confidence in his
country's future, Confederation, by Hal Griffin, is
recommended reading.
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Page 6
T HE       U  BYSSEY
Friday, January  13,   1967 Peer Gynt colossal, vulgar
By KEN LIVINGSTONE
Peer Gynt is both magnificent and monstrous,
a colossal dramatic poem which sprawls across
several continents and most of the lifetime of its
hero whose sheer audacity in the face of all he
encounters gives the play both coherence and
meaning.
It is this audacity, this insatiable gorging of
life without regard for the consequences that makes
us both willing and eager to follow Peer Gynt in
his adventure from the Troll King's palace to the
wastes of the Sahara.
Peer Gynt is the King of Liars who suddenly
finds his lies have come to life all around him but
instead of being cowed by them, as any mortal man,
he draws a deep breath and plunges into their midst.
In short, it is a play that demands an inspired
production and an almost gargantuan performance
from its hero. At the same time the difficulties it
poses for both actor and director are enormous and
must be given full consideration in any judgment
of a particular production.
The fault with the Playhouse production is not
that it lacks inspiration but that it totally lacks
meaning. In vain we look for a point of view, a
thread which rims throughout the play and links
the various scenes to some unifying purpose. There
is none. The play is a succession of vague episodes
(occasionally successful in themselves) which range
from the camp vulgarity of the Anitra scene to a
fashionable bow towards theatre of cruelty in the
asylum sequence. In fact, the audience faces rather
the same problem as Peer in his battle with the
Great Boyg: the play is there before us but there is
nothing with which to come to grips.
All this is not to quarrel with the director's
attempt to up-date the play, there would be little
point in doing it otherwise; however, it is one thing
to re-interpret a play in contemporary terms and
quite another merely to dress it up with various
odds and ends from the current theatrical wardrobe.
It might toe quite exciting to have a troll play an
electric guitar instead of a harp if the entire scene
were mounted in some sort of pop style, but surely
not when the rest of the trolls are costumed in the
best fairy tale tradition.
I have already mentioned the unnecessary vulgarity of the harem sequence which drew the requisite guffaws.
'Again, it is perfectly legitimate for the director
to throw out the Grieg score as dated and overly
romantic, but what do we get in its place? Everything from electric guitars to the Nutcracker Suite.
The music has been chosen, says Mr. Black, "to
point up a relevant attitude to the situation," but an
attitude is precisely what is missing in the entire
production.
As for the actual performances, it is entirely to
Neil Dainard's credit that his Peer comes across as
well as he did. The sheer stamina required to keep
the audience involved for so long a period of time
must be admired.
What his Peer lacked in scope he made up for
with enthusiasm, unfortunately this was also his
weakness. For us to believe his lies he must believe
them himself and all too often one felt that his
boyish grin betrayed the enormity of his gall.
Pia Shandel makes a lovely Solveig who nonetheless has enough strength to make us believe she
could wait for Peer. Mention must also be made of
Allan Dobby as the Troll King and Pat Gage as his
daughter.
Perhaps the most successful of the many supporting characters is Peter Brockington's Button
Moulder. Looking for all the world like a satanic
Santa's helper, he appears at the end of the play
with just enough whimsy to point out the irony.
Charles Evans' set is baffling. Its rigid angles
work almost entirely on a horizontal plane forcing
the action to repeat itself back and forth across
the back of the stage while leaving the main acting
area strangely empty, except for a curious coffin
which more often than not gets in the way.
Ultimately one must give credit to the Playhouse
for attempting such an important, if overwhelming
play, but sincerely regret that they did not follow
Isben's suggestion and cut it into a more manageable form.
Forget Europe—Japan's an education
A Canadian learned what friendliness is
when a tiny store closed for his visit
Gordon Alexander was one
of six UBC students who
visited Japan under the Japan
Summer Exchange Program.
By GORDON ALEXANDER
A few months ago I was
sitting in a  sushi  store  in
Adachi-ku, north Tokyo.
I had toeen invited by the
brother of the owner. The
parents came also, and another brother and his wife
and two children arrived.
Occasionally the door would
open and someone would
come in, some words would
be spoken indicating that the
store was closed that evening, and the' man would
leave. What a way to run a
business! I was used to my
father's printing business
where I had worked more'
than one Boxing Day and
New Year's Day to handle
the Christmas rush. Here, in
my honor, the family had
gathered and the shop was
closed. The size of the shop
also amazed me. We nearly
filled it and there were only
eight of us. But the shop
made good money; Suzuki
prepared excellent sushi.
Perhaps I can best describe
the exchange by quoting part
of my journal:
"Sitting in Ogura's house
listening to the frogs and
rain. (Trains pass often1.) It is
raining a warm, soft rain. A
bell sounds at the railway
crossing for another train.
Yesterday we went to Olympic Park. The Olympic Memorial Tower is really a pagoda
with a kurin on the top, in
modern square architecture
—concrete and cold. Then we
went to Ueno Park. The Museum of Western Art there
was excellent. The building
was warm and the paintings
carefully placed and lighted.
A display of Rodin — as good
as the one displayed at the
National Gallery in Ottawa.
Then to Suzuki's by car;
(after getting soaking wet in
the rain, but dry in half an
hour). Dinner at Ogura's —
sukiyaki and corned beef
afterwards, and finally rice,
tea and beer. To bed at 11:30,
up at 8:00.
This is a fairly typical day,
except that we travelled by
car instead of train. To do
justice to Japanese trains I
would need 20 pages. When
we travelled we talked. The
discussions varied from philosophy and its purpose, to
politics and Viet Nam, to educational systems, (and of
course to the fair sex but in
Japan 'fair' is not the right
word, perhaps gentle is better). I talked a lot but listened carefully and learned
much from the people with
whom I came into contact.
The tangible value of these
discussions is non-existent,
but my understanding and
knowledge of people will be
affected permanently. Needless to say I learned something about politeness and
hospitality—the basis of business, friendship, and all endeavours involving people.
I was sitting on another
plane in September. I was
coming back to my own
country and old problems,
but with a new sensitivity
and also a new obligation.
Somehow I must repay my
debt to those who made me
so welcome in Japan. Next
summer I will be working
on the Canadian side of the
Pacific, hosting six Japanese
students and continuing the
exchange program.
The program has no practical value. It cannot be put
on a balance sheet. If it were,
its capital would only be
those people who help in con
tinuing it. But, the program
has a value in that it can improve international relations
and the students who participate.
It also makes the Canadian students who go to
Japan examine their own
society, consider its weak
points, and its good features.
Students must travel to
have a complete education.
Eighteenth Century England
sent its young men to Europe.
I think Twentieth Century
Canada should send its young
men and women to Japan.
jtf 3hree
Friday, January  13,   1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7 UNIVERSITY CHURCH
ON THE BOULEVARD
UNIVERSITY HILL ST. ANSELM'S
(United) (Anglican)
11:00 a.m. Morning Worship
"Did Jesus Come Too Soon?"  8 a.m., 9:30 a.m., 11 a.m.
Guest Preacher:
Dr. W. S. Taylor Holy Communion
Principal of Union College
at St. Anselm's
7:00 p.m. EPIPHANY CANDLELIGHT SERVICE
8:30 p.m. EPIPHANY MUSICAL CONCERT
by Mr. Jerry Walker
HAROLD MacKAY JIM McKIBBON
Chartered Accountants'
CAREER
BRIEFING
SESSION
18 January 1967
12:30 to 1:30~Chemistry Bldg.
Room 250
Members of the  Institute of Chartered  Accountants
of B.C. will speak to 1967 graduates in all faculties
and answer questions about a career in chartered
accountancy.
Free coffee will be served
1917-1967
50th ANNIVERSARY OF THE SOVIET
STATE
To mark this important event, we offer 10 special tours of
cities of importance in the Russian Revolution. Tourists
travelling on these tours will have an opportunity to see
historical Monuments and Museums; Modern Industrial
and Agricultural Enterprises and social institutions.
