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The Ubyssey Jan 9, 1979

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Array UBC residents take end run
To avoid eviction, students at Gage
Towers are now playing "show and tell" with
their standards committee, pleading innocence in the Dec. 5 "mass participation"
of hurling projectiles out of windows.
Housing director Mike Davis said the
standards committee will be highly effective
in deciding exactly which students hurled
water bombs, computer cards and toilet
paper rolls out of windows.
"You have to prove that you weren't
one of the ones throwing stuff out the window. It's up to your testimony," he said
Monday.
Standards committee chairwoman
Patricia Davis said she thought "more than
half of Gage" was involved in the incident as
either spectators or participants.
Equipped with a list of about 50 names,
the standards committee met last night to ask
students to admit their personal involvement,
present evidence and provide additional information on the incident.
"All standards can do is try," Davis said
Monday. ".We want the students' and
residents' point of view."
She said the committee will be more effective than the housing department in handling the situation because the reasoning comes
directly from the student community itself.
"We can say how we saw it happen, how
we felt about it that night," she said.
Residence student affairs coordinator
John Mate said Monday he thought it was
much more feasible for the standards committee to deal with the incident.
"It's their (the residents') community.
They reach more people," he said. "I prefer
the committee to look into it, more than an
outside person like me."
Two days after the incident, John Mate
sent a letter to about 15 students in the three
quads in question announcing his decision to
"hold all those people who were present
responsible."
He declared to those who were merely
spectators: "I am therefore considering your
eviction, and unless I receive exact information as to who actually heaved the projectiles,
I shall recommend to the Director, Mike
Davis, your immediate eviction."
One source described the house advisors' treatment of the incident as
"authoritative, threatening," and added
the letter threatening eviction was a blatant
example of "blackmail" and "scare tactics."
"There were so many people involved, I
don't think anyone should be kicked out,"
the resident said.
"I think they should forget the whole
thing."
Former standards committee chairman
Rob Margolis, whose quad was also involved
in the incident, said he agreed that evictions
should be ignored.
"I don't think anyone should be
evicted/' he said Monday. "The first letter
(mentioning evictions) was definitely
unfair."
Margolis, who received the letter of
possible eviction himself, said people were
seen throwing things from his quad while he
was present.
Due to his presence at the time of the incident and its implications, he resigned Dec.
2 "in order to preserve the integrity of the
standards committee."
Mate justified the letter by saying that
exams prevented the students on the standards committee from having sufficient time
to deal with the situation.
"It's hard to know what to do. I wasn't
out to kick innocent people out of
residence," he said.
On Dec. 14, a second letter was issued
which Margolis said was "definitely more
fair." The letter encouraged people responsible for throwing things out of windows to
"take responsibility for their actions (in
order to save their quad-mates or floor-mates
further inconvenience) by giving their names
to the standards committee.
THE UBYSSEY) *,tario «•
slices profs
POLAR BEAR HUNTERS on expedition to main library pond in search
of great white fuzzy-wuzzy met with disaster Monday when their craft
was caught in tricky shifting ice floes that have claimed many a hapless
adventurer in past. Hungry and frost-bitten, the fur-fanciers were last
_ —ross burnett photo
seen stalking ferocious Sedgewick vending machines, rated among most
vicious beasts in world, in desperate bid for survival. Stay tuned for
Thursday's front page photo, which will feature discovery of fabled lost
city of Atlantis in UBC's magic watering hole.
'Politicians profit while students pay'
By HEATHER CONN
Education representatives at UBC are
doubtful that the Vancouver school board's
proposed $2.6 million budget cut will
drastically decrease employment chances for
education graduates.
"I don't think it's going to make too much
difference," education dean John Andrews
said Monday. "It's not of general concern to
me."
Andrews said it was clear that teaching jobs
in Vancouver would be scarce, but added that
this was the case for the last several years.
"There are a lot of teachers needed
elsewhere," he said.
Associate education professor Charles
Ungerleider said he agreed that the employment situation for teachers would be no
different than in other years with the proposed
budget cut.
"Things have always been difficult, and
they'll continue to be difficult," he said
Monday.
Ungerleider said educational cutbacks are
always a popular topic and added that it is the
public school students who suffer.
"It's generally the students who pay the
price when politicians seek to profit from
talking about school budget cutbacks," he
said.
Education students association president
Heather Lacelle said students in classrooms
are definitely the ones most affected by
educational cutbacks.
"You're hurting kids a hell of a lot more
than teachers," she said Monday. "The kids
1 will suffer in the long run."
Lacelle said cutbacks in teaching staff in
crease the pupil/teacher ratio in schools, with
poor results for students.
"You can't teach properly with 40 kids in
the class. Most classes have about 25 students
and that's a handful.
"They're making it hard on the kids."
Vancouver teachers have said they are
considering job actions such as working to rule
and are prepared to go on strike if the Non
Partisan Association-dominated school board
tries to cut back teaching staff.
"It's undesirable to threaten a person's
job security unnecessarily," said Ungerleider.
"If teachers' jobs are threatened, it's
reasonable for them to seek ways to protect
themselves."
He said he thought Vancouver teachers were
probably considering strike action only as a
last resort to protect themselves after taking
job action such as work to rule.
OTTAWA (CUP) — Tuition fees
will rise and professors will become
an endangered species next year in
Ontario because of low provincial
grants to post-secondary institutions.
The Tory government's announcement Friday of a five per
cent grant increase is expected to
mean 250 to 380 faculty positions
will be slashed at Ontario
universities next year. Tuition is
also expected to rise by five per cent
because of the small grants, which
will not keep up with the annual 8.8
per cent inflation rate.
The Ontario Federation of
Students, which has been conducting a campaign against tuition
increases and funding cuts, said the
government is following "an apparent policy of undereducation for
Ontario."
"This announcement from the
ministry (of education) reads like
an invitation to a wake," said OFS
chairwoman Miriam Edelson. "It's
another nail into the coffin of
quality education."
The Ontario Council on
University Affairs had recommended a $67 million funding
increase for universities this fall but
colleges arid universities minister
Bette Stephenson announced that
only a $41 million increase will be
granted.
OCUA head William Winegard
says that even if the original OCUA
recommendation had been followed
it would have meant severe restraint
for the universities.
The government announcement
means university students will have
to pay about five per cent more next
year (about $35 for a full-time
student), while college students
must pay 5.7 per cent more (about
$10 per term).
Last year OFS protested a 5.8 per
cent increase in government grants
because it too was lower than the
level than inflation. But according
to OFS representative Allen
Golombek, "compared to this, last
year looked good."
Golombek predicted that because
of suspected enrolment declines
university revenues would only
increase 4.4 per cent. This will
mean no new blood in university
faculty and severe cuts in library
and research expenditures, he said.
Ontario university students were
hit with a $100 tuition fee hike in
1977.
