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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Jan 18, 1983

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Array 	
Wedepohl gearing up for program vote
By CRAIG BROOKS
The evidence is in on a new four
year engineering program. Now
Martin Wedepohl must wait until
senate sits Wednesday night to find
out the verdict.
At an informal meeting for
senate members Monday, applied
science dean Wedepohl defended
and answered questions about his
proposed plan.
For   Wedepohl,   the   meeting
represented a last chance to sway
some of the uncommitted votes and
lobby for his proposal, the hottest
senate issue in years. Wedepohl said
he is not trying to coerce votes, but
asks people to vote logically based
on correct information.
The program, if accepted by
senate, will allow students to
enter first-year engineering from
high school, skipping the pre-
engineering year in science.
Wedepohl defends the proposal,
saying it will allow the "particularly
strong" to complete the program in
four years without repeating
material already learned in high
school. The program restricts admission to those with a B average or
better, he said.
Eighty to 100 students per year
would take advantage of the program, Wedepohl claims.
"Enough   planning   has   been
THE UBYSSEY
done, the plan should be put to the
test," he told the 25 senate
members present.
UBC is unique in Canada in having only the five year program,
Wedepohl  said.
UBC originally needed the five
year program since standards
amongst high school were inconsistent, Wedepohl said. "This stage
has passed."
But Wedepohl's proposal is opposed by many students, including
applied science student senator
Peter Hoemberger.
"I don't think the B average is
high enough," he told the meeting.
"They can't manage it."
Hoemberger   says  the   "culture
shock" of many students entering
the advanced program from high
school may lead to problems.
And Wedepohl admits there will
be bugs in the program. The
faculty will make necessary revisions as the program progresses, he
says.
Hoemberger was also concerned
with the loss of elective courses in
upper years, and the shortening of
other courses.
The program is not being introduced as a cost-saving measure,
Wedepohl said.
To run the four and five year
programs concurrently will mean
added cost, not decreased cost, to
See page 2: PROGRAM
Vol. LXV, No. 29 Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, January 18,1983 <^H^>48
BCIT workers end
four day strike
By SHAFFIN SHARIFF
More than 300 British Columbia
Government Employee Union
members returned to work at the
B.C. Institute of Technology Monday after four days of strike action.
BCGEU negotiator Diane Nelson
said Monday the decision to return
to work was made Sunday night as
a last ditch "good faith" measure
to give provincial mediator Richard
Longpre a chance to resolve differences between BCGEU local 59
and BCIT administration officials.
The 360 members of local 59
"returned to work to demonstrate
good faith and (offer) a last chance
for the administration," before
considering binding arbitration or
further strike action, Nelson said.
Mediator Longpre met with
union and administration officials
Monday to discuss outstanding con-
tententious points between the two
sides. The deadlock in negotiations
prior to Jan. 13 arose out of the administration's refusal to budge on
minimum wage increase proposals.
The administration has offered a
zero per cent salary increase and a
—ailaon hoana photo
ANTICIPATING BEGINNING of raindrenched fashions, unidentified student joins new cult of water worshippers to greet forthcoming wave of lateral rainshowers, otherwise knows as annual Alma Mater Society executive
elections. "Surely, this will protect me," she said, ignoring gloomy portents on horizon.
Pornography fighters 'not censors'
HALIFAX (CUP) — Andrew
Ager claims he is not a censor. Nor
is he a Victorian prude. He is a
university student who opposes the
degradation of women through pornography and is trying to have Penthouse, Playboy and Playgirl
removed from the Dalhousie
University bookstore.
The idea is not a new one. Simon
Fraser University student Laura
White is fighting to remove pornography from her campus
bookstore. Two years ago University of Ottawa students succeeded in
a similar campaign.
Ager met twice with bookstore
manager Irving King, but both
times King refused to remove the
magazines. Kirg later said
"academic institutions should stand
for something — the anti-
suppression   of   ideas   and   anti-
censorship." He said his personal
opinions do not matter much
because the bookstore's policies are
generated by an administration
committee.
"I am not denying them (readers
of these magazines) their right to
read what they want," said Ager.
"Those people who want to read it,
how am I going to stop it? It is my
right as a free citizen of Canada to
fight with conviction against
something which I find degrading
against a majority, just as it is their
right to fight against me. Pornography aims at suppressing the
free speech of women.
"It is extremely important to differentiate between pornography
and erotic art," said Ager. "Art is
an expression of the beauty of the
human body. It is a positive expression. Pornography is an expression
usually from only the male viewpoint. It is a degrading stereotype
of women, sexually and emotionally. Censorship is arbitrarily applied
by authoritarian powers. This
(removing the magazines) is not
censorship if it is accomplished
because it is a show of public concern."
These magazines thrive by combining pornography with some
good literature and this makes them
more dangerous, said Ager. They
are accepted and deeply ingrained
alongside theother common products of society, like cars or furniture, he added.
Ager plans to continue fighting to
have the magazines removed from
the bookstore with the support of
the Dalhousie Lutheran chaplain
and "quite a number of people."
three per cent increase in benefits
for some employees. BCIT president Gordom Thorn has repeatedly
contended that giving in to BCGEU
demands would mean layoffs.
BCGEU had initially demanded a
14 per cent wage increase, but union
representative David Vipond said
recently an increase similar to the
province's restraint program of six
and five would not be rejected.
Vipond said he would not say
what per cent would be acceptable
because any offer other than the administration's current stand would
be considered, pending membership
approval.
Talks between the two sides came
to a halt Jan. 13 when union
members decided to escalate their
protest against the administration
stand into a full scale strike action.
The strike action followed an administration move to lockout
members from the central broiler
room, Vipond said.
Most students and faculty crossed picket lines, and classes were not
interrupted.
UBC health grants
not given new life
By ARNOLD HEDSTROM
The health ministry turned off
the life-support system which kept
hope alive for students awaiting
health bursaries this academic year.
In a recent letter to the Alma
Mater Society student council,
health minister Jim Nielsen says his
ministry will not direct funds to
meet this year's increased demand
for funding.
The UBC awards office hasn't
received official word from the
ministry, but awards officer Dan
Worsley said Monday he'd seen
copies of letters which stated no
funds would be added to the program.
In the letter, Nielsen suggests
students affected by cuts in health
care money benefitted by $8.7
million added to student aid by the
government in October.
But Worsley said the $8.7 million
only meets a student's usual needs.
The health care bursaries gave
money above the $2,000 offered
through the B.C. Student
Assistance Program.
Health students at UBC and
across the province expected the
ministry to provide funding.
Some study for 11 months and
have limited ability to earn money.
In September, the government
distributed grant money but only to
early applicants.
Nielsen defended the program by
stating the funding level in the past
was adequate and his ministry had
used all funds allocated in the
1982-83 ministry budget.
Nielsen's letter states, "Your letter points out your (UBC's)
estimated shortfall is 'only
$250,000.' While this amount may
seem insignificant to you, in fact it
would represent a 100 per cent increase in funding which could be
obtained only through diversion
from some other ministry of health
program."
Worsley said students who are
qualified and didn't receive money
because of the cut off will have their
applications reviewed by the awards
office to see if they are eligible for
university bursaries.
The future of the health bursary
program is in question.
"We don't know if the government plans to continue, increase or
discontinue the program," Worsley
said. "They'll (the government) be
looking at that over the next few
months.
"They obviously don't want a
repeat of this year's hard feelings.
But your guess is as good as mine as
to what they'll do."
Nielsen's letter also shifts responsibility for poor administration of
the program to Bill Vander Zalm's
education ministry. Students didn't
receive notice or explanation of why
the government hadn't made
payments. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 18,1983
Program questioned
From page 1
the faculty. The entire four year
program is totally dependent on
next year's funding, Wedepohl
said.
Geological engineering society
president Randy Green said the
Geological engineering four year
program had received substantial
input from students. "It's the best
we can make it."
Although Green says the program is academically qualified, it
does not enable students to participate adequately in university
"student life."
As long as the five year program
continues to exist, Green supports
the four year program.
When asked what he would do if
senate voted against him Wednesday, Wedepohl would only say, "If
I get tyrned down, I get turned
down. In the long run we'll have a
four year program."
Wedepohl is not concerned about
the senate curriculum committee's
recommended rejected of the proposal. The committee voted Dec.
29, seven to five against, but was
taken when eight members were ab
sent, he said.
Senate ignoring a curriculum
committee recommendation is not
unheard of, and is not a vote of
non-confidence against the committee he said.
