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The Ubyssey Nov 9, 1979

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Array Wooster has
wrong plan
THE UBYSSEY
By KEVIN FINNEGAN
It might be cheaper to allow
university buildings to fall off the
cliff than to try and stop the erosion
of Wreck Beach, a former UBC student told a public meeting Thursday. ,
The meeting was the first of three
held to investigate alternatives to a
plan by Swan Wooster Engineering
Ltd. to reduce the cliff angle and install a rock berm on the beach to
stop erosion.
Adrian Stott asked Stanley
Weston, meeting chair and UBC
board of governors member, if the
university had conducted a cost-
benefit analysis study of the proposed erosion control plan.
"It seems to me it's a problem
only because of the foolish placement of buildings on the top of the
cliff," Stott told a crowd of 70 people at Lord Byng secondary school.
Another speaker said the Swan
Wooster plan to remove vegetation
and install a cycle path on the cliff
would "seriously alter the social
situation."
Representatives of Swan Wooster
and its consultants gave speeches
and slide presentations in support
of their plan.
"There is a solution to the pro
blem and it most certainly is an
engineering solution," said Swan
Wooster spokesman Charles Downing.
The Swan Wooster proposal calls
for the installation of a rock berm
to protect the cliff from toe erosion,
reduction of the cliff angle by
removing vegetation and soil, and
undetermined measures to reduce
underground seepage.
A berm installed in 1974 was partially destroyed by severe winter
storms that year, Downing said.
Alfred Tamburi of Western
Canada Hydraulic said more
research is needed to find a way to
handle the water seepage problem.
"There's not enough information
available to design an underground
water control system yet." he said.
The engineers stressed the beach
is not a naturally sandy one and the
berm would make it a cobble beach.
"The natural cover of upper tidal
areas are rounded boulders, occasionally covered by sand eroded
from the cliffs," Duncan Hay of
Western Canada Hydraulic
Laboratories Ltd. said.
There will be a second meeting
tonight at Lord Byng at 7:30 p.m.
and a third Saturday at Hebb
theatre.
Cocke enraged at
dirty tricks affair
By GEOF WHEELWRIGHT
The Social Credit "dirty tricks"
scandal is ruining the reputation
and integrity of B\C. politicians,
NDP MLA Dennis Cocke said yesterday.
He told 20 people in SUB 119 the
scandal involving underhanded
Socred campaign tactics and fraudulent letter writing is undermining
the credibility of all B.C. politicians.
"It makes me damn mad to see
everyone in politics go down because people say 'they (politicians)
are all the same,' " said the New
Westminster MLA.
Cocke said Socred researchers
implicated in the scandal were hired
by the government and were not
solely responsible for the dirty
tricks campaign. "I'm damn sure
Jack Kelly and Ellen MacKay were
not alone." Both Kelly and MacKay were Socred caucus researchers. Kelly recently resigned Oct. 19
and MacKay has been asked to take
a 30-day leave but refused.
Cocke said government members
responsible for the scandal should
admit their involvement. And if
they have lied or committed a
crime, they should resign, he said.
"There was a concerted effort by
this group to use fraudulent letters.
Any party in their right mind would
not give government funds carte
blanche to say the things they (Kelly
and MacKay) said, to put it on tape
and distribute it, 170 strong."
Cocke said the public should not
allow the issue to die without a full
explanation of all facts surrounding
the case. "There is a tremendous
tendency for people to put up with
a little lying if the government can
account for itself on the business
side of the ledger," he said.
Cocke said the Socreds should examine the background attitudes and
motives that led to the dirty tricks
campaign, rather than establishing
an "insulting" ethics committee to
police themselves.
He said that besides the letters
scandal the Socreds have made at
least three "incompetent" legislative blunders. Cocke said the B.C.
heroin treatment program, a clerical error which cancelled Seaboard
Life Insurance's right to exist, and
the Family Relations Act were all
incompetent acts.
The Heroin Treatment Act and
the Family Relations Act were ruled
invalid by the courts system and the
Seaboard legislation forced a special recall of the B.C. legislature to
eliminate the blunder.
Vol. LXII, No. 26
Vancouver, B.C. Friday, November 9,1979
— kevin finnegan photo
MATURE STUDENT ponders Beatles record in B section of string quartets in Wilson recording collection,
wondering which stringed instrument Ringo played. After searching in vain for early Byrds and Buffalo Springfield
classics, woman settled for some discs from M section, including two Mozarts and a McKenna Mendelsohn
Mainline. She left Sedgewick library muttering about lack of later Little Richard singles.
SAC to study art gallery change
By VERNE McDONALD
The student administrative commission has approved in principle
an architectural study, costing up to
$300, on transforming SUE art gallery into a hard liquor lounge.
No final decision was reached on
converting the gallery into a drinking hole because of the many potential difficulties involved, SAC chair
Don Tolson said Thursday.
Tolson said these difficulties included:
• opposition from the Alma
Mater Society art gallery committee;
• costs of conversion which
could jump beyond $50,000;
• the fact that such an expenditure would require a referendum
among all students in order to gain
approval for the plan.
Council comes bouriny gifts
By GEOF WHEELWRIGHT
The Science Council of B.C. is holding a $1.5
million giveaway.
To win you don't have to buy a lottery ticket, put a
sticker in your window or even answer a skill-testing
question.
All you need to do to win the first research competition is submit an ingenious research proposal in forestry, mining, communications, energy, environment
research or transportation.
The new competition is the council's plan for distributing a large research grant allotted by the provincial government, said council chairman Erich Vogt
Thursday. The council hopes to sponsor about 12
research projects for winners of the competition.
Vogt is inviting all B.C. researchers and interested
persons to compete for the money and says the competition is the only fair way to distribute it.
"The only way to give them (the grants) out is in
competitions of this kind," he said.
So the race is on, and you can expect researchers to
be madly racing to beat the clock as the offer expires
Dec. 1. Vogt said anyone can enter, but added he
doesn't expect many submissions from students.
He said some graduate students will get extra research work if their professors win.
Council spokesman Max Cairns said the competition is just. "We thought it was the fairest way. Entrants can be professors in the university or individuals
in the community," he said.
But Cairns added he does not expect many community members to win the competition because most of
them do not have the research equipment available.
He said the game rules will probably generate more
grant winners from industry, universities, research institutes and consultant firms than the public.
Tolson said he met with the art
gallery committee Thursday and
spent 45 minutes fielding questions
from members.
"They're not happy about the
idea of changing it into a lounge,"
he said.
Carol Frank, chairman of the art
gallery committee, said the committee is still opposed to putting a
lounge in the space the art gallery
now occupies.
"The committee is against the
idea of the Lethe moving into the
gallery and that's definite," she
said.
But Frank stressed she felt SAC
had done well in going to the art
gallery committee to talk about the
question.
"Communications have opened
up and we now have some input,"
she said. "Members of SAC are
now listening and we are very pleased."
Tolson said today the committee
and members of SAC will meet with
the architect to look at the concept.
"We want to change the Lethe
and right now the art gallery is the
most visible possibility," he said.
Tolson and Frank said they
agreed there are alternatives to
moving the Lethe to another part of
SUB.
"Another possibility is the listening lounge off the conversation
pit," Tolson said. "Just to install
water in the art gallery would cost
about $20,000, and that's a,
conservative estimate."
"If it's $20,000 or $30,000 above
the water costs then it's not a viable
alternative," he said.
Tolson added there is a problem
with the irreversibility of a decision
making the art gallery a lounge.
"If we turn it into a lounge, we're
stuck," he said.
Frank, too, said she has reservations about the gallery being able to
function in conjunction with a
lounge.
"I would like to see a nice lounge
but it would restrict the art to painting and sculpture," she said.
"We believe they can exist side by
side without being in the same location, but we don't want the gallery's
potential to be limited."
We're mad as
hell and will be
resting Monday
Boy, are we tired. And we're mad
as hell about it.
We went to the administration
and told them they're going to have
to make up some excuse to close
down the university so we can take
a rest.
It took some persuasion, but we
convinced Doug Kenny the anniversary of an armistice agreement that
took place 61 years ago was a tenuous but worthwhile reason for
cancelling classes for a day.
So you'll get Monday off. And
we won't have to insult you with
our dribblings about pseudo-socialist capitalism until Thursday next
week.
Buy a poppy from a legionnaire if
you haven't already done so. Remember, we owe them a lot more
than we'll ever know. We hope. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, November 9, 1979
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ONLY Friday, November 9, 1979 THE    UBYSSEY Page 3
Manitoba gov't does it all for youth
WINNIPEG (CUP) — The Man
itoba government created 10,000
jobs for students under four youth
employment programs last year.
That's if you're including volunteer positions and placements of
one or two days duration, as a provincial government press release did
last Thursday.
The document includes 400 volunteer positions and 1,700 casual
job placements of one or two days
Carrels
home for
Christmas
Study carrels moved to make
room for a bookstore sale will be
back in place before Christmas exams, a UBC vice-president said
Thursday.
And Brock 200, where the bookstore sale is being held, will not become the next student services office despite rumors to that effect,
said Erich Vogt, vice-president for
faculty and student affairs.
"We haven't got any definite
plans to move student services,"
said Vogt. "I would be distressed if
they didn't have the study carrels
back in there before Christmas
exams."
Student services director Dick
Shirran said moving the office to
Brock Hall was still "very much at
the discussion level."
"I have no knowledge of a schedule or plan (for the move)," he said.
Some students said they feared
permanent eviction when plans to
hold the book sale were announced
in late October (students were given
one day's notice to remove their belongings).
After the students studying in
Brock 200 protested their eviction
the carrels were not stored but moved to a smaller area in the rear of
the building. The new study space,
adjacent to the Canada Employment Centre and the women's
lounge, is cramped and noisy but
some students when questioned said
they are resigned to working there
for a month.
duration in the 10,000-job figure.
About 2,834 regular jobs were
created under the Hire a Student
program, the release continues, but
does not specify how many of these
jobs lasted for any significant period of time. (A "regular job" is
defined as one which lasts at least
one week.)
The volunteers did work which
trained them in the "operations of
government departments or agen
cies" — as part of a volunteers in
public service program which came
into full swing this summer. The
work included typing, filing and
clerical work, one volunteer said.
Most of these students would
have been unable to obtain provincial student aid this fall if they applied.
The amount of student aid made
available is based on the difference
between a student's summer earn
ings and a reasonable assessment of
the amount they would require for
living expenses.
Jackie Baizley, a University
of Manitoba awards office administrative assistant, did indicate volunteer work would be considered,
especially if it is within the student's
field of study.
But she said that students would
have great difficulty justifying the
fact they had earned no income dur
ing the summer and would not
necessarily receive a larger loan.
A job which lasts for one or two
days will not qualify a student for
assistance.
Some significant positions were
created by the private sector youth
employment and step-in-government programs, which by definition
last at least six weeks. Combined
figures are not available but 941
step grants were offered in 1979.
RESULT OF RECENT archeological dig, class of '74 student is unearthed
in deep cavern under Main Mall. Mummy, dating from end of Gage dynasty, perhaps might have witnessed origins of Kenny era before being buried
— glen sanf ord photo
in midst of midterm ritual which takes place between solar equinoxes. Remains were surrounded by ancient manuscripts, most of them undecipherable pending further investigation.
'Iron-heel' McGeer out to crush union move
Canadian University Press
A province-wide college faculty
union could be in existence by January despite attempts by B.C.'s
"iron-heel" education minister to
prevent its formation.
Representatives from faculty associations of colleges and institutes
across B.C. have been meeting since
June to determine the structure and
feasibility of a provincial union,
and will be meeting later this month
to draw up a constitution and
budget.
But while the faculties have been
planning their union, education
minister Pat McGeer has been exploring the costs of unions and publicly stated he is opposed to the concept of unions in colleges, calling
them an "unhealthy" threat to the
system.
"I think the public is entitled to
know how much of our resources
are consumed in this fashion," he
said.
McGeer's probe into the costs to
colleges associated with negotiations, arbitrations and grievance
procedures began with a memo to
college administrators last summer.
The memo was discovered by the
B.C. Government Employees Union, and it prompted union leaders
last month to file unfair labor practice charges against the minister.
The BCGEU also filed unfair labor practice charges against
McGeer in September after he intervened on behalf of the administra
tion of the Pacific Vocational Institute in a union exclusion dispute.
"He sure is building an anti-union reputation for himself. He's
getting to be known as iron-heel
McGeer," BCGEU spokesman
Robbie Robinson said.
The provincial faculty union
would replace the nine-year-old
College Faculties Federation, which
represents faculty associations at
eight B.C. colleges.
