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The Ubyssey Jan 11, 1972

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 Anti-
tory suppressed
By LESLIE PLOMMER
There's an interesting editorial
in the August issue of Alumni
Chronicle, the quarterly magazine
published by the UBC Alumni
Association.
In it, association president
Frank Walden calls on students,
faculty   and   alumni   to   debate,
Cameron's article, page 3
challenge and discuss the contents
of the August edition of the
Chronicle, which was composed
of several articles under the
general title The Pace of Change
at UBC.
Apparently the call for
discussion doesn't include
nationally-known writer and
former UBC lecturer Donald
Cameron.
Prior to publication of the
December issue of the Chronicle,
Cameron's effort at challenge and
debate — in the form of a written
response to an August Chronicle
article lauding the UBC board of
governors — was suppressed by
Walden and the association
executive.
The Chronicle article was
entitled Board of Governors: The
Closed Doors Hide No Ogres, and
was written by UBC graduate
Alex Volkoff. Cameron's criticism
centred on the fact that Volkoff s
article was an uncritical
whitewash of members of the
board of governors and their role
in the university and society.
Overruling Chronicle editor
Clive Cocking — who was ready to
publish the Cameron article — the
association executive, with
Walden in the lead, vetoed the
article.
Cocking felt the Cameron piece
represented "a very valid
viewpoint."
However, Walden didn't see it
that way.
"It was an unsolicited article
that didn't meet our editorial
requirements," he  said Monday.
What are these "editorial
requirements"?
"Oh, I wouldn't care to go in
to that," he said.
Do these requirements mean
the Alumni Association doesn't
allow the publication of Chronicle
articles that are unfavorable to the
UBC board?
"Oh, I wouldn't say that, not
necessarily," he said.
Well, what are these
"requirements" then?
"Isn't   that   what   newspapers
always say when they don't want
to publish something?" Walden
said, and abruptly ended the
conversation.
Walden then contacted Alumni
Association executive director
Jack ("I just work here")
Stathers, who had backed the
Walden initiative to scuttle the
Cameron article.
Stathers later told The Ubyssey
he wouldn't comment on reasons
for the suppression.
"If he (Walden) won't
comment, I won't," he said.
Starting about two years ago,
the Alumni Association executive
set  up  a system whereby major
articles to appear in the Chronicle
were first reviewed by the
association's president, executive
director and the chairman of the
Chronicle editorial committee.
It was under this system that
Walden received a copy of
Cameron's article before the
Chronicle went to press about
Dec. 6.
The Alumni Association, as
publisher of the Chronicle, is
putting about $42,000 this year in
to financing the magazine, which
is sent to all UBC alumni.
Thus, the executive of the
association (the publisher) takes
precedence   over   the   Chronicle
editorial committee in deciding
what is to appear in the magazine.
And the editorial committee did
not take part in the recent
executive move to kill the
Cameron piece.
"I don't agree with the
decision to can the article,"
Chronicle editor Cocking said
Monday.
"I hadn't asked for the thing; it
just came. 1 was going to run it
anyway," he said.
"I thought it represented a
very valid viewpoint, though it
wasn't a very new analysis of the
UBC situation.
"The   executive   decision   was
THE UBYSSEY
contradictory, because the object
of that issue of the Chronicle was
to stimulate the sort of reaction
and discussion that we got.
"It's a disppointing decision
because it's indicative of not a
very progressive attitude," said
Cocking, who has been editor of
the magazine for almost four
years.
The executive decision comes
as no surprise to Donald Cameron,
author of the suppressed article.
Anticipating just such an
occurrence, Cameron sent a copy
of the article to The Ubyssey in
October, suggesting that the
newspaper might run it if Cocking
was prevented from doing so.
Cameron writes for Maclean's,
Saturday Night and The
Mysterious East, an alternative
newspaper in Nova Scotia. He also
works for the CBC and is an
associate professor of English at
the University of New Brunswick
on leave this year.
His article appears on pages 2
and 3 of today's Ubyssey.
Cecil Green Park, home of self-appointed blue pencils of UBC Alumni Association.
'Social Credit guarantees resource rip-off
By JIM JOLY
B.C. is looked upon as the last
banana republic in the western
hemisphere, says Dave Barrett,
provincial New Democratic Party
leader.