Since only seven of 20 members
voted against it, it was a minority
decision, Wedepohl said.
Arts senator Paul Tennant, a curriculum committee member who
voted against the proposal, said the
meeting answered many of his questions, but he hadn't decided how to
vote Wednesday.
the woret tiling aanwana can teN you altar 4ltay*va toM yaw to writ* agnr hex la that
theyVe made yaw *a euBject of tha meathaad. WfltMa gray bouaa e» not «>e beet place for
rovenga they ara pramlnairaty ptaead en 1*i« paaaa of tha papar. And people ate raad gray
bonaa- don't they. Okay, ttlan'taa large aa a maathaad. But. . ■ I eWtavan know what-a
baenaaM about ma but I knew h*a bad. It mud babaeauea tm paranoM. So If anything bad la
written about ma In tha maathaad all I hava to aay la, "I don't can what you aay. Fuck yo»."
ZkrteWBSUDSnSttS^itk^^
Study less —
and leam more!
trammrearorottttcq
!»*-*■ v♦**.»:♦*♦ *:•-• * ♦-*
rorororororararosscgg
Oops!
LEARN HOW TO REDUCE YOUR STUDY TIME AND
BUILD A LIFETIME SKILL THAT WILL HELP YOU BECOME
MORE COMPETITIVE IN THE BUSINESS WORLD.
With 37 candidates for senate
and board of governors it was
bound to happen.
The Ubyssey wishes to apologize
to Penny Jones and Frank Frigon,
who are both running for graduate
studies senator.
You see, we accidently swapped
their statements in Friday's election
coverage.
Notices of the switch are posted
at all polling stations.
WE'LL SHOW YOU HOW TO:
READ UP TO 15 TIMES FASTER
3000 WORDS PER MINUTE.
AS MUCH AS
The UBC Dance Club
presents a
NEW
BEGINNER'S
CLASS
Come find us in SUB Room 220
• IMPROVE YOUR UNDERSTANDING AND RECALL,
EVEN AT THESE FANTASTIC SPEEDS.
• BREEZE THROUGH YOUR STUDYING. END ALL NIGHT
CRAMMING SESSIONS AND HAVE MORE FREE HOURS.
SEE HOW YOU CAN INCREASE YOUR READING SPEED EASILY!
VISIT OUR FREE ONE HOUR LESSON DEMONSTRATION AND REGISTRATION.
TUESDAY, JAN. 18
WEDNESDAY, JAN. 19
THURSDAY, JAN. 20
5:30 p.m. and 8:00 p.m.
CHRIS WALDEN, THE COURSE LEADER, HAS INSTRUCTED
HUNDREDS IN EVELYN WOOD READING DYNAMICS.
COURSE IS GOVERNMENT-APPROVED
AND COURSE FEES ARE TAX DEDUCTIBLE
FOR MORE INFORMATION, CALL THE READING ACADEMY
986-0216 / 277-0788 / 929-5634
MOTHER'S
proudly presents
The Great Pizza Pig Out
on Wednesday, Jan. 19,
Wed., Jan. 26 and Wed., Feb. 2
You can feast on all the
Pepperoni and Mushroom
or Ham and Pineapple Pizza You Can Eat
the price, only
$3.50
per person
5 p.m. till 10 p.m.    Dining Room Only
8440 Bridgeport Rd.,
Richmond, B.C.
270-8434
303 Marine Drive,
North Vancouver, B.C.
980-5754
Fully Licenced Chilled Refreshments $1.00 Tuesday, January 18,1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Libraries burnt and labs ruined
By SARAH COX
June 1980. The El Salvador army
storms the campus of the University
of El Salvador. The university
president is assassinated. Fifty
students and professors are
murdered. People are jailed, disappearances escalate.
1982. The university after two
years of occupation is re-opened.
"When the military occupied the
university in 1980 they destroyed
everything," an El Salvadorean
lawyer told 50 people Monday in La
Quenacafe, 111.1 Commercial Dr.
"Our libraries were burnt. Our
labs and computers were ruined.
They also destroyed solidarity
among students," said Felix Ulloa.
Despite the occupation the
university kept functioning, Ulloa
said. "The university authorities
decided to keep working outside
Video rape
outrages
MONTREAL (CUP) — A
cowboy flashes on the screen,
pushing his way through a field of
Indians shooting arrows at a native
woman bound to a pole. He dismounts, plunges a sword into her
and watches her legs wriggle. The
player scores a point.
The game is called Custer's
Revenge. The manufacturer,
American Multiple Industries, has
plans for two dozen more "adult"
video games by 1984.
Groups opposed to AMI'S games
say AMI president Stuart Kesten
has described Custer's Revenge as
an amusing game in which a woman
willingly submits to a sexual act.
Atari, America's leading video
game manufacturer, is suing AMI
for producing Custer's Revenge,
which can only be played on the
Atari VCS 2600 system. Atari has
received thousands of complaints
about Custer's Revenge and is worried its image as a producer of
family-oriented video games will be
tarnished.
American activists had already
campaigned against Custer's
Revenge when Canadian customs
approved it Oct. 18 for importation. By the end of October, 20
groups had mobilized to pressure
customs into banning importation
of the game.
These groups wrote letters and
telegrams to status of women
minister Judy Erola and revenue
minister Pierre Bussieres. Some
groups also verbally harassed video
game managers who planned to sell
the game. They also planned a one-
minute "speak-out" on CBC radio.
That proved unnecessary.
Customs reversed its decision Dec.
1.
But the battle may not be over.
AMI president Kesten has already
sued Suffolk county in New York
state for banning the game, and
might appeal the Canadian customs
ruling.
campus by renting office space.
There has been repression against
individual students, not institutions."
The government was forced to
reopen the campus because political
events in the country gave them no
alternative, said Ulloa.
"Previously the military and
FDR/FMLN (Democratic Revolutionary Front, a group of El
Salvadoran   freedom   fighters)
thought they could defeat
each other by military force."
Although some military actions
undertaken by the FDR/FMLN
were successful, increased aid from
the United States gave the army the
strength it needed to maintain control, said Ulloa.
"One of the strongest defeats for
the army was the destruction of 60
per cent of its air force. Then came
the destruction of weapons and per
sonnel and the demoralization of
the military by an increasing
number of defeats," he said.
But the FDR/FMLN's expectation of victory did not materialize
because of immediate U.S. aid to
the repressive junta, he added.
"After the airforce was
destroyed, new aircraft were
brought in by the imperialist
powers.  New shipments of arms
iiirtttt
-aliaon hoena photo
DEMOCRATIC PROCESS at work. Students vote against democracy — heaven's knows why, when anarchy
is so much more radical, reasonable, and adventurous. Boring students opt for more conservative political bent
afraid to face realities of the future and therefore doomed to wallow in mediocre political purgatory forever.
Voting for board and senate continues today until 3:30 p.m. Results Friday.
Money makes the difference
WATERLOO (CUP) — Carling
O'Keefe player of the game;
Labatt's player of the game. What's
the difference?
For the football programs at Ontario universities, the difference is
several thousand dollars in sponsorship money. Labatt's brewery is
paying more than $8,000 for the
right to promote the Golden Hawk
football team at Wilfred Laurier,
one of Ontario's smaller universities.
Carling O'Keefe, the Golden
Hawk's sponsor for ten years, admitted they could not even come
close to matching the Labatt's offer.
Dave Ryan, O'Keefe's regional
sales director, said the football
coach "made a sound business decision. No one could turn down that
much money."
Labatt's offered the eight
members of the Ontario University
Athletic   Association       football
league up to $70,000 to sponsor
OUAA football. The University of
Western Ontario refused, but last
August the other seven teams
agreed to split up the money.
Labatt's believed they could
boost attendance at football games
by aiming promotion at the off-
campus market.
Luke Koval, Labatt's promotion
co-ordinator for Ontario calls this
year's program a "total success. I
do not have the exact figures but
you will find that attendance
throughout the province was up 25
to 30 per cent."
But OUAA football coaches
surveyed said their attendance had
either declined, remained the same
or increased less than the 25 per
cent quoted by Koval.
Labatt's sponsors players of the
week and prints posters, schedules
and media kits. They have even
brought in skydivers for the half-
time shows.
Other sports programs have not
been so lucky. O'Keefe reassessed
its sponsorship of several other
sports programs after it lost the
football contract to Labatt's. It
decided to withdraw its sponsorship
for many of these programs.
Labatt's has shown no interest in
picking up non-football sponsorships.
and personnel were brought in by
the U.S."