McGeer said he thinks college instructors will make the "right decision," and reject unions.
CFF president Dave Mitton said
McGeer might be embarrassed by
the results of proclaiming all of the
act  because the college  faculties
Atomic warriors 'felt awe, regret'
By HEATHER CONN
A gripping clash of horror and awe, regrets
and relief plagued the men who dropped the
world's first atomic bomb on Hiroshima, a
guest professor said Thursday.
"There was a combination of exhilaration,
a feeling of 'Wow, look what we did' and at
the same time a completely opposite feeling
of horror," said Bill Youngs of Eastern
Washington University.
He told 21 people in Buch. 104 that the
men in three American B29s who flew the
death mission over Japan first felt "elation,
relief and awe" after unleashing the
equivalent of 20,000 tons of TNT in triumphant success.
But their view from 40,000 feet above,
through the blast's smoke that was still visible 250 miles away, clouded the agony below,
he said.
"They saw smoke but not burned flesh,
flames but not families, movement but not
pain," he said, reading from a personal
paper researched for three months from
newspapers, diaries and secondary sources.
"The men . . . lived in a world in which
good men could cause horrible suffering in
the pursuit of commendable goals."
Youngs said despite the popular belief at
the   time   that   the   Hiroshima  attack   was
necessary and logical, the men directly involved still expressed doubts and recrimination. He said just after the 9,000 lb. missile
had dropped, one of the aircraft's tail gun-
commented:
"I think I'd just as soon have missed it
. . .come to think of it, I won't be mentioning it to my grandchildren."
Youngs claimed another said: "I wonder if
maybe we're not monkeying around with
things that are none of our business."
He added that Paul Tibbets, commander
of the 509th composite bomb group, gave the
terse summary: "Saw city, destroyed same,"
and later called the mission " the dullest trip
anyone ever took."
One of the aircraft radio operators, Abe
Spitzer, had a nightmare the following evening, in which the image of a faceless commander ordered him to drop another atomic
bomb, said Youngs. The operator heard the
target called with the names of the city's
streets, Youngs said, and realized they
sounded familiar — they were the streets of
his own neighborhood in the Bronx.
Youngs said many crewmen felt sorrow
later when they saw pictures of victims of the
deadly bomb that was no more than 10 feet
long and 28 inches wide. Four square miles in
the centre of Hiroshima were completely
ruined, he said, and within a half mile of the
blast 95 per cent of the people had been killed. As Youngs read:
"More than 200,000 people are in the
midst of this inferno. Near the centre of the
city thousands are instantly burned to
cinders. Some leave their shadows on walls
and roadways as their flesh shades the stone
from the wave of heat. Ten thousand people
simply vanish without a trace."
The real question that still haunts people
today, he added, is the moral rationalization
for the bombing — why?
"It was as necessary as Pearl Harbor, or
the German invasion of Russia, or the D-Day
landing in France. Total war justified surprise attacks on merchant vessels, torture of
prisoners, and the bombing of civilian
targets.
"It provided a rationale for unspeakable
suffering and enabled men to kill 70,000 people in a day's work."
Youngs said he opposes the Hiroshima
bombing but admitted it did save Allied lives
by ending the Second World War.
"In a bizarre way this was the logical thing
.o do. I don't think it was justified. I think
it's wrong because all of war is wrong," he
said.
would opt for the trade union alternative.
"Faculties would definitely opt
for the trade union approach,"
Mitton said. "I don't know what
McGeer's got up his sleeve, but it
sure looks like he's up to something."
Rice crucial in
battle for Asia
Philanthropic foundations claim
that science and technology are
fighting the battle for Asia, a UBC
philosophy professor said Thursday.
Ed Levy told 25 people in the Lutheran campus centre that institutions such as the Ford and Rockefeller foundations are involved in
technology transfer research to
southeast Asia.
"The battle for Asia will be
fought in the rice bowl," is the attitude of these institutions, Levy
said.
Recipient governments might be
motivated to accept donations from
the institutions out of self-interest,
he said.
He added there are various levels
to transfer technology and scientists
and foundations are 'on different
levels.
"How do we increase yield per
hectare? That is the question the
scientific community addressed itself to," he said.
He added scientists are motivated
to do research for reasons other
than self-interest.
Scientists need not necessarily be
held responsible for the consequences of their activities if there
are "legitimate overriding institutions," governing their work, he
said.
Levy is currently working on a
project analyzing rice technology to
southeast Asia. His speech was the
second of a five-part series entitled
Faith, science and the future. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, November 9, 1979
Letters
^
God has final word on gays
With regard to the current "gay"
issue (I take exception to the corruption of this formerly pure
English word), it has become clear
to me that a certain essential
perspective has been lacking in the
debate, namely, that over/against
the constant struggles for (or
against) gay rights, there is an absolute authority to which one can
refer.
This authority is,-of course, the
word of God, or the bible as it is
more commonly known. The revul-
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BACK TO EDEN . . . unhealthy controversy
Gays not at all sick
I have been following the
arguments in your letters column
with reference to homosexuality
and wish to say that I am surprised
and appalled by the low calibre of
the arguments on both sides. I
would have expected a little more
respect for ordinary logic from a
group of "mature students."
Perhaps I can put the situation into
a little perspective by means of an
analogy.
First comes the argument that it
is an "immoral and disgusting"
sight to see men (and presumably
women?) interested in each other.
This is a gut reaction, not an argument. "Immoral," if you go back
Eden store
deserves
its boycott
The letter from Gordon Boothe,
entitled "A nickel for your
slogan," makes the claim that
discrimination in employment is appropriate, since it helps make a
business run "smoothly and successfully."
Boothe raises the point that, in
boycotting a person or institution
which discriminates in employment,
UBC students would themselves be
guilty of discrimination. This argument is foolish. Clifford Morris has
to accept the fact that, if he chooses
to deny employment or admittance
to others on irrelevant grounds,
many people (not just gays, but also
members of racial or religious
minorities) may find his establishment less than congenial.
Mr. Boothe's letter, stripped of
its sarcasm and disdain, is a celebration of those who would violate the
letter or spirit of the B.C. human
rights code. It is to be hoped that
students will continue to avoid
patronizing the Back to Eden
restaurant.
Vincent Manis
computer science
to the etymology, means anything
that you are not accustomed to. Extend that statement into a general
theory and you get "anything that I
don't do is wrong." I doubt if the
letter writers actually live by this
principle.
Then we have the related
arguments that it is "unnatural," a
"mental illness," and that "since
men aren't built to 'do it' with each
other" it shouldn't exist. That it is
an aberration of some sort,
hereditary or other, seems fairly obvious. The current fashion seems to
favor the heredity theory, although
I have my doubts about it.
The analogy to answer this is that
I personally find the idea of sucking
smoke into the lungs to be
disgusting to a high degree. This
doesn't exclude me from having
friends who do it. The human body
"was not designed" for this purpose. Do the writers of the "anti-"
letters therefore extend their hatred
to this other perversion of a body's
designated function? In all consistency, shouldn't they?
I do not, to my knowledge, know
any gays personally. But if I had
been propositioned by one (another
point which was brought up), my
reaction would be the same as if I
had been offered a cigarette or a
toke: a polite "no thank you." The
other person, unless a complete
boor, would then drop the subject
and go on to something else. Hardly
a traumatic experience.
As for the liberal-sounding proposal that we should never stand up
for anything, because it only provokes an opposite reaction — that is
obviously wrong. But anyone over a
certain emotional age will save his
energy for matters which threaten
right, reason, liberty, or life, in a
more than ordinarily violent way.
Bearing that in mind, they should
save their jihads for something like
the engineer's "practical joke"
reported on the front page of
Thursday's Ubyssey. We have better things to do with our spare time
than get upset about how other people spend their spare time.
Gareth Jones
arts 2
sion and indignation that many feel
toward the gay liberationists stems
in a real way from the traditional
Christian viewpoint that homosexual relationships are unnatural,
and, more importantly, completely
contrary to the command of God.
The biblical position on this issue
is very clear: God created human
beings in a male-to-female relationship. He instituted marriage, as between a man and woman, and proclaimed his blessing upon it
(Genesis 2:18-25). He punished
those who corrupted his institution,
as for example, the men of Sodom
and Gomorrah (Genesis 18-19). In
the New Testament as well, one can
read how homosexuality is to be
clearly understood as a state of sin
and a condition condemned by
God.
Romans chapter 1 is very
enlightening in this respect: "For
although they (i.e. unbelievers)
knew God they did not honor him
as God or give thanks to him, but
they became futile in their thinking
and their senseless minds were
darkened. Claiming to be wise they
became fools." The chapter goes on
to say that because of the
foolishness of such men, God will
give them up into impurity and
"dishonorable passions," (i.e.
homosexual relationships). And not
only this, but those who engage in
these activities will receive "in their
own person the due penalty for
their error."
From the above, it becomes clear
that social acceptance of homosexuals should not be encouraged. Further, the aggressive demands of
homosexuals and those who support them should be denounced.
Homosexuals should be receptive to
efforts to help them and should not
make themselves into a public spectacle. On the other hand, the rest of
the public should not look down
upon them, as if they are somehow
superior. Homosexuals should be
respected as human beings and
should be treated with compassion.
To those who are offended by the
didactic nature of this letter, no
apology is made. The modernist, no
doubt, rejects a view such as has
been given because he thinks it is archaic and narrow-minded. It is,
nevertheless, true and should be
honored as such. One need only
look into the world at large to
recognize the result of a rejection of
external authority — degeneration
in all aspects of life. And, of
course, once the external authority
is removed, the bickering and
squabbling among humans is never-
ending, for there is no man who on
his own authority can impose his
own morality onto other men.
Robert Schouten
arts
'Babies
make me
throw up *
This letter is written in response
to numerous articles in The Ubyssey
concerned with the rights of gays. It
makes me puke! I am sick and tired
of hearing those poor mouth babies
complaining about equal rights. If
they want to be treated as equals let
them stand on their own instead of
begging   for   sympathy   from   the
heterosexual students. If they can't
hack the pace, hop off the ferry!
Dave Walsoff
education student
Phi Gamma Delta member
Les gives line
It was a matter of the chairman laying down the law at Tuesday's
board of governors meeting.
UBC board members had barely settled into their cushioned
chairs when new chairman Leslie Peterson gave them a strict warning.
"There is only one master," Peterson said. "That is the University of British Columbia. That is the only body to which we are
responsible."
He wasn't nitpicking. Peterson specifically told student, faculty
and labor representatives that he would in no way tolerate any partisan action on their part.
Chalk up yet another in a continuing series of democratic actions
on the part of the board elite — the elite that education minister
Pat McGeer handpicks to run the show.
The implications of Peterson's attempt to put the fear of God (or
Pat McGeer) into the elected board members raises serious questions as to Peterson's ability as chairman.
The same members he warned not to stray from the only true
board line are the only board members who are elected — who
have been placed on the board because their consitituents want
them there.
How are they to properly serve their respective groups, with their
particular problems, if Peterson threatens them with some
unknown punishment? They can't. Nor does Peterson want them
to.
Peterson's pronouncement from the mount will only worsen
their problem.
But there might be a benefit from it all. If Peterson was truly
serious about partisanship, then could we expect McGeer's appointed Big Eight board members to become concerned with the
quality of education at UBC instead of echoing the cutbacks tune
of McGeer's?
Don't bet on it. There's too much at stake.
THE UBYSSEY 1
November 9, 1979
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the
AMS or the university administration. Member, Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices is
in room 241K of the Student Union Building. Editorial departments, 228-2301; Advertising, 228-3977.
Co-Editors: Heather Conn and Tom Hawthorn
Ratf Sameit and Brad Stock gasped when they saw the thought for the day on Heather Conn and Tom
Hawthorn's blackboard. Kathryn Thurman and Janet Comin blushed when they saw it and sympathized with Julie Wheelwright, who had to face the obscenity from city desk ali day. "Thank God Gary
Brookfield and Vic Bonderoff aren't here to see this," Shaffin Shariff exclaimed to Curtis Long and
Christine Wright. Richard Noble and Daniel Moon, maddened by the import of the vile words, furiously
attacked Peter Menyasz. "1 don't want to be alive anymore," Verne Mcdonald weeped as he tried to
persuade Alan Favell, Randy Hahn and Peter Ferguson to drink some mushroom-flavored hemlock
with him. "If it's true then I don't want to live, either," Wendy Hunt confided to Ingrid Matson. Geof
Wheelwright sought solace from Yvette stachowiak while Kevin Finnegan emptied the contents of the
press club fridge into his throat in three minutes flat. "43 issues to go," Gary Brookfield read and he
groaned softly. Friday, November 9, 1979
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
1
It's time we signed
our flicking names
OPTIC
ZONE
Student Discounts
They say that the sum total of
man's existence is but a flash in the
"liquid crystal watch of eternity."