Walter Pitman, president of
Ryerson Poly technical Institute,
said the low grants will mean staff
cuts and larger classes. "It will have
a detrimental effect on our
programs. It will mean every
program will suffer; classes will
have to gel: larger. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 9, 1979
S.A. stocks dropped
EDMONTON (CUP) — The
University of Alberta has decided it
is willing to sell off its investments
in companies involved with South.
Africa.
Don Young, a campus member
of the Free South Africa committee, says the U of A finance
committee has decided to stop
investing in firms which have interests in South Africa and will sell
all such investments currently held.
The university has more than $15
million invested in 46 companies
who deal within South Africa, he
said.
But Dan Kanashiro, acting investment officer in the U of A
investment office, says the finance
committee has only decided to
consider a general policy on social
issues.   The   policy   would   cover
investments in politically-sensitive
countries such as South Africa,
Rhodesia and Uganda, he said.
Young says the university will sell
almost $2.5 million worth of Rothmans stock, $667,000 of General
Motors, $645,000 of Hudson Bay
Oil and Gas, $409,000 of Royal
Bank shares and more.
But Kanashiro says the university
only has about $1 million invested
in companies operating in South
Africa.
OPTIC
ZONE
Student Discounts
ARBUTUS VILLAGE
733-1722
K0RRES
*w MOVING ANOT.
IH TRANSFER LTD. I"
1STORAGE
Big or
Small Jobs^
Reasonable
Rates
2060 W. 10t.
Vancouver
732-9898
ALSO GARAGES,
BASEMENTS & YARDS
CLEAN-UPS
Summer jobs
Getting one takes initiative.      ^
And one of the best initiatives you can take is to
help get a Young Canada Works project going
your way.
Young Canada Works is a federal government
job creation program that funds projects designed
to improve your skills and future job prospects.
But projects must be applied for by groups or
organizations.. .companies, associations, clubs, etc.
So the best thing you can do is to suggest a
good project (creating at least 3 student jobs lasting
from 6 to 18 weeks each between May and
September) to a group or organization you know.
Then work on the project yourself.
Application forms and guides are ready now at
your nearest Canada Employment Centre/Canada
Manpower Centre or Job Creation Branch office.
Do your homework. And make sure the application gets in by the February 2 deadline. It just might
work for you.
■ ^    Employment and Emploi et
■ t     Immigration Canada    Immigration Canada
Bud Cullen, Minister    Bud Cullen, Ministre
Two representatives from the Job Creation Branch will
be available at the Canada Employment Centre on Campus which is located in Room 214 Brock Hall from
12:30—2:30 on Thursday, January 11th to discuss the
Young Canada Works Program with anyone interested in
submitting an application for the summer of 1979.
R3DFTOP PARKING
224-4912
sre
HAIRWORLD
SASAMAT (W Oh AVE. & SASAMAT
VANCOUVER
Employment
Personnel from the Ministry
of Labour will be on
campus at U.B.C, Canada
Employment Centre, Room
214, Brock Hall from:
JANUARY 15-19,
1979...
to accept applications for
summer employment with the
provincial government under
the Provincial Youth Employment Program. Students who
completed Youth Job Applications in November, 1978
need not re-apply.
Province of Ministry of
British Columbia Labour
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY PROGRAMS Tuesday, January 9, 1979
THE      UBYSSEY
Pag* 3
, * ■■- ■*
j.
■*ei.ijw
-ft;..
C'tee blasts
Sandhu
»••
*
-^i* i' '.,.„v.
1
~jk\
—peter menyasz photo
UNFORTUNATE BASKET CASE babbles incoherently about missed deadlines, staff shortages, scratched
stories and other horrors of the newspaper business as he leaves Ubyssey offices in stretcher for extended stay at
Happy Valley Home for Editors. Actually St. John's Ambulance team was teaching UBC firemen basic ambulance
techniques on SUB stairwell outside Ubyssey offices Monday afternoon. Medics prescribed infusion of new staff
to SUB 241K every Monday, Wednesday and Thursday at noon as only possible cure.
Paul Sandhu no longer sits on the
board of governors, but his expulsion from a December board
meeting might come back to haunt
the board.
Two students have established an
ad hoc committee to investigate and
protest Sandhu's expulsion from
the Dec. 6 board meeting.
Sandhu was ejected after he
admitted discussing confidential
funding proposals for completing
the Asian Centre with The Ubyssey.
The matter had been discussed in a
closed session of the previous board
meeting, and those who voted for
Sandhu's expulsion, including the
other student representative Basil
Peters, said this breach of confidentiality was the reason for his
removal.
"I'm sick of the fact that
everybody just takes it. People
might talk about it for a few days,
but nobody ever does anything,"
said committee organizer Lillian
Starr, fine arts 3.
"What's the need for all this
confidentiality anyway? There may
be one or two things that may cause
problems if secrecy were not
maintained, but I can't think of
any."
Jeremy Cato, arts 3, said the administrators  have   forgotten   that
they are public servants, hired to
serve students.
"What it boils down to is that the
administration does so many things
without the: student body knowing
about them or approving them and
it's time somebody did something
about it," he said.
"The administrators are public
servants, they work for us, and
without students where would they
be? This administration has lost
sight of that fact."
Cato also said he wants the board
to be more responsive to students
and added that the board should
send a letter of apology to students.
Both Cato and Starr criticized
Peters for voting to expell Sandhu.
"Basil Peters has demonstrated
that he is a great yes man," Starr
said. Cato said Peters had "sold
out."
Starr said he was more concerned
with the confidentiality of the
meetings, and not Sandhu's
ejection.
"I asked this guy from a science
faculty what he thought of the
board's secrecy and he said 'no
comment," Starr said.
The ad hoc committee will be
meeting in SUB 215 at noon
Monday.
Campus blasts from recent past
Senate rejects
degree study
An attempt to have the UBC
senate's curriculum committee
conduct a study of core
requirements for a bachelor's
degree failed for a second time at
the December senate meeting.
Law student senator Eric Warren
said he wanted to question "the
entire philosophy behind the
granting of bachelors'   degrees."
Warren said he moved his motion
to place an emphasis on interdisciplinary exposure, which he
says would add a greater depth to
the requirements for a bachelor's
degree.
An investigation should be made
into the institution of an interdisciplinary general studies program,
he said.
Arts dean Robert Will said the
senate defeated Warren's motion
because a study of the degrees
would infringe on the rights of the
faculties. The usual procedure is
that the faculties submit proposals
to the senate, and not the other way
around, he said Monday.
Graduate studies dean Peter
Larkin said he agreed with the
intent of the motion, but found it
too ambiguous to support.
"It amounts to us sitting down
and saying 'let's look at everything
we've done,' " he said. But
separate studies concerning a
general studies program and the
requirements for a bachelor's
degree in the arts and science
faculties would be beneficial, he
added.