This caused the FDR/FMLN to
change its emphasis from a military
to a political campaign in October
1980, said Ulloa.
"Mass movements were reactivated. "With their growth the
church started pushing for
dialogue, the university became active, and 12 factories went on strike
or on strike notice. At the end of
last year we could see great advances."
"These institutions are going to
play a major role in determining the
outcome of the conflict," said
Ulloa.
Canadian university students can
also help overthrow the oppressive
junta by donating books,
typewriters and money to the
University of El Salvador, he said.
Anarchy
unpopular
Ten UBC students have put to
rest the rumor that anarchy is
becoming a trend by submitting
nominations for Alma Mater Society executive positions.
But campus democracy is
weakening. Last year 12 hopeful
politicians vied for the five executive positions. This year two
people are running for each position. They are: for president,
Douglas Low, physical education 3
and Mitchell Hetman, commerce 4;
for vice-president, Renee Comesot-
ti, arts 2 and Rick Oliver, science;
for director of administration, Greg
Pelling, physical education 4 and
Alan Pinkney, arts 4; for director
of finance, James Hollis, science 4,
and Peter Mitchell, commerce 2,
and; for coordinator for external
affairs, Bruce Armstrong, science 4
and Lisa Hebert, arts 3.
Hollis is the only incumbent,
although Armstrong was AMS
president in 1979-80.
Nominations closed Friday.
Voting will take place Wednesday
to Friday next week, with an advance evening poll on Tuesday.
Stories that certain candidates
had recently been caught reading
John Locke and Thomas Hobbes
could not be substantiated at press
time.
Discrimination alienates
students at Concordia
r
Tax credit slashing hurts students
Many UBC students will loose up to $150 in 1982
income tax credits as a result of a provincial government decision last term.
Finance minister Hugh Curtis announced Nov. 10
that the provincial renters tax credit will be
"suspended" until further notice.
Residence fees and off-campus accomodation rentals qualified students for up to $150 in refunds.
"I very much regret that the government has had
to take this decision, but current financial difficulties
facing the province require it," Curtis said.
"However, I am still hopeful that the recovery of the
provincial economy will allow credits such as these to
be re-established at some time in the future."
Curtis also announced suspension of the provincial
personal income tax credit. This only affects people
with taxable incomes.
The rental credits, which could have been claimed
by any person, even if they had no income tax to pay,
varied up to $150, depending on the person's net income.
Curtis said the suspension of the credits will allow
the government to place more emphasis on the
Guaranteed Available Income for Need and Shelter
Aid for Elderly Renters programs. Students are ineligible for both programs.
Housing director Mary Flores said Monday the
grant cancellation was a "shame."
Flores said the university will still print the
residence fee receipts, previously required to apply
for the grant. The forms might still be of some use to
students she said.
MONTREAL (CUP) — Cold
weather is not the only thing international students face when they
study at Concordia University.
A recent Concordia study concluded the university's foreign
students face discrimination,
language barriers, bureaucratic
hassles and higher tuition fees. This
contributes to the feeling that
nobody cares, said one foreign student.
Foreign students interviewed for
the study said discriminatory attitudes exist among the people they
study and work with. "Professors
mark lower because they have
doubts that work done is our own,"
claimed one student.
Another student said staff
deliberately misinform international students because of their
foreign origins such as giving bogus
directions to information,centres.
Students cited other examples of
discrimination: they are accused of
lying, cheating and being too
demanding, while Canadians are
referred to as normal.
Differential fees, which tripled
two years ago in Quebec, were also
seen as discriminatory. "I think
foreign students pay more because
they're not citizens here. But to pay
three or four more times more than
Canadian students, that's too
much," said one international student .
The effect of large differential
fees "is like telling us not to come
here," said another student. The
current differential fees at Concordia and McGill are among Canada's
highest.
Many students interviewed said
understanding spoken English is a
major problem. "I don't always
understand professors (when they
speak), especially when they get into something abstract or slang,"
said one foreign student.
"Sometimes they are joking and all
the rest of the class is laughing and 1
just sit and look at them. I feel
alienated."
The report blames the students'
poor skills on the emphasis on
grammar in English courses taught
abroad.
Before admittance to Concordia
students must pass written English
competency exams. Page 4
THE   UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 18,1983
Silence
STUDENT POLITICIANS DIVE INTO CAMPAIGN
aLlQ   U  %0 Si    S
Odious whiffs in Fisheries
The recent so-called "salmon
poaching" charges laid by federal
fisheries officials against 130 people
(of which 129 were Native Indians)
is nothing more than a carefully
calculated political ploy to discredit
the Native Indian people and their
aboriginal right to fish.
The manner in which these
charges were made clearly indicates
that this was not so much a simple
exercise in law enforcement as
much as it was a publicity stunt by
the federal fisheries department to
effectively convict the entire Native
community of "salmon poaching."
In view of the upcoming federal-
provincial meeting with Native
leaders aimed at defining
"Aboriginal Rights" (as recently
recognized in Canada's new constitution) and in view of the recent
Pearce commission report recommending a political solution to the
Indian fishing issue, the federal
fisheries department has once more
Candidates statements
mixed in election coverage
I would like to draw your attention to some serious election irregularities in the election of the
graduate student senator. First, my
opponent Frank Frigon had a letter
published in The Ubyssey on Friday
Jan. 7 explaining his position. I
delivered a corresponding letter on
Monday Jan. 10 before the
newspaper deadline and received
verbal assurance that it would be
published in the issue of Tuesday
Jan. 11. The letter did not appear.
The Ubyssey then solicited a
statement in lieu of this letter for
publication in the Friday Jan. 14
issue. My statement was published
under my opponent's name and he
made a statement published under
mine. This is clearly a blatant
misrepresentation of the views of
both parties and a surprising accident, as I had submitted a typed
version of my statement with my
name appearing on the same sheet.
It was incorrect for The Ubyssey
to publish another statement from
Frigon as he had already received
his permitted 200 word exposure
(AMS code of procedures, section
four, article six).
As The Ubyssey name switch has
undermined the campaign of both
candidates and undoubtedly confused the electorate, I request that
either grad student elections be
postponed or that a statement correcting the Ubyssey error be given
to each graduate student with their
ballot paper.
Penny Jones
candidate
Reorganeering
I realize that the issue of the proposed four year engineering pro-
grain is complex and could easily lead to misunderstandings. That is
why I typed out seven points which could be seen as objections concerning the, new proposal for The Ubyssey.
The verbal quote that I gave reporter Chris Wong should have
been punctuated as follows: "The Canadian engineering accreditation board includes in their definition of 'humanities* — social
science and administration courses." I did not say that applied
science only includes humanities in their definition. On the contrary,
their definition is the same as the accreditation board's.
The resultant problem is that many engineering students take administration or economics courses to fill their humanities requirement. Often, because of time table scheduling, many engineering
students find themselves in the same section.
One of the aspects that the 87 senators will consider Wednesday is
whether the proposed 10,5 units (three and a half courses) outside of
a four year engineering degree will limit the scope of the program.
Lisa Hebert
^
student senate caucus y
shown how out of step it is with the
current position held by their own
government on Indian aboriginal
rights.
It is of little justification to say
that the federal fisheries officials
were simply enforcing existing laws
since such enforcement could have
been accomplished without publicly
discrediting the entire Indian community.
By ignoring the buyers and
distributors and selectively charging
only Indian fishermen, the fisheries
department has sought to publicly
condemn the Native Indian people
and thus reduce Indian fishing
rights to nothing more than
"salmon poaching." Such a tactic
is deplorable and should itself be
publicly condemned.
Steven Point
Carmen Place
Bernard Charles
native law students assoc. UBC
Party politics
priority
Re: Senate Seats Hotly Contested, Jan. 11.
One must consider party affiliation when considering for whom to
vote. Surely Mike Rosborough
would agree that belonging to a
political party, be it Tory or NDP,
states something about how they
view student issues. If a government
was going to establish some social
program they would not hire a person who was opposed to the program to administer it.
We are in a time when politics,
not reason, is guiding the decisions
of government.
In B.C., the Universities Council
of B.C. lost $12 million from its
operating budget but the Whistler
mountain ski resort has been bailed
out to the tune of $27 million.
The priorities of candidates must
be considered when deciding for
whom to vote. The politics of the
person indicates the priorities of the
person, and thus one should consider the political affiliation of each
candidate.
Dominique Roelants van
Baronaigien
grad studies
University of Victoria
In a world full of abused freedoms, some are worth censoring.