Furthermore, one man's life is a
mere "half-flicker" in the sum of
all men's lifetimes. In this context,
the four or so years we're at UBC is
a flicker of a flicker.
So how then should we spend our
precious moments at our UBC
oasis? Some suggest bake-sales and
sock-hops while others declare the
benefits to be found in paper
monuments. Bake-sales are stale,
sock-hops are dated and paper
monuments are toppled by the same
breath from which they are created.
So what then? Are we to be recorded as the student generation whose
greatest contribution was to change
everything so it all remained the
same?
There is an alternative to our present endless circle. Students can use
their inherent creativity and energy
in taking stands on issues. All of us
can use our minds and figure out
that we are not being handed
satisfaction as a receipt for tuition
fee payments. We all know it is up
to us and that it is ours to determine
(i.e. Tuum est).
So a very few people have initiated a letter-campaign to MLAs
to say, "Hey, why don't you have a
look at what is and isn't going on at
UBC. Until you do, the quality of
my education is deteriorating with
diminishing funding in light of rising costs and increased needs."
The facts bear out that UBC (like
Simon Fraser University and the
University of Victoria) is seriously
underfunded:
• requested funding has been
consistently chopped by the Universities Council of B.C. (an intermediate body between the
universities and the provincial
government) and again by the provincial government;
• the university faces a higher inflation rate than a consumer price
index indicates. This results from
Ombudshack
looking out
for vinegar
Is 1979-80 not going to be one of
your vintage years? Is someone or
something turning you vinegary? If
so, perhaps I can help out.
John Ormiston
Alma Mater Society ombudsperson
SUB 234
228-4846
Free sex
advice.
That's right. When you
visit PJ. Burger & Sons
we'll advise you of your
sex. Free of charge! Add this
free advice to our 15 classic
burgers and other great stuff
and you've got one heck
of a crazy little restaurant, sir
or madam. 2966 W 4th Ave.
by Bayswater.
Open daily from 11:30 a.m.
large acquisitions of scientific
equipment, books, etc., that also
fall victim to the devalued dollar
syndrome;
• class sizes increase as a result of
funding cutbacks (definitely not
conducive to quality teaching);
• real purchasing power for this
university decreases due to factors
outside its realm of control.
A simple letter-campaign is
started to draw insufficient funding
to the attention of the people who
decide how much money UBC gets.
Not an unrealistic move. Actually,
this university was created many
years ago because of some similar
student action (remember the Great
Trek?). The battle then was to build
the university and today is to
preserve it as a centre of ideas and
quality education.
No one's asking for a radical
move or an exercise in futility. Instead, all that's being asked for is a
letter, signed by you, and directed
to the people who will ultimately
decide whether or not our "flicker"
was for naught.
Glenn Wong
AMS secretary-treasurer
MalJ Book B^aat%^^^?!_ _ Zop_Sale_ Npy.Tj -1_8j(
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theatres
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SCREENPLAY BY BILL KERBY AND BO GOLDMAN '   STORY BY BILL KERBY
EXECUTIVE PRODUCER TONY RAY •   DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY VILMOS ZSIGMOND.A.S.C.
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WARNING - FREQUENT COARSE LANGUAGE, OCCASIONAL SUGGESTIVE SCENES - B.C. DIRECTOR f
Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, November 9, 1979
Tween classes
TODAY
I.Y.S.
General meeting, noon, SUB 111.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
General meeting, noon, SUB 130.
DEPARTMENT OF SLAVONIC STUDIES
Lecture by Anrij Hornjatkerye on Ukrainian bardic tradition, noon, Buch. 2230.
STUDENT LIBERALS
Lloyd Axworthy speaks on the party in the west,
noon, Buch. 100.
MUSSOC
Variety show, noon, SUB auditorium.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Greek night, 8 p.m.. International House.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
General   meeting,   noon.   International   House
lounge.
AMS ACCESS COMMITTEE
Meeting about car pool proposal,  noon,  SUB
206.
SATURDAY
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Film Taking Tiger Mountain by Strategy 2:30
p.m., SUB auditorium.
SUNDAY
GAY PEOPLE OF UBC
Volleyball,   1:30 p.m.  to 3 p.m.. Gym B west
complex.
UBC SPORTS CAR CLUB
Slalom race registration, 8:30 a.m., B-lot.
NDP CLUB
Grudge hockey match NDP club vs. PC club, all
welcome, 6:30 p.m.. Gym F, Thunderbird winter
sports centre.
MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY
Haida artist Robert Davidson exhibits his graphic
artworks, 3 p.m.. Museum of Anthropology.
TUESDAY
RUSSIAN CLUB
General meeting, noon, Buch. 1256.
Hot flashes
Super mouths
fo battle wits
The UBC debating society, people of sharp tongues, quick wits
and big mouths are performing at
UBC once again and will be battling
with brave souls from campus clubs
next week:
Gay club, Nov. 13, SUB 212.
Resolved that: Employers don't
have the right to hire on the basis of
sexual preference.
UBC Engineers, Nov. 14, SUB
auditorium.
Resolved that: Geers are God's
gift to women.
UBC Pro-lifers, Nov. 15
conversation pit.
Resolved that: Abortion be
abolished.
Liberal club, Nov. 16, SUB auditorium.
Resolved that: Liberalism is alive
and flourishing in the west.
Faculty association, Nov. 19,
SUB auditorium.
Resolved that: Professors are
superfluous.
UBC conservatives, Nov. 20,
SUB 212.
Resolved that: Issue dealing with
PetroCan possibly.
UBC NDPs, Nov. 21, SUB auditorium.
Resolved that: Dirty tricks are an
acceptable and necessary form of
political campaigning.
Commerce U.S., Nov. 22, SUB
conversation pit.
Resolved that: It is the social
responsibility of business to make
profits.
Women's committee, Nov. 23,
SUB auditorium.
Resolved that: The Lady Godiva
ride be banned.
Females tight
The 1930s hit and with the wave
of social discontent that swept
North America came workers demanding better rights. These workers included women, for perhaps
the first time in history; to most
people the stories of great women
and their struggles has been left untold.
Now you have an opportunity to
enlighten those musky corridors of
ignorance and view the law students' film committee's presentation. Union Maids. It depicts
women in the 1930s American labor
movement and will be shown at
noon, next Wednesday in Law 101.
FIRST YEAR
DANCE
Sponsored by ihe
Science Undergraduate Society
FRIDAY, NOV. 16
7:30 P.M.
Tickets at the S.U.S. Office,
Room 1500 Biol. Sciences
and PHYSSOC and FYCC
Zeta Beta Tau Fraternity
cordially invites you to
C4S1N0
NIGHT
DINNER & DANCE
Saturday, Nov. 10
4 pm to 1 am
Come try your luck
at Roulette, Blackjack
Crown & Anchor, Horse Racing
and Over & Under Seven.
CASH PRIZES
For more information call
327-2070 or 321-4386
JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTRE
41st & Oak Street, Vancouver
Tickets:
$2.50 advance       $3.00 door
(entry only)
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
Testimony meeting, noon, SUB 224.
FIRST YEAR COUNCIL
Organizational meeting, noon, SUB 211.
COALITION FOR A SAFE CAMPUS
Discussion with the members of the coalition,
1:30 p.m., SUB 130.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
General meeting, noon, SUB 130.
WUSC
Discussion  about  refugee  students  at   UBC,
noon, Buch. 205.
WEDNESDAY
LAW STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
FILM COMMITTEE
Film Union Maids about women in the American
labor   movement   in   the   1930s,   noon.   Law
building 101 and 102.
TM PROGRAM
Group meditation with videotape, noon, Buch.
217.
VOC
General meeting, noon. Chemistry 250.
SKI CLUB
Ski festival and equipment update, 7:30 p.m.,
SUB auditorium.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Fat is a feminist issue discussion group, noon,
SUB 130.
THURSDAY
NDP CLUB
General meeting and indoctrination, noon, SUB
119.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Lesbian drop-in, noon SUB 130.
ARTS
BEAR GARDEN
Friday, November 9
CHEAP BEARS
GREA T MUSIC
4:00 - 8:00 p.m.
Buchanan Lounge
VN.
Peruvian
midgets.
Yes, these fidgety little
rascals are terrified when
they see the size of our
monstrous burgers. 15 classic
burgers. And other great
stuff. 2966 W 4th Ave. by
Bayswater. Open daily
from 11:30a.m. Opening soon
in Lima. (Una mcntira
may GRANDE).
sc
hair studio inc.
UNISEX HAIRSTYLES
master charge
FOR APPOINTMENT
224-1922
224-9116
5784 University (next to Bank of Commerce)
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: Studant - 3 linn, 1 day $1.50; additional linn 36c.
Commwtol~3Ihi«,1d^«3wOO;iKldltlonalUiwaOc.Addltiof^cUy»«2.TO»nd^
y Classified ads are not accepted by telephone ami ere payable in advance.    -
y; Yy'';" Deat&meK It:30 ajn., the oey before publication. *■-.
§|f|||§J  ft*/K«t«wOff«^«m «i, i«a, t/sc, ww, e.c wr fits  **\
5 — Coming Events
20 — Housing
80 — Tutoring
"Finding A Path Through
The Chaos Of Cults"
PART II
Speaker   LORI McGREGOR
Ex Cult Leader
7:30 p.m. Thur*. Nov. 15
LUTHERAN CAMPUS CENTRE
Sponsored by UBC Christian Fellowship
A FRESH APPROACH to the knowledge
that ends all conflict; a discussion of serf-
awareness with Riley White. Please call
278-5680.
SLIGHTLY INJURED PENGUINS. 50%
off. Dogs, turkeys, white elephants, 50%
off. Any book published by a bird or an
animal, 20% off at the First.Annual Zoo
Sale. Mall Book Bazaar, 850 Granville,
November 11-18.
10 — For Sale — Commercial
COMMUNITY SPORTS. Excellent prices for
ice skates, hockey, soccer, jogging and racquet sports equipment. 733-1612. 3615
West Broadway, Vancouver, B.C.
POSTERS, reproductions, photo blowups,
largest selection. The Grin Bin. 3209 West
Broadway, Van. 738-2311. Opposite Super
Valu.
TO SUBLET FOR DEC-JAN. Completely
furnished highrise apartment at 7th and
Alma. $292.25 P.M. Telephone Mart
228-8245 or 689-3891.
WANTED: Mature female, non-smoker,
teach German to children. House-sitting;
some light housekeeping exchange for private
room and breakfast kitchen privs. in house on
campus. Stay in T. W. Th. nights. Phone
946-8296.
GERMAN LESSONS by German Student.
All levels. Translations. 682-2437.
88 — Typing
25 — Instruction
30 — Jobs
36 — Lost
SMALL TAN PURSE in Main Library. I.D.
Important. Reward offered. 526-7326 or
434-3330.
40 — Messages
AN HILARIOUS SPOOF' of the 1930s
gangster films. BUGSY MALONE will be
playing in SUB THEATRE on SATURDAY,
Nov. 10 at 2:00. Only $1.00.
TO BIMBO
3-8-1 Happy Year and one-half
Slug Bait
PAPERS and/or theses typed and
proofed. IBM Selectric. Phone 732-9466
evenings.
TYPING 80c per page. Fast and accurate.
Experienced typist. Phone Gordon,
873-8032.
TYPING. Essays, theses, manuscripts,
including technical, equational, reports, letters, resumes. Fast accurate. Bilingual.
Clemy 324-9414.
YEAR ROUND EXPERT essay and thesis
typing from legible worx. Phone 738-6829
from ten a.m. to nine p.m.
ADRIEN'S STENO SERVICE. Manuscripts,
term papers, theses, reports. Reasonable
rates. Electric typewriter. Call 987-3569 any
time.
90 — Wanted
99 — Miscellaneous
11
For Sale — Private
50 — Rentals
HP67 Programmable Calculator. $450.00.
Phone work 687-0331 local 21. Home
988-3351.
63 OMAR, new paint, tires okay, flow
through ventilation, strong suspension, interior needs work, need new: battery,
radiator, distributor. Car has great cemental
value with colorful history, must be seen to
be appreciated. $300 o.b.o. Contact E.U.S.
228-3818.
65 — Scandals
AUDITION  NOW  BEING   HELD for  new
production    of    "Three's    Company"    in
Wheelhouse basement. Apply now.