Chemistry department head
Charles McDowell moved to have
Warren's motion ruled out of order
on the basis that it exceeded the
curriculum committee's jurisdiction. McDowell's motion was
defeated after a half-hour debate.
Warren said he felt that a desire
for   faculty   autonomy   and   the
resistance among department and
faculty heads to university intrusion
into their jurisdictions led to the
defeat of his motion.
Since a similar motion was also
defeated by senate in October,
Warren says the only option open
to him is to present his proposal to
individual faculties or wait until a
new senate is elected.
UBC's 12 faculties offer 17
different bachelors' degrees.
UBC's senate is responsible for
establishing academic standards,
accepting new programs and
determining qualifications. There
are 17 student representatives on
the   105-member   senate.
SUS grasps for
student bucks
Science students will decide Jan.
15 and 16 whether to approve a one
dollar levy to finance science
undergraduate activities.
Science Undergraduate Society
spokeswoman Anne Gardner said
Thursday that last year's fee
referendum fell 14 votes ~short of
quorum, needed to institute an indefinite SUS fee.
"Last year 91 per cent of those
who voted were in favor of the one
dollar fee levy," she said, "but at
least 15 per cent of the members
have to vote to establish the fee indefinitely."
The fee levy is the only source of
funding since the Alma Mater
Society grants to undergraduate
societies were abolished two years
ago. This action was meant to encourage societies to be more responsive to members and to fund
themselves.
Speakers, mini-courses, and intramural programs are among the
projects that the SUS fee would pay
for, said Gardner.
The fee referendum will be held
at the same time as the senate and
board of governors' elections next
week.
Nurses settle
for contract
UBC's registered nurses and the
university administration have settled their dispute over fringe benefit
conditions in their new contract.
The dispute ended in late
December with the signing of a two-
year contract with the Registered
Nurses' Association of B.C. The
contract gives UBC's more than 200
nurses a four per cent wage increase
for 1978, and a six per cent increase
in 1979. Other details have not been
released by the two parties.
The RNA represents nurses at
UBC's extended care hospital,
psychiatric unit and student health
services.
The nurses voted 92 per cent in
favor of strike action in November,
after negotiations between the
association and the university broke
down in a heated contract dispute.
A university spokesman said during
the dispute that fringe benefit discrepancies exist between the nurses'
university contract and a master
agreement which applies to all
employees in the health industry
outside UBC.
Enrolment up 1%
UBC's enrolment this year is the
highest ever, with 31,985 students, a
one per cent increase over last
year's 31,572.
More women students and part-
time students are enrolled at UBC
this year, with women comprising
45 per cent of the total student
body. This is a three per cent increase over the last four years.
This year's part time enrolment
increased by seven per cent to a new
high of 6,031, comprising 23.79 per
cent of the total student body.
—peter menyasz photo
NFL FOOTBALL MADNESS HITS CAMPUS Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 9, 1979
B**i*iG, it/a., TetuouS
Att> )0HUSS*Aj6SA)67HtHe
IQ'/MJmU
Sterling pounds
Sterling Lyon, the one man depression machine and the Progressive Conservative premier of Manitoba, is rapidly trying to turn
his province into a rural backwater. The mass firings of civil servants, the cutting and cancellation of many programs, often the
more imaginative and active ones, pose a grim prospect for that
province's citizens.
Doug Smith, in this issue's page five article, describes how the
cuts are currently affecting the province's civil servants. But the
principal people they serve: the unemployed, those on welfare,
students, senior citizens, small businessmen and others who need
government services in one form or another, will be the ones
hardest hit.
The cuts are the concrete manifestation of much of the right
wing tax revolt and anti-government spending forces which have
sprung up from behind every bush recently.
The situation in Manitoba is important to British Columbians
because it shows what we will soon be experiencing if our Socred
government continues to cut government expenditures wherever
and whenever possible.
We face double jeopardy in that we may also be facing in the
near future a federal Progressive Conservative government. Joe
Clark and some of his cronies have expressed interest in what
Lyon is doing in Manitoba.
We have faced a minor version of these government cutbacks
recently in the form of higher costs for most government-provided
services which are now being required to pay for themselves. Auto
insurance, ferry rates and bus fare increases are examples in the
field of transportation alone.
The recent decision by the provincial government to impose a
municipal tax freeze is the latest example of this fiscal austerity
campaign. This freeze, which limits municipal and school budget
increases to five per cent, will mean considerable hardship for
municipalities and regional governments which are also being asked to assume greater responsibility for transit, hospitals and pollution controls, formerly a provincial government responsibilities.
A paradox indeed, and one that will become increasingly difficult
for British Columbians to endure.
THE UBYSSEY
JANUARY 9, 1979
Published Tuesdays. Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the
AMS or the university administration. Member, Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial office is in
room 241K of the Student Union Building. Editorial departments, 228-2301; Advertising, 228-3977.
Editor: Mike Bocking
Ubyssey staffers are no different than other students. As their fellow pupils returned to the hallowed
halls of learning, many budding journalists brought with them memories of an illness-plagued holiday.
Two Geof Wheelwrights appeared, complaining of schizophrenia, Steve Howard went home early,
sporting a case of "home-brew" fever. Dave van Blarcom was sneezing from a cold that he caught in a
political snowstorm. Bill Tieleman felt rotten to the core. His doctor had diagnosed him as having
Dutch Elm disease. Ross Burnett couldn't picture himself sick, bu succumbed to seasickness
nonetheless. Peter Menyasz had Saturday Night Fever, caught from a Friday-night date. Paul Wilson's
albatross was a rare tropical ailment that causes random hair growth. Tom Hawthorn burdened under a
mass of traction equipment, trying to correct his spinal myopia. Heather Conn had acute appendix,
along with everything else. Judy G. broke out in "last-name" amnesia. Verne McDonald was sniffling
and snorting through his burned-out-sinusitis. Glen Schaefer successful overcame a bout of
homesickness. Kevin McGee's terminal arthritis slowed him down some. Mike Bocking fell prey to cirrhosis of the liver, and conspicuous consumption. Sick, sick, sick!
Piranha Peters
eats own kind
A piranha in a three-piece suit.
That's the impression formed from watching Basil Peters, "student" board of governors
member for the past three years.
It's pretty well general knowledge among students involved with the Alma Mater Society
that many (not all, fortunately) become involved with student politics for one reason — to list
a goody-two-shoes credit on a resume.
But even the most cynical and
self-serving student hacks recognize
that they have some duty to serve
their constituents, the students who
overcame apathy to register a vote
for them.
$
a
By BILL TIELEMAN
Apparently Basil Peters does not
even acknowledge that scant duty.
