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The Ubyssey Feb 22, 1966

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Array Curse you,
Red Baron
THS UBYSSEY
Vol. XLVIII, No. 51
VANCOUVER,   B.C.,  TUESDAY,   FEBRUARY   22,   1966
CA 4-3916
Council
tabl
Viet brief
Student council Monday
night tabled a brief to the
federal government calling for
Canada to move positively towards a peaceful settlement of
the Vietnamese war.
Tht brief, in the form of an
open letter to the government,
was signed by faculty and student representatives from universities across Canada.
Only three councillors opposed the motion to table the
controversial issue.
The brief urges the government to:
O Publicly call for an immediate end to U.S. bombing in
north Viet Nam.
• Call on U.S. Government
to end such tactics as scorched
earth policy, crop poisoning,
and naplam bombing of civilians.
• Disallow Canadian firms
to export any arms or material
to the U.S. or any other country to be used in the Viet Nam
war.
• Support U Thant's call
for recognition of the National
Liberation Front of South Viet
Nam as a full participant in
any peace negotiations.
• Report that the International Control Commission can
no longer control or supervise
the Geneva Agreement, and
that only the reconvening of
the Geneva Conference can
lead to a resolution of the Viet
Nam problem.
• Declare support for the
principles of the 1954 Geneva
Agreement as the basis for
peace. These include the withdrawal <fi foreign troops and
bases, and supervised free elections to reunify Viet Nam.
Among the UBC signees
were pharmacology head J. G.
Foulks, sociology professor
Lionel Tiger and Asian studies
professor   William   Willmott.
Med ballot
set, grad
vote sunk
By ANNE BALF
Student council Monday night decided to settle the
problem of medical student fees by a referendum and at the
same time scrapped a referendum on grad student fees.
The referendum to determine
if AMS fees for third and
fourth year medical students
should be abolished will be
held March 10.
—powell  hargrave photo
WAYSIDE SINGERS folk it up at pep meet Monday. Queen
Elizabeth High School group was warming up for Greek
Songfest this Friday in Queen Elizabeth Theatre.
McAfee seeks questions
on his favorite SUBject
Roger McAfee, Student Union Building chairman, is
on a quest for questions.
McAfee said Monday his plea for student questions
about SUB which appeared in a paid advertisement in The
Ubyssey last week, resulted in only one query being submitted.
Questions may be left at the AMS office, SUB Box
119, or in the SUB office on the upper balcony of South
Brock.
McAfee said they will be answered in further SUB
advertisements Thursday and Friday.
ABOLISH   FEES
The grad student referendum
had been originally tentatively
scheduled for the same day as
the medical student referendum.
Medical undergraduate society president Con Michas
moved the referendum be held
to abolish the fees for the 1966-
67 year.
"Since the students spend
most of their time working and
studying in hospitals oif campus, they have little time or
opportunity to benefit from
AMS facilities," said Michas.
STILL MEMBERS
The medical students would
still be members of the AMS,
having the same status as grad
students presently have.
The motion to hold a referendum to bring back AMS fees
for grad students was opposed
by grad studies president
George Wootton.
GRADS LEAVING
He said grad students get no
benefit from the $15 of the
AMS fee that goes to the SUB
fund, since they will not be
here to enjoy the SUB building.
"Besides, we pay $12 a year
towards the grad students' centre, which has the same functions."
Displaced
residents
get hearing
Married student housing committee chairman Jim Slade will
meet  with  residences  director
Malcolm McGregor Wednesday
to discuss the plight of Acadia
Camp's displaced families.
Ten families will be forced
to leave their homes in May
when the huts they are occupying are torn down to make
way for the new dental school.
Slater's committee has conducted a survey of the families
and compiled its recommendations into a report.
But Slater will not release
the results of the report until
he has talked them over with
McGregor.
He said McGregor, who has
been out of town since Wednesday, received the report
Monday.
McGregor arranged the Wednesday meeting to discuss the
recommendations.
"He wanted to go over it
more thoroughly," Slater said.
"He is investigating whether
the recommendations given are
possible."
Slater said the results would
be available by Thursday.
WEBSTER BOOTS  OFF
BROTHERHOOD  WEEK
•     r
It's time church's teeth got kicked in
Diefenbaker is a destructive
maniac, Bennett has got to go,
and it's about time the Church
in Quebec got its teeth kicked
in, the opening session of
Brotherhood Week was told
Monday.
"Don't be too bloody brotherly," said Vancouver newsman
Jack Webster. "When you've
got something on your mind,
say it."
Webster said Canadians have
the governments they deserve—
and the governments are nothing to be proud of.
"Conservative leader Diefenbaker is a destructive maniac,
Socred leader Thompson has no
business in politics and Bennett
would do anything to keep
power," he said.
Webster said he is discouraged by lack of public interest in
politics.
"I bet this room contains
some of the most ill-informed
people in our society," he said.
"We elect governments that
would make anyone throw up."
Turning to Vancouver politics,
Webster said Mayor Rathie tries
to do the right thing but can't
deal with people.
"Vancouver city council is a
comic opera," he said.
He said politics and human
relations are closely linked in
Quebec.
"I'm happy to see the church
get her teeth kicked in," said
Webster. "But this may open
the doors to real dangerous sep-
eratism."
WEBSTER AND FANS
kick  their teeth,   brotherly
The broadcaster said Canada
is the most over-governed country in the world.
"The Quebec, Ontario, and
B.C. premiers together with
Pearson can sit behind closed
doors and carve up our rights.
"There's too much decentralization."
Webster said removal of university fees must come eventually.
"But I hope it doesn't come
until we've got more out here
than beautiful buildings," Webster said. "I have a feeling too
many of you people aren't
qualified."
Brotherhood Week continues
today with an international folk
dancing program in Brock Hall. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  February 22,   1966
«w
BY   UBYSSEY   PHOTOG   HARGRAVE
. . . third prize, novice
— powell hargrave photo
Students out-click
shutterbug profs
Students swept the profs clean out of sight in this year's
campus photography competition.
The
Bigsby bids
big things
for Victoria
By CAROL WILSON
Big things are in store for
Victoria College student council.
Its president next year will
be Steven Bigsby, arts II, elected by Vic College students
Friday.
Bigsy"s 815 votes gave him
an easy victory over Gordon
Pollard with 409. The third
candidate, Rick Ogmundson,
got 358 votes.
Bigsby will take over at the
end of the academic year from
present president Paul Williamson.
Bigsby said he wants continued pressure for maintaining tuition fee level.
He also called for an examination into expanding of Victoria's student union building,
more AMS speakeasies on controversial campus affairs, a
high school survey to examine
the social and economic barriers to education, and a more
active role for the newly-
formed B.C. Assembly of students.