70 — Services
15 — Found
CHILDREN'S Corner Daycare. Suzuki Piano
Program by Susan Wong, B. Mus., UBC:
A.R.C.T. Daycare by experienced personnel. Enrolling 3-4 year olds. 327-4736 evenings.
USE
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED
To Sell -
Buy -
Inform <M
(sheep, sir?) China Month comes to Vancouver
By RICHARD NOBLE
and CHRISTINE WRIGHT
Last Saturday amidst a flurry of
red balloons and colorful dragons,
China Month opened in Vancouver.
For the first time in its history Vancouver is celebrating the arts and
culture of its oldest and largest ethnic community.
The festival surrounds three major events: the Peking Opera, The
Great Cultural Revolution (a new
play by Ken Mitchell) and a series of
Chinese films at Pacific Cinematheque. There are also art expositions, concerts and lectures on various aspects of Chinese culture.
Although China Month occurs at
a time when the Peoples' Republic
of China is opening itself to the
world, its origins lie closer to home.
Last July Brian Richmond, director of The Great Cultural Revolution, noticed his play would be
opening at the same time the Peking Opera made its North American debut. It was appropriately
ironic that the play, which is about
the banning of a playwright at the
beginning of the cultural revolution,
should be presented just as the
opera, a symbol of Chinese artistic
expression, is opening for the first
time since 1960, outside China.
Richmond says he thought a
month-long festival celebrating Chinese culture in general and highlighted by these two events would
be a good idea. He took his plan to
the various cultural associations in
the Chinese community and their
response was enthusiastic. A committee was formed and the government solicited for money. Funding
amounted to $12,500 split between
the city, the provincial lottery fund
and the multiculturalism directorate
of the secretary of state. The committee has only had since July but
has arranged over 30 events, most
of which are free.
The organizers of China Month
are calling it a cross-cultural exchange. The intent, they say, is to
foster a better understanding of
Chinese culture and arts among the
people of Vancouver.
Glen Erickson, one of the main
coordinators of the project, suggests that while the Chinese community is integrated into the business and professional communities
LION DANCE...opening ceremony to kick off China Month
of Vancouver, its
remain a mystery.
arts and culture
DANCERS...stepping through cultural barriers
Committee chairman Wah
Leung, in his speech to the China
Month opening, stressed that a better understanding of Chinese culture and the contributions the Chinese community have made to Canadian society will help unify the
country. And it can't hurt the producers of the Peking Opera or The
Great Cultural Revolution.
Considering the short period of
time the festival has had to evolve,
community response has been excellent. Aside from the three main
events there will be some very
worthwhile expositions and lectures.
Some of the more interesting artistic events are the Chinese painting exposition at Robson Square
Nov. Eh20, a collection of Chinese
artifacts at the Hyatt Regency Nov.
1 to 18, and a concert at the Vancouver East Cultural Centre.
Throughout the month there will
be lectures and films on everything
from acupuncture to Chinese cooking to Monkey Kings. Many of
these are at UBC and free of
charge. Times and locations of
events are listed on the pink China
Month calendars strewn about the
city.
The three main events of the festival should prove fascinating. The
Peking Opera blends dance, acrobatics and opera into a unique and
world-renowned production. It is
sponsored jointly by David Y. H.
Lui Productions and the Canada
Council. It is showing at the Queen
elizabeth Theatre Nov. 8-11.
The Chinese film festival sponsored by Pacific Cinematheque will
be a total of 12 films made in the
Peoples' Republic prior to the cultural revolution. None of them have
previously been seen in North America. The intent is to show an overview of Chinese cinema prior to the
cultural revolution and the revolutionary films of the early 1970s. It
should be interesting but tickets will
be difficult to obtain.
The Great Cultural Revolution is a
new play by Ken Mitchell and in a
sense embodies the cross-cultural
intent of the China Month festival.
It is a play written by a Canadian
playwright about the banning of
Chinese playwright Wu Han's play,
Hai Jui's Dismissal.
Get a handle
on something great.
Page Friday 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, November 9, 1979 rama
&.--*#v
Actor Heath
Gunga-ho
By WENDY HUNT
The banner on the Spratt's Ark
marquee proudly proclaims "Shot
in Gungavision." Enthusiastic fans
wave their placards saying "Gunga
Saves" and "Boycott Chili Gunga."
I'm waiting in line when a tasteful
brown and beige limousine glides to
a halt in front of the theatre. I join
the general hooting, hollering and
hand-clapping as Gunga Heath
emerges from the limo exquisitely
dressed in a maroon, striped terry
robe and his pyjamas.
Gunga Heath
Conceived by Heath Lamberts
At Spratt's Ark
Until November 24
In the !obby I hear that the
scenario witnessed outside has just
been enacted for the tenth time this
evening. The lilting strains of
bagpipes playing the theme from
Jesus Christ Superstar float out
over the crowd.
The set resembles the well-worn
sitting room of that friendly but dotty old aunt who has a passion for
travel and an even larger passion for
collectibles.
The show begins with a musical
flourish suitable for MGM in its halcyon days. But before that a little
ditty out of Alice's Wonderland
comes over the public address
system:
Hi diddly dum . . . an actor's life
is fun.
Hi diddly dee . . . an actor's life
for me.
Hi diddly day . . . an actor's life
is gay.
Heath Lamberts has talent.
More important, he's got guts.
In Gunga Heath, Lamberts does
the wild, ludicrous things we all
ache to do in our heart of hearts. He
wants us to vicariously enjoy his
hilarious antics as much as he enjoys   pulling   them   off.   In   other
words, actor and audience are having the time of their lives even if
that time does fall somewhere between the ages of four and six.
Perhaps this is the reason why
Saturday's audience was responsive to Lamberts' requests to clap,
tell their names and come up on
stage.
Gunga Heath is a series of small
skits, some funny, some raunchy,
some sober and all entertaining.
Lamberts keeps moving quickly
throughout the show and his
energy never flags.
Lamberts changes costumes
almost as often as he changes skits.
It's absolutely fascinating watching
someone do such an ordinary thing
as change his clothes down to his
Stanfield's. I couldn't take my eyes
off him.
Lamberts is a funny man. He is
the show. He tells the story of how
he once had an odd job of moving
some bricks from a roof 'to the
ground. To save time he rigged up a
pulley with a rope and barrel attached. As he continues the story the
plot quickly becomes clear but I
couldn't stop laughing the whole
time.
Then Lamberts announces the
turkey draw. Everyone had been
handed an orange ticket on arrival
at Spratt's Ark. Rummaging around
in the giant fish bowl Lamberts
pulls out a ticket and reads aloud
the number.
"4-8-2-2-6."
I am speechless, having never
been very good in emergency situations. Lamberts has just called my
number. When there is no
response, Lamberts throws the
ticked over his shoulder saying,
"Oh well, they probabley went
home at intermission."
As he is about to dive back into
the bowl for another ticket my com
panion, who is normally reserved
under such circumstances, decides
to save me from myself and shouts
out, "She's here!"
Lambert's head snaps around like
LAMBERTS...turkeys are Heath's only din
the   wind.
a    hound    scenting
"Where? Where?"
I raise my hand and Lamberts
leans over the edge of the stage
peering into the dark. Suddenly a
cold, wet Rock Cornish game hen
flies through the air and amazingly,
amid howls of laughter, I catch it.
What a turkey!
What an experience!
Highball examines drama of logging industry
By RALF SAMEIT
On a small plank stage in a low little theatre some men are pretending to be loggers.
One man sings sitting slightly off
stage, his drawling, deliberate lyrics
projecting through amber, orange,
violet and blue teasers. His story is
his father's story: a bull-of-the-
woods,  a high-rigger,  a Swedish
emigrant. The music, trenchant and
too slow, overpowers. You are lugged, if not lulled, through the days
of whoop-ups, brawls, bars and
bullcooks.
HIGHBALL...logging drama experience
Before you forget which decade
you're in, remember it's Highball! A
powerful drink. Also, a synonym
for action.
Highball
Written and directed by Ronald
Weihs
At Janus Theatre until Nov. 24
Believe in the scenes before being too critical. Believe in the
steam-donkey mimed by three actors, the old Ford truck called a
"crummy" which rumbles to work
full of shaking men and the imaginary tree Nels scales and cuts.
Believe in the union formed by
men like Whitey who risked lay-off
to improve working conditions.
And believe it when Willie, towing a
boom across a lake, imagines he's
pulling not logs but dead men.
Director/writer Ronald Weihs
has reached for our heritage in
these scenes re-creating B.C.'s rugged 1920s around the words of
Barry Hall songs.
His reason: "The loggers' is a
very rich culture that many people
don't know anything about...loggers are not simple and their lives
are not simple . . . logging is the
basis of...the wealth of our province...(and) the way we live."
Weihs centers his piece on one
issue and two main characters.
Nels, a rough Swedish high-rigger,
is crippled and ends up on Skid
Row. Willie, a prairie greenhorn,
joins the union.
Unfortunately the drama falls
apart. The potentially sinister Rod
Turpin, defeated in a brawl early in
Act One, is also the potential conflict between supervisor and hired
hands. Occasional tension boils up
between Nels and others, as in the
final scene, but only one side of the
conflict is apparent — the workers'.
To survive as a set-piece,  the
saga-like,    weary   opening    must
dissolve. Too much historia. Songs
themselves cannot stand up. Too
often, nothing happens on stage.
Oh, Pecker Point!
It's a helluva joint!...
If you want some fun
And you're looking for bum.
Never mind the union. Show us
the old French whore, and the pair
in the woods, the guy that held his
Stanfield underwear out the window and Roughhouse Pete. In
them lies the heritage and the
drama.
Friday, November 9, 1979
THE    UBYSSEY
Page Friday 3 El Super looks inside outsiders
By DANIEL MOON
Why would a man leave the sunny sugar cane fields of Cuba to
shovel snow in New York City? The
answer is Fidel Castro.
El Super, shot two winters ago in
Manhattan, is an intense portrait of
exile, frustration and loneliness that
is the everyday reality for thousands
of Cubans living in the United
States.
El Super
With English sub-titles
At the Ridge Theatre
Until Nov. 18
Unable to return to his country
and unable to adapt to his new
home, Raymundo Hidalgo-Gato is a
man caught in the middle. He plays
Roberto, the superintendent of a
Manhattan tenement, a middle-
aged hero fighting the cold, the
mountains of trash and the callous
indifference of his adopted city.
Roberto lives in a basement suite
with his wife and 17-year-old
daughter. When he isn't fixing windows, coping with religious
fanatics or dealing with building inspectors, he plays dominoes with
his buddies. They drink rum and argue about the Bay of Pigs invasion
but Roberto doesn't share the
macho image they desperately try
to uphold.
"I'd love to burn the whole city in
the boiler," he tells them.
El Super wisely avoids political
commentary and focuses instead
on Roberto's relationships with his
family, his friends and himself. He
argues with his wife about the high
price of meat and the color she dyes
her hair but one suspects that their
love is the only glue holding his life
together.
Moviegoers who don't know any
Spanish-speaking people and are
unaware of the heavily matriarchal
structure of Latin society will probably find the romance schmaltzy.
Certainly her acting is not always
convincing. But her confrontation
with her pregnant daughter, ably
played by Elizabeth Pena, is totally
believable and is one of the emotional high points of the film.
Like any first effort. El Super has
its share of rough edges. The use of
the Bee Gees' Staying Alive is a
EL SUPER...the underside of Cuban America
heavy-handed and unnecessary
comment on the theme of survival.
As well, directors Manuel Arce and
Leon Ichaso could have pared the
numerous sidewalk shots of
cosmopolitan New York without
any loss of context or continuity.
On the plus side, the sound track
conveys the robust virility of the
rhumba and subtly counterpoints
the cold, snowy streets. Roberto's
apartment, a simple but effective
set with its statue of St. Barbara
and cheap arborite furniture serves
as a compact symbol for the clash
of cultures.
The tenderness and warmth of
the Latin community spirit comes
vividly to life in the final scene of
the movie, a goodbye party for the
Miami-bound family.
El Super is a revealing inside
look, at once sad and humorous, at
the outsiders in our society.
New Schlesinger movie Yanks at tear ducts
By SHAFFIN SHARIFF
Some of John Schlesinger's
films are the early 70's most
memorable. He directed films like
Midnight Cowboy, the first X-rated
full length feature to win an Oscar
for Best Picture, and Sunday,
Bloody Sunday which involved a
bizzare love triangle between two
men and a woman.
But his newest, Yanks, is the
most miscalculated film of his
career. It's a slow-moving, sentimental tale of American troops in
a small British town in 1943.
Yanks
Starring Richard Gere, Vanessa
Redgrave and Lisa Eichhorn
Playing at the Odean.