One of them is pornography.
The argument has been made in this space before: pornography
degrades women, men and children: but it principally exploits
women. It turns human beings into objects—centrefolds to be admired, gawked at, masturbated with, and then disposed of.
Readers of Playboy, Penthouse and Playgirl and other such
publications do not seem to realize the effect pornography has on
society. Those who do not purchase these magazines do at least
one service; they refuse to support and perpetuate the multi-billion
dollar pornographic industry and existing sexual stereo-types.
But they do a greater disservice: —they support it by ignoring it.
UBC students who don't consider themselves supporters of pornography should ask themselves how many times they have objected to the sale of pornographic magazines at the UBC
bookstore.
The issue can no longer be ignored as insignificant or one to be
deliberated sometime in the future. Some campuses across
Canada have already said No to pornography.
It is time for UBC to do so as well. Bookstore manager John
Hedgecock's arguments that removing pornography constitutes
censorship is superficial and faulty.
Hedgecock engages in censorship at his bookstore everyday. He
and his staff decide which magazines, newspapers and books will
grace precious attention.
And Hedgecock and the bookstore staff have seen fit to give
pornography prime space at the bookstore's entrance. No UBC
student who enters the store can miss it.
A new bookstore is now being built—seven bookstores in one, in
fact. Can we assume that Hedgecock will deem it necessary to give
more space for pornography ?
Pornography does not belong on this campus. In the new
bookstore or in the existing one. Or for that matter, in society.
Some assumed freedoms are worth eradicating.
Ubyssey eats it
In an inane editorial entitled Predictions (Jan.7), we made a
reference to Team Uganda winning against the Soviet hockey
team, and added: "Win attributed to human diet."
We apologize for the racist remark.
By now, students should realize that cannibalistic tendencies exist only among Ubyssey staff members.
Play to grow program
for special children
If you love or care for a special
child who is handicapped physically, mentally or emotionally or if you
have just been wondering about exceptional children, there is a great
adventure awaiting you. The student council for exceptional
children at UBC has been honored
with a grant from the Joseph P.
Kennedy, Jr. foundation to begin a
let's play to grow program at UBC.
Let's play to grow clubs are small
groups of special families that get
together periodically to play, learn
and grow. Families are also taught
how to adapt play activities for
their handicapped family member
and are given ideas on activities to
do at home. Through these clubs,
parents, relatives and friends get the
extra support, skills and training
they need to meet the special
challenges of a handicapped family
member.
Let's play to grow provides an
opportunity for family involvement
and interaction which includes the
handicapped family member. It
provides community support for
handicapped children and their
families.
It provides an opportunity for
handicapped children to learn to
develop through play and recreation. It also provides the opportunity for all students to get actively involved with exceptional children.
All interested persons are
welcome to attend the let's play to
grow introductory meeting on
Wednesday Jan. 19 at 12:30 in
Scarfe 1226. See you there!
Jane Sikorski
vice-president
student council
for exceptional children
THE UBYSSEY
January 18, 1983
The Ubyssey is published every Tuesday and Friday
through the university year by the Alma Mater Society
of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those of
the staff and are not necessarily those of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian University
Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is in SUB 241k,
Editorial phone 228-2301/06. Advertising 228-3977/78.
"Who's running for Grant Pubah?" asked Sarah Cox and Craig Brooks, who agreed with
Muriel Draaisma that ic ouldn't possibly be Brian Jones. The denizens were now at a loss.
They had gone through the whole list of possible candidates, which included Harry Hert-
scheg, Cary Roddin, and Doug Boyd, and ended up scratching their heads. "Now who can
count two and two and come up with an appropriately correct answer." Not Shaffin Shariff,
they thought in unison, he only thinks in 75 inches. Not Doug Schmidt, either, they considered, rainbow patches don't count here. "Who does that leave?" their bipedal brains surmized. Why Lisa Morry, of course. She's new and energetic — just what the kingdom needs.
But what about Monte Stewart, chimed Jean Mustard. "We need more Dumb Bowl
coverage." Why, if that's the criterion, why not have Neil Lucente in the running? Just then
the dippy godmother, Emilie Smith came in. "You silly fools, you. You've forgotten the most
obvious choice. The one who has been grooming and groomed just to lead the pack." The
denizens were still puzzled. Th&£ajggry air had already blinded them.
y&pitf -■■;-S -■ Tuesday, January 18,1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Characters search for director
By MURIEL DRAAISMA
Ten minutes into the play, and the actors are performing a song and dance set which has no relation to the
following scenes. They are lively and energetic, but
director John Brockington's little improvisation added
to the beginning of Six Characters in Search of an
Author is definitely out of place.
Six Characters in Search of an Author
By Luigi Pirandello
Translated by Paula Avila Mayer
Directed by John Brockington
At the Freddy Wood Theatre
Until Jan. 22
Brockington probably intended the opening Side-
by-Side routine to be a light, entertaining transition into the emotionally charged scenes that form the bulk
of Pirandello's modern classic. It doesn't work. The
scene detracts from the main plot and confuses the audience.
One of the improvisation's most disturbing elements
is the actresses' costumes. Heavily made up, the
women wear disco-like warmups: gaudily colored
leotards topped by loosely fitting sweatshirts or shirts
buckled at the waist. Disco queens are a strange addition to a play which finds its base in early twentieth
century Italian culture.
And is it really necessary to make the women display
as much leg as possible?
The production, because it is so poorly acted, is
somewhat confusing. A director and his company of
actors are rehearsing a production and are interrupted
by a blackout. When the lights come back on, a dour-
looking family of six dressed in sombre black mourning clothes appears on the scene. They tell the actors
they are searching for an author to finish the drama
about their tragic lives.
After a little persuasion, the director agrees to the
job, and the six characters proceed to tell their story.
The director and the original cast become the audience, while the six characters become the actors.
The father introduces the narrative. Unhappy with
his wife, he eventually lets her go to another man. But
he soon feels the loss of her sexual presence and is forced to seek "casual affairs" to satisfy his lust.
The wife starts a new family with her lover. He dies
unexpectantly and leaves her in dire financial straits.
She and her eldest daughter seek work sewing for
Madame Pace, a Spanish woman who also runs a
brothel. Madame Pace recruits the daughter for her
house of prostitution. One of her first customers
ironically turns out to be her stepfather. This fatal sexual encounter provides the focus for their tragic
drama.
Played by Equity actor Leon Pownall, the father
tells the story while the stepdaughter, Lisa Klingspon,
interjects with comments, modifications and infectious
laughter. The two begin the tragic tale, and slowly each
family member is drawn in.
After each scene in the family's life is recounted, the
"real" actors take to the stage and attempt an artistic
interpretation. The family is not pleased with the result
and insist that only they can be the principal players in
the unfolding drama.
Six Characters in Search of an Author obviously
demands emotional depth and intensity from its actors. It requires a theatrical maturity and an ability to
convey strong feelings without shrillness.
The actors in Brockington's production do not appear to have this maturity. Most of the cast overact
and lapse into hysterical shouting and screaming
whenever the script calls for emotional exchange.
Lines are not delivered with precision and are rattled
off without any depth or thought. And for a few, it is
painfully obvious they are not comfortable with and
have not totally memorized their parts.
Pownall is a prime example.
In scene after scene, he shouts at either Klingspon or
the mother, Claire Brown, but employs exaggerated
movements and a high-pitched, grating tone of voice
distressing in amateurs, but shocking in a professional.
On Friday night, he even stumbled over his lines. As
student actors. Brent Alston, the director, and Klingspon are much more impressive.
There is one memorable scene in the production.
After the father and stepdaughter relive their sexual
experience in Madame Pace's room, the leading lady,
Shauna Baird, and the leading man, Luc Corbeil, attempt to stage the scene. Their fumbling interpretation
provides much needed comic relief. The cast briefly
appears to be enjoying themselves.
The scene also conveys the conflict between reality,
as lived by the characters, and illusion, as created by
the actors, central to Pirandello's play. And for only
one moment does the audience see the dichotomy between the playwright's original conception and the
director's finished product.
It is too bad Brockington's cast cannot make better
use of Pirandello's magic. Whether it is inexperience,
incompetent direction or sheer nervousness, the cast of
Six Characters are only able to present a rather
tedious, high school production in search of a director.