COME AND SEE US FOR DETAILS
HAGEN'S TRAVEL SERVICE LTD.
2996 W. BROADWAY
9 a.m. to 5 p.m. (including Sat.) 736-5651
FACULTY MEMBERS ARE  INVITED TO  DISCUSS  HEADING A 6ROUP OF
STUDENTS, GRADUATES OR FRIENDS  IN RETURN FOR FREE TRAVEL.
just in cose you haven't heard
Duthie Books Ltd,
UNIVERSITY BRANCH
at 4560 W. 10th Ave.
has been
REVISED and ENLARGED
Come in and see it - and the books!
B-V-S.-V,!
Love's   whirlpool
Shell-shaped love pattern unravelled by fragments in rich
French translation
By SEYMOUR MAYNE
Diane Giguere's second book, translated
from the French, is ostensibly the recalling and
exorcism of the memory of an affair.
What figures behind this short novel is
the labyrinthine figure of a convoluted shell
which becomes the emblem of both the style
and the shape of the experience. The symbolic
impressionism attempts to suspend the flux
of the heroine's love affair in the act of the
revelations of the aftermath.
The whirlpool in her mind takes the shape
of the shell—the dimensions of the shell-shape
moving in the mind as the pattern of the spiral.
The feminine languor alternates with sudden
rapidities—siezures in intuition.
WHIRLPOOL, by Diane Giguere, trans, by C.
Fullman. McClelland & Stewart Limited.
1966.
Either the mind of the heroine unravels
itself slowly in memory, or it darts, circularly,
through the revolutions of consciousness and
realization. The style suggests the symbols,
the symbols suggest the style.
The plot is relatively insignificant to the
settings: a resort beach of the Caribbean, St.
Croix and Montreal. At the edge of the rim
of revelation, the heroine is carried away, almost in a paroxysm of unfolding.
The  secrets  of  her  life  are imparted by
means of all the keys of the imagination:
"From time to time, I uncover precious fragments, distorted shells that speak to me in a
language of the dead." Miss Giguere's language
follows this opening statement by her heroine.
The precious fragments of the love affair by
the sea speak in the language and symbols of
memory.
The heroine, at the end, finds herself in
her own city—"city like a labyrinth"—Montreal; but the novel tries to round itself off too
well, as if the denouement were known from
the beginning.
Leaving the terror of childhood and a mad
mother, the heroine escapes too easily at the
hands of the writer: "try as I might not to
linger too long, the vision pursued me, coiled
in spiral forms." The melodrama of the final
revelation in the significance of the name of
the resort, St. Croix, is to cerebral a conceit
to end the book.
The crucifixion identification is an all-too-
familiar device of French-Canadian writing,
and it becomes a melodramatic symbol equation.
Yet, on the whole, Whirlpool is rich and
suggestive, and is the work of a real writer.
One hopes that French-Canadian publishers this year, at least, will emulate McClelland
& Stewart's policy of publishing translations
of the finest works of French Canada into
English.
Thus far only a handful of novels and
poems written in English in this country have
filtered across the Laurentian Curtain. And
many of these books might prove as interesting as Diane Giguere's.
No pet authors escape
Wallach's barbed wit
Page 8
Hopalong-Freud and other
parodies by Ira Wallach, General Publishing Co. Limited,
1966. Price: $1.15.
By KIRSTEN EMMOTT
So you've always thought
T. S. Eliot was vastly overrated? Or you're indifferent
to T. S. Eliot and all his
works, but you wish somebody would point out just
how toad Hemingway really
was?
Hopalong-Freud is for you.
Hopalong-Freud, by Ira
Wallach, is a collection of
parodies of just about all the
literary styles of the last ten
years. You'll probably find
your favorite author gets a
good needling as well as a
few you've never liked.
"Hopalong-Freud", the title
bit, is a takeoff on Eliot's
"The Cocktail Party", and
it's so well done the less improbable parts could pass for
the real tiling.
In fact, several of the parodies in this hilarious little
book require close scrutiny
before you realize the subtle
ironies interwoven throughout.
The best moments in the
book, however, come when
Wallach abandons all pretense of seriousness, and gives
himself over to outrageous
burlesque. My favorite is
"Me, the Judge", a caricature
of Mickey Spillane.
"At last!" burbles a phony
review. "A writer who knows
how to fill the gaps between
blood and sex with blood and
sex!"
"Pete Rivet is something
pi 4our
THE      UBYSSEY
new in detectives," comments
another. "He is a sadistic,
degenerate idiot."
The supposed back-cover
blurb continues: "When the
suspects piled up, including
passionate Martha Emery,
passionate Louise Higgleston,
and passionate Natalie Wallace ..." etc. etc.
Then there's "The Art of
Fan-Weaving," a beautiful satire on expositors of phony
Oriental wisdom.
Wallach sails into decadent
Southern novels, science fiction ("Styrth, a sinister bivalve with a chemistry based
on silicon . . . "), Truman
Capote, James Jones, psychiatric reports, Immanuel Veli-
kovsky — and, of course,
Hemingway.
The tiles alone are indicative of the mood of the book;
"God's   Little  Best   Seller",
"Worlds in Collusion", "Chew
Your Way to Health and
Beauty."
Then there's "A Tattooed
Streetcar Name Rose": (As
the curtain rises, Mike tears
it down and stuffs it down
Dolly's throat.)
Mike: Okay. You wanted
the curtain up. The curtain's
up. You like it better this
way? (Socks her in the jaw.)
Wallach has an unerring
eye for what lends itself to
satire in each of the writers
he victimizes. His "hew criticism" of good old "Invictus"
isn't too far off from what
John Ciardi is doing today.
Despite one or two flat
moments, it's a great book.
Get it, pass it around, disrupt
classes with it.
You'll hurl yourself back
into English 100 with renewed vigor.
Friday, January 13,  1967 Sellers foxy
in parody
By JUDY BING
That unique product of the
American film industry, the
gangster film of the thirties,
has left us innumerable bastard sons in the form of crime-
comedies currently in vogue.
• • •
Recently we have been inflicted with such pointless
films as How to Steal a Million, Penelope, Pink Panther,
Murderer's Row, Shot in the
Dark, and their more interesting French counterparts
Vivre sa Vie, A Band of Outsiders, and The Sucker, all of
which deal with theft and /or
murder — things totally ir-
relevent to our experience.
Reasonable people who deplore war will flock to see
completely predictable spy
pictures of the James Bond
type and thrill to six reels of
stupid brutality. The proliferation of these kinds of
film may not be unrelated to
the ready acceptance of
brutality and lawlessness in
U.S. foreign policy by the
American public.
Okay, so one of the functions of movies is providing
escape, but I like my escape
varied and civilized.
• •    •
It is with understandable
reluctance then, that I let myself be talked into seeing
After the Fox by a certain
Peter Sellers nut.
[Billed as yet another crime-
for-laughs picture, After the
Fox is redeemed by a hilarious parody of Frederico Fel
lini and what Pauline Kael
calls "creeping Marienbad-
ism".
Not that I agree with de
Sica's philistine point of
view, but nothing should be
immune from satire.
The Fox (Peter Sellers) has
this great idea for smuggling
the stolen gold of Cairo into
Italy. He pretends to be a
film maker called Frederico
Fabrizzi directing a picture
called "The Gold of Cairo",
about smuggling gold bars
into Italy.
• •    •
One scene in- "The Gold of
Cairo" is to be, according to
Fabrizzi's instructions, about
nothing. "It shows man's inability to communicate in the
modern world," he explains.
His stars (Victor Mature
and Britt Ekland) sit at opposite ends of a long table
and Sellers calls for "Lights!
Camera! No action!"
• •    •
In the best tradition of Don
Quixote, Tristam Shandy,
and the stories of Borges,
After the Fox is a happy
flaunting of artifice, a film
about a film.