Elections for the other positions on council will be held
Feb. 25.
annual Ben Hill Tout
contest is one of the few campus events open to everyone
on equal terms, but during the
past few years students haven't
been able to match profs click
for click.
This year students got their
revenge.
Not one professor or staff research worker will get any of
the prizes to be passed out noon
today in Angus 104.
Color slides will be shown
after the presentation. Black
and white prints are on display
in the main lounge of the education building until March 4.
Two prints by Bob Flick,
arts III, took first and second
place in the senior division.
Dave Henderson, arts I, took
third place.
Novice division was won by
Monica Nasmyth, science III, of
Crescent Valley. R. D. Whet-
ham, commerce II, of Windermere, placed second, and third
place was taken by Powell
Hargrave, commerce I, of Nan-
aimo.
Hargrave is also a member
of The Ubyssey's all-star photo
staff.
The color competition was
led toy Bob Belhouse, science
IV of Islington, Ontario. Another fourth-year scienceman,
H. W. Sturhahn, took second
place, and J. J. Toth, arts n,
won third place.
Artsmen  prepare
for  election
Arts students will vote
Wednesday for their 1966-67
president.
There will be an arts presidential all-candidates meeting in Bu. 104 noon today.
The three candidates running for the position are
Jim Cooke, arts II, Victor
Hamm, arts III and Don
Wise, arts III.
Voting in Wednesday's
election will be restricted to
those AUS members in or
past their second year.
(jetting tHanied?
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TOO NICE'
Vic profs quit
over policy rift
VICTORIA (CUP) — Two English lecturers have been
dismissed at Victoria College, and a third has resigned
in protest against the way the English department is being
run.
James W. Smith, who has
previously taught at the University of Washington and in
Japan, said he did not accept
the pedagogical philosophy of
his inspector.
"My surprise inspector claimed I was too nice to the students. He was afraid they'd
get the idea they were more
important than the subject matter."
"I must admit my classrooms
tend to be progressivist jungles but we do have certain
respect for the individual. Education is a matter of conditioned response, according to my
inspector. He went on to say
that the proper way to approach students was Pavlo-
vian."
More than 20 students in
Smith's second-year class said
he had stimulated student interest in English.
The students said his lectures were well-prepared and
he was willing to accept students' opinions and encourage
class discussion.
Another English professor,
Roy Johnson, has been dismissed without being given reasons. A third, Gilbert Dumas,
submitted his resignation to
English department head Roger
Bishop without making his
criticisms of the admisistration
public.
Will the KEY CLUB contribute
to student unrest?
No. but it will still be fun.
A
GSM NEWS
SKI DAY: On Saturday March 5, at 7:00 A.M. a Ski
Group will leave the GSC for Whistler Mountain.
The cost will be $3.00/Person. There may be a
Group reduction, depending on the number interested.
Pay at the GSC Office or see Mr. D. Holt, Sports
Officer.
SPRING SEMI-FORMAL: The GSA Spring Semi-Formal
will be held on Saturday, February 26, in place of
the normal Club Night. There will be a live band.
Cost: $3.75/Couple, tickets at the GSC OFFICE.
MUSIC EVENING: In conjunction with the Faculty Club
Association, Graduate Students are invited to attend
a Free Music Recital in the Faculty Club Main
Lounge, at 9:00 P.M., March 3, 1966.
SPRING GENERAL MEETING: The Spring General Meeting of the GSA will be held in the GSC Lower
Lounge on Thursday, Feb. 24, from 12:30 P.M.
Nominations for GSA Executive Positions must be
submitted by 5:00 P.M. on Feb. 24, to the GSC Office.
A successful 1966-67 Year depends upon an active
GSA Executive, so if you are interested in an executive position, Nomination Forms are obtainable at
the GSC Office.
Two Tickets For The Price Off Onel
VANCOUVER SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
FIFTH ENCORE CONCERT
"JAZZ AND THE SYMPHONY"
Conducted by Meredith Davies
with the
DAVE ROBBINS' JAZZ WORKSHOP ORCHESTRA
Friday, Feb. 25 - 8:30 p.m.
Q.E. THEATRE
Regular $3.00 and $2.00 Seats
For The Price of One
Order Forms Available From
Alma Mater Business Office
Another Bonus From
HOME
HOME OIL DISTRIBUTORS LTD. Tuesday,   February  22,   1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
if'j
—dennia gans photo
—dermis gans photo
SHAKESPEARE HAUNTS campus this week as UBC department of theatre presents an all-student cast in the Bard's
Love's Labor's Lost. Here players Ann Chislett and Lionel
Johnston try on their costumes.
MASSIVE  ERROR'
Willmott tires
at Viet Nam policy
The basis of the 1955 American intervention in South
Viet Nam can be viewed only as a massive political error.
Asian Studies professor Wil
liam Willmott speaking in the
second of four weekly lectures
on Viet Nam, said "Secretary
of State Dulles was convinced
that anyone in South Viet Nam
would choose a non-communist
government over a Communist
one."
"The Americans selected Ngo
Dien Diem to head the South
Vietnamese government because he was anti-communist
and had no association with
the previous French colonial
administration.
"However, the man U.S.
Senator Mike Mansfield Senate majority leader regarded
as the George Washington of
Viet Nam had no popular support.
"Diem, a minority Catholic,
lacked the endorsement of any
of the twelve Vietnamese political parties.
"The army regarded Diem as
something from the 19th century and he lacked a personal
image," Willmott said.
"Diem felt that he could
trust no one but members of
his family and an autocratic
personal regime evolved as
Diem would not delegate
power.
"Political support for the
Diem regime eventually came
from 800,000 Catholic refugees
who had fled North Viet Nam.
"In 1955, New York Times
correspondent Joseph Alsop
concluded that the Diem government was out of contact
with the people and had no
roots in the country," Willmott
said.
CUS PONDERS
GODDAM SUN, say Joe
Workmen as they slave
high above campus, rushing fo complete forestry-
agriculture complex south
of education building.
PILL, WAR
Agenda Just routine'
Delegates to a board meeting
of the Canadian Union of Students at Ottawa last week discussed a variety of subjects
from birth control to Viet Nam.
UBC delegate to the meeting, AMS president Byron
Hender, said the agenda was
"just routine."
CUS is preparing a brief to
have the criminal code amended to legalize the dissemination
of birth control information.
A report on the Viet Nam
congress resulted in a resolution to send a Canadian student
or recent grad to Viet Nam
and South East Asia to report
on conditions.
The board also discussed the
Canadian Student Means Survey which shows student earning power as opposed to expenditure.