ELECTION
STUDENT REPRESENTATIVES TO
SERVE ON GOVERNING BODIES
Evening Polls, Monday, January 17, 1983,
as follows: —
5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Totem Park Common Block
Place Vanier Common Block
Walter H. Gage Common Block
Daytime Polls, Monday and Tuesday,
January 17 and 18, 1983 as follows: —
10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
S.U.B. Sedgewick Library
Buchanan MacMillan
C.E.M.E. Law
Computer Science Angus
Scarfe V.G.H. (Heather
Woodward Library Pavilion)
(Subject to student being available to run these polling
stations.)
BRING YOUR A.M.S. CARD
BOARD OF GOVERNORS
Candidates from which TWO are to be elected:
Margaret COPPING (Third Year Arts)
Dave FRANK (Fourth Year Science)
G  T. McNABB (First Year Law)
SENATORS AT-LARGE
Candidates from which FIVE are to be elected:
Sylvia BERRYMAN (Third Year Arts)
Francisco Xavier CABANAS (Ph.D Candidate
— Physics)
Sherri DICKINSON (Third Year Medicine)
Ted DIXON (Third Year Commerce)
Lucy GAUDETTE (Third Year Science)
Ken GORDON (First Year Science)
Jeff KUWICA (Third Year Engineering)
G  T. McNABB (First Year Law)
Craig NICHOLLS (First Year Forestry)
Andrew PEARSON (First Year Commerce)
Joanne QUERIE (Third Year Commerce)
Ann RAHME (Third Year Arts)
Bob SUMMERBELL (Fourth Year Arts)
Mark THOMPSON (First Year Law)
SENA TE REPRESENTA TIVES
FROM INDIVIDUAL FACULTIES
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES
(One to be elected)
Nancy CAMPBELL (Second Year)
Peter NISHIHAMA (Third Year)
(Voting will take place in the MacMillan Building
only.)
APPLIED SCIENCE
(One to be elected)
Ignacy LIPIEC (Second Year Engineering)
Sean WILLIAMS (Second Year Engineering)
Nils ZIMMERMANN (Third Year Engineering)
(Voting will take place in C.E.M.E. and COMPUTER
SCIENCE buildings only.)
FORESTRY
(One to be elected)
Wayne DAVIDSON (Second Year)
Bruce GILMOUR (Second Year)
Jeff SCHREITER (Second Year)
(Voting will take place in the MacMillan Building
only.)
GRADUATE STUDIES
(One to be elected)
Frank J. FRIGON (Ed.D. Candidate)
Penny JONES (Ph.D Candidate — Geography)
(Voting will take place at all polling stations.)
LAW
(One to be elected)
Jim HANSON (Second Year)
Peter KENDALL (First Year)
(Voting will take place in the Law Building only.)
SCIENCE
(One to be elected)
Robert HANDFIELD (Second Year)
Brad WAUGH (Third Year)
(Voting will take place in the Computer Science and
Sedgewick Buildings only.)
NO PROXY VOTING WILL BE ALLOWED AND
STUDENTS REQUIRE THEIR A.M.S. CARD TO VOTE
(It should be noted that any allegation of irregularities in connection with these elections
must be submitted in writing to the Registrar within 48 hours of the close of polling and
must include the signatures of at least three students eligible to vote.)
'*   ^ Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 18,1983
TODAY
BAHA'I CLUB
General meeting, everybody welcome to open
diacussion on the Baha'i faith, noon-2:30 p.m.,
SUB 207. IPIaaae use only one Tween Class form
for each event, thank you).
FAMILY HOUSING FILM SERIES
Walt Disney's Condorman, 6:30 p.m., SUB
auditorium, $1.50 Eight film series, $5.
WORLD UNIVERSITIES
SERVICE OF CANADA
General meeting, noon. International House
lounge.
UKRAINIAN STUDENTS CLUB
General meeting, noon, Buch. B223.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Tap workshop Jan. 22-23. Accepting pre-
registration and giving info, noon-1:30 p.m.,
SUB 216E.
Register for winter ballet, jazz, stretch and
dancercise classes, noon-1:30 p.m., SUB 216E.
NEWMAN CLUB
Soup lunch at St. Mark's. Come at 12:30 and get
your face on TV, noon, St. Mark's lunch room.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Film, all Spanish Sports Film: A Ganarl, noon,
Buch. B216.
SPEAKEASY
Please come in and register if you are a tutor or if
you need a tutor, 9:30 a.m.-9:30 p.m..
Speakeasy desk, SUB 100A.
INTERNATIONAL HOU8E
Film preeentation on Quebec: Monaatary, Villa
Marie - Christianity to Wildernaaa; Le Devoir
pan 2 — Tha Quiet Revolution; La Quebec aa
eeen by Cartier Breaaon, 8 p.m.. Gate 4 International houae.
GRAD STUDENT SOCIETY
Panel debate: Ethics and Science - Social
responsibility of Scientists? 7:30 p.m., Grad centre garden room.
OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS
General meeting, 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.,
Lutheran Campua centra conference room.
ENVIRONMENTAL INTEREST GROUP
Recycling meeting, noon, SUB 206.
PRE-MED SOCIETY
Dr. William Cave, from the department of
Pathology at tha Royal Columbian Hospital,
speaks on foranaic medicine, noon, IRC 1.
PRACTICAL WRITING LECTURE SERIES
Wayne Wickens. regional director, B.C. Ministry
of Agriculture and food on Transfer Technology,
noon. Computer Science 201.
COOPERATIVE CHRISTIAN
CAMPUS MINISTRY
Celebration of euchariat with George Herman-
son, noon, Lutheran Campua centre.
ART GALLERY COMMITTEE
Meeting, 11:30 a.m., SUB 224.
ZOOLOGY CLUB
General meeting, noon. Bio. Sci. 546B. (Please
put a Tween class form in for each meeting,
thank you).
CUSO-UBC
Development education eeriee. Third World
Development in the Eightiea, 7:30 p.m.. International houae upper lounge. IPIeaae uaa the new
Tween classes form from May 1982).
CHESS CLUB
Speed cheaa tournament chempionahip. Free to
members $2 non-members. Come early.
Deadline for entry is 12:40 p.m. Prizes.
Noon-2:30 p.m.. SUB 206.
WEDNESDAY
INTERNATIONAL SOCIALISTS
Booktable, noon, SUB hallway.
STUDENT COUNCIL FOR
EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN
First meeting of Let's Play to Grow, a unique
family club involving you and a special child,
noon, Scarfe 1226.
STUDENTS FOR PEACE
AND MUTUAL DISARMAMENT
Steering committee meeting, noon, Angus 214.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Rock and Roll seminar — a fact filled seminar on
rock and roll. (Please - one form per event -
you don't need to submit forms for each time
you want it in the paper, it is automatic!).
Noon hour Bible study, bring your lunch, noon,
SUB 215.
STUDENT HEALTH SERVICES
Information on contraception, morning after pill,
and related subjects, 11:30 a.m.- 1:30 p.m..
Speakeasy desk, SUB 100B.
ANARCHIST CLUB
Literature table, noon, SUB.
AMS OMBUDSOmCE
Complainta   day,   8:30   a.m.-4:30   p.m.,
Sadgawick Nbracy - SUB concourse.
CANADA COUNCIL AND
PRISM INTERNATIONAL
Poetry reading by Elizabeth Gourley, 7:30 p.m..
Waat Point Gray Library, 4480 W. 10th.
CAMPUS PRO-LIFE
Meeting to diatribute posters, ate. to organize
pro-Ufa weak, noon, SUB 208.
COOPERATIVE CHRISTIAN
CAMPUS MINISTRY
Co-op dinner followed by dialogue on the middle
eeet  crista with  John  Conway and  Connie
Pen/ay, 6 p.m.. HIM houae.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Romance language evening, 7:30 p.m., Gate 4
International houae.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Rock and roll aemlnar: A fact fieed seminar on
rock and rod, 7:30 p.m., Scarfe 100.
THURSDAY
SAILING/SKI/
WINDSURFING/CLUBS
Ski bunny/beach bum interclub volleyball game,
9 a.m., Osborne Gym A.
NEWMAN CLUB
Presentation by June Lithco on the World Council of Churches, noon, St. Mark's music room.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Conversation hour, 1:30-2:30 p.m.. International
house main lounge.
UBC OLD WOMEN'S RUGBY TEAM
Team practices for women's rugby, league play,
no experience necessary, call 733-3877 for more
info.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
Bible lesson study, 1:30 p.m., Buch. B222.
CHINESE SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
When the Harvest is finished, by Dr. Stock,
noon, SUB 119.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Bible   study   and   fellowship   group,   visitors
welcome, 7:30 p.m., SUB 119. Film - a Ganar
— an All Spanish sports film, noon, Buch. B216.