In the trial scene when the
spurious "Gold of Cario" is
shown as evidence against
the Fox — the film with the
film, the film turned back on
itself — a film critic is carried from the court screaming "It's a masterpiece!"
The same cannot be said
for After the Fox, but it is
an amusing and curiously
paradoxical movie.
SASAMAT    SHOES
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BROKEN LINES
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THE      UBYSSEY
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
MEMBERS FOR HOST COMMITTEE,
TENTH ANNUAL C.U.S. SEMINAR
Members will make arrangements for the Tenth
Seminar, to be held in late August or early September in the Lower Mainland area. The position would
involve work on one of the following sub-committees:
Finance, Facilities, Public Relations, Transportation,
Entertainment, or Clerical. Some tasks will require
more participation during the school term than in the
summer; others will require little activity until the
summertime. Experience in related work is helpful,
but not essential. Members will attend the Seminar
as part of their duties. Further inquiries and/or
applications should be directed to Box 153, Brock
Hall, or phone 224-6965.
NOTICE OF ELECTION:
The election of the Executive of the Students' Council 1967-68 will be held as follows:
First Slate: for President, Secretary, Second Vice-
President. Nominations open January 25 and
continue to February 2, 1967. Election will be
held on February 8, 1967.
Second Slate: for First Vice-President, Treasurer, Coordinator. Nominations open February 1 and
continue to February 9, 1967. Election will be
held on February 15, 1967.
HOMECOMING CHAIRMAN:
Applications are now being received for the position
of Homecoming Chairman. Eligibility forms are available from the A.M.S. Office (S. Brock). Applications
and eligibility forms must be submitted to the Secretary of the Alma Mater Society, Box 52, Brock Hall
before Thursday, January 19th, 1967.
CAN
OCTOGENERIANS
MAKE WITH  THE SIXTIES?
You bet your sweet young life they can. Take
Grassies downtown on Seymour. Right now in
swinging sixty-six Grassies are celebrating their
eightieth birthday. And they're as young as
ever. They have to be. Catering for youth demands a youthful approach. Grassies have it.
All the way — from jewellery to time-pieces,
cufflinks to earrings, bracelets to brooches to
necklaces and  all   things   rare  and  beautiful.
That's because Grassies emphasise 'style'. Prefer
the "way out" to what's "in". They approve and
applaude today's young set. Like what they see.
So will you. When you step into Grassies —
jewellers extraordinairel
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Rich students—bah
By KIRSTEN EMMOTT
I can hardly say how
angry it makes me to sit in
student council meetings and
listen to med student Hubert Williston's vacuous remarks about the vast wealth
of UBC students.
If my notes for last Monday night's meetings are
correct, Williston said, "I
can't help being impressed
by how little kids are being
hurt  by  all   these   massive
increases (in residence fees,
parking rates, etc.) — Look
at all the cars that come on
campus! Where do kids get
all the money to buy cars
with?"
To Williston, raising parking fees is A-OK because
'^kids have the money —
they'd pay $50 if that was
the fee!"
Then he actually cited the
long lines at the Whistler
ski tows as evidence for the
Mystery, myth
in Babylondromat
By NELSON MILLER
Stephen Scobie's volume of poems entitled Babylondromat is rooted in mystery and darkness.
Pale girl, tubercular, weaves highland screens
on white-walled wicker seats: her hair
is woven into snow and nests of eagles.
So I watch myself
suspension cables crack, the bridge
the freighter hurtles to the questing tides,
the sickle sweeps across a falling sky.
Put a new log on the fire and
stab it to the centre of the flame.
Heat crumbles its white ashes
to sculptures of insanity.
Ballad-like and plaintiff in its tone, his poetry is a
quest for truth in the resurrection of the myths of the gods,
seafaring men, nature's mysteries and lovers of darkness.
One aspect of a form
is the continuous return
The poet's form is cyclical:
Are you sleeping
Sleeping, still, without me?
Two nights upon the bridge I waited
Are you weeping,
weeping, close, without me?
Two nights the eagle's song was silent.
It starts in darkness and returns to it.   The mythical
landscapes he creates are full of shadows and madness,
cold skies and stars and blood warm earth-
Love is not a dying ember,
but is an ember of our dying
upon the gracious sea.
For Scobie, the cycle manifests one thing, death, even
loves does. Juxtaposing the contemporary with the tradi-
ditional, the poet writes of the timeless past of death.
affluence of students.
His reasoning seems to be
that education is a commodity which will inevitably rise
in price, and that it is only
just to demand ever higher
fees from young people with
little or no income.
One can always point to
the loans and grants available to determined students,
but those who must finance
an education in this way
must mortgage their future,
graduating with a huge debt
already  on  their  shoulders.
And believe it or not, the
situation is little different
for those like me who are
supported by generous parents. I have the sentimental,
unrealistic idea of some day
paying back what I have
taken. That means I am unwilling to borrow more than
I have some hope of returning.
Of course, I'm very lucky.
Money is there if I want it.
Think of all those who support themselves. They see
their little bank account
dwindle with no hope of getting more.
They work and their
studies suffer, or they go
deeply in debt.
And yet young people are
resilient, and students in
pleasant surroundings and
an exciting intellectual atmosphere don't notice the
dreariness of life on nothing
a year. But the daily grind
of being unable to own any
of the material things that
give city and university life
their vitality and color, of
being ashamed to face all
the friends from whom you
have borrowed, of totting
up all your debts with a
sinking heart, is a far cry
from the picture young Mr.
Williston has.
I envy him his affluence,
but I don't envy his isloation
from real student life nor
the poverty of thought
shown in his witless comments.
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Page TO
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, January 13,  1967 The man from Ubyssey
discovers women are
bad luck aboard bicycle
By ARNOLD SABA
There's a rumbling like
big trucks, on the street below. Oh Lord, oh Jeez, we
get up at five o'clock in the
morning, smash the alarm
clock, fall out of bed. You
know how it is at five o'clock, you sort of shuffle
and sway, you can't quite
think.
Ritual: wash your face,
put on your coat, (is it raining?) put on your hat. It's
dark out, the yellow light
makes you feel sick, and
you close the door and swim
out through the darkness,
fall down stairs, open the
garage.
Oh, those trucks down
there. You're really only going to work, you're on early
shift, but you can pretend
you're weary spies or journalists, off on a daring night
escape.
Grab the bicycle, up the
driveway — this is the way
it's always done, in the
early morning, on a bicycle,
the trucks rumbling below
(trucks always rumble) as
the troops move in, the night
See Potter's for
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terror, off to the spies on
bicycles, got to reach the
border or the bunker or the
boat or just plain get the
hell out, but at any rate,
disguised as natives, stupid-
looking, as the tanks come
in, ibecause who bothers
with natives, right?
You're beginning to think
now — down the lane —
you think it's cold. The
street lights aren't on. My
gosh, those ARE tanks! And
trucks and jeeps and all that
—you turn on to the street.
Stupid weather, why aren't
we down south?
It's dark and wet, except
the steady line of tanks
light the road. Look at them
all—a solid, dark line, dark
lumps with headlights, move
slowly along toward you.
The road ahead is lined with
them, all the way to the
village.
The group approaches; oh
god are they going to shoot?
A blinding flash, red burst
yellow fire burning pain of
machine gun bullets burst
out loud break the night hot
blood   for   an   instant,   fall
over dead in the ditch,
snuffed out, kaput, mowed
down by the advancing oppressor, sudden violence in
the quiet countryside, but
they won't even look at your
body because by morning
there'll be so many. Maybe
they'll steal the ibicycle.
But they don't shoot. The
first one passes, slowly; a
tank looks like a great big
army canteen. A little man
sticks his head out, looking
ahead. How do they steer,
anyway?