This is a national survey by
CUS in co-operation with the
Dominion Bureau of Statistics,
and will be released March 4.
CUS is trying to lower the
voting age to 18 years. The
discrepancies in the federal
voting act which prevented
many students from voting in
the recent election are also under consideration.
The local CUS committee, in
co-operation with Dr. C. J.
Schwartz, will investigate mental health facilities on campuses.
The Company of Young Canadians, a domestic peace corps
created by Prime Minister Lester Pearson, gave a progress
report.
Library stays open
for exams, likely'
By CAROL WILSON
The  Sedgewick  library  will  probably  be  open   until
2 a.m. before and during final exams this year.
"I see no reason why we
cannot keep the Sedgewick
Library open until 2 a.m. three
weeks before exams and the
first week of exams," head
librarian Basil Stuart-Stubbs
said Monday.
He said the only problem
might be in getting staff to
work that late. "We would probably have one student assistant and a commissionaire."
''The commissionaire would
be necessary at exam time,
when people's tempers tend to
explode. We would have to
keep it quiet in there," he said.
"It would cost us more than
$50 per week to keep it open
the two extra hours," said Ture
Erickson, head of the 479-seat
Sedgewick Library.
"The student assistants
working at that time of night
get $1.30 an hour and the commissionaire gets $2.70 an hour.
Stuart-Stubbs said it would
not be practical to keep the
library open until 2 a.m. every
day. "Only one per cent of the
students using it stay till 12:00
a.m. now."
Pressures'
force SFA
editor to quit
The editor of Simon Fraser's
newspaper, The Peak, has resigned.
Sam Steenhaus sent in his
letter of resignation to the
Peak Publications board of
directors Wednesday.
Steenhaus said Monday he
resigned because of academic
pressures.
Chairman of the board of
directors, Milton Biodey, announced the board's regretful
acceptance of the letter of resignation.
The board will be interviewing applicants for the now vacant position and will announce
their decision Tuesday night.
In the meantime, Brodey
said, news editor N. Alan Bell
has taken over and the publication is running smoothly..
—dermis gans photo
APRIL IS THE CRUELLEST MONTH, and April 18 the cruellest day. That's when exams start,
seven short weeks away. Students belonging to these brief cases are studying for those
exams   in   library,  that  big   grey   building   behind the pond. mnrsssY
Published Tuesday, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the untTerslty
7«ar by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial opinions
expressed are those of the editor and not necessarily those of the AMS
or the University. Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office, CA 4-3242,
Loc. 26. Member Canadian University Press. Founding member, Pacific
Student Press. Authorized as second-class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa,  and  for payment of postage in cash.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and editorial writing.
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 1966
"The responsibility of the press
is to report the Truth."
—Batman, Feb. 3,   1966
1^^^^
Gollyl
i
There was one council waffle Monday night which
certainly rates a cheer from our side.
We refer to council's decision, after all, NOT to hold
a referendum on whether or not grad students should
pay full AMS fees after first year.
At a previous meeting, council had decided to take
the matter to the students at large. Which is equivalent
to asking them if they want to receive more money.
Which is — aside from nothing — the one sure thing
everyone will support every time.
So now, with the referendum NOT to be held,
council is doing the other alternative — nothing — about
the perennial problem of how much support those senior
student groups on the outskirts of the AMS — law,
medicine, graduate studies — should give the society.
To be sure, a referendum asking students to decide
whether third and fourth year med students — who
aren't even on campus — should pay a full AMS fee is
still slated to be held March 10.
But when those years of study return to campus in
a few years when the new med complex is finished, the
problem will probably be no further towards a solution
than it is now.
For our money (which it isn't), we like the suggestion that the grad students pay their own $12 grad
student fee (about $11 of which goes toward their
centre) plus that portion of the AMS fee which some
impartial committee determines, based on graduate students' use of the society (as, in direct grants, The Ubyssey
and so on).
One point which especially rankles the grad students
is having to kick in for two building projects — the
upkeep and expansion of their own project and the union
building project.
They're pretty loud in their thoroughly justified
beef about this, and we think that the fee arrangement
outlined above would certainly be good for them —
since they obviously wouldn't have to support the Great
Mistake.
And what's more, this would set a highly desirable
precedent, for other groups (such as engineering) whose
present or planned common room facilities make the
SUB superfluous for them would justifiably not have to
kick in to the thing.
And if this latter move meant that the Great Mistake
had to be shelved, and the money used to provide the
co-op residences (for all students) and more aid to common rooms (on Some proportional aid basis) and a
smaller scale Brock expansion (if needed) — well, that's
not a bad idea.
Id he, or id n't he?
Once upon a time there is a little king whom we read
about each morning.
Almost everything appears to roll along smoothly
in his classic-type castle.
The kitchen staff is in the scullery, Rodney is in
the armory and Wiz is in wizardry because his mother-
in-law is visiting.
The only apparent fault we see is the prisoner, and
the condition in which he lives.
King, in his wisdom, has never explained why the
poor old prisoner is incarcerated, which we suppose is
excusable, but why must the conditions in the dungeon
be as they are?
Swill for food every day, for example, is excusable
if there is a plausible reason, but King is beginning to
look ridiculous because he never gives an inkling of the
reasons behind the conditions and the swill.
We're sad to see he is failing to use the huge amounts
of space he has in each morning's paper to show why
such conditions remain. — N. B.
Response of le Quartier Latin, "journal bihebdomadaire
des Etudiants de I'Universite de Montreal," to the McGill
decision to stay out of UGEQ, the French student union.
Oh, really?
department
Police suspect fowl play in
a chicken-throwing incident in
Point Grey Sunday night.
Mrs. H. G. Sledz of 2554
Trimble told police her back
window was smashed and the
bird thrown into the kitchen
Seconds later a car sped away
from the yard. The bird was
uninjured and was turned
over to the  SPCA.
— The Province,
Feb. 21, 1966
The Minsk Tractor Plant,
the newest in the country, has
turned out its 400,000th Bye-
laruss tractor.
In the past seven years the
Soviet Union has manufactured 2 million tractors, twice
as many as were forecast by
preliminary  estimates.
Annual output is to rise
from 329,000 in 1964 to 625,-
000 in 1970.
Altogether, 1,790,000 will
be manufactured in the next
five years. More than 2,800,-
000 tractors worked the 38,-
000 collective and 10,000 state
farms  in   1965.
— Soviet Union
Today, Feb.. 1966.