BAHA'I CLUB
General   meeting,   everyone   welcome,   noon,
SUB212A.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC CLUB
General meeting, noon, St. Merit's music room.
ISMAIL! STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Ganaral meeting, noon, SUB 125.
INSTITUTE OF A8IAN RESEARCH
Films - Recreation - The Japanese Way and
Judoka. noon, Asian centre auditorium.
UBC WOMEN'S CENTRE
Showing tha N.F.B. film Not a Love Story,
women only, noon-2:30 p.m., IRC 5.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Stammtiach, 7:30 p.m..  Gate 4 International
house.
PACIFIC RIM CLUB
Japanese food sale — hot and cold lunches, lun-
chtime, SUB concourse.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Bible  study  and   fellowehip   group,   visitors
welcome, 7:30 p.m., SUB 119.
UBC FLYING CLUB
General meeting, noon, Harming 302.
UBC WADO KARATE CLUB
Beginning sessions for Novices, 7 p.m., SUB
ballroom.
FRIDAY
STUDENTS FOR PEACE AND
MUTUAL DISARMAMENT
Film showing: No First Use, noon, SUB 205.
NEWMAN CLUB
Soup lunch, an alternate to the cafeteria, noon,
St. Mark's lunch room.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Conversation hour,  noon,   International House
main lounge.
GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES
Development and distribution of Rift systems, 4
p.m., Geo. Sci. 330A.
INTRAMURALS
Bowl and pizza night, 7-10:30 p.m., SUB games
room. Register teams to Jan. 19.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Burns — night social evening, 7:30 p.m., International House main lounge.
THUNDERBIRD VOLLEYBALL
Thundervolley   tournament    featuring    best
women's teams from around B.C., all day, Peace
gym.
THUNDERBIRD HOCKEY
Bring  your  Magnavox  flyer  to  the  game  for
change  to   win   a   colour  television,   8   p.m.,
Thunderbird   arena?   (the   Tween   class   form
doesn't say who we are playing!)
STUDENT HEALTH SERVICES
To give info on contraception, morning after pill
and   related   subjects,   11:30  a.m.-1:30  p.m..
Speakeasy desk, SUB 100B.
DESTINATION
SKI RENTALS,
— Personal Boot
Fitting
— Reservations Being
Taken NOW!
— Also Vi Day, Day,
Weekend Rates
— Brand New
Equipment
— High Performance
Demos
— Leasing
984-4394
1160 Marine Drive
North Vancouver
OPEN 7 DAYS
SATURDAY
MARDI GRAS
Game night, games until 9:30 p.m. dance afterwards, 7:30 p.m.-1 a.m., SUB ballroom.
SKI CLUB
Hamburger weekend, all day, UBC ski cabin,
Whistler, B.C.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Social night (games and beer), 7-12 p.m., SUB
212.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Tape workshop, 12:30-2 p.m., SUB ballroom. Introductory tap tape workshop which will be
taught by Bonnie Hauas, a well known Vancouver instructor. Registration is necessary.
Please come to SUB 216E for more info.
INTRAMURALS
Sports-Alpine squash grand Prix Round II,
Thunderbird Winter Sports centre. Draw up.
Jan. 19, $5.
THUNDERBIRD BASKETBALL
Thundervolley tournament featuring best
women's teams from around B.C., all day. Peace
(War Memorial) gym.
THUNDERBIRD HOCKEY
Magnavox colour television and seasons tickets
to the Whitecaps will be drawn for on Feb. 19, 8
p.m., Thunderbird arena.
FAMILY HOUSING FILM SERIES
Walt Disney's Condorman. 3 p.m., SUB
auditorium, $1.50. Eight films $5.
SUNDAY
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Second day of tape workshop. See Saturday.
CYCLING CLUB
Ride, non-members welcome to come along, 9
a.m., between SUB and aquatic centre.
UNDERWATER HOCKEY
Practice,   10  p.m.,   Aquatic  centre.   All  new
recruits welcome.
MOTORCYCLE CLUB
Sunday ride to Squamish, weather permitting,
10:30 a.m., North side of SUB.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Full   gospel,   praise,   worship   and   teaching,
visitors welcome, SUB 217.
MONDAY
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Slide   presentation:    Argentina,    with    Hugo
Leschot, 8 p.m.. International house Gate 4.
English language evening, 7:30 p.m.. International house gate 4.
NATIVE LAW STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Native Land claims, by Neil Sterritt, president of
the Gitksancarrier tribal council, noon-1:30 p.m..
Law 101. All interested students welcome.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Bin Soto evangelist singer and recording artist
from Dallas, Texas, visitors welcome, 7:30 p.m.,
SUB 212.
a>
THIS WEEK AT HILLEL"
Tues., Jan. 18
12:30-2:00 p.m.—Shefa Lunch Bar
Wed., Jan. 19
12:30 p.m. — Slide Presentation on Soviet
Jewry
6:00  p.m.   —   Potluck  Dinner   —   Program:
Church's response to Middle East" with guests
Dr. John Conway 8- Connie Parvey
Thurs., Jan. 20
12:30-2:30 p.m. — Network Seminar — Inquiry
Report with Professor M. Mayzel.
Fri., Jan. 21
Hillel — Chabad Shabbaton featuring Rabbi
Moshe Shur singing Jewish songs in country
and folk-rock style at Chabad House. Starts at
7:00 p.m.
CHARLIES
GIRL
Classic and modem
hair cutting for
men and women.
STUDENTS ONLY
Cut, wash, blow dry
Gents $10
Ladies $15
JOICO JOI-GEL
AVAILABLE
3615 W. 4th Ave.
     734-3841
Tfo'2
from
3 to 4
CAKE & COFFEE*
(per/person)
MUFFIN & COFFEE*
*or tea of course!
$2.50
$1.25
MONDAY - FRIDAY
(at the back of the village)
Reading, Writing,
and Study Skills
Register Now
Reading for Speed & Comprehension
Grammar & Basic Composition
Writing Improvement
Choosing the Right Word
Improving Your Speaking Voice
Study Skills
Writing Business Letters & Memos
Writing Effective Reports
Writing a Research Paper
Courses begin the week of January 24
sn§e
Phone 228-2181 (245)
Centre for Continuing Education
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines. 1 day $2.50; additional
lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $4.20; additional lines, 63c. Additional days, $3.80 and 58c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
5 — Coming Events
70 — Services
10 — For Sale — Commercial
11 — For Sale — Private
20 — Housing
ROOM AVAILABLE in communal house.
Two bathrooms, study space, close to campus. $2707mo. or less. Call 732-5129.
FULL ROOM & BOARD. On campus.
$1,240 per term. Call Dennis at 224-3606 or
224-9431.
ROOM AND BOARD available at Deke
House, 5765 Agronomy Rd. Phone Jack
Fournier 228-1568 or John Robertson
224-4140.
"ACCOMODATION AVAILABLE in small
shared house very close to campus.
224-1450."
MODE COLLEGE of Barbering and Hairstyl-
ing. Students $6.50 with I.D. Body wave,
$17 and up. 601 W. Broadway, 874-0633.
FOR YOUR Mary Kay Cosmetics, call Pam
266-4812 or Lyn 271-1737.
NEED EXCELLENT DAYCARE? Applica-
tions welcome Unit 2 UBC. 5603 Yalta PI.,
18 mon.-36 mon. Call 224-3828 or visit.
AEROBICS & STRETCH
Mon.-Fri. 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.
Sat. 11:00 a.m.-12 noon. $3. Drop in
or $30 per month. St. James
Church, 3214 W. 10th, 733-6765. 1
free class with Ad til Jan. 31.
85 — Typing
25 — Instruction
GMAT,   LSAT,   MCAT   Preparation.   Call
National Testing Centre 738-4618.
30 - Jobs
PART-TIME breakfast cook wanted. Hours:
approx. 6:30-8:30 a.m. On campus. $7.50
per hour. Call Dennis at 224-3606 or
224-9431.
DANCERS for Vancouver STRIP-O-GRAM,
female and male. Excellent pay, no nudity.
Car required. 1-206-754-8877.
TYPIST required part-time. With IBM
Selectric if possible. Phone in morning.
224-6518. Work from own home.
35 — Lost
LOST: Ladies burgundy wallet, Fri., Jan. 14,
vicinity of the village to Gage. PI. call Deir-
dre 224-2502.