The vehicles come and
come. Tank treads chew up
the road, trucks mash the
pavement, shake the night
and the trees and the
ground, take over the whole
area, watch out, don't get
in the way. Dark it is, only
the headlights, and you, the
escaping spy, pedal madly
by, in the night, ha ha, they
don't guess, do they, mein
camarade?
You both flash by the cavalcade through this little
country village that doesn't
guess what drama is being
enacted in its midst, it's only
scared to  death of the advancing oppressor, that's all.
You leave the advancing
oppressor, cut up into the
village, down the side
streets, over a hill between
little village houses, down
the cobbled road, turn at
the corner, up the hill —
these spies, wildly riding in
the night, taste the wind,
flying coat-tails, around a
corner on an angle, pedal
fast. Hurried conversations,
strategy, get to the boat, the
bunker, the border. We can
change our horses at the
next village. The mail must
go through.
Oh, escaping adventurers, up on the ridge of the
hill, see the road below.
The advancing oppressor is
still coming, a torturous
slow parade of lights in the
night, along the lake road,
belching noise all over the
place, far away, like a river
of nuts and bolts, murmuring in the distance.
Along the road ... These
little European countries
get all the excitement, we've
made it now, damn these
sudden invasions, I always
hate them. There's a figure
by the side of the road; it
hails  you  down.
Sir, are you going to the
border, the bunker, the boat,
the barn where we can hide?
It's a human life, sir. I am
in danger, they are after me
for my political activities.
My God, it's the Black
Countess, notorious counter
counter counter spy. OK,
hop on.
So you go off into the
night again, the nubile Black
Countess sitting on your
bicycle as she holds on
tiphtly and you grit your
teeth for King and Country
and democracy and all that
jolly good show, and sweat
blood.
What's that behind us?
Lights? Hell, they've found
us, quick, dive into the
ditch. The roaring rushing
vehicle's   lights   eat   a   hole
mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm
in the darkness, get closer
behind you. Drive the bicycle into the ditch, it's full
of water and frogs, you
suffer multiple fractures and
contusions and a cracked
liver. You peek out of the
reeds as the big bus full of
soldiers rolls by, above you.
Quick, Black Countess,
back on the bicycle. Damn
it, never mind killing yourself, you're NOT a burden.
Think to yourself: Women
are bad luck aboard a bicycle.
You get to the barn where
the Doctor is waiting. Two
long taps and one short, he
opens the door, lets you in,
aha Black Countess, you
too. Yes, Herr Doktor.
Quickly, gentlemen, this
way. there is no time to lose.
Good old Herr Doktor, he's
on our side, whatever side
that is.
The doctor leads you
down, a passageway; the
Countess stops you half way
down; thank you for stopping me from doing what I
might have regretted later.
She looks at you and instinctively you bend down,
touch her lips .  .  .
Oh, it's cold! You get to
the gate of the fort, show
your passes, ride down the
road to the mess hall. Oh
God, you're tired. Must have
some coffee.
Nubile Countess, where'd
she go? Must've fallen off.
Seduced by Herr Doktor, the
turncoat, I don't know.
Wander into the mess hall,
sign in, dive into that coffee, oh, sit down. Jeez, six
o'clock in the morning. Say,
what were all those tanks
around for? Oh, just a bug-
out, a practice evacuation
for an invasion.
Oh, jeez, practice, they
don't know. Gotta work all
day. The advancing oppressor was never like this.
Oh, Black Countess, where
is thy sting?
[
Powerful Drama Of a Tortured Family
Eugene O'Neill's Autobiographical Masterpiece
DAY'S JOURNEY INTO NIGHT
with Alma Thery, Barney O'Sullivan, Lee Taylor, and Eric Schneiler
Directed by Stanley Weese
JANUARY 13-21
STUDENT TICKETS AT 75 CENTS AVAILABLE ALL PERFORMANCES
This production is presented by the Department of Theatre especially for the
students of English 100. You are advised to get your tickets early. Hundreds
were unable to see Marat/Sade. Don't be left out of Vancouver's Leading
Theatre this time by leaving it to the last minute.
EARLY CURTAIN  7:30 p.m. nightly
BOX OFFICE   —   ROOM 207  —
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
Friday, January 13,  1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 11 Dear John
or dear yawn
By NELSON MILLER
In Dear John Ulysses finds
his siren Penelope. Out of
the ordinary experience and
people, Lindgren extracts
the magic, the soul of the
situation and them.
The romantic desires of
the land and the practical
wisdom of the sea are synthesized in the relationship
of two people, a sea captain
and a waitress, who transform their loneliness into
love.
The captain sees and desires his Penelope. He plays
the sad, longing siren's song
on a jukebox. She responds
to his call, for she is a siren;
she is a graceful and expert
swimmer and as a prepatory
ritual to the sexual climax
of their desire, she takes him
to a lighthouse point where
they talk of, and begin to
make, love among the rocks
and sand, the home of sirens.
He becomes a genii for her
child and takes the child
and mother on a plane to
see a zoo which is a world
of enchantment for the
child and them.
The man and woman now
have only to consummate
that enchantment in sexual
fulfillment.
Both have vfirginail, shy
souls which are in need and
cautious. They are stilted,
embarassed, angry and finally they surrender to what
they want, love. They first
make passionate love on the
land and then playful love
in the sea.
The captain must sail his
ship; he leaves his Penelope.
Doubt troubles him. He must
hear her voice; and have its
music assure him. He phones
and over the image of the
sea, his siren love's whisper
travels:
John, dear John . . .
The sadness, the humor,
the joy, all the magic is
there; it is only for the viewer to believe it.
By STEPHEN SCOBIE
Somewhere deep beneath
the dubbing, there may be
rather a good little film hidden away in Dear John —
but it's hard to find.
Lars-Magnus Lindgren's
film has been dubbed into
English with a heavy
Swedish accent, which is
(a) ludicrous and (b) totally
lacking in artistic skill or
tact. It forms a continuous
distraction, and ruins any
sense of intimacy in the love
scenes.
Another 'obstacle is the
time-structure, which is not
so much complex as confusing.
After the first ten minutes
you can follow it fairly
easily, and it does make a
few neatly ironic points,
but there's no real reason
why it should be there. Admittedly, there's no reason
why not, either.
Once you get past these
obstacles, you find a quiet,
unpretentious film about two
lonely people who discover
that they like each other a
lot, and eventually manage
to get into bed.
Their manoeuverings are
observed with understanding detail and humor; their
quarrels and reconciliations
proceed predictably towards
a happy ending.
Visually, the film is excellent: good photography, and
the acting (on the visual side)
is fully adequate.
The B.C. Censor has even
let past two tiny glimpses of
nudity, and there is a fine
close-up of he tip of an elephant's trunk.
Struggling
for magic
vision
Jim Brown's The Circus
in the Boy's Eye is an honest
and accurate vision of a man
who is aware of his childlike and magic self, but who
also has the sense of its loss:
but we have mountains
inside us;
we have the white peaks
and the blue faraway slopes
rising
against the loneliness
that drifts in
from the gray sea
Sure Fve written about
Flowers
and sparrows
and tall white girls
do you think
my youth fell away
without protest?
the pale boy in you
is not so dead . . •
The* voice of the poet is
colloquial, lyrical and struggling for the magic vision.
His poetry is sensual and
literal in its descriptive
aspects:
a little girl
playing in the shallows
a boy in a blue bathing suit
digging in the moist shore
sand
and the fat girls wading
out
prosaic and accurate in analytic aspects:
still I torture myself
trying to make poems
like love
Bill Bisset's illustrations
are aptly sexual.
pf 8ight
WHAT MAKES A RUSSIAN SMILE? A SPANIARD SHOUT
OLE? ... OR INSPIRES FIFTY MILLION FRENCHMEN TO
KICK UP THEIR HEELS? . . .
THE NEW
CHRISTY
MINSTRELS
As they bounce thru their finger-snapping, toe tapping
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Thru Saturday. Jan. 28th
BE WITH THE "IN" GROUP AT   . .