LETTERS  TO  THE   EDITOR
We like permanent staff we liker
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir: brightening up now and Now previously I had only
It appears that there are again? enjoyed illusions of sexual
certain departments at this In view of this startling prowess whilst completely out
university that fail to realize revelation, may I ask you to of it. So the only decent thing
the value of good permanent overlook the prevailing order * nad to do was to down a
staff. and harmony (much as it may couple of quarts of old re-
There is one department hurt you to do so), to recogr frigerator fluid before tele-
that I am thinking of in par- nize good employee when you Phoning this dog the guys had
ticular, it is one with which I see one, and not throw your picked out for my potential
have much experience. staff around  hither and yon conquest.
Employees  of   this   depart- to  keep them  safe from the Telephoning wasn't bad, but
ment   are   suddenly   yanked evil  of  making friends with picking her up was hell,
away to work elsewhere al- us? she opened the door fatly
though they are well liked by a LOWER MALL RESIDENT and said, "Your face is red."
the students with whom they ubc "My  little   brother's   shirt,
work. riRcrrwr   iMDr.TCKi.-v Collar's tight."
It is for this reason that I ",?    ™    ttu            «*■ Arriving at the shaker was
..       .u       - „ Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir: ,.  .  T             , ,    _
write    the    following    open ' a relief. I was able to escape
letter. Yes,   it's   really  true.   You momentarily into the bedroom
Dear sirs: are about t0 eni°y immensely for a quickie (smoke, that is).
I am speaking for a large ™°thf &<** segment in the fiut ^ wag & mistake ghe
body of perplexed students. \*» of none other than Rad- followed     and     immediately
We fully realize that staff furd Clydefink. It follows . . . gned    her    dresg     Egad)    &
members of your department zt happened last year. nympho!   And   on   my   'first
who get on well with the stu- My buddy was throwing a date, too!
dents make for a harmony and shaker and it seemed the guys gne    couldn't    understand
efficiency    which    must    be were all taking (shudder) wo- wny   j   wouldn't   grovel   her
avoided at all costs, and fur- men. j_od.
ther, we realize that good re- Of   course   being   only   26 She called me emotionless,
lations between your depart- this was something I had ne- cold, incapable, impotent and
ment  and the  students  with ver  done  (heaven  to Murga- other    ego-shattering    sexual
which  it   is   concerned   is   a troyed, no). slanders,
thing to be discouraged. But  due  to  the  insistence I  guess  she  didn't  under-
Therefore, we are sure that of my buddies, that is, a bro- stand that I was saving my-
the present staff-shuffling will ken   arm,   and   a   just   read self for Hayley Mills,
go   a   long way  towards  the "Where Kiddies Kome From" RADFURD  CLYDEFINK
eradication of these  undesir- book I decided to initiate my- President
able elements and the speedy self. Hayley Mills Fan Club
re-establishment of chaos. r, -       -,         ~ - >-    •> - - ^t;^^^^^^^^:^^^mtm!s^^!^m0m^s^^w^m
It    is   the   purpose    Of   this EDITOR: Tom Wayman
Ipttpr tn infnrm  vnn nf n fart         New*        Ron Ri,er Dennis  Gans  led  the  dank dark
letter to inform you Of a fact        Asfoeiafe  G           Reamsbottom room ^"Monday   and measured
which   you   seem to   be   bllSS- clfvr                                           ,i ,.      u "P as the tallest photo chief since
,   „         J                     _.. ,     ..                         t"V   Al Donald Byron    Hender.    The    rest    of   the
fully   unaware.   Did    it   ever        Photo  Norm Betts slaves working for photo and city
occur to you that we like per-         Sports Ed Clark desk  were  Powell  Hargrave, Anhe
A..'* m_,__.                            n_- m..ii_._. Bali,   Carol   Wilson,   Kathy   Hyde,
manent staff that we can get *«» News     -—■    --    Dan Muii«n Fiu Bug Dick Taylori Inge Muel.
i      „       -iu    «,   t  j     tu   j     .1. Richard Blair, Robbi West ]er,   Val Zuker,  Bert Hill and Gus
along With, that do their ]ODS         A„/t city    Danny Stoffman Ricker. Tween classes typing team
well,    and    that   brighten   the         Page Friday     John Kelsey ™>-8   led   b*   Marilyn   Hill    Stuart
'                                      , u         •                              if Gray was part-time city editor. Al
Old place up just a bit?                       Managing   Ian Cameron Donald learned how to spell  Mul-
Features   Mike Bolton ten's   name.
Heaven knows it needs some    cup           _. Don Hull Tuesday,  February 22,  1966
THE        UBYSSEY
Page 5
FOREGROUND
Those  English  student  papers:
Fourth estate
swarms into
new colleges
The following gem was passed on to The Ubyssey by a
European fan, John Andrews
of the Daily Express. It was
clipped from the Manchester
Guardian, under the by-line
of Ann Shearer.
Every university has a
newspaper.
Essex has one, and York,
has just changed from "Rone-
oed" sheets to real print. East
Anglia has solved its teething
troubles, and the first edition of the "Mandate" will
come out on Saturday.
Even Kent, the paint barely
dry on its walls, is trying to
rustle one up.
Self - advertisement, after
all, is half the fun- of university life.
Nor is it scrappily done.
MOST LEAP
Some of the less opulent
and newer papers hover round
the eight-page mark, but most
leap between 12 and 16. Varsity, of Cambridge, often produces 24-page issues, and was
the (fourth paper in Britain to
bring out a color supplement.
University papers cost between 3d and 6d; between 1,-
500 and "Varsity" again —
6,000 people to buy them.
Printer's charge about £100
to produce an eight-page issue.
This weekly—or fortnightly
—sense of belonging could not
be purchased at all if it was
not for national advertisers
snapping up their column
inches at £1 or even less a
time.
ADVERTISING
The average university
newspaper picks up £1,000 or
more from national advertising in a year.
Some papers barely bother
with local advertising: Gong-
ster, of Nottingham, says that
90 per cent of its advertising
is national, and Hull's Torchlight 75 per cent.
Grants from the university
union can make for a more
stable  position.
GOAL OF MOST university newspapermen, here or in
England, is a spot on the big league papers. Here Nels
Hamilton, former UBC student, sits at the Sun's old desk
as night city editor. Nels is now associate editof of Vancouver  Life.
These are general in non-
collegiate universities where
the papers are, in fact, administered by a union committee,
their editors union-appointed,
and their offices, as often as
not, in the union building.
MORAL HOLD
The financial assistance is
welcome and sometimes essential, but the moral hold of
the union council is less popular.
The union is responsible
for possible libel damages,
and a (fairly firm eye is kept
on the content of the papers.
Most editors deny that this
is restricting or that there is
undue pressure from the union
council to splash its savings
large and kindly.
But there are hints of tension.