Yanks is about three American
soldiers (Richard Gere, William
Devane and Chick Vennera) who
fall in love with three British girls
(Lisa Eichhorn, Vanessa Redgrave
and Wendy Morgan) while training
for war.
Gere and Eichhorn are the film's
torn lovers, unable to reconcile personal and cultural differences.
Eichhorn is reluctant because she
thinks Gere doesn't love her.
Besides, her parents don't approve
of the "Yanks" and she's engaged
to be married when her boyfriend
returns from the war.
Redgrave plays a well-off woman
with a husband who's away
fighting for the British forces. In her
spare time, she does volunteer
work and worries about her son being unhappy at a private school.
Also, she has an affair with Devane,
who has a dissatisfied wife in the
States.
Yanks strives for success but
achieves nothing remarkable
because it's been done before with
better results. It's not even an effective tearjerker. All the characters
are likeable but subject to some
very weak lines (eg. Redgrave: 'Is it
cold . . . ?' Devane: "It ain't
Miami."!).
Of the men, Devane is the
weakest. He is not suited to his part
and frankly he's at his best when he
has little to say and keeps his mouth
shut. Gere is improving and carries
much of what little impact Yanks
has. But his best work to date is still
in Richard Brooks' Looking for Mr.
Goodbar. Vennera does as much as
is possible with the miniscule part
he has.
On the other hand, the female
cast is impressive. Redgrave, one of
the best actresses around, is the
saving grace. But her understated
effectiveness is nearly incompatible
with Devane's droll performance.
Eichhorn, making her first major
film debut, has the film's most difficult part and carries it off like a
veteran. If any tears are induced,
the feat is due solely to this actress'
heartwarming performance. Wendy
Morgan has a less visible role but
complements Vennera perfectly.
Yanks has some effective
moments. One is during a New
Year's Eve party when a bunch of
American whites assault a black
man for dancing with a white
British girl. As Eichhorn later confronts Gere, the irony of the situation is that the Americans,
themselves subject to prejudice
from the British, do not hesitate to
discriminate against blacks.
John Schlesinger has proven his
worth before but Yanks is a clinker.
The film is full of beautiful shots of
rustic town streets and authentic
atmosphere, but to what purpose?
Schlesinger's next project will be
the film adaptation of Mary
Gordon's first novel and bestseller
Final Payments. With Diane Keaton
in the lead, the film will hopefully be
better than Yanks.
Page Friday 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, November 9,1979 Turning thoughts into clay
Ceramics is too often considered a craft rather than an art.
The public becomes so used to
practical, pretty pottery that it rejects out of hand any exhibition
which challenges its preconceived
ideas.
WENDY
HUNT
The ceramic sculptures currently displayed in the UBC fine arts
gallery are concrete realizations of
others' minds, visible manifestations of the imagination and proof
of its scope.
The works of Lisi Siegel and
Denys James, two Lower
Mainland artists, speak from the
spirit to the spirit.
Recent Work in Ceramics
By    Lisi    Siegel   and    Denys
James
At the Fine Arts Gallery
Until Nov. 17
Although Lisi Siegel has worked with clay ever since she was a
child it was only about 10 years
ago that her interest was spurred
on by a ceramics course under
Ruth Duckworth at the University
of Chicago. She has done group
shows in the past but this is her
first major exhibition.
"The work in this show didn't
exist before I was asked to do the
show," said Siegel. "When I was
asked by Glenn Allison (the gallery
curator), I felt I had carte blanche.
And this work is very different
from anything I'd done before."
Siegel described her previous
work as totemic, house-like
monoliths enclosing space. While
these structures were not
representational, they resembled
objects enough to give people the
impression of a thing. This
detracted from the pure concept
the structure was originally meant
to convey.
"Two of the things the current
show is about is movement and
dynamic force. I wanted to create
something to give this idea
without it being a thing. I wanted
to choose an abstract format to
explore those elements and clarify
them for myself. It was a conscious exploration of threads of
thought which had been in my
work all along," Siegel said.
JAMES...museum setting highlights primitive aspect
In preparation for this show
Siegel introduced a new element
into her work: color. Formerly
Siegel pit fired her ceramics,
which left them black or white.
Because it was her first time using
color and she wanted to completely control the coloring process, Siegel painted her
sculptures with acrylic.
Using an airbrush she began
with light colors and progressed
to darker colors through several
thin washes. The muted colors
come from nature, specifically the
waterfront where Siegel
ruminated on her work during the
summer.
"The pieces are interior. I chose
colors that responded to that and
had a dream quality," said Siegel.
"I used those colors because they
had real impact on me. It was a total experiment because I've never
used color before."
Siegel's sculptures have the
crepe-like texture of grey egg cartons. She likes the rich texture of
clay and strives to keep it as an
important aspect in her work.
"I stretch the clay which opens
the texture and makes the grains
of coarse material visible. I used
the colors and the airbrush to
enhance the texture of the clay,"
Siegel said. She said she wanted
the color to be integrated with the
clay and not just sit on the surface.
"My preoccupation was to
keep, even when the clay became
hard, the sense of softness clay
has. I wanted that fragility. I
wanted my sculptures to have
very little solid mass. Some of
them are about things which happen in an instant of time."
Siegel is aware of the risks she
has taken in choosing the abstract
format of a rigid grid. People may
not be willing to follow her into
the nether world where form is
feeling. She says she is disappointed that more people will not
see the show and give her feedback.
"It's not a commercial gallery.
There are no demands to sell so I
didn't have to concern myself
with that," she said. "But I work
in an isolated environment. During the summer I made no pots
and no money. I worked only on
this show.
"Painting my sculptures I'd get
into them on a very emotional
level. I'd work and work. I turned
myself inside out and then let people come and look. It's very
frightening."
Siegel is happy with her work in
the show. "I'm excited by the use
of color; I've never been able to
use it before. I have not been able
to explore my own ideas as clearly
as I have this time. This work was
my reason for living for quite a
while and then I had to relinquish
it. In that sense the show is a bit
of a let down. Every once and
awhile I go down to see it and I'm
astounded that it's there."
Denys James is the other contributor to the show. At first
glance his bowl-like structures appear more conventional, but they
do not lend themselves to the indignity of being filled with fruit.
James is now involved full time
with exhibitions and supplying
work to a White Rock ceramics
shop. It seems a far cry from being a geography teacher and
counsellor in Prince George.
"It was a gradual transition
from teaching to ceramics," he
said. "I enjoyed working with
something non-verbal. Ceramics
allows me more self-expression
than less physical occupations."
Since the initial invitation in early July, James has created two-
thirds of the show. Like Siegel,
James is also influenced by nature
and spends a lot of time in contact
with the mountains and ocean.
"I work intuitively, trying to not
know where I'm going. I start with
very simple materials and I go
from there," James said.
James likes the flexibility of
clay, the way it moves and how it
can be formed. Although he has
not worked with of-.er materials
he has done some carpentry and
found that it satisfied the same
urge as did ceramics. "Arranging
pieces, that's my life."
James' ceramics underwent
changes as he worked on his
pieces for the show. His work
moved from fragile thin-lipped
forms to heavier and thicker
forms.
"More than half the show is
heavier, which is a fairly recent
development. I was feeling solider
and it was a result of the practical
side of moving them. I tend to
stretch things and then compress
them. That's part of my personality," he said.
James conceded that his work
does mirror his personality, but it
is not an aspect of his work which
he dwells on.
"I try to suspend all ideas while
working.   Clay  reflects  tensions,
See PF 11
Friday, November 9, 1979
THE    UBYSSEY
Page Friday 5 ooks
New handy book
on nuolear abuse
By JULIE WHEELWRIGHT
The new Captain Marvel is
fighting to save, not truth, justice
and the American way of life, but
the world from the dangers of
nuclear power.
The Anti-Nuclear Handbook
By Croall and Kaianders
Pantheon Books. $2.95
Stephen Croall and Kailanders
hae produced The Anti-Nuclear
Handbook, a comic book about
nukes. But it loses none of its
message in characters with bubbles.
The book begins with a look at
the history of the nuclear industry
from the discovery of the atom to
the present day arms race — "the
exclusive nuclear club."
Many little-known facts about
the nuclear industry also come
under the scrutiny of Croall and
Kaianders in a humorous and
enlightening way.
For example, Croall explains how
workers are often exploited by the
industry by not being informed of
the dangers that are involved in
their work.
"The Swiss nuclear power industry once ran out of top flight
welders. All 700 who were qualified
for the job collected the maximum
radiation dose when repairing a
reactor at Beznau . . . radiation
was so intense that each welder
for    only    two
could    work
minutes ..."
The same thing happened at a
plant    in    New   York   and    the
Lust in an older, colder world
By VERNE McDONALD
Growing old is hell. And trying to
escape that fact only invites worse
torture. Lusty Winter is a novel that
carries this theme to an extreme
that is difficult to accept in a "realistic" novel.
Lusty Winter
By Max Braithwaite
Bantam-Seal Paperback, $2.25
Max Braithwaite is best known
for his humorous treatments of his
early life in the depression. In Why
Shoot the Teacher and The Night
We Stole the Mountie's Car, which
won the Stephen Leacock Award
for humor, he portrays the depression as a hopeless time when people managed to laugh and survive.
In Lusty Winter he portrays the
contemporary world as a place of
luxury, ambition and endless potential where survival is difficult and
often impossible.
The person trying to survive the
lusty winter of his life is George Wilson, a 65-year-old who is hale,
hearty, horny and full of hate for
modern society.
He escapes from a nameless city
that sounds a lot like Toronto,
leaves his ambitious celebrity wife
behind and sets himself up in an
isolated cabin in northern Ontario.
Wilson is about the same age as
Braithwaite and like Braithwaite is a
retired teacher.
This personal connection between author and character is at
times troublesome. Braithwaite's
ideas are occasionally grafted onto
his fictional plot in an awkward and
interfering manner.
To his credit, Braithwaite does
not allow this difficulty to get out of
hand. He builds up Wilson's character well enough to make him real
to the reader and writes well
enough to keep the reader engrossed.
But in the end Wilson is defeated
See PF 10
repairmen, all 2,000 of them, were
used in the same way.
Energy alternatives also mean
choices between life styles and
types of government. The nonrenewable energy sources don't
have a clean bill of health, and
choosing between using oil and
nuclear power is like choosing between cholera and the plague.
"Saying 'no' to nukes means saying 'yes' to something else. "
It's time for some radical changes
and the handbook points out there
is a growing idea that only a social
blueprint can reverse the order of
our present situation.
And any energy strategy must be
considered in light of its economic.
social and political implications, and
they are enormous.
A lot of consideration is given to
alternate energy sources and unlike
many pessimistic, doomsday
messengers heralding the coming
age of the technocrat, the book offers solutions.
An appendix lists energy alternatives organizations against
nuclear power and a reading list.
But changing society and protecting the earth from the dangers of
radiation can only work when people get involved in the process, and
"in the end ifs up to you."
"Better active today than
radioactive tomorrow."
r DON'T YOU UNDERSTAND?
I SAID SAUZA.' TEQUILA SAUZA!
THE NUMBER ONE TEQUILA IN
I r\E COUNTRY! DO YOU READ ME?
NUMBER ONE, NUMERO UNO!
YOU BETTER UNDERSTAND IT!
I'VE GOTTA GO NOW!
f*A
The unique taste of Southern Comfort, enjoyed for over 125 years.
NUMERO UNO IN MEXICO AND IN CANADA
Page Friday 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, November 9, 1979 »»•*»»-—w^wjpsbir;
usic
Slug's musical talents
prove SUBstantial
By DANIEL MOON
Doug and the Slugs kissed Vancouver goodbye Saturday night.
Their unannounced farewell concert in the SUB ballroom left 800
whistling, stomping, handclapping
fans wondering whether this superb band can possibly get any better. We'll find out in December
when the group returns from a
month-long tour of eastern
Canada.
The show got off to a Sluggish
start with a blues number designed
to warm up the musicians and their
instruments. But when Doug Bennett walked on stage he twisted the
focus knob to ultra sharp and led
the band into Chubby Checkerland.
Students born the year a corkscrew
dance craze hit the charts probably
missed the humor of Doug's updating of the lyrics to Do You Know
the Incest?
SLUGS...not to be taken with salt
But they were with it when organist Simon Kendall carried lunacy
into oddball virtuosity with a kazoo
cum saxophone solo. Meanwhile
Bennett applied brakelight palm
and elbow technique to the abandoned keyboards.