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626 HORNBY ST.-
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MU 2-3677
1967 Summer Employment Program
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FEDERAL CIVIL SERVICE, OTTAWA
Thinking of a Career?       Try us out for the summer!
QUALIFICATIONS:
1. You must be specializing in one of the following:
Political Science, Public Administration, Sociology, Industrial Relations,
Business Administration, Commerce, Economics, Statistics, Social Work,
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Science.
2. You must be enrolled in an Honours program and entering the final
year of this program in the fall of 1967, or continuing studies at the
post-graduate  level.
SALARIES:
$350. - $610. a month depending on academic qualifications and previous work experience. Most positions are in Ottawa, and return travel
expenses in excess of $30. will be paid.
APPLICATION FORMS:
Available at your Placement Office — Complete and return to the Civil
Service Commission of Canada, Ottawa 4, not later than Jan. 31, 1967.
Sensational Special Purchase!
BANKRUPT
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RECORD SALE
We have purchased an entire 'BANKRUPT STOCK'
of a well known record dealer. Stock consists of
thousands of top line stereo and monaural records,
including famous name labels — and they're all
going on sale at A FRACTION OF
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Popular . . . Classical ... Western . . .
Folks, you name it—we have it!
HUNDREDS OF WONDERFUL HITS
AT RIDICULOUSLY LOW PRICES!
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571 GRANVILLE (at Dunsmuir)
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Page 12
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, January 13, 1967 Friday, January 13,  1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 13
DEPARTMENT STORE?
SUB pub and grub plan
By MARY USSNER
A pub for SUB — and maybe a department store — suggests SUB chairman Lome
Hudson.
Plans for the new Student Union Building were outlined Thursday by Hudson.
"SUB will be approximately the size of
the Pacific Press building but not as high,"
he said.
"There is a probability of a pub.
'IDowntown department stores are also
interested in cashing in on the effort.
"We have directly contacted the larger
Three woodpushers
plan Red woodpush
Moscow is the destination of two UBC
professors and a grad student. Object—a
game of chess.
Mathematics professors, Dr. Elod Macskasy and Dr. Nathan Divinsky, and student
Duncan Suttles have accepted an invitation
from a Moscow University team..
The game will end a long duel by correspondence.
"The Russians want to play us over the
board," said Macskasy.
The trio plans to leave early this summer.
Other European teams have also ottered
invitations to play to the UBC team.
"We'll probably go on to Budapest,
Prague, Oxford, and maybe Monaco," he
said.
The Russians will play a return game
here early in September.
Macskasy, Divinsky, and assistant math
prof Dr. Tim Anderson, have been playing
two games simultaneously with the Moscow
team for over two years.
"One ended in a draw, the other may
continue for a year or two," Macskasy said.
It's the Russian's turn to move and we
think we have them over a barrel."
department stores some of which are making
feasibility studies of a college extension,"
said Hudson.
"The final go-ahead comes from buildings
and grounds Friday (today), and we hope
everything will be in order to go before the
board of governors' March 14 meeting to
commence construction.
"The architect has not been extravagant.
For instance the ballroom is going to be tremendously impressive but will be often
used."
"Present facilities are accoustically awful.
Food services have been an area of great
concern and a lot of money is being put into
the new services. SUB will have a full six-
line cafeteria and a snack bar.
"With adequate pressure the food services
will improve. It needs to adopt a policy of
attracting students by competing with lunch
bags," said Hudson.
SUB dining areas will be open from early
morning to late evening.
"It won't be unusual to have an average
of 4,000 persons in the building at once."
SUB includes a small auditorium, a TV
room, two music rooms, an art gallery, a
party room and special facilities for clubs.
"SUB is the best situated union in North
America in view of accessibility. Approximately 90 per cent of the students will be
within five minutes walking distance.
"A large free car park for faculty and
staff will be at the disposal of the students
during the evenings. It parks 600 cars opposite SUB."
Library grant got
UBC has received the first half of a
$20,000 grant from Consolidated Mining and
Smelting Co. to equip and furnish a 50 seat
library and reading room in the new metallurgy building.
The library will foe open to all students,
faculty, and representatives of the metallurgy
industry.
— dennis gans photo
WANNA KNOW why there's no good pictures in the paper today? 'Cuz this is the
way our photogs spend their lunch hours, that's why. But Pubster Kirt Hilger chug-
a-lugged the frothy stuff in  record time to win the boat  race.
Stone age relics  roll into SFA
Simon Fraser Academy looked back
100,000 years this week.
Dr. Roy Carlson, assistant professor in
anthropology at SFA, began opening the
first crates of artifacts from his 1965 Nubian
expedition.
Among more than 10,000 items unpacked
are hand axes and tools 100,000 to 4,000
years old.
Carlson, who specializes in prehistoric
archaeology, shipped the materials from
Khartoum last year..
The stone age relics will be housed in
the archaeological laboratory of the new
east wing of SFA's academic quadrangle.
The laboratory will be the first step toward establishing a permanent archaeological museum at the academy.
Bookstore has no plans
for $110,000 BofG grant
UBC board of governors has
approved a grant of $110,000
for the university bookstore—
but bookstore manager John
Hunter doesnt' know what it's
for.
Hunter said Thursday: "The
money's been alloted, that's all
I know."
"We don't know ourselves
what it's for — we have no
other information," said assistant architect planner Jordan
Komburoff. J
A university spokesman said
the money is for expansion of
the present bookstore's overburdened facilities.
"But I don't think there's
any specific plans," he said.
J. A. HUNTER
, . cash for what?
Summer Employment Opportunities
In Federal Government Departments
Approximately 1,800 summer positions are available
across Canada for undergraduate and graduate students
in the pure and applied sciences, engineering, and those
in medicine, dentistry and pharmacy.
Salaries will range from $300 to $640 per month and
Salaries will  range from  $300 to $640 a  month and
there are generous provisions for travel to and from places
Details and application forms are available at your
placement office. Closing date for receipt of applications
is January 27, 1967.
GEOLOGY
Grads and Undergrads
The Great Plains Development Co. of Canada Ltd. will
be  conducting   interviews   at  the   Placement  Office  on
JANUARY 17
Graduating geologists (honors or major) will be interviewed for career
oil or minerals exploration. The class of '68 (honors or major) will be
interviewed for summer jobs in surface geological studies for mineral
exploration. Make appointments now at Placement Office.
This is the House that
4       ADRIENNE built
Actually, this unique old house at 1386 Burrard
is the Adrienne Cameron School of Modelling.
Adrienne has completely decorated the interior
to combine an old fashion charm with a delightfully modern setting . . . perfect surroundings
in which you can benefit from the very latest
techniques in personal development or professional modelling.
4       This is ADRIENNE
One of Canada's leading models, Adrienne Cameron has been dubbed "Vancouver's Most
Photographed Girl." Her talents have taken her
to many fashion centres including London, New
York. Montreal, House of Dior and Toronto. There
can be no question of the fact that Adrienne
Cameron is Vancouver's Most Complete Authority on  Every Aspect of Professional  Modelling.
Wjiy not drop in, meet out teachers and have a look at our school. Our
courses include: Personal Development (Make-up, Visual Poise, Fashion
Co-ordinator, Wardrobe and Grooming, Hair Styling, Figure Co-ordinator
and Diet, Speach and Diction, and Social Etiquette);Professional Modelling,
Creative Acting; Isomertics; Fashion Design and Illustration.
Phone NOW for an appointment and a complimentary analysis.
Adrienne Cameron School of Modelling
1386 Burrard St. 688-1301 Page 14
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, January 13,  1967
BETTER BUY BOOKS
UNIVERSITY
TEXT BOOKS
NON-FICTION
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Review Notes
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Rugger men match
to meet Aussies
Play this weekend is highlighted with tryouts for the
UBC team that will play the
Wallabies, the touring Australian national team.