JOINED  BATTLE
Liverpool's "Guild Gazette"
last year joined battle with its
union and established autonomy: it still gets £500' a year
subsidy, with the promise of
an extra £100 if the paper
changes from fortnightly to
weekly printing.
Oxford and Cambridge,
cheerfully undemocratic, believing in spite of agitators
that unions are for debate and
drink, characteristically let.,
their papers get on with it.
Cherwell and Varsity are
both limited companies, with
boards comprised of ex-editors
and senior members of the
university, who hold the
shares between them. Independence can have its drawbacks in libel actions but insurance can cope with such
emergencies, and the papers
show an annual profit.
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
CHAIRMEN   NEEDED
Applications are now being received for chairmanship
of the following committees:
CANADIAN UNIVERSITY SERVICES OVERSEAS
CANADIAN UNION OF STUDENTS COMMITTEE
HIGH  SCHOOL  CONFERENCE  COMMITTEE
SPECIAL EVENTS COMMITTEE
WORLD UNIVERSITY SERVICE COMMITTEE
All applications shall be in writing and shall be addressed to the secretary   (Box 54).
Eligibility forms must be submitted with applications.
Eligibility forms are available at the secretary's office
(upstairs south Brock).
Applications must be submitted by 4:00 p.m., Thursday, Feb. 24.
10% Discount Given to
All U.B.C. Students on
Corsages
Vogue Flower Shop
2197 W.  Broadway 736-7344
66 Graduates—Any Discipline
If you are interested  in a sales career with
AMES CO. OF CANADA
manufacturers of a broad line of laboratory products
for hospitals and physicians, contact the University Placement Office for appointment.
INTERVIEWS  TO BE HELD  MARCH   1st
MAX DEXALL
OFFERS
10% Discount
to UBC Students
2609 Granville at 10th
A complete stock of all the popular makes
of shoes for the college student, as well as
hosiery, handbags, slippers, rubbers and
umbrellas.
What ever your need in footwear you'll find it at
Dexall's. Pay them a visit — see the exciting new
styles in their sparkling new location — and ask for
the 10% discount.
Better Shoes for Less
DEXALL'S - GRANVILLE AT 10TH - RE 8-9888
The Player's Jacket fashioned by BANTAMAC in Tcrylene*  - C'cl-C'il fibre.
Come on over to smoothness
with no letdown in taste      I
Rfi;,l Can   I M
Come on over to
New!
Player's
Kings Page 6
THE
UBYSSEY
Tuesday,   February   22,   1966
RUGGER  SPLIT
SPORTS at UBC
California trip
partly successful
By  DOUG  MOSER
UBC   rugby Thunderbirds   split  a
California.
Thursday the Birds dumped
the UCLA Bruins 41-6 in Los
Angeles.
UBC backs and forwards
scored seven tries, all of which
were converted by fullback
Mike Gartmell.
Cartmell added two dropped
pair   of   games   in
Soccer Birds
tie Firemen
to stay alive
UBC Thunderbirds soccer
team turned giant killers Saturday.
Thunderbirds held Pacific
Coast League-leading Firefighters to a scoreless draw at
Varsity Stadium.
Both teams were unable to
field their regular starting 11.
The Birds were weakened as
they failed to have their regulars and substitute goalies at
kick-off time.
So coach Joe Johnson called
on John Campbell, normally a
fullback for the Junior Tomahawks. Behind a solid UBC
defence, he came through in
fine fashion to hand the firemen their first shut-out of the
season.
Both teams seemed to have
trouble adapting to the slippery
turf, but what the play lacked
in finesse it more than made
up in spirit.
The Thunderbird forward
line had its chances but it was
the defence, led by John Haar,
that gave UBC the one point
in the standings.
The tie kept UBC in contention for a first-league place
|finish.
DIAMOND       RINGS
FLAIR
....   FROM »100
FIRBANKS
599  Seymour  -  Brentwood
and Park Royal
Ask about your student
Discount
goals   to   score   a   total  of   20
points for the game.
Saturday was a different
story. The Birds, under-strength
with three injuries from Thursday, went down 16-3 before a
much heavier pack in a sea of
California mud at Berkeley.
The University of California
Golden Bears, winners of the
World Cup last year, outweighed the UBC team by an average of 25 pounds.
Back on campus, UBC Totems suffered their first defeat
of the term, going down to
Meralomas 9-5.
At the same time the Tomahawks were hosting Blue
Bombers II. After a shaky
start, they added an 11-6 win
to their string of victories.
INTRAMURALS
Manager's  meeting   Wednesday noon, Memorial Gym room
211. Bring lacrosse entries.
•      *      •
MEN'S ATHLETIC
COMMITTEE
Elections noon Friday, room
211, War Memorial Gym. Anyone interested in nominating
a reliable person or running as
candidate for president, vice-
president, secretary, contact
Bus Phillips, Athletic Director,
War Memorial  Gym.
ROWING
UBC crew is looking for an
assistant manager to aid in
training for World  Champion
ships this summer. He should
be willing to accept all exotic
trips, glory and status associated with this position. Phone:
George AM  1-4906.
COMMERCE     GRADS     '66
interested  in
MARKETINGS & MANAGEMENT
Make   appointments   at  the   Placement   Office
Today and Tomorrow for Interviews
February 24th
The Mutual Life
ASSURANCE COMPANY OF CANADA
'A Canadian Company Owned by the Policyholders.
PAPERBACK
NEW ARRIVALS
List No. 78 - Feb. 16, 1966
Animal   Communication.   Frings.   (Blaisdell.)    2.50
Biological   Effects   of   Radiations.   Groseh.   (Blaisdell.)     3.50
Black  Book.  Durrell.  (Dutton.)     '•*»
Castroism:  Theory  &  Practice.  Draper.   (Praeger.)     2-35
China   and   the  Bomb.    Halperin.    (Praeger.)      2-35
Coming of the Europeans.  Grenville.   (Longmans.)     2.10
Course in the Slide  Rule and  Logarithms.  Hills.  (Ginn.)    3.00
Creoles and Cajuns: stories of old Louisiana. Cable. (Anchor.) _- 1.65
Democratic   Theory.    Sartori.    (Praeger.)                                                  -3.70
Discrimination   and   Popular   Culture.   Thompson.   (Pelican.)     .85
East   European    Revolution.   Seton-Watson.   (Praeger.)     3.15
Economic   Backwardness   in  Historical   Perspective:   a   book   of
essays.   Gerschenkron.   (Praeger.)      4.25
Electronic   Analog  Computer   Primer.   Stice.   (Blaisdell.)     2.75
Electronic  Structure & Chemical   Bonding.  Sebera.  (Blaisdell.)     3.50
Elementary   Plasma   Physics.   Arzimovich.  (Blaisdell.)     2.25
Help I   I'm a  Prisoner in  a Chinese  Bakery.  King.  (Avon.)     .60
Heredity  and  the  Nature  of  Man.  Dobzhansky.   (Signet.)  .60
In Pursuit of World  Order:   US foreign  policy  and  international.