Charging the present Social
Credit administration with lack of
planning, Barrett told 60 persons
Monday in SUB 205 that the
government is guaranteeing the
give away of the province's
natural resources.
"$240 million worth of B.C.
copper was shipped to Japan and
the United States in 1969-1970,"
he said. "The direct return to the
people under royalties was zero."
Barrett called for greater
toughness in negotiating natural
resources contracts with other
countries.
"B.C. should either bargain
ruthlessly for the use of those
natural resources or leave them in
the ground until we get a more
sensible administration," he said.
According to Barrett, tourism
has the greatest potential of any
industry in the province.
"The whole of B.C. should be a
restful oasis for people all over
North America," he said,
mentioning the possibilities of
old-fashioned trains and steamers
running through the province,
providing summer employment
for students.
If elected piovincial premier
Barrett said he would nationalize
B.C.   Telephone   and   institute  a
government automobile insurance
plan.
"B.C. Tel sends S22 million of
profit each year to New York,"
said Barrett. "We need the $22
million here."
He also said car insurance
holders were being "hosed"
through excessive rates.
Predicting a federal election in
June and a provincial election for
August, Barrett said the people of
B.C. should become more
politically aware.
"If you want your politicians
to two the line, you must involve
yourself in politics, no matter
which party."
- He recommended the
separation of unemployed
workers   from   the   rest   of the
BARRETT  . .. tough bananas
people on welfare rolls to better
provide them with jobs.
"Unemployables can do
meaningful productive work in
the fields of tourism, parks, roads
and sewers," he said.
"Welfare is not a major drain
of funds, welfare is a major drain
of people,"
Barrett said he is trying to
work for the best possible deal he
can get for the B.C. people.
"The revolutionary crap is
okay for kids on the corner, but it
isn't realistic," he said.
Barrett said old line parties
stand to gain by not doing
anything while in power.
"Why ruin a good promise by
doing something about it?," he
mused. Page  2
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 11, 1972
NEW YORK
FORMAL WEAR
All the latest styles in Tuxedos
— Dinner Jackets —
Suits inc. Edwardian style
Dinner Jackets in all styles and a
large variety of colors. Flair Pants,
Lace Dickeys, etc.
SPECIAL STUDENT RATES
Rent The Best For Less
4397 W. 10th 224-0034
BOUGHT
&
SOLD
A. H. FALSTAFF, books
[All subjects of University interest
NEW ON 10th   .
4529 W 10th—224-4121
Come and Browse-Fair Prices
NOTICE
Late Payment of Fees
A late payment fee of $25.00 additional to all other fees will be
assessed if payment of the second instalment is not made on or before
January 14, 1972. Refund of this fee will be considered only on the basis
of medical certificate covering illness or on evidence of domestic affliction.
If fees are not paid in full by the following date, registration will be
cancelled and the student concerned excluded from classes. Second
instalment — January 28, 1972.
If a student whose registration has been cancelled for non-payment
of fees applies for reinstatement and his application is approved by the
Registrar, he will be required to pay a reinstatement fee of $25.00, the late
fee of $25.00, and all other outstanding fees before he is permitted to
resume classes.
100 FLIGHTS to BRITAIN
14-113 Days from $225.
FEB. 21-MAR. 5          Vai
MAR. 27-APR. 16
APR. 18-MAY 17
MAY 2-JUNE 6
MAY17-JUNE 17
JUNE 3-JULY 18
JUNE 15-JULY6
JUNE 28-AUG. 29
JULY2-AUG. 23
i.-London-Reti
      225
     235
     235
     235
     259
     259
     279
      279
STUDENT SPECIAL
31/2 months-May 14-Sept. 4 $235
BROCHURES PHONE 926-3817
ROYAL
BANK
THE HELPFUL BANK
CANADA STUDENT LOANS
Deposit Accounts-General Banking Services
University Area Branch — Dave Stewart, Manager
10th at Sasamat 224-4048
AMS OFFICIAL NOTICE RE:
Meeting of Students' Court
(1) Students' Court will convene in rooms 207-209, 7:00 p.m.,
January 13, 1972 STUDENT UNION BUILDING to hear
the action brought by Tom MacKinnon, Law III, regarding
the November 24, 1971 by-elections.