But these boys aren't just a circus
novelty act as they ably proved on
the slow, ballsy ballad Tropical
Rainstorm. John Burton and Richard Baker had the crowd swaying
like palm trees to their cool, windswept guitar work when Bennett
called upon them to turn the ship
around.
Doug Bennett is this town's most
magnetic, witty and entertaining
vocalist. As the band geared into
overdrive he pulled on his suspenders and began his walking, talking
intro to a song about falling in love.
His crazy rap about space creatures
checking out human mating rituals
turned into a strutting, chest-
pounding, ego-stripping look at the
painful, playful game of boy-meets-
girl.
You didn't need a university degree to know this man was singing
about sex. Doug stood on the sidelines wiping his brow as Kendall's
brilliant keyboard solo highlighted a
musical orgasm that demonstrated
the Slugs could cut it on their own
anytime, anywhere.
Sweet Little Sixteen kicked off
the second set. The hard rock delivery picked up a novel slant by
favoring a California surf sound rather than predictable Chuck Berry
chunky guitar chords. The next
song, Sweet Jane, was the only
one of the evening that didn't come
off. The band aped Lou Reed and
the Stones but they lack the needle
and   spoon   nihilism   required   to
BENNETT...prime minister of rock 'n roll
make that kind of material convincing.
The Slugs cover a variety of
styles that would seem presumptuous in less capable hands. They
play rock, blues, punk, soul, reggae, country and Martian music.
And they get away with it. When
Manfred Mann's Do Wah Diddy
had the dust blown out of its
grooves the audience knew that
both wry humor and unadorned respect cued up that choice.
Everybody laughed when Bennett lay on the floor and told his
shrink about being wired to rock
and roll. But when the band blked
into Steppenwolf's Born to be Wild
the fans weren't laughing. They
were too busy rocking their rocks
off.
Saturday night Doug and the
Slugs proved they could take a stut
tering showpiece like I Could Have
Been Mistaken and carry their raunchy bar style intact into a larger hall.
They proved they could take a simmering number like When the Heat
takes my Faith off the back burner
and let it boil over into feverish percussion. John "Wally" Watson's
triple-X drum solo put the roman
candle on that cake.
And with a song like The Message, powered by Steve Bosley's
punkish bass, they proved they
could turn Hallelujah and Hare
Krishna into megaton rock and roll.
This band is better than their
closest competitors The Pointed
Sticks because they refuse to play
the same concert over and over
again.
The Slugs aren't content to
watch Doug Bennett set a song on
fire, they've got to pour gasoline on
the blaze.
BITE THIS
Better yet, clip it out. Whatever you do, note down the following events.
They are going to be some of the most talked-about and controversial events this year.
The UBC DEBATING SOCIETY proudly presents:
• SUPERMOUTH SERIES 1979 *
A series of debates that will see the Debating Society confronting various organizations and forcing them to defend
their views on certain issues. Tough issues. Controversial and touchy. Ludicrous and wild. Issues you can all sink
your teeth into. Take a look:
Tues. Nov. 13 - SUB 212 12:30
DS vs Gay Club
Wed. Nov. 14 - SUB Auditorium 12:30 DS vs Engineers
Thurs. Nov. 15 — SUB Conversation Pit 12:30  DS vs Pro-Life
Fri. Nov. 16 - SUB Auditorium 12:30 DS vs Liberals
Mon. Nov. 19 - SUB Auditorium 12:30 DS vs Faculty Assoc.
Tues. Nov. 20 - SUB 212 12:30 DS vs P. Conservatives
Wed. Nov. 21 - SUB Auditorium 12:30
DSvsNDP
Thurs^ Nov. 22—SUB Conversation Pit 12:30 DS vs Commerce
Fri. Nov. 23-SUB Auditorium 12:30 DS vs Women's Comm.
Resolution
'That employers do not have the right to deny employment on the basis of sexual orientation'
'That Engineers are God's gift to women'
'That Abortion be available on demand'
'That Liberalism is alive and flourishing in the West'
That professors are superfluous'
'That the federal government retain ownership of
Petrocan'
'That dirty tricks are a necessary and vital part of the
political system'
That the social responsibility of business is to make
profit'
'That the Lady Godiva Ride be banned'
Every day at noon for the next two weeks, somewhere in SUB a battle of words and
ideas is going to be fought.
Admission is free and all are welcome!
Friday, November 9,1979
THE    UBYSSEY
Page Friday 7 imy
■t ■>*■:.■-
nterview
Joe Jackson
By KATHRYN THURMAN
In .the usual rock star style Joe
Jackson is hypnotically entranced
in front of the television screen.
But this habit is apparently his
only foray into the trappings of rock
By
KATHRYN
THURMAN
stardom. Actually he is almost the
very antithesis of the rock 'n roll
star. A fact he candidly admits in
conversation and in song.
"/ make a fool of myself again
Ya make me trip and stumble
I'm the guy with the big feet
But plenty of nerve."
The six-footer with the surly
Peter Pan face who uncannily personifies the name of a British pub
band he once played in, Arms and
Legs, has no patience with people
who expect him to act like a rock
star, dissociate himself from his few
close friends, or change his lifestyle
in general.
"I'm going to continue trying to
be myself. That's all. But even if I
say I'm trying to be myself, that
even sounds a bit illogical. I don't
think I'm trying to present or live up
to any fabricated image."
His adamant refusal of such a
supposedly shallow lifestyle is
deeply felt in several of his songs,
most emphatically in I Don't Wanna
Be Like That.
"Now the cocaine club says
welcome...
But I'm sorry to say that I'm
going out to work
While you're going to the
swimming pool...
So you Playboys can just go
play with yourself
That's your style, 'cause that's
a drag."
Musically, Jackson's first album
(Look Sharp), released earlier this
year, has a sparse and "live"
sound. Lyrically the tracks are concise and direct with scalding social
criticisms and sharp edged cuts
satirizing personal relationships.
"Fools in love, they think
they're heroes...
I say fools in love are zeroes...
I should know
Because this fool's in love
again."
"All of my songs are from personal situations, either experience
or observed. They are about situations that are real to me and affect
me directly. Some songs are more
personal than others. Like some of
them are about a relationship just
between me and one other
person," he confesses.
On his recently released second
album, I'm The Man, Jackson has
musically and lyrically taken a strikingly different angle. Yet he claims
it still sounds like a Joe Jackson
album.
"I feel the second album is better
than the first. If I didn't come up
with one that was different and better there would be no point in doing
it! As far as the lyrics go I'm writing
the audience," he emphasizes,
"because I feel that all those people
are out there watching and listening. But the fact that I'm aware of
the   audience   doesn't   mean   I'm
I'm not going to shut myself
away in a studio
and jerk off
and just indulge myself
JACKSON...reading PF in Sunday Papers
about different things because once
you've written a song about a particular thing, you've done it.
Musically it's a progression as well.
It's not like a formula I'm gonna
keep repeating."
With I'm The Man, Jackson
chooses to vent his rage at social
themes he finds particularly
disgusting. In the title cut, of the
same name, he stomps on Madison
Avenue-type entrepreneurs (advertising hacks) who try to sell the willingly gullible public every trend and
fad from the hula-hoop to the yoyo.
"/ think I'm gonna plan a
new trend
Because the line on the graph's
getting low
And we can't have that...
'Cause I got the trash and you
got the cash.
"If I observe a situation, one that
is interesting and affects the whole
of society and I feel I'm qualified,
then I'll write about it, otherwise I
won't."
All of the tracks from Jackson's
second album were recorded in
London's TW Studios >n fourteen
days with the same band members
he used on the first album: Gary
Sanford (guitar), Graham Maby
(bass, vocals), and Dave Houghton
(drums, vocal).
"We recorded both of our
albums so quickly because I find
recording in the studio very boring
and uninspiring. I like to record as
quickly as possible and get it over
with. I'm not interested in piling on
hundreds of overdubs and sounding like an orchestra. I want the
music to sound fresh and real, like
four people playing music not a big
studio production," he says.
Joe Jackson lives to perform in
front of a live audience. The respect
audiences have shown him he
reciprocates in earnest. But he
hopes he can live up to and progress above their expectation
without compromise. The song
Amateur Hour poignantly sympathizes with his fears, and frustrations.
"Just miss one line
Fall over — you'll be left
for dead."
"I never want to lose touch with
pandering to them. I still want to
surprise them, maybe inspire them,
and make them think. And I want to
keep trying different things. I'm not
going to shut myself away in a
studio and jerk off and just indulge
myself."
Internationally the first album has
been on the music charts for over
30 weeks. The second album seems
destined to retrace the treacherously fickle steps of the Top 40 staircase. Jackson's phenomenal success seems partially due to the fact
that his music is accessible
(translated: non-political) to the
North American masses, or to use
the more disparagingly dreaded
term "commercial."
But he scoffs at other new wave
musicians who shun such
classifications.
Graham Maby often highlighted his bass playing with
up-tempo riffs and lightning guitar
strokes. The brash sound of Gary
Sanford's guitar strumming sifted
through the songs more than any of
the other instruments. Dave
Houghton pounded out steady
backbone drumming throughout
the adventurous and excellent set
of new-wave music.
Yachts, the opening act, hail
from Liverpool, England. The band
pursued an uneven but determined
mixture of thrash and technique
that continually crossed between a
pop and heavy metal sound
reminiscent of many British bands
of the early 60's.
Lyricist Henry Priestman
delighted the crowd with an
energetic display of calisthenic antics in between plucking at his
keyboards and harmonizing on
vocals.
Lead vocalist and guitarist Martin
Watson enhanced the snappy and
witty lyrics with a pleasingly pop
oriented voice and uncluttered
phrasing.
Bob Bellis on drums (and vocals)
and Martin Dempsey on bass (and
vocals) inserted the pulsing fill-ins
that rounded out the band's raw yet
melodic tunes.
Some of the songs the band
played that require repeated listening are Love You, Love You, Look
Back In Love, Suffice To Say, and
their new single Yachting Type.
Despite a few jagged edges this
band is well worth watching.
Page Friday 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, Novembers, 1979 TJW-'—-
■ « V
'"■■*$■■■<
New papers for pup training
By TOM HAWTHORN
Isn't it great to be in college?
We get to drink beer all the
time, smoke some dope, get
laid as often as possible, and, if
time permits, even get a degree.
And all this can be done on daddy's charge cards.
And we can all be white,
middle-class males to boot.
Such is the distorted view of
college life presented in College
Papers, a slick American
magazine "for college students,
not about them."
It sure as hell isn't by them.
College Papers is the new
baby of that oh-so-trendy bible
of the under-35 set, Rolling
Stone. And with Rolling Stone
attempting to cash in on those
cheeky collegians, there's little
doubt left that the baby is an
abortion.
Seems Rolling Stone has
discovered that there's a market
for advertisers at the college
level, despite the gloom and
doomers of declining enrolment. And with that principle in
hand, they've come up with
College Papers to cash in on the
bonanza.
And what right-thinking college student could resist? The
first issue has an interview with
Gilda Radner of Saturday Night
Live (very trendy), a story from
Bruce Springsteen's youth
(trendy in a clever way), and
pieces on women's basketball
(fashionable), beat author
William Burroughs (who just
happens to be both gay and a
libertarian, which is exceedingly
trendy), and on the connection
between rock and the anti-
nuclear energy groups (trendy,
for the time being).
But the true nature of College
Papers is found in its five-page,
full-color spread on the joys of
beer, the "Great American
Drink."
"An ounce of marijuana can
cost you sixty dollars," reads
the index, "but a pitcher of beer
still costs two bucks — beer is
back on campus."
And with that delightful
social comment. Papers tears
into a battle of the beers taste
test, just so that all confused
students can be sure that the
beer they drink is just like their
buddies.
There are even beer games
for the kiddies to play when
they're bored with their Bud.
For the unsure collegians.
College Papers ensures that
enough "Wise Sayings" are included to convince the novice.
"The important thing about
beer is that it makes you rowdy,
as opposed to pot," states one.
Meanwhile the graffiti on the
wall reads, "Any girl who drinks
beer must be horny."
Now that's great stuff. It's
just about enough to make you
head outside and puke in that
great beery tradition.
College Papers represents the
worst in Animal House journalism. And there are greater
lows in the issue.
While promising *o act as a
forum for America's best college writers, the first issue confined college efforts to one
short story, three reprints from
student newspapers and a
smattering of photographs. It's
a small, very small, concession.
Papers will probably do well,
though, and should expect
large circulation increases in the
future. The beer-drinking,
fraternity set will love it. The
19-year-old walking Dewar's
profile-type will love it. Middle-
class suburbia kids'll love it. So
will their parents.
A read through College
Papers is a step into a fantasy
world, where everything is comfortable, enjoyable and relaxed.