This Saturday the Tomahawks will attempt to break
the unbeaten streak of the
Trojans 2nd team while the
Totems    meet    St.     Georges.
BIG HOCKEY  WEEKEND
I
TONIGHT!
FREE DEMONSTRATIONS
I
I
I
SEE EFFECTIVE RAPID READING AT ITS BEST
AT THE
BAYSHORE HOTEL
McKENZIE ROOM 5 p.m. and 8 p.m.
UNIVERSITY HILL SECONDARY SCHOOL
AUDITORIUM 5 p.m. and 8 p.m.
BRING A FRIEND!
NOW REGISTERING FOR MID-WINTER CUSS
READING DYNAMICS OF BC LTD
MAIN OFFICE: 549 HOWE STREET  VANCOUVER 1 BC
SUITE 210 685-2374
1
WINDPR00F
UMBRELLAS
COLLEGE SHOP
BROCK HALL EXTENSION
$2-*8
CORDILLERAN EXPLORATION
CORPORATION LTD.
On behalf of a client requires third year, fourth year
and graduate students in geology and mining for summer employment on geological exploration projects in
British Columbia.
INTERVIEWS WILL BE HELD
MONDAY, JANUARY 23, 1967 AT U.B.C.
Interested applicants are asked to contact the U.B.C.
Placement Office for appointments or
If unavailable for interview contact Mr. J. W. Stollery.
Cordilleran Exploration Corporation, 400-837 West
Hastings St., Vancouver 1, B.C. Phone 685-0167.
Hosting Huskies
ART RIEL, above, is a hardworking checker, playing
with the Huskies for his
fourth year. Dave Dunn, below, is a rookie whose defence tactics have placed
him high on the list of prospects for Chicago this year.
The UBC ice hockey Thunderbirds host the University of
Saskatchewan Huskies in two
games this weekend at the
Winter Sports Centre.
Friday's game starts at 8:00
p.m. and Saturday's at 2:30
p.m.
The Huskies have played
eight conference games for a
6-2 record. They have defeated
Calgary twice, won 3 and lost
1 against Manitoba and split
two games with the University
of Alberta. Indications are that
they will foe the team to beat
for the WCIAA title.
The leading point getters on
the Saskatchewan team are
left winger Ed Hobday with
7 goals and 5 assists, and
winger Tom Kellough with 7
goals and 4 assists. Prominent
returnees on the Saskatchewan
roster are goalie Jim Shaw
and defenceman Wayne
Stratham, both on Portland's
prospective list.
The Birds have a well-balanced squad, with strong goal
tending by Rick Bardal and
Russ Kirk, a Memorial Cup
veteran. Back with the Birds
are former National Team
members Dave Chambers and
Al McLean. Bob Apps, B.C.
Lions flanker and former McMaster University hockey star
is giving the forward line
added strength.
Leading UBC scorer so far
this season is Kevin McGlad-
ery with 11 goals and nine
assists in 11 games. The Birds
have won 8 and lost 2, with
one tie this season. The team
has scored 65 goals, with 38
goals against them.
Soccer men fight Royals
to enter PCSL playoffs
Last weekend at Victoria
the Thunderbirds dropped a
2-0 decision to the leading Pacific Coast Soccer League
team.
Coach Joe Johnson was not
displeased with the result as
this was the first action his
team had seen after the Christmas holidays. The Birds will
meet the Victoria team twice
more in league play.
The Birds host New Westminster Royals this Saturday
at 2:00 p.m. in Varsity Stadium. In order to remain in
playoff contention, the Birds,
who are in fourth place PCSL
standings, must beat the fifth
place Royals.
Opportunities in
FOREST FIRE RESEARCH
Salaries up to $17,500 Per Annum
THE CANADA DEPARTMENT OF FORESTRY AND RURAL
DEVELOPMENT is expanding its fire research activities at
various centres across Canada. Currently about 12 professional positions are available to scientists, preferably
with post-graduate training in mathematics, physics,
forestry, chemical engineering, meteorology or related
disciplines, who possess a sincere interest In joining an
active research group.
Typical problem areas include studies of fire behaviour,
fuel complexes as related to diferent forest stands, combustion principles, fire control logistics, fire meteorology
and fire danger rating.
Salaries will be commensurate with training and experience.    Opportunities for advancement are excellent.
Further details and application forms are available from
the CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION OF CANADA, OTTAWA
4, ONTARIO.
.Pleas* quota reference 67-110-02. Friday, January 13,  1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page   15
Skiers realize
early predictions
Christmas training camps
have prepared the ski team
well for the season's competition ahead and results to date
have verified the team's potential.
At Lake Louise the five-
memiber downhill squad surprised many during the six
timed runs as it placed consistently ahead of the Les
Epoirs (Junior National Team)
and even a few National B
Team skiers.
Individual leaders of the
team were Elmwood Peskett,
who led in four of the six runs,
and David Turner, who won
the final trial and posted the
fastest team time for the
course. Bill Shaak won the
first trial and Bob Calladine
and Tom Jenkin were always
close to the leaders.
Slalom trials were dominated by former National Team
skier Calladine, with the rest
of the team closely matched
among themselves, and by
newcomers Alan Vittery and
Bruce Wood.
Al Verigin and Steve Woodruff turned in promising times.
With rival Rolf Pettersen
remaining in Prince George to
coach following the cross country training camp, Jan Atlung
led the trial races in Rossland
as expected.
Placing close behind him in
both runs, however, was an
unheralded Swiss skier, Kurt
Pfeiffer.
Despite  poor course  condi
tions and missing the wax,
Turner, Peskett and Jenkin
placed in respective order
right with the top U of W team
in a downhill at Crystal Mountain.
In cross country, Pettersen
travelled to Wenatchee to
defeat the entire U of W
squad and place third overall
just behind two Canadian National Team members. Meanwhile, Tom Ramsay led a local
field on Seymour Mountain in
the Ski Emblem Trials despite
impossible weather and course
conditions.
Next major race will be the
Kimberley Open on Jan. 21
and 22 against the Canadian
National Team.
Three Thunderettes
chosen for Quebec
JV hoopsters continue
vying for more victories
The UBC basketball JV's
are a hot team.
Over the last two years the
team has a record of 25
straight wins in league play
against Canadian Jr. Men's
competition. Ten of those wins
have come this year.
The JV's overall record, including exhibition games, this
year is 18 wins and two losses.
These losses have come at the
hand of Highline Jr.  College
Field men tie
winning team
The three UBC field hockey
teams will all be busy this
Saturday playing games that
had earlier been rained out.
The Birds will play the Vancouver A team at Wolfson
field at 1 p.m. The Tomahawks
will play at Wolfson at 2:30
against the Pitt Meadows B
team. Also at 2:30 the Braves
will take on the Pitt Meadows
A team at Spencer field.
The Birds are currently tied
with the Jokers for first place
in the league's first division.
Both teams are unbeaten. The
Jokers are ahead on goal average.
The Jokers are made up of
ex-UBC players plus imported
international players. They
have just returned from Mexico where they won two, tied
two and lost one.
The Birds, who haven't
played since Christmas, have
placed six of their members
on the 20-man Canadian team
which will play in the Pan-
American Games to be held
in Winnipeg this year. Twelve
of the 20 come from B.C.
The winner in Winnipeg goes
to the 1968 Olympics in Mexico City.
of Seattle and the SFA Varsity
squad.
The JV's have scored 100 or
more points in three games
this year and are averaging 85
for and 50 against.
They won the Bob Whyte
Invitational Tournament at
Victoria this year for the second year in a row. The JV's
also won the Jr. Men's Christmas Tournament for the
second straight year.
The leading scorer on the
team is Sam Vandermeulen
wiht 280 points, an average of
18 a game. Rick Inrig is the
rebound king with 193. He is
second in scoring.
Inrig has come within three
points of Phil Langley's Jr.
Men's record of 41 points in a
single game.