Peters' latest comments, on the
expulsion of fellow student board
member Paul Sandhu from a board
meeting for informing students
what was going on with attempts to
finance the completion of the
neglected Asian Centre with
Alberta petrodollars, show exactly
which side of the fence he stands
on. Peters said of Sandhu's ejection
from the meeting:
"I would be hard pressed to
disagree with a decision to remove
students from the board after this."
What?
It must seem incredible to those
who haven't observed Peters'
performance as student board
member over the past three years to
hear a student member come out in
effect in favor of removing students
from the board, long a dream of
education   minister   Pat   McGeer.
But then Basil Peters hasn't
functioned as a student representative on the board for some time.
Just this past year has seen the
student representative assembly
censure Peters for not reporting to
or attending SRA meetings. He is
known as the Invisible Man to those
student representatives for his
devotion to duty.
Peters' actions on the board also
bring up questions about exactly
whose interests he is serving. Peters
had no qualms about joining in
with the board's big business types
to vote to oust Sandhu.
Peters' explanation for his action
bears examination. "I am greatly
dismayed that a student member
was evicted because he couldn't
conduct himself in accordance with
the rules the board had
established," he said.
But those rules, which require
board members to hush up about
what happens during closed (read
important) sections of the meeting,
are meant to disenfranchise
students of their right to know what
is going on at this public institution.
In effect secrecy rules and closed
board meetings strip the students of
their representation — unless their
representatives are strong enough
and concerned enough to fight
policies meant to silence them.
Basil Peters is not.
Paul Sandhu has found out this
year what happens when one
consistently speaks out about what
goes on at closed board meetings.
The issue for which he was
supposedly ejected from the board
meeting — discussing Asian Centre
funding — was merely a convenient
excuse for administration president
Doug Kenny and his cronies to
punish Sandhu for bringing issues
out of the board room to those
most affected, the students. It was a
good time to intimidate this year's
freestyle
candidates for board and similar
measures were taken last year
against outspoken student representative Moe Sihota for the same
reasons.
The expulsion was because "a
general principle" was involved,
the board says. And they're dead
on.
But the principle involved is an
elected student's responsibility to
fellow students. Sandhu's crime
was to not discard it when he entered the rarified air of the board
room and become one of the "old
boys."
Let's hope this year's student
representatives remember who
elected them and who they're
responsible to.
We've had three years too long of
a student board member with a bad
memory.
Bill Tieleman is news editor of
The Ubyssey. Freestyle is a column
of opinion, analysis and humor
written by Ubyssey staffers.
y$w£>
Letters
Sehler misrepresents fact
If The Ubyssey made a New
Year's Resolution to become more
acquainted with the facts before
printing a story, it was not evident
in the Jan. 5 edition. I refer to the
front page story concerning the
resignation of Nick Sehler, the
former AMS social centre manager.
I take particular exception to the
part about the claim of misrepresentation of his job description. I
was present at the interview, and
such was not the case. Indeed, every
attempt was made to ensure that the
duties of the position were clear to
all candidates applying for the job.
When Mr. Sehler resigned, he
neglected to inform the AMS of his
dissatisfaction with the position, as
was reported. His resignation was
ostensibly for personal reasons. If
leaving the AMS for a position with
Parnell   Foods   at   Simon   Fraser
University is for personal reasons,
so be it.
In late December when Bern
Grady spoke with Mr. Sehler about
his resignation, Mr. Sehler indicated that he had applied to Par-
Sandhu
stabbed
The Sandhu affair strikes a
dagger to the heart of democratic
principles. Further, it destroys the
illusion that public institutions in
Canada are indeed democratic.
The board of governors of UBC
have risen up on their hind legs and
struck down the students' representative, an act that represents a
victory for emotional fascism on
campus.
Mark W. Defazio
nell Foods prior to his contact with
the AMS and that the larger eastern
company suited his long-term
plans. He also expressed an
opinion about working with the
large part-time staff employed by
the AMS.
If The Ubyssey will consider the
above facts, perhaps they will
conclude that any misrepresentation concerning the position of
social centre manager didn't lie
with the AMS management.
Geoff Smith
student administrative commission
Thank you for the clarification,
but perhaps the person you should
quarrel with is Sehler and not The
Ubyssey reporter who merely
recorded Sehler's comments. —
Staff Tuesday, January 9, 1979
THE      UBYSSEY
Pag* 5
Lyon mauls civil servants
Manitoba premier purges gov't
employees of liberal redundants
WINNIPEG — Early last December a
Manitoba civil servant in the finance
department came to work to find a layoff
notice on his desk.
Another civil servant returned from an
out-of-town business trip to find a letter of
notice had been sitting on his desk for two
days.
In one department a senior administrator
wrote a list of names on a blackboard. Those
in one column were still working there, those
in the other column were "redundant."
The deputy labor minister went into one
civil servant's office, put his feet on her desk
and asked if she had heard any rumors.
When she said she did not respond to rumors
he told her she should go and check at the
personnel office. She was told there that she
was redundant.
c
By DOUG SMITH
)
In northern affairs, six people were told by
registered mail that they were redundant.
In this heavy-handed way the Progressive
Conservative provincial government of
premier Sterling Lyon delivered its special
season's greeting to a still undetermined
number of civil servants. In most cases, the
only reason given for the layoffs was redundancy, meaning that with the province's
reorganization scheme many tasks were
being combined and they were not needed.
Those in one column
were working,
those in fhe other,
'redundant'.
The manner of the layoffs is not the only
aspect of the recent round of firing that has
given some people cause for concern. Many
civil servants feel reorganization is little more
than a fancy way of dropping controversial
programs and employees the government did
not like.
He said these people had fought for the
integrity of their programs and were laid off
as a result. He said civil servants are seeing
the way to advancement is keeping their
mouths shut and letting the government do
what it pleases.
Wilson Parasuik, a former senior civil
servant in the Ed Schreyer government and
currently an NDP MLA from Transcona said
in an interview he is disturbed by the
selectivity in some of the dismissals. He said
that during the previous administration
many people had been brought in who were
highly motivated and desirous of making
their programs work. It is these people Parasuik said who are being fired.
Employees are offered
fhe option of 'resigning'
with three months pay.
Furthermore, "they are being replaced by
all the duds who had never worked out in the
civil service." Parasuik said he is particularly
disturbed by the dismissal of people like
Linda Wiebe, the director of New Careers,
Floyd Williston of the Job Office and
Gordon Vidal of the Youth Secretariat.
He said the government has also laid off a
woman who prior to 1969 had been the
secretary of a Conservative cabinet minister.
Due to an NDP affirmative action program
she was promoted to an administrative
position. At the time of her layoff she had
spent 19 years in the civil service.
A number of the layoffs have hit people
who were involved in job creation programs
that were aimed at the disadvantaged. The
current government does not seem to be
interested in "native people" one of the laid
off said. The person said it was not expected
the government would try to find employment for the graduates of its New Careers
program.