40 — Messages
LET US REMEMBER our literary heritage.
That which it creates. Schlong.
50 - Rentals
EXPERT TYPING essays, term
papers, factums, letters, manuscripts,
resumes, theses. IBM Selectric II.
Reasonable rates. Rose, 731-9857.
U-WRITE WE TYPE. 736-1208.
Word Processing Specialists for Theses,
Term Papers, Resumes, Reports,
Correspondence, Days, Evenings,
Weekends.
MICOM WORD PROCESSING: Thesis,
term papers, equation typing. Rate $10 an
hour. Jeeva, 876-5333.
TYPEWRITING. Minimal notice required.
UBC location. 224-6518 day or night.
RENT TIME on an IBM Word
Processor — theses, essays, etc. $5 hr.
Free instruction. 224-1061.
ESSAYS, theses, reports, letters, resumes.
Bilingual. World Processor. Clemy,
266-6641.
FRANCINE'S TYPING SERVICES: Theses,
papers, etc. — reasonable rates. Please inquire 732-3647.
NEED A TYPIST? Look no further, resumes,
reports, theses, letters. Professional
results. Reas. rates. Audrey, 228-0378.
90 - Wanted
PARKING SPOT required for long term
storage at reasonable rate. Indoor or outdoor. Graham 684-9024. After 8 p.m. Tuesday, January 18,1983
THE    U BYS S EY
Page 7
Ski team wins at Mt.Baldy
By DOUG BOYD
After dominating a ski meet in
Washington last weekend the T
'Bird men and women again
displayed their prowess by winning
their respective meets at Mount
Baldy in Osoyoos.
The men's team, with 51 points,
finished well ahead of their nearest
opponent and rival SFU, with 75
points, and the University of
Washington, with 126 points.
On the women's side UBC tallied
45 points while second place SFU
was well behind with 65 points.
University of Washington scored
126 points. The men's team swept
up the top four positions in the
giant slalom led by former national
team member John Hilland with
Bob Leach second, Bruce Hilland,
who is just recovering from a back
injury, placing third, and coach
Rick Crowson finishing fourth. In
the slalom, Dale Stephens placed second, followed by Crowson, third
and Tom Stewart — who was
eighth.
In the women's giant slalom
event, the ever consistent Darcy
Estabrook came in second, Carolyn
Wilson fifth and Sally Wilson,
eighth.
(SPORTS)
In the slalom. Jim Murray of SFU
took top honors while 'Birds'
Wilson was fourth, Willis sixth, and
Jane Roots placed tenth.
In crosscountry action, the
women's team brushed aside all opposition. The relay team consisting
of Roots, Estabrook and Cathy Be-
nyon took top spot. For the
women's individual results Roots
finished   an   astonishing   three
m
HEWLETT
PACKARD
calculators and
personal computers
Discount Sales
437-6114
&ATE International House
1783 West Mall
228-5021
m
INTERNATIONAL
HOUSE
BURNS NIGHT
Friday, January 21st
7:30 p.m.
FULL FACILITIES
HOLY COW
WHAT A DEAL I
SOUP & BREAD
PRIME RIB
RICE & VEGETABLE
$4.95
Mon. - Fri. 5:30 - 7:30
(at the back of the Village)
minutes ahead of second place Jill
Warland of SFU. The next four
positions were won by UBC's
Estabrook, Beynon, Wilson and
Willis.
On the men's side the relay team,
which consists of Ole Anker-Rasch,
Murray Maitland and Crowson,
finished third behind the University
of Washington and SFU. In the individual cross-country event, which
was won by Mike Reid of SFU,
Anker-Rasch placed second while
Maitland finished third.
Come and Hear the Candidates Running for
AMS EXECUTIVE
POSITIONS!
Friday, January 21,   12:30 p.m.
SUB Conversation Pit
CITR-UBC Radio will provide music from 12:00
WILLIAM G. BLACK
MEMORIAL PRIZE
A prize in the amount of $1,000 has been made
available by the late Dr. William G. Black for an
essay on some aspect of Canadian contemporary
society. The topic will be designed to attract
students from all disciplines. The competition is
open to all students who are enrolled in
undergraduate programs and who do not already
possess a graudate degree. A single essay topic of
a general nature related to Canadian contemporary society will be presented to students at the
time of the competition. Duration of the competition will be three hours.
Time and Place:
SATURDAY, JANUARY 29, 1983
BUCHANAN 106
10:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m.
Ptotse not. corrmct dmtm.	
GRAD'S
Phone    now   for    complimentary portrait sitting.
RESUME PHOTOS
AS LOW AS 75c
IN COLOUR.
iflmagraph*
Srndins Ltd.
3343 West Broadway
732-7446
GRADUATE STUDIES
IN
INDUSTRIAL DESIGN
Students with Bachelor's degrees in a
related field and wishing to inquire about
the University of Calgary program may
meet Professor Nobuoki Ohtani of the
Faculty of Environmental Design on
Wednesday, January 19th from r to 3 p.m.
Room 402, Laserre Building.
CPAir
Holidays
*4
SAVE
Til?
per couple
as §
low
as
748.
ONLY
10°/
DOWN
per person
Air Only
VY*
Book your flight to Britain and pay a 10% desposit before January 31, and you will save $400 per couple.
Arrange for either your departure or return date to fall between May 1 st — June 30th or September 5th —
October 24th and you will qualify for $200 per person savings off the air fare that applies to your selected
travel dates. Naturally we offer our international charter services in-flight, including free movies, steak
and champagne dinners, a choice of international wines and liqueurs, free in-flight bar and duty free
shopping. You can't buy better or more for your money — and now you can save up to $400 per couple on
your air fare.
CP Air Holidays is a division of Transpacific Tours Ltd. CP and t< are registered trademarks ol Canadian Pacific Ltd. Flights are Advanced Booking
Charters. Non-refundable deposit and/or cancellation penalties apply. Airport
taxes not included in prices. Prices are lowest available. Price shown valid only
on certain days. Discount, do NOT apply to longstay lam.
CPAir
Holidays
- October 23, Westbound between May 14th — June
* This fare applies for travel Eastbound between May 6th — May 22nd & September 9 -
6th and September 19 — October 29. Other dates are at higher prices
Fares In Canadian dollars, airport taxes not Included, nights are advance booking charters. A.B.C regulations Including non-refundable
deposit* and cancellation penalties apply. Departure dates and lares are subject to change. ^^
^^ TRAVEL CUTS
t^GoingYourWay!
TRAVEL CUTS
VANCOUVER
Student Union Building
University of B.C.
Vancouver, B.C.
604 224-2344
Limited seats available
AS   a 0±jm *\ per person
a™ 61o."roniv
LONDON
TRAVEL EASTBOUND PRIOR
TO MAY 1st AND RETURN
BETWEEN MAY. 1-JUNE 6 OR
BETWEEN SEPT. H-OCT. 24.
TRAVEL CUTS
ADVENTURE CENTRE |
Granville Island
1516 Duranleau St.,
Vancouver, B.C.
PHONE: et7-«440.
>     ~, Page 8
THE    U BYSS EY
Tuesday, January 18,1983
Unpredictable 'Birds close
By MONTE STEWART
There is a popular theory that the
only predictable aspect of sports is
its unpredictability.
The men's basketball team confirmed this theory on the weekend
at War Memorial gym.
Friday, The Ubyssey predicted
the 'Birds would not be a contender
for the Canada West Basketball
Classic championship. The 'Birds
proved the prediction wrong.
As predicted, the University of
Victoria Vikings made it to the
championship game Saturday
night, but their opponent was none
other than the unpredictable
Thunderbirds.
The Vikings last year's Canadian
Champions, boasted an impressive
14-3 record going into the tournament — 10-2 against American
universities, 3-0 against Canadian
counterparts, and a 1-1 record
against Athletes in Action.
The Vikings were a virtual "shoe-
in" as finalists.
They almost missed getting in.
Needing only one victory to advance to the championship game,
the Vikes narrowly defeated the
University of Calgary Dinosaurs
67-65 Friday night. After Calgary's
Karl Tilleman had tied the score
65-65, Viking guard Quinn
Groenhyde sunk a shot from 22 feet
just before time ran out.
Tilleman, who rarely seemed to
miss, led all scorers with 38 points
while Groenhyde paced the Vikings.
Unlike the Vikings, the 'Birds had
to earn their way into the championship game.
Thursday, the 'Birds introduced
themselves to the University of
Lethbridge Pronghorns with a
78-74 victory.