(2) Students' Court will convene in rooms 207-209 STUDENT
UNION BUILDING on January 18, 1972 at 7:00 p.m. to
hear the question raised by David S. Dick, Arts IV
regarding:
(a) The elegibility of the present three graduate
student association's representatives to have
voted at the December 6, 1971 Student Council
Meeting and to vote at any further meetings.
(b) The number of voting representatives the
Graduate Student Association is presently
entitled to have on council.
JIM BROWN, Court Clerk
"Dance," said John Liersch. Eyes
glazed, faintly smiling, Alex Volkoff rose
and began to sway in time with the
music.
"Okay," Liersch nodded, turning off
the record player. "Now climb that tree. "
As Volkoff's fingers clutched the
rough welts of bark, Liersch turned to
Leon Koerner.
"What do you think? "
"Not bad," Koerner grinned. "Not bad
at all."
Volkoff was back. Liersch gestured
hypnotically, the Mandrake of the power
elite.
"Your critical faculties are asleep, "he
intoned. "Your critical faculties are
asleep. Your critical faculties are asleep. "
"My critical faculties are asleep,"
smiled Volkoff.
"Fine," said Liersch. "Now go write
your article. "
I mean, what else can explain it? Alex
Volkoff is no dummy: she writes of
Harry Adaskin with enthusiasm and skill,
and of the new student government at
UBC with engaging skepticism. But in
"Board of Governors: the Closed Doors
Hide No Ogres" (UBC Alumni Chronicle,
August) she just smiles and smiles.
Setting out to show, for some perverse
reason, that the board is not "a
university bogeyman . . . keeping a
careful eye on education for Uncle Cece",
she makes numerous claims which her
own evidence plus a minimum of research
show to be quite untrue. The board
members are not "governors", she says,
but rather more like "administrative
assistants". Then she outlines the board's
responsibilities: all university
appointments, establishment and
maintenance of buildings, preparation
and adoption of both capital and current
budgets, student! fees and restriction of
enrolment.
Assistants? To whom — God?
Then she outlines the composition of
the board: president Walter Gage, two
lawyers and a judge, a housewife and six
businessmen. "Nearly half," chirps
Volkoff, "are not businessmen." Which
seems a singular way of saying that the
businessmen hold an absolute majority on
the board. Moreover the housewife is a
daughter of the late George Cunningham,
who built up one of the largest — perhaps
the largest — chain of retail drug stores in
Canada. Not one member of the board
comes from outside British Columbia's
ruling elite. Where are the fishermen and
farmers and schoolteachers and clerks
whose taxes pay for the blasted place?
For that matter, where are the
professions other than law? Where is
agriculture? Where are the academics:
could no professor at Simon Fraser or
UVic add lustre to the UBC board? Where
is labor?
Labor's absence, at least, is explained.
The university would like, Volkoff notes,
"more representatives of labor." Well,
splendid: it could hardly have less. "But
frankly," concedes UBC deputy president
Bill Armstrong, "this is not
acceptable to the provincial government."
Why the provincial government should
worry its little head about such a pack of
eunuchs — or "administrative assistants"
— Volkoff never makes clear. And one
wonders a good deal about the integrity
of a university which truckles to a yahoo
government even on such small matters as
this.
Armstrong also believes faculty
members should keep their noses out of
what doesn't concern them. "People with
vested interests," he declares, "should not
sit on the board." Fine: but what's sauce
for the faculty is sauce for the president,
who is also a university employee and
does sit on the board.
The people without "vested interests"
who now fill the board turn out to
include officers of Canadian Forest
Products, Rayonier Canada, Canada
Fishing  Company  and MacMillion and
Donald Cameron's
suppressed reply
to a whitewash
of UBC's hoard
of governors
Bleedall, not to mention the former Miss
Cunningham. The terms in which they are
described are warm: one is "a quiet
professional", and another "a brisk,
business-like and affable lawyer"; others
are variously described as "colorful",
"extroverted", and "charming". It sounds
like the guest list at the Last Supper.
But who are these people "competent
in money matters"? What kinds of
interests do they represent? I have only
one power-research tool with me in my
Nova Scotia hideaway, the Dominion
Bureau of Statistics' (remember that
phrase?) Intercorporate Ownership,
which reports that Walter Koerner's
Rayonier "Canada" is 99.9 per cent
owned by the American parent company.