One of the people who was found
"redundant" said it was difficult to
determine what the reasons were for some of
the layoffs, since "some were so surprising
it's hard to figure out." In general the feeling
is that the government is rooting all those
"people hired after 1969, but not generally
party (NDP) people. Generally they go for
the most progressive people."
Floyd Williston of the Job Office said the
department has only limited success in
convincing the government of the need for
employment programs. Williston, who was
fired from the Job Office on two days notice,
said the office had in the past provided
employment that left some residual value to
the province.
c
CANADIAN
UNIVERSITY PRESS
J
Another former civil servant said he
thought in a short while the government will
have dropped all but its student summer
employment program.
None of the laid off seemed to have any
idea what was coming. Unless they have
suspicions that their dismissals were
politically motivated they all say it was a
complete surprise. The layoffs are being
carried out in a quiet fashion and no one
seems to be aware of what is happening in
other departments.
In many cases the employees are being
offered the option of resigning with the three
months severance pay or being laid off with
only one month's severance. The enticement
to resign will help the government keep down
the number of people it formally lays off, so
it can adhere to its policy of reduction
through attrition.
OFFICE OF THE PREMIER
WINNIPEG
R3C 0V8
FOR RELEASE IN
NEW YEAR'S EDITION
PREMIER'S NEK YEAR'S MESSAGE
ir".* &"%•**    ~^*> -
As  we  enter the  year  1979  --  the
final  year of  this  decade  --   I  wish  each
of you hope  and happiness  in  the  days
that   lie  ahead.
We  in Manitoba,   as  people  elsewhere,   will   face both   challenges   and
opportunities,   and  the  mark  of our
achievement will   rest  on how well   tnese
have  been met.     We  can  De  confident  about
the  outcome,   for history  has  shown  us   tiiat
tne  real   strengtn  of Manitoba  rests  with
ner people.     Manitobans,   from many   cultures
and backgrounds,   have worked  together to
create  this  province,   and  to  strengthen
and  to sustain  it.
I'.'ith  our broad  economic  foundation,   and with well-trained  and  energetic
people working  toward  our common  goals,  we  can be  assured  that  the New Year
will   oe  one  of  success   and   achievement.
It   is   in  this   atmosphere  of hope   and expectation,   that   I  wish  everyone
a year of purpose  and nappiness.
Sterling  Lyon
Premier of Manitoba
The government has set up a system of redeployment but many of the people affected
by the layoffs feel it is "a joke." The redeployment program appears to be working
fairly successfully for clerical and
stenographic staff whose supervisors are laid
off. But the middle management staff claim
that it has not been very good at all in finding
new places for them.
The attitude of the Manitoba Government
Employees Association of the layoffs was
also criticized. One of the permanent civil
servants affected by the layoffs said she was
appalled by the treatment she received from
the MGEA when she went to see them about
her situation. Others have termed the
association's response to the recent series of
layoffs as "lousy."
One person complained of the fact that the
current contract has no protection against
layoffs and there was no need for the
government to adhere to any concepts of
merit or seniority. The person also complained that the association has a very poor
record on the cases they have taken to arbitration on this issue.
People fought for the
integrity of their
programs and were
laid off as a result.
The morale in the civil service is being
described as "absolutely terrible" as a result
of the layoffs. Those people who have not
been laid off are wondering when the axe
might fall. In some ministries staff say there
are no clearly defined lines of authority and
people do not know who they are reporting
to. "It's a mess, that's all."
The reorganization itself has also caused
some bitterness and raised some concern as
to its effectiveness. The bulk of the civil
service found out about the shuffle in
ministries through the press. The change was
supposed to come in August but because of
resistance in cabinet it was not announced
until October.
Morale in the civil
service is 'absolutely
terrible' because
ef fhe layotis.
One person said the reorganization did not
make much sense and attributed it to the way
it had been carried out. The source said
premier Lyon and senior cabinet officials
had cut out sheets of organizational charts
and then pinned them on the wall in new
groupings. He said the reorganization appeared to be "a fancy word for cutting
programs."
One former civil servants said, "the plan
seems to be to get rid of people who were
promoted by or associated with the previous
government."
The department of urban affairs, recently
merged with urban affairs, has been
described as a doomed department. One
political science professor at the University
of Manitoba said the recent layoffs of social
analysts in urban affairs indicated the
government was not interested in the
problems of the urban poor. He said the
government does not intend to develop ar
urban affairs policy.
The feeling of the civil servants, both past
and present is that the people who the NDP
didn't fire, who they "let sit around and
count paper clips for eight years" are going
to be providing a rerun of the pre-1969 years.
Doug Smith is Winnipeg bureau chief for
Canadian University Press. Pag* 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 9, 1979
'Tween classes
TODAY
CHARISMATIC CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Prayer and sharing, noon, SUB 213.
UBC CANOE CLUB
Weekend trip to Whistler, Friday to Sunday, for
information call 266-5272.
UBC NDP CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 213.
YOUNG TRUTCHKEYITES
Landing    compensation    and    review    board
meeting, 5:30 p.m. January, SUB cafeteria.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Disco  lesson  registration,   Tuesday  to   Friday,
SUB 216A.
Ice skating party, 8:45 p.m., Thunderbird Rink.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
General meeting, noon, SUB 130.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Bill   Crockett   speaks   on   Sexuality    7pm
Lutheran Campus Centre
PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVE CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 205
S.I.M.S.
TM group meditation, noon, Angus 210.
HILLEL HOUSE
Fallafel lunch and Israel film, noon, Hillel House.
WEDNESDAY
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Lesbian drop-in, noon, SUB 130.
VARSITY OUTDOOR CLUB
Slide show, noon, Chem. 250.
AIKIDO CLUB
Demonstration, noon, SUB party room.
UBC SAILING CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 205.
AMNESTY UBC
Letter writing workshop, noon, SUB 212A.
THURSDAY
WOMEN S COMMITTEE
Women s drop in   noon   SUB 130
SFfen
General meeting, noon, SUB 216.
MEDIEVAL SOCIETY
Discussion of coming events, noon, SUB 113
POTTERY CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 251.
UBC LIBERTARIAN SOCIETY
General meeting, noon, SUB 224.
PRE-DENTAL SOCIETY
Short lecture and T-shirt pick-ups, noon, IRC 1.
S.I.M.S.
Weekly meeting, noon, Angus 210.
Hot flashes
Vive le
Scotland libre!
If you're interested in finding out
why that great land which has produced such Canadian staples as
porridge and Drambuie would wish
to split off from wonderful old
mother England, the political
science department has just the
chap to tell you all about it.
Professor Henry Drucker of the
University of Edinburgh will lecture
on "The Rise of Nationalism in
Scotland" on Wednesday at noon
in Buch. 318.