The JV's last three games
include two wins over Victoria
College by scores of 61-59 on
Jan. 6 and 65-33 on Jan. 7. On
Jan. 10 the JV's beat YMCA
64-49.
The JV squad plays the CYO
Saints tonight in a game at
War  Memorial   Gym  starting
Wrestlers forfeit
fifteen points
Due to a lack of wrestlers
in three weight classes, the
UBC wrestling team will hand
15 points to the University of
Puget Sound this Saturday.
The Birds meet the Puget
Sound Loggers at 3:00 p.m. in
the Education Gym. Last year
UBC defeated the Loggers 30-
8. The weakened Birds will be
short at 130 lbs., 152 lbs., and
160 lbs.
The UBC starters are Chuck
Tasaka, 123 lbs., Dennis Boul-
ton, 137 lbs., Ron Turner, 145
lbs. Ken Kerluke, 167 lbs.,
Greg Greiner, 177 lbs., and
heavyweight,   Chris  Nemeth.
at 8:30. On Saturday the team
travels to SFA to play its
frosh squad at 6:30 p.m.
JV coach Norm Watt said
however that the team is
pointing for a rematch against
the SFA Varsity squad to be
played here on Jan. 27.
The UBC basketball Birds
are playing two games against
the University of Calgary in
Calgary  this  weekend.
The Spanish House
FABULOUS SALE
Shipment delayed by
Dock Strike.
Now on SALE
at great reductions
eg. Coffee table, value $79
Sale Price $50.
Clairtone Infanta Stereo
List Price $669.50
Sale Price $569.50
and many more great
bargains
SALE ON  NOW
We can arrange financing
The Spanish House
4456 W.   10th Ave.
(Near UBC Gates)
The eighth annual Thunderette basketball tournament,
Jan. 13 and 14, will feature
the Vancouver Molsons, defending champions.
Molsons also hold the Canadian Senior "A" title and
dominate the Canadian
national  team.
* *    *
Local teams vying for honors
include the UBC Thunderettes,
Mt. Pleasant Legion, and
Simon  Fraser  Academy.
UBC and Legion are both
represented on the national
team. Three UBC players who
will see 'tournament action,
Pauline Gensick, Elaine Stewart, and Janet Douglas, have
been picked up by the Molsons
to compete in the Quebec Winter Games.
Vancouver Island will be
represented at the tournament
by Victoria Rawlings and Victoria College.
• •    •
Prince George and Central
Washington State College
round out the roster. The
Washington contingent will be
led by forward, Cathy Benedetto, a member of the U.S.A.
national women's team.
The tournament begins today
at 4:30 p.m. and continues
Saturday at 9 a.m. at the
Women's Gym on campus.
Adults will be charged 50
cents and students, 35 cents.
CATHY BENEDETTO
. . . leads Washington
Tough
The 900 people who have
joined Canadian University
Service Overseas took on a
tough job. Long hours. Little
money. But the reward was
in the response of people
eager to help themselves.
Now it's your turn. Write
CUSO, 151 Slater Street,
Ottawa.
CUSO
The Canadian Peace Corps
£ki— fyex
Weekend of January 20-22
All Inclusive: Just $30
INFORMATION: MAIN FLOOR
ANGUS BUILDING - 12:30
TODAY AND MONDAY
The greatest air fare slash since flying began. Join a
World-Wide group to Europe — assured departures
every two weeks commencing March 5th. London $345
plus $76 ground arrangements. Other European destinations available at similar low fares. Telephone any
World-Wide office.
WORLD WIDE INTERNATIONAL TRAVEL
224-4391
5700 University Blvd. (on campus)
WI NDPROOF
UMBRELLAS
COLLEGE SHOP
BROCK HALL EXTENSION
$2-M Page 16
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, January  13,   1967
'TWEEN CLASSES
EUS tries power play
EUS
Skating party tonight, 8 p.m., Thunderbird arena. 50 cents admission includes
hockey game, skating and sock hop.
FINE ARTS GALLERY
Bob Flick conducts a tour of three photographic exhibits today, noon, in the library
gallery.
QUADRA INSTITUTE
Quadra Institute and November 11 com-
Hard to make trips,
prof explains acidly
SASKATOON—(CUP) — Research work
with LSD is being hampered at University
of Saskatchewan, says psychological research
director Dr. Daniel Sydiaha.
In a recent interview, Sydiaha explained
that because legal measures have had to be
taken to control illicit traffic in LSD, researchers have difficulty in obtaining the
drug in the quantities needed.
It appears, however, that the Saskatoon
campus is comparatively free of student
experimentation. Despite talk among students about "acid trips", neither the Saskatoon City Police nor the RCMP have ever
made an arrest or found any of the drug
being used on campus.
An RCMP spokesman said LSD and other
less well-known psychedelic drugs are listed
under the Canada Food and Drug Act, and
that illegal trafficking could result in a conviction and a sentence of one to four years.
"However," he said, "we have yet to
find any on campus or in Saskatoon. We
have men on and around the campus at
almost all times, and it is doubtful that drug
trafficking could be going on without their
knowledge."
A CKOM radio official who was involved
in the Riversdale Businessmen's investigation last month, said even his men did not
turn up any of this type of drug. "I cannot say
just what is going on on the campus," he
said, "but I think it would be interesting
for a student organization to conduct a survey similar to ours and see what can be
dug up."
mittee general meeting Monday at 8 p.m.
in Ed. 201.    Widespread coverage of marijuana and LSD-25.
INTERNATIONALISTS
Alex Bandy speaks on the Problems of
Two  Revolutions  tonight  at  7:30  at  2979
West 29th Avenue.
PHRATERS
Meeting noon, today, Bu. 104.
FOOTBALL  TEAM
Football team meeting (rugby) noon today in Frank's office.
ARCHAEOLOGY CLUB
Meeting noon today in Bu. 204.
ALLIANCE FRANCIASE
Meeting noon today in IH.    Coffee, and
film: Peintres de Nouveau Brunswick.
EL CIRCULO
Jorge Garzon speaks on Ecuador noon
today, Bu. 204.    Also slides and music.
IH
Dance to Trini Lopez and others tonight,
9 p.m., lower lounge, IH. Everyone welcome.
CLASSICS CLUB
Meeting 8 p.m. tonight at 4155 West 12th
Avenue.
GERMAN CLUB
Meeting noon today, Bu. 203, to discuss
ski trip.
COMMERCE US
Ski trip to Apex Jan. 20-22, $30, all inclusive.     Information   today   and   Monday,
main floor, Angus building.
CIRCLE K
Installation meeting tonight, 8:30, Jack
Hetherington's.
CUS
Co-op home cleaning bee Sunday, 2722
West Sixth, noon to 5 p.m.    Bring cleaning
equipment.
BOWLING CLUB
More bowlers needed.   Monday at 5 p.m.
or 7 p.m., gym bowling lanes.
COMPUTER CLUB
Wehrner Detwiller of computing centre
speaks on time sharing Tuesday, noon, Chem
250.   Non-members welcome.
STUDENT VOLUNTEER SERVICE
Coffee party Thursday noon, school of
social work.
OUR 14TH ANNUAL JANUARY
^gfRECORD
SALE
Bigger and better than ever — Thousands of long play
records to choose from. Every classification — from pops
to classics — Drastically reduced to clear our inventory.
Selected Long Play
Records.
Soiled or scuffed
covers. Discontinued
items.
HALF PRICE
DIAMOND
NEEDLES
Most popular
types
$3.49
Other types
30% off
regular
prices
Thousands of LP's —
Mostly classical, imports
and also Broadway show
or sound tracks.
30%
Balance of all Long Play
Records, factory fresh
20%  off
Alexander & Axelson
APPLIANCES LTD.
4558 WEST 10th AVE.
CA 4-6811
Sick computer
DALHOUSIE (UNS) — The
publishing of the Dalhousie
University student handbook
is too much for the institution's IBM computer. The
machine suffered a serious
breakdown part way through
the hand - book compilation
process.