Lloyd Scrubb and Pat West paced the 'Birds with 18 points apiece
while Bob Arnett led the Pronghorns with 21 points. 'Birds'
newcomer, Bruce Holmes contributed 14 rebounds.
The only sour point in the game
occurred when UBC guard Lloyd
Scrubb suffered a dislocated
shoulder. He will be on the sidelines
for at least three weeks.
The 'Birds recorded their second
victory in two nights Friday.
They defeated Saskatchewan
Huskies 62-58 to earn a spot in the
final. Holmes and West led the
'Birds with 18 and 15 points respectively. Mark Peters was the high
scorer for Saskatchewan with 12
points.
In the championship game, UBC
got into trouble early.
The game opened with a foul shot
because the 'Birds failed to submit
their line-up ten minutes before the
start of the game.
Otherwise, the 'Birds were very
nervous at the start but quickly settled down. Consequently, they
played one of their finest games of
the season.
Freshman centre Mark  Marter
Playoff hopes rise
for UBC hockey team
was impressive against the likes of
Canadian National team players
Gerald and Greg Kazanowski.
Marter led all scorers with 19
points. West, who converted 73
per cent of his field goal attempts,
added 16 points while Holmes contributed 12 points and 16 rebounds.
Tom Narbeshuber led the Vikings
with 18 points.
The Vikings never trailed in the
contest, with the lead ranging from
10 points to one point at the game's
start.
Viking's coach Ken Shields was
upset with his team's performance.
"I think UBC played pretty well
but I don't think our team played
well at all," Shields said.
The Vikings converted 36 per
cent of their field goal attempts
while the 'Birds were good on 44
per cent from the field.
Molinski was disappointed with
the loss.
"I thought we deserved a better
fate. We played hard but we made
some mistakes at the end and (they)
cost us the ball game. Overall, I'm
pleased with the effort but disappointed with the result."
The 'Birds second place finish
could be indicative of how they will
fare in the regular season. But, then
again, it is not very wise to make
predictions.
FINAL STANDINGS
1. Victoria
2. UBC
3. Calgary
4. Alberta
5. Saskatchewan
6. Lethbridge
Correction: Saskatchewan, not
Manitoba as reported last week,
was the sixth entry in the tourney.
By HARRY HERTSCHEG
It's hard to believe. But yes,
despite a dismal 2-10 record, UBC
Thunderbirds men's ice hockey
team is still very much in the playoff race in the tough Canada West
conference.
If it wasn't for the slumping
Calgary Dinosaurs, the Thunderbirds could have already kissed
their playoff hopes good-bye, even
though it is only the half-way point
in the season.
The last-place 'Birds stayed close
for the first two periods in both
games against Alberta Golden
Bears over the weekend in Edmonton.
But the Bears blew the 'Birds
away in the third period of both
games scoring 11 of their 14 goals of
the series in the final frame. The
result for the 'Birds was losses of
6-2 on Friday and 8-3 on Saturday.
In Friday night's game, Mike
Coflin and Gregg Cockrill scored
for UBC while Dave Souch led
Alberta with three goals. The two
teams were tied one-all going into
the final period. The Bears outshot
the 'Birds 40-34.
The following evening, Drew
Hunt, Kevin Argue and Anthony
Thomas scored to give the 'Birds a
3-0 lead early in the second period.
That was before the arena's roof
caved in and the Bears scored eight
unanswered goals led by Bill
Ansell's two goals.
The 'Birds were outshot 49-29.
While Ian McEachern minded the
nets on Friday, third-string goalie
Pierre Grenier relieved McEachern
during Saturday's game.
In Calgary over the weekend, the
defending conference champion
Saskatchewan Huskies remain tied
for first place with Alberta after
sweeping a two-game series with
Calgary Dinosaurs.
Saskatchewan coach Dave King is
one of the leading candidates to
replace former Minnesota North
Stars coach Glen Sonmor, who
resigned last Thursday after four a a
half seasons as coach of the North
Stars. Minnesota North Stars'
coach  and  general  manager  Lou
Nanne has already interviewed
King, coached Team Junior Canada
to a gold medal at last year's world
championships and a bronze medal
this year.
Saskatchewan Huskies coach for
the past three seasons is also
scheduled to coach Canada's 1984
Olympic hockey team along with
Jean Perron.
King said he feels obligated to
finish the season as coach of the
Huskies, but would seriously consider taking the North Stars job
next season.
Meanwhile, the Thunderbirds are
in preparation for this weekend's
big series with Calgary Dinosaurs.
If the 'Birds win both games Friday
and Saturday at Thunderbird
arena, they will be tied with the
Dinosaurs for third place, which is
also the final playoff spot. If the
'Birds get swept, they could still set
their sights on improving on last
year's 6-18 finish.
Saturday's game will be broadcast by CITR-FM 102 starting at
7:45 p.m.
CANADA WEST STANDINGS
W
L
P
Saskatchewan Huskies
9
3
28
Alberta Golden Bears
9
3
18
Calgary Dinosaurs
4
8
8
UBC Thunderbirds
2
10
2
CUSO presents
THE GLOBAL
COMMUNITY
(A Member's Guide to
participation)
A weekly series exploring international development issues and
possibilities for personal involvement.
EVERY TUESDAY
January 18 to March 15
7:30-9:30 p.m.
INTERNATIONAL
HOUSE
For more information call
228-4886
—allaon hoana photo
Thunderbirds . . . tourney uplifted team's spirit
Swimmers have mixed success
By JEAN MUSTARD
After a two month layoff from
active competition the Thunderbird
swimming and diving teams were
back in action this past weekend.
On Friday the 'Birds competed
against the University of Alberta
and the University of Victoria at the
Aquatic Centre. Saturday they
played host to the University of
Calgary.
Alberta came out on top Friday
in both the men's (60-52) and the
women's (67-45) swimming and diving competition. UBC trounced
Victoria by scores of 85-27 (men)
and 81-30 (women).
Both teams also cleaned up in the
diving competitions.
Saturday afternoon the women's
swimming team defeated Calgary
by a single point. For the men it was
a disappointing afternoon as they
came up against the defending national champions losing 91-22.
Individually, Val Whyte won the
200m backstroke on both days
while Rhonda Thomasson won the
50 and 100m events on Friday and
added the 200 individual medley
Saturday. Both women joined Kim
Austin and Shelley Morgan to win
the 400 medley relay event.
Mike Blondal and Mike Ball
came first and second respectively
in the 50m freestyle. Pat Smith also
did well by winning the 200m butterfly.
In diving, Nancy Bonham finished on top in the one and three metre
event. UBC men's team took all
four top spots on Friday with Bill
Tharpe and Calvin Church winning
the one metre and three metre
events respectively.
Coach Jack Kelso felt that the
men's team was "uninspired"
against Calgary and thought the
"Canada West conference will be
the power in the Canadian Inter-
Collegiate Athletic Union swimming and diving championships this
season."
The 'Birds will travel to
Washington to compete against the
Huskies   on   Friday   and   Pacific
Lutheran University on Saturday
afternoon before meeting
hometown rivals SFU Feb. 4 at
SFU.
UBC will host the Canada West
championships on Feb. 11 at
the Aquatic Centre. That will be the
last chance for swimmers to reach
qualifying times enabling them to
compete in the nationals at Laval
University on March 3, 4, and 5.
CORKY'S
APPOINTMENT SERVICE
731-4191
3644 West 4th Avenue
At Alma
ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE IN THE
FACULTY OF ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN
AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CALGARY
Environmental Science in the Faculty of Environmental Design offers opportunities for graduate study at
the Master's level in ecological management, technological systems, information and policy analysis, and
behavioral planning. There are three other master's programmes in the Faculty: Architecture, Industrial
Design, and Urban & Regional Planning. The Faculty places an emphasis on professional practice in an interdisciplinary context.
The Faculty of Environmental Design, the University of Calgary, invites you to hear a brief statement about
the Faculty and its Programmes, meet Dr. Dixon Thompson, Director of the Environmental Science Programme and discuss the interdisciplinary Master's Degree Programme.
DATE: Thursday, January 27. 1963
TIME: 12:30 to 14:30 hours
PLACE: BIO SCIENCES, ROOM 2000
Enquiries regarding application for admission and financial assistance forms and specific questions about
programme and degree requirements should be directed to:
Student Programmes Officer
Faculty of Environmental Design
The University of Calgary
2500 University Drive NW
CALGARY ABT2N 1N4
  Phone: (403) 284-5098

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