Gardner.   (Praeger.)     2.50
Introduction  to   Logic  and  Sets.   Christian.   (Ginn.)     1.75
Joyce's,   James   —   Ulysses.   Gilbert.   (Peregrine.)   _. 3.50
King   Rat.   Clavell.   (Crest.)       -    — 3.50
Lattices   to   Logic.   Bubisch.   (Blaisdell.)     1.65
Limits: the Concept and its Role in Mathematics. Miller.  (Blaisdell.) 2.25
Modern  Discoveries in Medical  Psychology. Allen.  (Pan.)  1.50
Modern Drama: an Anthology of Wine Plays. Lowell.  (Ginn.)  3.00
Modern  European Poetry.  Barnstone.  (Bantam.)     1.65
Modular    Arithmetic.    Jones.    (Blaisdell.)     1.65
Moral Judgment of the Child. Piaget. (Free Press.)    2.65
Mosquitoes.  Faulkner.  (Dell.)    .60
New  Directory of Canadian  Universities and Colleges.   (Coles.) __ 2.95
Napoleon.   Markham.   (Mentor.)     .95
Natural  Philosopher   I.  (Blaisdell.)     1.95
Natural   Philosopher   2.   (Blaisdell.)     1.95
Natural   Philosopher   3.   (Blaisdell.)     1.95
Natural World:  a. guide  to  North  American  wildlife.   Viorst.
(Bantam.)     _  .75
New  Face  of  Soviet  Totalitarianism.   (Ulam.)   (Praeger.)     2.45
New   Look   at   Arithmetic.   Adler.   (Signet.)     .75
Nibelungenlied.   Hatto.   (Penguin.)         1.65
Norden:   crossroads  of destiny  and progress.  Malmstrom.   (Van
(Norstrand.)       1.75
One World Perspective. James. (Blaisdell.)  2.50
Origin of the Communist Autocracy. Schapiro. (Praeger.)  3.55
Origins of Intelligence in Children. Piaget.  (Norton.)    2.10
Pan   Book  of  Amateur   Dramatics.   Wykes.   (Pan.)     .85
Permanent   Revolution.   Neumann.   (Praeger.)     3.70
Physics   of    Ice.    Pounder.    (Pergamon.)      3.20
Pregnancy:  conception and  heredity.  Weiser.   (Blaisdell.)     1.50
Problems   of   Parents.   Spock.   (Crest.)     .60
Projective  Geometry,   Vol.   I.   Veblen.   (Blaisdell.)     2.25
Projective   Geometry,   Vol   II.   Veblen.   (Blaisdell.)     3.00
Puritan Heritage: America's roots in the bible. Gaer. (Mentor.) __ .95
Seeds  of  Liberty:  the  genesis  of  the  American   mind.   Savelle.
(U.  of  Washington.)     4.25
Shakespeare's   Plutarch.   Spencer.   (Peregrine.)     2.95
Slave   States.   Olmsted.   (Capricorn.)      1.45
Some   Prefer   Nettles.   Tanizaki.   (Berkley   Medallion.)        .60
Space   Propulsion.   Turcotte.    (Blaisdell.)      2.50
Story of Sandy. Wexler.  (Signet.)     ,50
Survey   of   English   Literature.   Phelps.   (Pan.)  ...     1.80
Thousand Cranes.  Bawabata.   (Berkley  Medallion.)     .60
Vietnam. (Eyre and Spottiswoode.)   .  .   _   _.  1.25
West: Contemporary Records of America's Expansion Across the
Continent: 1607 - 1890. Still. (Capricorn.)     1.65
World   of   Elementary   Particles.   Ford.   (Blaisdell.)     2.95
UBC BOOKSTORE Tuesday,  February 22,  1966
THE        UBYSSEY
Page 7
AROUND  THE CAMPUS
By BRIAN  CASSIDY
A gentle, hand-on-heart thank-you to those who used a
tiny part of their mid-term break to drop us a few lines about
athletic awards.
Bill Gillespie, Science IV, because he and his "group"
have hashed over the topic of athletic awards for years, feels
that he is "somewhat of an expert in this rather limited field
of thought."
Mr. Gillespie feels that there is no such thing as a
SCHOLAR-ATHLETE. Instead, he says, there "are only SCHOL-
AR-athletes and scholar-ATHLETES" and I am "sick or will
be pretty soon if I try to lay equal emphasis on the two
words."
Simmer down and cheer up, Bill. By emphsizing both, I
was hoping to point out that an athletic awards system should
not be loaded with athletes who can't meet the academic
entrance requirements.
Bill, you're also hilarious. The humor you exhibited when
you stated "Money is not of prime importance in the draw
any college has on athletes" grabbed me about my change
purse and really shook me up.
According to you, "Neither (scholar or athlete) gives a
damn about money."
Yes, Bill, I hate the stuff too.
With that I leave you all to form your own opinions of
said undesirable commodity.
Also cited were occurrences of shady behavior in an
athletic awards program. Mr. Gillespie states that although
this exists, it is not "a necessary consequence" of an awards
system, but must be considered because it exists.
I agree wholeheartedly that it must be considered and
so does our prominent faculty member who still wishes to
remain anonymous.
In iact, our phantom prof, who feels he is rapidly entering a minority, states that if an athletic awards system comes
into being, he will accept it and thereafter commence to work
like hell to keep it clean.
Good for our phantom Chalk one up for athletic awards.
Sorry we couldn't print your whole letter, Bill.
At least you wrote, though, which is more than can be
said for the UBC faculty and a slightly vast majority of
students.
Hark, people, sharpen your quills and let your views be
known!
Birds beat hex,
shuffle past jokers
The Thunderbirds field hoc- [Braves  trounced North Shore
key  team  broke a  year-long
jinx Saturday.
Birds defeated Jokers A 2-1
for the first time in just over
12 months. The teams had tied
on four previous meetings.
Bruce Hodgson, a newcomer
to the sport playing his first
game for UBC, scored the winning goal late in the second
half.
The win clinched the sixth
consecutive Vancouver Field
Hockey League title for the
Thunderbirds.
In   other   games   Saturday,
RUSHANT
CAMERAS LTD.