<yw
Wfe     THE
POPPY SHOP|
OUR CONCEPT — LOW PRICES!
UP TO 50% OFF
LADIES FASHIONS       s£
Samples and size range also.   *^
ONE SEASON AHEAD OF LEADING
RETAIL AND DEPARTMENT STORES
So, buy wholesale and save    ~^a
your hard earned money! gy^
4394 W. 10th (at Trimble) ^
,224-4341
OPEN
HOUSE '79
General Meeting
Wed. Jan. 10
Room 206
S.U.B.
Playing this week—8:30 p.m.:
Tuesday
JAM NIGHT With DON 0GILVIE
Wednesday
MAINLAND JAZZ BAND
Thursday
DAVE ROBERTS JASSBAND
Friday
PHOENIX JAZZERS
Saturday
WESTSIDE FEETWARMERS
TUES/WED/THURS — FREE for Members
LIVE—NEW ORLEANS JAZZ
36 E. Broadway — 873-4131
_   YEARLY MEMBERSHIPS — $3.00   _
George & Berny's
VOLKSWAGEN
REPAIRS
COMPLETE SERVICE BY
TRAINED
MECHANICS
FULLY GUARANTEED
AT REASONABLE RATES
731-8644
2125 W. 10th at Arbutus
PAYMENT OF FEES
THE DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE, THIRD FLOOR
GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION BLDG.
WISHES TO REMIND STUDENTS THAT THE SECOND
INSTALLMENT IS DUE ON OR BEFORE:
FRIDAY,
JANUARY 12, 1979
W
nee
kterhouse&COo
CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS
SUMMER
EMPLOYMENT
Third-year Commerce Accounting Option or First-
Year Licentiate in accounting students who are interested in summer employment with the Vancouver Office of Price Waterhouse & Co.: Please
mail copy of your U.C.P.A. form or personal
resume and most recent transcript of marks to:
Personnel Manager,
1075 West Georgia Street,
Vancouver, B.C.
V6E 3G1
CENTRE FOR THE ARTS
SIMON FRASER UNIVERSITY PRESENTS
.sP^
*mM
&
^
«<**
^
,«*
&
kT<&*'
V
>*'
r
FREESEE
g Sponsored by the Women Students' Office
_ With the support of The Leon and Thea Koerner Foundation
THE HUMAN
JOURNEY SERIES
JAN. 10 - FEB. 21
EVERY WEDNESDAY
SUB
12:35 p.m.
AUDITORIUM FREE
All Students, Faculty and Stall are invited.
8 P.M., SFU THEATRE
$4 General, $2 Students
Vancouver Ticket Centre (683-3255) and Kalons outlets.
SENIOR
RESIDENCE ADVISOR
(part-time employment)
The Department of Student Housing is presently looking to fill the position of
Senior Residence Advisor in Place Vanier Residence for the academic year
of 1979-80. The ideal applicant will be a mature graduate student with a
limited academic workload. The job will be attractive to people who have the
skills and interest in working in an extensively people oriented field. Responsibilities will include the following:
(a) Coordinating the team of Residence Advisors.
(b) Community development in Place Vanier Residences through residence programs.
(c) Implementing Departmental policies in administrative  matters
(d) Helping to create a safe and secure environment for resident students by ensuring that proper standards of behaviour are maintained.
The Senior Residence Advisor will live in Place Vanier in a self-contained
suite. The remuneration for this important part-time position is $2400.00 plus
accommodation for the eight month period.
Past experience in residence living is preferred.
For further information, please phone John Mate, Coordinator of Residence
Student Affairs, at 228-5778.
U.B.C. DEPARTMENT
OF STUDENT HOUSING
INVITES APPLICATIONS FOR
RESIDENCE ADVISORS FOR 1979-1980
These positions are open only to single men and
women. Successful applicants will be required to
live in the residences. Application forms and
detailed job descriptions are available at the
Ponderosa Housing Office and at the Front Desk
of each residence area: Totem Park, Place Vanier
and W.H. Gage.
Applications will be accepted from January 3rd to
January 19th, 1979 at the Front Desks of the
Residences or at the Ponderosa Housing Office.
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES:   Campus - 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines 35a
Commercial -r- 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional lines
50c. Additional days $2.25 and 45c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T 1W5
5 — Coming Event*
UBC DANCE CLUB. Lessons begin
Tues., Jan. 9. Noon hour practices:
Tues., Wed.. Fri. SUB Ballroom. Banquet and Dance: Sat., Jan. 20, 7:00
p.m.  Members  $5,  Non-members $7.
FREESEE: The Human Journey Series
starting Jan. 10, every Wed., 12:35
p.m. SUB Aud. Free Film Series.
10 — For Sale — Commercial
FOR SALE
OR WILL ACCEPT TRADE
1975 DODGE MAXI VAN
SNOW TIRES
Copper color, fiberglass raised roof,
29,000 miles. Camperized, fridge,
stove, toilet, convertible bed, lots of
cupboard space. Black leather and
leopard lined interior. City tested,
super condition. $5,000, o.b.o. or
will accept trade of small automatic
car.
CALL MRS. RITA BASCO,
278-9711 (Local 237) or
274-7508 after 4:00 p.m. '
11 — For Sale — Private
COMMUNITY SPORTS — Excellent
prices for ice skates, hockey, soccer,
jogging and racquet sports equipment. 733-1612. 3615 West Broadway,
Vancouver, B.C.
20 — Housing
WEST  POINT GREY! Furnished  bachelor for $155: Two appliances, carpets,
drapes! (OSI).
RENTEX 299^331
HEAT   AND   LIGHT   PAIDI   Furnished
one bedroom. Carpet, drapes, two appliances; Parking too!! $165.  (ISOD.
RENTEX 299-8331
WASHER AND  DRYER available!  One
bedroom, $150! Heat included! Fridge
and stove, yard too! QSD
RENTEX 299-8331
25 — Instruction
POTTERY   CLASSES   at   Peg's   Place
starting Jan. 16th, '79. Special 8 we*
courses $90 all inclusive — glazes,
firing, practice tiroes. 738-2912 or -visit
2780 Alma at 12th.
85 — Typing
TYPING — 75c per pace. Fast and accurate by experienced typist Gordon,
68S-48«3. Tuesday, January 9, 1979
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
SPORTS
Conditioning costs puck 'Birds
By STEVE HOWARD
Playing without four starters and
still finding their skating legs after
the Christmas break, the hockey
Thunderbirds couldn't keep up
with the Richmond Sockeyes in
exhibition play Saturday.
With goaltender Ron Paterson,
winger Rob Jones, defenceman
Ross Cory and centre Derek
Williams still playing for Olympic
teams, the 'Birds could only field
three returnees  against  the  team
which currently holds down second
place in the Pac-A hockey league.