And where acne is one of life's
great tragedies.
It's also a world with no black
students and where the only
drugs are legal (read socially acceptable).
It's a strange world indeed.
And, oh, aren't we so lucky
to be living in Vancouver, where
all the important bands come to
perform.
Vam, for Vancouver area
music, has hardly lived up to its
name in its two appearances
since it first hit the newsstands
on Oct. 17. In fact, all that
shows for the staff's efforts are
two dismal collections of petty
public relations articles.
While paying lip service to the
burgeoning local music scene,
Vam's stable of freelancers
finds it necessary to gush over
just about every and any group
to play Vancouver.
The cover apparently
depends on the biggest "name"
group appearing in town while
the issue is for sale. Little River
Band and Earth, Wind and Fire
have so far had that dubious
distinction.
Those involved in the local
music scene, particularly with
new wave groups, are unhappy
with Vam's efforts.
"It's a rag," said one group's
manager. "You'd think they
would be able to find enough
excitement in Vancouver's
groups, without having to rely
on all the major acts coming in
from the States.
"There's no doubt in my
mind that they're just sticking
flack pieces around the ads.
Makes me want to puke all over
them."
Vam editor Flint Bondurant is
even reported to have shrugged, "the Pointed What?" when
one musician asked him about
an article on the Pointed Sticks,
Vancouver's hottest new
wave/pop group.
Nor does Vam provide a high
quality of writing or lay-out
design.
And any doubt about poor
writing ability and relevance is
evaporated by this gem by
Cathy Morris from her interview with Doug and the Slugs:
"What follows is a candid,
honest interview with a
fascinating, serious, dedicated
musical poet who deserves all
the success he and his band are
about to glean."
Pass the saccharine. You just
know Morris got an A- in Grade
8 English and hasn't looked
back since.
And when one sees publicity
stills with the recording company's logo floating just behind
the lead singer's left ear, one
must wonder whether the
priority is with the advertisers or
the readers.
Vam does provide a fairly
adequate list of concerts and
dances in the Lower Mainland,
but two bits is a waste for information readily available in other
publications.
And besides, Vam's editors
think disco is a viable music
alternative. They're also too
afraid to use words like fuck
when the expletives creep into
interviews with musicians.
Ah well, anything to placate
the advertising masses.
L.R.B.
Gaining
strength
HARD
ROCK
IMPORT
If Man. wnM CFOX-Hoi Is pmanting il.    .        Itmti
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Friday, November 9, 1979
THE    UBYSSEY
Page Friday 9 mmmmjm^mmmmtmgmm^mmt^^
R**M ■
' tM^Jimti-
■MilHMNailM*
Postcards
lost in melee
By JANET COMIN
Don't be misled by the titie.
French Postcards is not about the
naughty French but about the not-
so-naughty (and not-so-funny)
Americans. At best, the movie is
light entertainment. At worst, it's
skin-crawling melodrama.
French Postcards
Written    by    Gloria    Katz    and
Willard Huych
Playing at the Capitol Six until
Nov. 14.
Writers Gloria Katz and Willard
Huych have conceived one of the
schmalziest plots  since the "boy
Old teacher
strives for
his survival
From PF 6
not by the forces of the plot but by
the author's intentions.
The theme is the impotence of
the old in dealing with a world that
will not allow them to retain their
dignity no matter how strong, patient and determined they prove
themselves to be.
Braithwaite stacks the odds
against Wilson to the edge of disbelief.
When Wilson tries to fight the
snowmobilers who invade his isolation, they turn out to be vicious
thugs. When he complains to the
police, he is treated with contempt
and eventually arrested for swearing, a piece of black humor that
fails because Braithwaite wants the
reader to take it seriously.
He can't even get his rocks off in
peace. The woman in his affair is
the wife of the richest and most vindictive man in the area. She suggests they run off together to the
Caribbean; he has reservations and
suddenly they part in anger.
The reader is left bewildered that
older, experienced people could regress to adolescent stupidity with
such blinding speed.
Most remarkable of all is the incongruity Braithwaite imposes on
Wilson's character.
Wilson, photographer of birds
and squirrels, is endowed with
seemingly endless patience. As a
retired schoolteacher he is infinitely
calm and flowing with the milk of
human kindness.
Yet at every pivotal point in the
plot he flies into a rage that never
fails to make things worse. In the
end he flails with a sharp axe at two
of the few people who have tried to
help him and come over to his side.
It is inexplicable. It simply doesn't
fit.
These flaws detract from a very
well conceived and written novel.
The ending, for instance, is a masterful piece of writing.
Max Braithwaite has proven himself to be a good novelist and this
book emphasizes his obvious
talent. If he could refrain from interfering with the excellent characterization and plotting he sets in motion, he would be very good indeed.
meets girl, boy loses girl" structure
evolved. Katz's most notable accomplishment is American Graffiti
and it's obvious that her fascination
with the American teenager still
hasn't been treated.
The movie is based on the
romantic adventures of three
American students spending a year
in Paris. Each student has great expectations for their stay and each is
deluded, until they luck into their
"true loves" and are deluded again.
But in the finale the meant-for are
rematched and the not-meant-for
are redistributed and "happily ever
after" floats across the horizon.
Much of the movie's comedy is
based on.the confrontations between very typical French and
American people. This strong emphasis on stereotypes removes the
credibility and the subsequent
dimension of the humor. The
laughs are often short and cheap.
But just as often they are very well
merited.
The best humor comes from the
idiosyncrasies of the characters.
Joel (Miles Chapin) portrays the all-
American son — never decisive,
never rash, with a nine-to-five,
Monday-to-Friday future ahead of
him. He is charmingly naive and
manages to give even his worst
lines with grace.
FRENCH POSTCARDS...deux innocents en Moulin Rouge
Laura (Blanche Baker) is the loyal
girlfriend determined to see every
one of the 205 famous sights of
France. And Alex (David Marshall
Grant) is the
"searching-for-life's-meaning   "
young man.
Unfortunately, Baker and Grant
share the movie's sappiest lines and
the result is bad acting. But the
well-written scenes are performed
with  good  comic technique,   pro
viding the movie with its best
moments.
Had the writers tried to maintain
the light comedic quality of the
movie, it might have qualified as
two-star entertainment — enjoyable but not epic.
Instead, Katz and Huych chose
to attempt an insight into the
maturing adolescent. The result is
some disgustingly inexcusable
melodrama that causes the
deterioration of the movie.
French Postcards (as the title indicates) is good for a few laughs
but should not be taken seriously.
I want everybody to run out
and see this movie!" w^0%sRpAe^0e
&
Take any kids you can lay
Liz Smith. Cosmopolitan
CANADIAN ODEON Theatres
FOR THEATRE !N FORM ATI ON CALL 687-1515
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4375   W. 10th Best foreign film — 1951.  	
Page Friday 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, November 9, 1979 ii y...„i! ii     '» l P"«Jt.i u.iniiiinn;ij)iij un i .v;.j
Trooper gets flying colors
for fine rock n roll delivery
By BRAD STOCK
In the final episode of Trooper's
continuing success story, Vancouver was treated to one of its best
shows of the year.
Trooper returned to Vancouver
on Saturday in fine form to deliver a
solid set of good rock and roll to
their devoted home-town crowd.
The show typified Trooper's act
and featured most of their top material as well as much of their new
album. Flying Colors.
Trooper is one of those rare acts
on the road who not only capture
the essence of their recorded
material but surpass it with an excitement they communicate to the
audience.
The stage presence of Ra
McGuire and Brian Smith is the
key. Ra McGuire on lead vocals and
Brian Smith on guitar have a stage
presence that is seldom found in
many of the big name touring
bands.
Trooper is not new to the live music scene in Vancouver. They have
gone the whole distance in Vancouver, from high school dances to
night clubs and now finally the coliseum. Trooper proved on Saturday
what many people have known for
quite a while, that they are a top
class band in the middle of the road
music scene.
Many people turn up their noses
at the mention of Trooper. They
consider them too adolescent, and
to be fair most of the show's audi-
look them because they are a local
band and not from the U.S. or Britain. This is an unfortunate oversight as Trooper plays their music
for fun and that's what they convey
to the audience.
Beside McGuire and Smith the
band consists of Doni Underhill on
bass, Tommy Stewart on drums
and their newest addition, Rob
Deans on keyboards, replacing the
recently departed Frank Ludwig.
Deans is certainly an adequate replacement, yet he does not carry
the same impact on stage that Ludwig did.
The show contained many of
their old hits: Baby Woncha Please
come Home, General Hand Grenade, Two for the Show, Santa
Maria, Here For a Good Time, and
Pretty Lady.
Highlighting the show were Boys
in the Bright White Sports Car
which featured a sizzling guitar solo
and Three Dressed up as a Nine
from the new album.
The audience called them back
twice and were rewarded with a
couple of non-Trooper songs:
Summertime Blues and Johnny B.
Good as well as their own Loretta.
The show comes at the end of
their North American tour and was
certainly their largest crowd to
date. The show contained a fair
amount of theatrics with flashpots
and fire at the appropriate spots, an
excellent use of a minimal amount
of lighting and their large Trooper
The show was opened by Private
Eye which was an excellent complement to Trooper. Their set consisted of good, hard-driving rock which
set the show up well.
Private Eye is a typical 4-man
band who play competently and un-
offensively in live performance,
which is not common for groups of
this genre. Their material is well rehearsed and contains some interesting solo work without becoming
self-indulgent, with a fine job done
on their hit Your Place or Mine?
Private Eye is a band with good
potential to become a major act.
It will be interesting to see where
Trooper will go from here. They
have obviously made it in Vancouver and in Canada. Their greatest
hits album HotShots is the largest
selling Canadian album ever.
Perhaps their next conquest will
be the American market. Hopefully
they will return at the conclusion of
their tour to do a few dates in small
local venues as they have previously.
FREDERICK WOOD THEATRE
THE FATHER
By August Strindberg
November 23-December 1
(Previews - Nov. 21 & 22)
8:00 p.m.
Student Tickets $3.00
BOX OFFICE - FREDERIC WOOD
THEATRE - Room 207
Support Your Campus Theatre
ence was under 16. They also over-    logo.
Work part of self
From PF 5
feelings and struggles in my own
life that need to come out. Some
break out while others are quiet and
peaceful," James said. "Later on I
can look at my work and see parts
of myself. And then it becomes
something else when other people
put meanings on it."
The fine arts gallery in the basement of the main library has been
arranged to show the works to their
best advantage. It is diagonally
shared between the work of the
two artists. James' work is set on
several levels with plexiglass tiers. It
is much like a museum display and
highlights the primitive feeling of
the sculpture.
In   contrast   Siegel's   work   is
grouped together in twos and
threes, all at the same level. The
high energy and alertness of
Siegel's work complements the
contained violence of James'.
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Friday, November 9, 1979
THE    UBYSSEY
Page Friday 11 Sontag strikes at
narcissistic heart
By JOHN STOUT
Suffering and narcissism are recurring preoccupations in Susan
Sontag's I, Etcetera, a collection of
eight stories which has just appeared in paperback here.
"People are videotaping their
bedroom feats, tapping their own
telephones," observes the narrator
of Debriefing, a masterly tale of the
chaos and gloom of urban America
in the '70s. The dilemma of the narrator living in this barely tolerable
environment is shared by most
thinking, caring people of today.
Can one be fully, constantly aware
of grave social conditions and endless individual suffering and, in
spite of one's knowledge, go on living, encouraging others to live?
Sontag suggests that narcissism
and the aggressive individualism,
implicit in her title I, Etcetera, are
chief causes of the problems at
hand.
One scene from Debriefing represents perfectly the "me-and-no-
body else" mentality that is undermining human understanding.
Young graffiti-writing street gang
members are "sending insolent
messages to Simone Weil . . . She
says that the only thing more hateful than a 'we' is an 'I' — and they
go on blazoning their names on the
subway cars."
Sontag continues to address herself with urgency in her writings to
people alive now, who are attempting to fathom "whaf s happening in
America," in the word. In I, Etcetera, according to the commentary
on the book's dust jacket, she aims
to fictionalize "the ordeals and dilemmas of a modern consciousness
weighted down with too much history, too much information, too little wisdom."
"Some   of   us   will   get   more
Vancouver Classical
Guitar Society
presents
JACOB SALOMONS
Classical Guitar
Works by Bach, Rodrigo,
Sor and others
Saturday, Nov. 10 - 8:30 p.m.
Robson Square Cinema
All tickets $4.00 at door
Geometry
explained*
A mother bakes luscious
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pan. Kid arrives home.
Mother presents pie to kid.