4538 West 10th
The Store with the
Technical Photo Knowledge
* TRADES
6 MENTALS
* TERMS
4 REPAIRS
Try us for the best in
CUSTOM PHOTOFINISHING
Black and White and Color
We are always ready to help
with all your
Photographic Problems
DARKROOM SPECIALISTS
Your B.C. ILFORD stockist
224-5858   224-9112
Free Parking at Rear
"B" 7-0 to remain on top of the
Third Division but Tomahawks
were buried 12-0 by a young
Hawks B team.
COACH PUGH
OPTIMISTIC
Cindermen look fine
By HAL ARMSTRONG
Several outstanding individual performances and a good
relay effort by UBC's track and
field team at the Canadian National Indoor Championships
Saturday point to a strong performance by the squad at the
upcoming intercollegiate meet
at Winnipeg this weekend.
Cross-country veterans Dave
Aune and Sean Duffey both
placed second in the Open 600-
Want  to  stick
in  the  wicket?
UBC will have three undergraduate cricket teams
this year.
Starting in mid-April, UBC
cricketers will be limbering
up for spring and summer
competition with teams from
Victoria and Seattle, and
about 25 local teams.
If you are interested, contact Peter Heap at 224-5251
or Bill Smickersgill at 224-
7218.
yard and the Club 1,000-yard
respectively in the meet at tho
PNE Agrodome.
Aune took an early lead in
his evening race but was overhauled in the last lap by Mike
Evans of Washington State, one
of the best West Coast quarter-
milers.
Aune registered 1:14.3 behind Evan's winning time of
1:13.4.
Sprinter Chip Barrett qualified for the final of the 50 yd.
dash, which was won by Harry
Jerome from a field of top Canadian talent after four false
starts
In the mile relay, UBC's
team of Tony Clarke, Jim
Hawke, Geoff Stancombe, and
Aune placed a respectable third, edging out a stacked
Ontario squad which will form
the backbone of their relay opposition in Winnipeg.
All four were under 52 seconds in the event, which was
won by Washington State.
On the strength of UBC's
showing at the international
meet coach Lionel Pugh feels
UBC has an excellent chance
of retaining its Canadian intercollegiate title and the Golden
Buffalo trophy Feb. 26.
BAY
SWAN LAKE
Bolshoi Ballet
plus
HUSH HUSH - SWEET
CHARLOTTE
(Adult)
Belie Davis - Joseph Cotton
STUDENTS 75c
DELTA
FEB. 25 & 26
NATURE GIRL AND THE
SLAVER
Marion Michaels
Plus
A GLOBAL AFFAIR
B. Hope, Lilo Pulvei
SPECIAL
EVENTS
presents
THE VANCOUVER SYMPHONY
Meredith Davies, Conductor
      ~       A
T
h
u
r
s.
N
o
o
n
Selections from Bernstein, Shastakovitch, Wagner,
Walton _and Turine.
COMING
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 25th
Kimeo Eto, Japan's Foremost Koto Player
SATURDAY, MARCH 5th
Paul Winter Sextet — Jazz at its best.
JJJnL Soasdy, (pJUL&sinJtA.
PRIDE &
PREJUDICE
With Laurence Olivier
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 24th
12:30, 3:30, 6:00 and 8:30
AUDITORIUM
50c
| THE LUSTROUS LOOK IS IN
FOR SPRING!
Glenayr
NEW SILKY
ANTRON
It's so feminine—the
exciting new look for
Spring—the shimmering
new pastel look—captured
here by Kitten in this new
perfectly matching cardigan
and skirt—the cardigan with
raglan shoulders (shapely)
and % sleeves. 34-42,
$13.98. The fully-lined
straight skirt to perfectly
match, 8-20, $15.98.
Both in the fabulous new
fibre—silky Antron.
Look for Kitten's
lustrous new look at
\ good shops everywhere!
Without this label
&&*.&
it is not a genuine KITTEN. Page 8
THE        UBYSSEY
Tuesday,   February  22,   1966
7WEEN CLASSES
Carious off to sleep
PRE-DENTAL SOC
Dr.   Yorsh   speaks   on   Hypnotism   in Dentistry,   Bu.   204
noon.
SPECIAL EVENTS
Concert by Vancouver Symphony Orchestra, noon in armory. Program includes works
from Bernstein and Shosta Ko-
vitch. 35 cents.
HILLEL FOUNDATION
See Israeli Folk Dancers,
South American Dancers, Filipino Dancers, Scottish Highland Dancers and hear vocalist Murray Schoolbraid in
Brock at noon.
FILM SOC
Pride   and    Prejudice    with
Laurence     Olivier     Thursday
12:30,  3:30,   6:00,  and  8:30  in
Aud.  50  cents.
ONTOLOGICAL SOC
Let Life Live You! Ron Po-
lack    speaks    on    Wednesday
noon in Bu. 221.
VIET  NAM  COMMITTEE
Dr.  Willmott  speaks on  Second   Indo-Chinese   War   Wednesday noon in Aud. All welcome.
HILLEL   FOUNDATION
Thursday noon, Bu. 100, Simma   Holt   speaks  on   the   new
story   of   Doukhobors   in   our
present  society.
IH
Exhibit of paintings by Mr.
Iu  I-Hsiung,  a  Chinese  artist.
Feb. 24 - March 4.
PRE MED
Dr.    Glen    McDonald,    City
Coroner,   Wednesday   noon   in
Wes. 201.
CINEMA  16
Les Abysses — Aud. 8:00
p.m. Open to all Cinema 16
members and International
Series Pass holders.
SPECIAL EVENTS
LAST MINUTE TICKETS
available for Russian violinist
Boris Gutnikov, Wednesday;
and for tonight's performance
of II Trovatore. Special Events
Office, Rm. 255 Br. Ext.
Elementary   &   Secondary
FUTURE
TEACHERS
•
DON'T
BELIEVE
RUMORS
The Vancouver School Board
does hire many teachers
directly from university
SO
when  you   are
applying for an
elementary or secondary
teaching  position,
remember to   apply  to  the
Vancouver
School Board
1595  West  10th Avenue
For an interview
call RE 1-1131
CHRISTIAN   SCIENCE
The Story  of  Christian  Science   —-   a   film,   Wednesday
noon in Bu. 202.
PHOTO SALON
Annual Salon of Photography opens today. Presentation of prizes and display of
accepted color slides, Ang. 104
at noon. Display of black and
white photography in Ed.
Lounge until Mar. 4.
CUS
Seminar on Rhodesia, Robert
Zwhoira speaks at noon in Bu.
106.
COMMUNITY  PLANNING
Free illustrated lecture at
noon in Lass. 102. Prof. F. R.
Issacs, Harvard University —
Gropius and the city.
EL CIRCULO
Spanish speaking day in IH.
Coffee available.