UBC collapsed in the second
period, which it lost 5-1, in the 7-5
contest at the winter sports centre.
The doubleheader against the
University of Alberta which was
originally scheduled for the
weekend was postponed to the
March 2-3 weekend. Alberta had
six players on the Olympic red and
white teams.
Frank Gorringe tallied two goals
for the 'Birds and Frank Inouye
also had a pair, while Jim McLaughlin scored one. Keith Tucker
opened the Sockeyes' scoring and in
the second period Richmond
swamped the 'Birds on goals by
Jeff Dey, Mike Antunovic, Mackie
Elmer, Mickey Candler and Trent
Angus.
After Ken Pederson stretched the
score to 7-3, the 'Birds fought back
with two goals, but Richmond,
playing its fourth game in five
nights,   was   in   top   shape   and
UBC rowers barge up Nile
While most of us were suffering through record
lows over Christmas, the UBC rowing crew was
away in Egypt participating in the eighth annual
Nile International Rowing Festival.
The UBC crew joined hands with members of the
Vancouver Rowing Club to form the internationally recognized UBC-VRC combination representing Canada, one of 12 countries invited. Others
chosen were the United States, Great Britain,
France, West Germany, Ireland, Belgium,
Yugoslavia, Spain and Greece.
The festival began in Luxor with banners proclaiming the heroes of rowing: the Leander Club
from Great Britain, Dublin University from
Ireland, Gent Rowing Club from Belgium,
Washington University from the United States,
UBC-VRC from Canada and the Arab Contractors
Sporting Club representing Egypt. The sole race of
the day was the eights race, a remake of the 5,000-
year-old Festival of Oars in which contestants used
to race for the privilege of transporting a deceased
pharoah across the Nile to the City of the Dead.
Following the Parade of Participants, the six
crews boated in and proceeded to the starting
blocks for alignment. In an apparent oversight, the
starting line was not quite perpendicular to the
course, but rather favored those boats in lanes one
through three.
UBC-VRC, which was in lane four, was at an
obvious disadvantage to the University of
Washington in lane two, which jumped out to an
early lead. The UBC-VRC crew got off to a bad
start and fought their way out of last place to finish
second, unable to catch the Americans.
The second half of the Festival was staged in
Cairo where other Egyptian crews joined the crews
which had raced at Luxor. On the way to the
starting line for the eights race, the already late
UBC-VRC entry collided with a fishing scow, badly
damaging the gunwale of the racing shell at seat
two, so that the boat took on water and a
replacement shell was needed so UBC-VRC could
continue in the competition. Luckily the two man,
Ken Rae was unhurt in the collision.
A substitute shell was found after a frantic
search of the boathouses that line the Nile course,
and   with   the   caretaker   for  the   lending   club
pleading: "Take care please — this is the last boat
See page 8: ROWERS
Recreation U.B.C.
CI
asses—
-1979
Disco Dancing
Day & Time
M  W
12:15- 1:00
1:00- 1:45
Place
Rm 207-209
SUB
Starting Date
Jan. 15
Yoga
M  W
4:30 - 6:00
Rm 211
Mem. Gym
Jan. 15
Tennis
M  T W  F
12:30- 1:15
Armoury
Jan. 8
Karate
Th 7:30 - 9:30 p.m.
Sun 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m
Jan. 4
Gymnastics
M  W F
7:00 - 9:00 p.m.
Gym G
Jan. 8
Badminton
M Th
11:30 a.m. - 12:15 p.
m.
Memorial Gym
Jan. 15
Women's Self Defence
T
7:30 - 9:30 p.m.
Gym E
Jan. 30
Faculty & Staff Exercise
Class
M W F
12:30- 1:05
Gym E
Jan. 3
Skating
Contemporary Dance
TW F
11:45- 12:30
M 5:30 - 7:00 p.m.
Th 12:45-2:00 p.m.
Main Rink
Rm 208
Armoury
Jan. 9
Jan. 8
Classes are free to students. Faculty and staff are required to purchase a Recreation
U.B.C. card ($10.00).
A $2.00 refundable deposit is also required at registration.
For further information and registration, please contact the office at Room 203, War
Memorial Gym. Tel. 228-3996.
outhustled    UBC    during    the "We didn't practice between Dec.
remaining minutes. 22 and Jan. 3, when we played."
UBC   beat   Richmond   7-4   on UBC's next league games are a
March 4, in their last meeting. pair at 7:30 p.m. this Friday and
"It's conditioning we've lost," Saturday with the University  of
said  UBC  coach   Bert   Halliwell. See page 8: TWO
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
THREE BY BECKETT
(Krapp's Last Tape, Breath, Not I)
by Samuel Beckett
JANUARY 12-20
(Previews - Jan. 10 & 11)
8:00 p.m.
Student Tickets: $2.50
BOX OFFICE * FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE * Room 207
Support Your Campus Theatre
HELP YOURSELF
FREE SELF—HELP
WORKSHOPS TO
INCREASE YOUR SKILLS
WORKSHOP 1-EFFECTIVE STUDY HABITS
Four one-hour sessions on developing
more efficient methods of study.
WORKSHOP 2—PERSONAL GROWTH
A small group workshop to help define personal goals, set plans to reach
them and practice new behaviours
with the support of other interested
persons.
WORKSHOP 3—CAREER EXPLORATION
Four one hour sessions to aid students in examining career choices.
WORKSHOP 4—JOB SEARCH TECHNIQUES
Four one hour sessions aimed at providing students with information and
skills beneficial in seeking employment.
All workshops commence the week of January 15. Sign
up now since enrollment is limited.
COUNSELLING CENTRE
OFFICE OF STUDENT SERVICE
PONDEROSA ANNEX "F" Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 9, 1979
SPORTS
Two 'Birds up for 1980 Olympics
From page 7
Saskatchewan at the winter sports
centre. UBC is currently 3-5 in
league play and 9-10-1 over-all.
Saskatchewan, which is 1-7, has
won its only contest over the 'Birds.
When asked for a prediction of
UBC's place in the final standings
this year, Halliwell said, "It looks
like third this year."
Last year UBC finished second.
Only two teams make the playoffs.
Alberta leads the Canada West
standings with a 7-1 record, while
Calgary is second at 5-3.
Students   are   reminded   that
admission to games is free to
holders of Alma Mater Society
student cards.
Ross Cory and Rob Jones played
with the 24-member Olympic red
team, which won a tournament in
France against the Czechoslovakian
and Swedish Olympic teams. The
red team was sent to Europe to get a
taste of European competition, in
preparation for the 1980 Olympics
at Lake Placid.
But the 24-member white team,
which stayed in the country and
played in Calgary, Edmonton and
Medicine Hat, is also trying out for
the final Olympic squad. Both
teams will spend a month in
Calgary in July and half of them
will be chosen for the final Olympic
team, which will warm up by
playing professional and semi-pro
teams at an Ontario tournament.