Slacks Narrowed
Suits Altered
and  Repaired
Tuxedos  Remodelled
Expert Tailoring
UNITED TAILORS
549 Granville St.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00 Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office: Brock Hall.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost & Found
11
LOST, PAIR OF BLACK GLASSES
between Sasamat and UBC. Phone
224-4856.
LOST MIDDLE OF DEC. LADIES'
silver wrist watch and circular
gold and pearl pin phone 736-9462.
LOST AND REQ'D. URGENTLY—
2 French pronunciation manuals
by Leon. Lost Dec. 7. Phone
Audrey   at   261-0804.	
PEARL NECKLACE. DOUBLE
strand. East Mall. Last Thursday.
Phone   Heather  at   987-6606.
LOST: BLACK PURSE. LEFT BY
hitch-hiker in car on Wednesday
morning. Please phone Laurie,
224-9355.
LOST: JAN. 6. PAIR OF MEN'S
glasses in black case. Front ot B
lot.   Phone   266-4272.
Coming Dances
12A
LIGHT SHOW & DANCE TO THE
West Coast Sound of the Unfor-
seen and the Seeds of Time. The
Afterthought 2114 W. 4th. Fri. at
8:30.	
NEWMAN BALL, REGAL BALL-
room, Georgia Hotel, Friday, Jan.
20, 8:30 p.m. $6.00/couple ($5.00 for
members). Tickets at A.M.S. or
Newman   Centre.
MARDI GRAS CHARITY BALL.
Show Mart, Jan. 27-28. Dance to
The Accents. Tickets at Brock
Ext.  168.
Special Notices
13
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rates? If you are over 20 and
have a good driving history you
qualify for our good driving rates.
Phone Ted Elliott 224-6707.
SCIENCE FORMAL CRYSTAL
Ball this Saturday at the Coach
House Inn, 9:00 to 1:00. Tickets
13.75 from A.M.S. office or S.U.S.
Exec.
E.U.S. SKATING PARTY! N.U.S.—
Home-ec — Rehab med. Girls ln-
vited. Fri. 8:30 T-Bird Arena.
SPREAD YOUR TALENT TO THE
masses. Enter Mardi Gras comic
cartoon contest. Judged by Len
Norris.   Deadline   Jan.   23.
SEE UBC GAZELLES AND LITHE
Peruvian animals Sat. 14 at War
Memorial Gym. UBC Invitational
Volleyball Tournament begins at
10:00 a.m. Finals at 7:00 p.m.
Peru at  8:30.
PARADISE VALLEY, SCENE OF
'67 Academic Symposium on Education. See application notices
everywhere.   Apply   now!!!
Transportation
14
RIDE NEEDED FOR 8:30 CLASSES
Vicinity 49th and Fraser. Ask for
Sandy,    327-7704.	
NEED TWO DRIVERS FOR
North Van carpool. Vicinity Capi-
lano   Highlands.   Phone   988-5666.
Wanted
15
Scandals
39A
MARDI GRAS  GOES   COMIC.   JAN.
27-28.
SEWING - ALTERATIONS    40
Typing
43
TYPING!—FAST,    ACCURATE    EF-
ficient,   any   time.   224-5621.
Professional  Typing
ARDALE   GRIFFITHS   LTD.
8584   Granville   St.
70th   &  Granville  St. 263-4530
TYPING —  ELECTRIC
224-6129.
WANTED LOTS OF PEOPLE AT
cross-cultural workshop in Inter-
national House Sat., Jan. 14, 9 a.m.
WANTED TO BUY. OLD ELEC-
tric toy trains, the older the better. American Flyer, Lionel Hornby,  etc.  Phone 261-1838 eves.
Travel Opportunities
16
TAKE A TRIP AT THE AFTER-
thought. A Light Show & Dance
with the Unforseen and the Seeds
of Time. The Afterthought, 2114
W.   4th.   Friday at 8:30.
AUTOMOTIVE  & MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
TRANSPORTATION     CHEAP    —
$150.00.   AL.   5-8061.
1961      CORVAIR     MONZA,      VERY
good   shape.   Ph.   Carlos,   266-9298.
1954 STUDABAKER COMMANDER
V-8, excellent condition, new tires.
$225 or best offer, phone 278-2377
after  6  p.m.	
1957 PONTIAC SW V-8 NEW
shocks, tires, battery. recond.
motor, clean throughout, $595,
phone 228-8144.	
'55 VAUXHALL VELOX, 4-DOOR,
Six cylinder, excellent running
condition,   $135.   433-7844.	
FOR SALE: 1953 AUSTIN SOMER-
set.   Good   condition   $70.   987-5434.
•62 V.W. DELUXE. EXCEL. COND.
Best offer. 922-5026 after 5 p.m.
BUSINESS SERVICES
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
WANTED: BABYSITTER FOR 3
yr. old girl. 4:30 to midnight approx. Live-in. Call Mrs. Lu Hal-
lick 738-1203.
INSTRUCTION — SCHOOLS
Instruction-Tutoring
64
ALL FIRST AND SECOND YEAR
subjects by excellent tutors: Sciences and arts. 736-6923.
ENGLISH, FRENCH AND HIS-
tory lessons given by B.A., M.A.,
B.L.S.   736-6923.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
EXPO     ANYONE?    LARGE     CON-
verted   bus-camper   complete.
Sleeps 6 plus. 434-1577.
ELECTRIC BASS GUITAR MUST
sell! Worth $170.00. Sell for $100.00
Phone CA 4-5584. Gord.
FOR SALE: OXFORD UNIVER-
sal Dictionary $10.00, Complete
Yale Shakespeare 40 volumes
$25.00. Both as new. Phone 681-
1944 eves.	
'65 MODEL FENDER BASSMAN
Amp. Special heavy-duty speaker
system. New condition. Student
must sell. Phone Pete eves., 224-
5958.	
1 PR. MEN'S TYROL SKI BOOTS.
Size  8%.   $25.   Ph.   AM 1-5619.
GUITAR FOR SALE. STEEL
strings, excellent condition, $35.
Call Diane at 224-6846 evenings.
RENTALS  &  REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
ONE SLEEPING ROOM WITH
small room adjacent—males only.
MU  4-6736  or 224-0956.
Room & Board
82
Scandals
39A
IF YOU'RE OVER THE AGE OF
consent you're old enough to have
fun at the Afterthought. 2114 W.
4th.   Fri.   at  8:30.
ROOM AND BOARD. ON CAMPUS.
Good food and comfortable accommodation. Phone 224-9662 .after
5:00   p.m.	
ROOM _ AND BOARD CHEAPEST
on campus. Five minutes from
classes.   Call   224-9660.
EXCELLENT ROOM AND BOARD.
Phi Delta House; convenient location; congenial atmosphere. Jim
Gaudin,   CA   4-9073,   5:30-7:00.
ROOM AND BOARD. $40 MONTH
plus light babysitting. One block
from   gates.    224-0146.   Girl   only.
ROOM AND BOARD—2 STUDENTS
sharing. Packed lunches. Near 4th
and   Alma.   733-5573.
Furn. Houses and Apts.
83
3 MEN WANT A FOURTH TO
share house at 15th and Burrard.
Must be over 21. Phone 738-3033
after 5  p.m.
WANTED: MALE STUDENT TO
share 2 bedim, apartment. Kits.
Immediate occupancy. $47 per
month.   Ph.   738-0685.
GIRL WANTED IMMEDIATELY
to share modern apartment and
costs at Dunbar & 16th. Phone
Myrna,   224-6397   after   5   p.m.
Unfurn. Houses    &Apts.
84
STUDENT   WANTED    TO SHARE
suite     near     University. George
Cornish,    HE    4-0122    or 681-8730
after  6:00  p.m.
BUY  -  SELL  -   RENT
WITH
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED

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