IL CAFFE
Italian speaking day in IH
Wednesday. Films on Italy at
noon. Coffee.
SUS
Nominations for executive
positions open until Wednesday. General meeting Thursday noon in Hennings 200.
Elections Wednesday. March 2.
WUS
German exchange student
speaks at WUS meeting today
in council chambers, Brock.
BADMINTON CLUB
Tournament starts tonight.
COMMUNITY  PLANNING
Free  Illustrated  Lecture
PROF. R.R. ISAACS
Dept. of City and Regional Planning, Harvard University
Gropius & The City"
Tuesday
February 22
Lasserre 102
12:30 p.m.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days. $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Please bring or send to Publications Office, Brock Hall.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost 8c Found
11
FOUND ADS inserted free. Publication! office, Brock Hall. Local 26,
224-3242.
THIEF. PLEASE RETURN THOSE
Psych, books to Lost and Found.
Finals are comin. Don't be a
crud.
LOST — ALUMINUM "STA D"
camera tripod. Please leave with
Ponderosa cashier.
Special Notices
13
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INST.R-
ance rates? If you ar_ over 20
and have a good driving history
you qualify for our good driving
rates.  Phone Ted  Elliott,  224-6Z07,
RUMMAGE SALE. ACADIA CAMP
Recreation Hall, Friday, Feb. 25,
1-9 p.m. and Saturday, Feb. 26,
10-2  p.m.     	
THE SLIPPED DISC-O-THEQUE
Pre-Med Annual Ball, March 5th
at The Coach House, bar, door
prizes. With the Dartelles. $3.50
couple,   at   A.M.S.            	
DARLING: I DON'T CARE IF IT
isn't new. I love you. R. H. Would
the mysterious card sender please
make their identity known. Both
R.H. and G.P. are very interested.
Get in  touch in the same manner.
WINTER IS COMING
WINDER IS COMING
WINTER   IS   COMING
Wanted
15
TWO LADIES' BICYLES WITH
gears wanted. Call Daphne, UBC,
Local 244 or 733-2304 evenings."
Automobiles For Sale
21
1958 ZEPHYR IN GOOD CONDI-
tion. Radio and heater. 3831 W. 13
Ave. CA 4-3053.
'61 SUNBEAM HARDTOP. CLEAN.
Smart as new. Whitewalls, twin
carb, overdrive, sporty economical,
for quick sale, $850.00. Phone 922-
0236.
SPECIAL
'61   CORVAIR   COUPE   700.   Asking
$675.00.  Stan.  Trans,  in  good  condition.   Call   228-2248   or  224-9940.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Typewriters & Repairs
42
GOOD CLEAN TYPEWRITERS. $20
up. Also Typewriter repairs at
SO percent savings. Poison Typewriters, 2140 W. 4th. Phone RE
1-8322.
Typing
43
PROFESSIONAL TYPING, ARDALE
Griffiths Limited, 70th and Granville,  263-4530.
STUDENTS — TYPING DONE, MT
home. Essays, reports, etc. tow
rates,  Phone  261-2996.	
TYPING 25c PAGE OR $1.95 HR.
West End, 685-5539 eves. Campus
pick-up & delivery. 224-6341,
(John).  Leave  tel.   no.	
THESIS TYPING
'65   W.P.M.   4   YRS.   OFFICE   Experience.   Call   Inger   at   254-2"_56.
Reasonable rates.
WILL DO TYPING IN MY HOME.
Reasonable rates.  224-9174.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted 51
PIZZA PATIO IS CONTtNUIJSG
with its policy of making employment available to students for part
time evening work—one or two
evenings a week. Students considering applying must have clean
driving record for use of Company
cars and be 21 years of age or
older. Contact Manager at .the
Pizza Patio most convenient to
you after 5 p.m. Locations In Kerrisdale, South Van., Downtown
and West  Van.
PS:   New   outlet   now   open   close
to  U.B.C.
TWO STUDENTS WANTED FOR
part time work now, and full time
during summer. Duties include
maintenance work on apartments
& revenue houses and occasional
chauffering. Applicants must "be
reliable and of neat appearance. All
applications in writing. Send name,
address & phone number and "recent photo to Mr. Alexander, 1320
Comox,   Vancouver 5.
Guitarists Wanted
61
EXPERIENCED LEAD AND BASS
guitarists still needed for up-and-
coming British R & B group, for
audition, phone Stu, YU 5-5541:
Dance
62
DANCE TO THE ACCENTS. TO-
tem Park, Friday, Feb. 25, 9 -1
a.m. A.M.S. Cards, Please.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
ROOM-MATE WANTED (MALE)
preferably -senior years, to share
expenses of fully furnished two
bedroom apartment. Phone !RE
3-7805,   (reasonable   rent,   $25).'
Apartments
83
WANTED. MALE TO SHARE A
suite with same. Phone after 6
p.m.   224-3102.
HEEAR - A Panel of African Students
DISCUSS-
"Religion, Social Change and
Race Relations in Africa"
Thursday, February 24 - 8:00 p.m.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
SIMPSONS-SEARS
LIMITED
•
will be interviewing
B. Comm. and B.A. Students
for Challenging Careers
in all phases of
Retail Merchandising
Today and Tomorrow
•
Arrange an interview at the
Placement Office today.
SIMPSONS-SEARS    LIMITED
CAN YOU LOSE YOUR HEART
TO A MOTION PICTURE?
Why not, when an entertainment like "A PATCH OF BLUE"
comes out of the blue and falls right into your lap. This is a very
special kind of film. It's a love story...warm and human. It also
happens to be a drama of unflinching realism... Great talents
have come together to make "A PATCH OF BLUE"—
from Academy-Award winners Sidney Poitier and Shelley
Winters to new discovery Elizabeth Hartman to writer-director
Guy Green ("The Mark"—"Light in the Piazza"). Everyone,
including the critics*, has fallen in love with "A PATCH
OF BLUE." We think the same thing will happen to you. It's
just that kind of motion picture. IT'S YOUR KIND OF
MOTION PICTURE!
'SPECIAL MAGIC!"
5a/. Review
*"0NE OF THE YEAR'S TEN BEST!%.y.»,.,
A VERY SPECIAL FILM!"
Cue
BL«e
METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER pttanis A PANORO S.BERMAN-GUY GREEN PRODUCTION siamn,
SIDNEY POITIER SHELLEY WINTERS ELIZABETH HARTMAN
Adult Entertainment Only
Starts WEDNESDAY, PARK ROYAL, West Vancouver
JUST WEST OF EATON'S       •       922-9174       •       AMPLE FREE PARKING
2  PERFORMANCES—7:00 AND 9:00  PM.

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