The white team had a 1-1-1
record with the Edmonton Oilers
and a 1-0-1 record with the Moscow
Riga team.
The red and white squads are
made up of university players and
some junior and senior league
players. None are professional.
Halliwell     said     the     four
prospective Olympians will be back
in the lineup for the games with
Saskatchewan.
On Dec. 1, UBC beat the North
Shore Intermediates 6-4. Jones had
two goals, and singles went to Terry
Shykora, Jim McLaughlin,
Gorringe and Inouye. John Mc-
Kerrow made 35 saves.
On a tour to the Interior, the
'Birds lost 13-5 to Nelson of the
Western International league on
Dec. 21, then bounced back to beat
the Trail Smoke Eaters 5-4 the next
day.
THUNDERBIRD SCORING
ALL GAMES
[not including Saturday's game]
GP   G   A   Pts. PM
Rob Jones       16    16     8   24     8
DerekWilliamsl8    14    10   24    19
Jim
McLaughlin    19    12    11    23     8
Frank
Gorringe 16     9    11    20     8
JayRumley     19     5    10    15    16
RossCorry      17      2    10    12    31
CONFERENCE
McLaughlin      8     4     5      9 6
Williams 8     7      18 6
Jones 8     6     2     8 6
Hoop 'Birds lose all at tourney
By PAUL WILSON
The UBC Thunderbird basketball team came close twice, but
failed to win any games at the
fourth annual University of
Calgary basketball tournament this
weekend.
In the feature game Friday night,
the 'Birds were humiliated 84-54 by
the host Calgary Dinosaurs. But
they came back with a strong effort
Saturday narrowly losing 88-86 to
the University of Manitoba Bisons.
In   Sunday's   consolation   round
UBC lost a cliffhanger to Wilfrid
Laurier University 76-75.
The tournament was won by the
defending national champions, the
St. Mary's University Huskies. The
Huskies easily handled all their
competitors and demolished the
host Dinosaurs in the final game
108-66.
St. Mary's has nine returning
players from last year's championship team, including national team
members Tom Kappos (6'8") and
Ross Quackenbush (6'7"). They are
expected to again sweep the
Atlantic conference and figure
strongly in the battle for the
national crown.
Other teams competing in the
tournament were the University of
Victoria, the University of Alberta
and Whitworth College of
Spokane.
The 'Birds also dropped two
exhibition games Dec. 29-30 to the
Athletes in Action team by scores
of 95-67 and 112-65. The A.I.A.
team consists of one Canadian and
Rowers mesh oars with Arabs
From page 7
we have," the UBC-VCR crew
again headed off for the starting
line.
There was more trouble when the
2,000-metre race began. The course
was so narrow that Belgium and
Ireland, and the Arab Contractors
and Canada intermeshed oars.
However, no damage befell the
equipment. The U.S., meanwhile,
avoiding the commotion, took
command of the lead and were
followed across the line by Great
Britain. Canada finished third,
after just beginning to show signs
of adjustment to the substitute
shell.
In other  races,  the  UBC-VRC    '
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TUX SHOP
NOW AT
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688-2481
four of cox Peter Jackson, stroke
Rob Hartvikson, David Dunnison,
Peter Hamilton, and Morris
Hutchins won their event and the
coxed pair of cox Mike Conway,
David Orr and Fred Withers came
second to the Arab Contractors in a
close race.
Combining these results with
what was accomplished in the eight,
UBC-VRC  won  the  regatta,   the
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Arab Contractors and the
University of Washington tying for
second.
For only the second amateur
team ever to represent Canada in
any sport in Egypt, such a success
practically guaranteed a return
invitation. Cairo University is also
considering inviting the University
of British Columbia for a race in
mid-May.
I
UBC
Graduation
Portraits
since 1969
Amunraylt   #>tutmui iCtfi.
3343 West Broadway
732-7446
Phone now for your Free sitting
PUBLIC
228-6121
FRI. & SAT.
7:30 p.m. - 9:45    p.m.
SUNDAY
1 :00 — 3:00 p.m.
STUDENTS
& CHILDREN     .75
ADULTS $1.25
THUNDERBIRD
WINTER
SPORTS CENTRE
STARTS THURS.
pom
The generations change.
But the choices remain
the same.
Thurs, Sun 7:00
Fri. Sat 7:00 & 9:30
SUB THEATRE
$1.00
A SPECIAL
CHALLENGE
IN CHILD WELFARE
Therapeutic foster parents for children ages 5 to 16
years required in Vancouver. These children present a wide range of emotional and behavioural
problems. Therapeutic foster parents should have
experience and proven skill in working with
children. Contracts may be for 3 months or longer
depending on child's needs. Fee for service is $900
plus room and board and clothing, plus.
Please contact Resources Unit, 251-1701 or
Dorothy Bennett, Ministry of Human Resources
294-4844 between 8:30 - 4:30 p.m. for further information.
11 former American collegiate
stars. They are based in Abbotsford
and intend to play most CIAU
teams this year.
The 'Birds resume league play
Friday when they meet the
University of Lethbridge Pronghorns in Lethbridge.
The 'Birds have had very little
success this season in either
exhibition games or league play.
They are currently in the basement
of the western conference with a 1-5
record.
The University of Victoria
Vikings lead the league with a 5-1
record. They are followed by
Calgary, Alberta and Lethbridge in
a dogfight for second place with 4-2
records.
Rumley
8
1
5
6
8
Gorringe
8
2
3
5
2
Cory
8
1
3
4
10
Shykora
8
0
4
4
8
P. Carson
8
0
4
4
13
Henneken Auto
MERCEDES—VOLKSWAGEN RABBIT—VOLVO
Service—Repairs—Used Cars
8914 Oak St. (Oak & Marine) 263-8121
HILLEL HOUSE
PRESENTS
FALLAFEL LUNCH
and
ISRAEL FILM
Tuesday, January 9th
12:30
CONCORDIA
UNIVERSITY
CONCORDIA UNIVERSITY
GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS
Applications for graduate fellowships are invited from candidates
intending to study full-time in a graduate program leading to a
master's or doctoral degree at Concordia University. Academic
merit, broadly interpreted, is the prime consideration in the
granting of awards. Financial need is not taken into account.
APPLICATION DEADLINE: February 1, 1979
ANNOUNCEMENT OF WINNERS: April 1, 1979
COMMENCEMENT OF TENURE: September 1, 1979
These awards are valued at up to $6000 a year,
plus basic tuition, and may in some cases be
renewed for up to three years.
Additional information and application forms
are available from the:
Graduate Studies Office
Concordia University
1455 de Maisonneuve Blvd. W.
Montreal, Quebec H3G 1M8
Tel: (514)879-7314

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