He looks at it and screams,
"But mama, this pie are
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craven," predicts the narrator of
Debriefing, Cassandra-like. "Meanwhile most of us will never know
what's happening."
The tone of Sontag's writing
ranges from satirical, ironic, to
sober, earnest, prophetic. The
troubled woman traveller of Un-
guided Tour thinks: "In the beginning all the world was America."
How far from the beginning are we?
When did we first start to feel the
wound?"
Not all these stories are equally
accomplished. Superb tales precede mildly interesting ones.
Undoubtedly, the appearance of
I, Etcetera marks Sontag's attainment of maturity as a writer. If one
compares an early story like The
Dummy (1963) with later work such
as Unguided Tour, it is obvious that
Sontag's prowess as a writer of fiction has developed considerably
since   The   Benefactor,   her   first
novel. It was fascinating in its ideas
but more conventionally written
than her later fiction.
Her writing is frequently more
personal in I, Etcetera than in her
earlier books. Project for a Trip to
China is autobiographical enough
to be a diary excerpt. Her method in
the best stories is deft, innovative.
She dispenses with the "rules" of
the traditional short story. She invents, juxtaposes real and imagined
scenes, or spoken words and
thoughts from different situations
one after another, creating a sort of
fiction collage of the human condition.
Since her brush with death at the
time of her radical mastectomy over
a year ago, Sontag has become intensely concerned with staying
alive, affirming life and the individual's power to confront it lucidly.
Here is a voice we should all be
listening to.
CAR POOLS?
A Sensible Alternative?
A FORUM TO DISCUSS THE
CAR-POOL ALTERNATIVE FOR
THE UBC CAMPUS:
FRI. NOV. 9 12:30 pm SUB 206
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:
CRAIG BROOKS                          BOB STALEY
224-4457 263-7185
for the ultimate
in fine coffees
and pastries
come to.
inis
DAILY
8- Midnight
WEEKENDS
11 Midnight   2134 WESTERN PARKWAY
-"IN THE VILLAGE"	
espresso bar
OCCUPATIONAL
By Nora D. Randall
A New Canadian Play
Directed by
Moira Mulholland
NOVEMBER
12-17
8:00 p.m.
Tickets: $3.50
Students: $2.50
Tickets: Room 207
Frederic   Wood
Theatre
DOROTHY
SOMERSET STUDIO
CUSO
Tuesday,
November 17
7:30 p.m.
Upper Lounge International
House
Slide Presentation on
Bolivia by
JIM BRECKTA
Recruitment Information
will be available.
HOCKEY
THUNDERBIRD STYLE
UBC vs CALGARY
FRI. & SAT. NOV. 9-10 - 8:00 P.M.
WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
STUDENTS FREE ADMISSION
NOW, A NEW
BURGER THAT'S
MORE BURGER
THAN
RUN
Introducing the new hamburger from the DAIRY QUEEN
BRAZIER store. In a new "six to a pound" size that really
gives you some meat for your money. Instead of a banquet of
bun.
You see, while other burger chains
get as many as ten hamburgers from a
pound of beef, we get only six. And
that gives you "more burger than
bun." A burger that's tender,
deliciously-cooked. Every time. The
new burger from DAIRY QUEEN
BRAZIER.
2601 W. Broadway
Dairy
Queen
brazier
WARM-WOOL
SALE
1. ALL WOOL, U.S. MARINE
SURPLUS TROUSERS. No better
value for hiking, cross country
skiing, or cold knees. Cut off the
bottoms for the cheapest wool
knickers going!
Price per pair $10.00
2. STANFIELDS' WOOL LONG
UNDERWEAR. They don't scratch
but they do shrink, and they do
keep you warm!
Price (large size only) $10.00
3. WOOL KNICKER SOCKS and
HIKING SOCKS, 10% off marked
prices.
Y^$
PACK & BOOTS SHOP
V>**^-3425West Broadway,\fencouver 738-3128
Page Friday 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, November 9, 1979 International  Archives Week
commemorates our Canadian heritage and is held Nov. 1-8. To celebrate this event, visit the Vancouver
archives situated beside the planetarium.
This week's Masterpiece film to
be shown at the Varsity Theatre is
Rashomon, Akira Kurosawa's
classic drama on the relativity of
truth. Showing is Nov. 11 at 2 p.m.
Institutional Theatre Productions Society will be presenting
be playing works by Bach, Walton,
Rodrigo, Sor and others.
Ferron, a noted singer/ songwriter and guitarist, will be playing
at the Soft Rock Cafe on Friday,
Nov. 10. She will also be holding a
workshop on the art of basic songwriting at the Literary Storefront
on Thursday, Nov. 15, 8-10 p.m.
Preregistration is necessary at the
Storefront, #213-131 Water St.
The Johann Strauss Ensemble
will be at the Orpheum Theatre
ARCHIVE WEEK...city burns but documents remain
Loot, a play by Joe Orton at the
Matsqui Institution. Performances
will run on weekends beginning
Nov. 24 to Dec. 16. Tickets must be
purchased several weeks before
any given show because of the security clearance for spectators required by the institution. Tickets
can be purchased at Peregrine
books, 2950 West 4th Ave.
The Vancouver Classical Guitar
Society is presenting Jacob Salomons on guitar in a concert at the
Robson Square cinema, Saturday, Nov. 10 at 8:30 p.m. All tickets
are $4 and are available at the door.
Salomons, a native of Calgary, will
N0RRES
*w MOVING AND TE
Si TRANSFER LTD. J—
iSTORAGE
Big or
Small Jobs
Reasonable
Rates L^—-rtfi^
2060 W. lOth^r3^
Vancouver ^^
734-5535
Eve. and Holidays 732-9898
Also Garages. Basements, Yards
CLEAN-UPS
for a performance on Saturday,
Nov. 10 at 8 p.m. Founded in 1965
the group consists of 12 leading
members of the Vienna Symphony
Orchestra. Dance music, including
polkas, waltzes and minuets, comprise most of the program. Tickets
available from Famous Artists box
office at the Bay.
Vancouver's first annual music
festival is coming on the 16th, 17th
and 18th of November. The show
will present musicians of the New
Orchestra Workshop Music Collective and guest artists. Tickets are
$3 per night or $7 for the series.
BLACK & LEE
TUX SHOP
NOW AT
1110 Seymour St.
6882481
24,24
NOVEMBER
Fri eve/Sat aft/Sat eve
8-2 am/12-5 pm/8-2 am
George & Berny's
VOLKSWAGEN
REPAIRS
COMPLETE SERVICE BY
TRAINED
MECHANICS
FULLY GUARANTEED
AT REASONABLE RATES
731-8644
2125 W. 10th at Arbutus
,**S*>#
5th ANNUAL
9 BANDS each session
2 locations each session
Free SHUTTLE BUS between
$5 per session
$10 All-Event
Advance sales at
36 E. Broadway (873-4131)
34 hours of
TRAD, DIXIELAND. SWING
HILLEL HIGHLIGHTS
November 13th-16th
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13
Social Action Programme on Soviet Jewry
12:30 Hillel House
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 14:
Menu: Vegetarian Mousaka, Greek Salad
12:30 Hillel House
COFFEE HOUSE
8:00 p.m. Hillel House
Xmasp-p
p-parties.
Unfortunately the bozo
who wrote the headline
had a terrible stutter. But
never-the-less, his info was
correct. For a great and
inexpensive Xmas bash head
to P. V. 1? R J. Burger & Sons.
15 classic burgers. And other
great stufffff. 2966 W. 4th Ave.
by Bayswater. Open dailv
from 11:30 a.m. Call 734-8616.
'-^O
imiiimHUiii »	
s
n
RED LEAF ..*
RESTAURANT
Luncheon Smorgasbord
Authentic Chinese Cuisine
228-9114
J- FREE DELIVERY
I from 4:30 p.m.
10% Discount on all
cash pickup orders
2142 Western Parkway
E.L. Vancouver. B.C.
l^r^iat^r^JfaJNr^r^JeJf^rsJ^
SPECIALIZING IN
GREEK CUISINE
& PIZZA
FREE FAST DELIVERY
228-9513
4510 W. 10th Ave.
-'4idr=lgli3»i=Jn]r=lidr=Jr=trJlaJd^rddidFlF=lr
UBG Gampas
Pizza
Steak & Pizza — Lasagna
Spare Ribs — Ravioli
Chicken — Greek Salads
Souvlaki
Fast Free Local Delivery
224-4218 - 224-0529
Hours: Mon.-Thurs. 11:30 a.m.-2:00 p.m.; Fri.
11:30 a.m.-3:00 p.m.; Sat. 4:00 p.m.-3:00 a.m.;
Sun. 4:00 p.m.-1:00 a.m.
2136 Western Parkway
Salad Bar * Caesar Salad
Charbroiled Steaks * Seafood
Licensed Lounge
PIZZA
Free Delivery
Open Daily from 11am.
SUNDAY from 4 p.m.
4450 W. 10th Ave.
V       224-3434 224-6336
{pmklbocC
<£>ONrW<>
KmJLJmw .KI1MN
j&ttlAontic-»««»£ ffwiuiw
Live Belly Dancing on
Friday & Saturday Nights
LUNCH   11:30 -3:00 Mon. -Sat.
DINNER   5:00 - 1:00 Mon. - Sat.
5:00- 11:00 Sunday
417Jw.IOth.An*.
22W2Y
FRASER ARMS
1450 S.W. Marine Dr.'
«••••••••••••••••••
\£unch> -t- cfcnn&U^
2.904 W. <**• AVE.    733-37i3
An eating experience not to be under
estimated as one of the best mexican restaurants north of California.' Thats what
it is all about!
OPEN TUES. SUN.
TAKE OUT ORDERS WELCOME'
LICENSED
THE "SUPER"CURRY
IN TOWN
JeP
$<*£ kl <^;
xuKBy House
1754 WEST 4TH   732-5313
Open 7 Days A Week
Open 5 P.M. Every Day
CHARGEIX MASTtRCHARGE
AMEX DINNERS CLUB
WHITE TOWER PIZZA &
SPAGHETTI HOUSE LTD.
KITS - DUNBAR - PT. GREY
A variety of great dishes includ
ing   Moussaka,    Kalamaria^
Souvlakia, and Greek
salads.
Mon- Thurs 4 pm-2:30 am
Fri & Sat 4 pm-3:30 am
Sunday   4   pm-12   pm
738-9520
or 738-1113      | DOWNTOWN
3611 West Broadway ■ 3_«_ WJ»B
PARKING AT REAR «M-*«l
Ointnfl Lounge- Full Facilities -
Take Out or Home Delivery
Late delivery call '/; hour before closing.
Another  Lindy'S;
SPECIAL
FULL COURSE MEALS
From $3.95
BEEF STROGANOFF
SALMON CASSEROLE
POT ROAST OF BEEF
HALVE OF A ROAST DUCKLING
BREAKFAST SPECIAL
BACON, HAM OR SAUSAGES
AND EGGS
HASH BROWNS, TOAST
COFFEE
$1.95
._ 8:00 AM - 11:00 AM      .
Sfitofc
3211 Vi. BROADWAY
738-2010
RIBS STEAKS SEAFOODS RIBS STEAKS
1 st ANNIVERSARY
IN GASTOWN .. . LEO'S FOR 16 YEARS
NOVEMBER SPECIAL
SALMON WHOLE SOLE
DINNER DINNER
FOR TWO FOR TWO
9.95
OPEN 11:30 AM - 1 PM SEVEN DAYS A WEEK
PLAN YOUR XMAS CELEBRATION NOW
9-95
STEAK
DINNER
FOR TWO
13*
170 WATER ST., GASTOWN      682-1235
Friday, November 9, 1979
THE    UBYSSEY
Page Friday 13 Page 20
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, November 9, 1979
24-Hours
HOW IT WORKS
The 1-HOUR Price is good for the time shown under
each item; or during the hour the "Wild Card" appears.
WILD CARD
Here's your chance to
get any of the 1 HOUR
SPECIALS that ran
before at their 1-HOUR
PRICE. (Hurry, some of
these items may be sold
out).
LAST CHANCE
WILD CARD
If we still have any left in
stock, here's your
chance to get in on any
of our previous 1-HOUR
Specials at A&B's
1-HOUR PRICES.
24-Hours of Value
YAMAHA O
1-HOUR PRICE
FRI. 7 PM TO 8 PM
L-19 SPEAKERS
The L19 is the acoustically identical
of the JBL BROADCAST
MONITOR. Features 40mm high frequency tweeter and a 200mm low
frequency woofer.
1-HOUR PRICE
M95HE
MON. 2 PM TO 3 PM

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