Koerner, then, is the figurehead of a U.S.
branch plant.
John Liersch, past chairman of the
UBC board, is vice-president of Canadian
Forest Products, which in turn is part of a
bewildering conglomeration of companies
which connects at several points with
Crown Zellerbach. For example, Liersch's
company is owned 21.1 per cent by
Canfor Building Products Ltd., 12.5 per
cent by Stave Lake Cedar, 26.9 per cent
by Spring Creek Logging, 26.9 per cent
by Canfor Holdings Co. Ltd. and 12.5 per
cent by Consolidated Timber. But Stave
Lake Cedar, Consolidated Timber and
Spring Creek Logging are all more than
30 per cent owned by Canfor Building
Products. And all three are also more
than 30 per cent owned by Canfor
Holdings. Consolidated Timber owns 29
per cent of Spring Creek, while Spring
Creek, not to be outdone, owns 33 per
cent of Consolidated Timber as well as 33
per cent of Stave Lake Cedar. Stave Lake
Cedar owns 100 per cent of Canfor Ltd.
and 40 per cent of City Realty Holdings.
What is City Realty Holdings? I don't
know — but I am made curious by the
fact that two chunks of 10 per cent each
of City Realty Holdings are owned by
VOLKOFF
. . climbs trees Tuesday, January 11, 1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
The foxes who
guard the
chicken
coop
two numbered National Trust Company
accounts. And —
Well, the hell with it. You can look up
the rest for yourself in Complex 256 of
Intercorporate Ownership. No doubt all
this was set up so that full taxes would be
paid on every buck earned by the group,
though. Corporation people are so
public-spirited, after all.
Allan McGavin, UBC's chancellor, is
the McGavin bakeries fellow; and his
company is now meshed into the national
corporate structure. McGavin
Toastmaster Ltd. is owned by Ogilvie
Flour Mills and Maple Leaf Mills Ltd.
Ogilvie Flour Mills, however, is 99.7 per
cent owned by John Labatt Ltd. and
other companies in the Ogilvie group
include Catelli, Ault Cheese, Habitant
Ltd. and Canada Grain Export. What do
all these companies actually do?
Apparently Volkoff didn't inquire, and I
can't — but some other troublemaker
should.
What kind of person sits on the board?
What is their record on pollution?
MacMillion and Bleedall has a New
Brunswick subsidiary,
Rothesay-MacMillan, which pours muck
into the Little River and was scathingly
denounced by the former chairman of the
provincial water authority. Its
management refuses even to discuss
pollution contol with reporters unless
they agree in advance to have their copy
edited by the company. Even on the east
coast we hear rumblings from SPEC
about the company's operations in B.C.
Its representative on the UBC board is
vice-president Richard Bibbs.
What are the relationships between
these companies and government? Are
they the subject of consumer complaints,
and if so, for what? How many of them
are unionized? What kinds of conditions
and pay obtain in their plants? What
kinds of "incentives" do they get from
public money? Are any of them
monopolistic? Do they go in for
price-fixing? These may be highly
respected citizens, these administrative
assistants, but should they be? We can't
know unless we examine the performance
of the enterprises they direct — and
Volkoff isn't looking into anything
beyond personality.
Consider, for instance, Donovan
Miller, president of the Canadian Fishing
Company and "a reserved man in his
third term on the board." Despite its
name, Canadian Fishing Company is a
wholly-owned subsidiary of the New
England Fish Company, which makes
Miller the local manager of a component
of the American economic empire. (Make
that "a running dog of Yankee
imperialism". No, on second thought,
don't: it might lead people to charge that
I reveal a most unscholarly lack of
objectivity. Volkoff s article, however, is
both ''objective'' and
"non-controversial", two pluses for her.)
Donovan Miller's devotion to the
public interest is well-known here in Nova
Scotia, where his company was dickering
with the government to take over the
plant and equipment of Acadia Fisheries,
a British-owned firm which went
bankrupt after fighting a seven-month
strike rather than allow its fishermen to
join the United Fishermen and Allied
Workers' Union — or the "West Coast
union", to use the scornful phrase applied
to it by the companies and the Nova
Scotia press. The provincial government
has about $9 million in Acadia, including
$6 million in the plant alone, and Acadia
owed the town of Canso $117,000 in
back taxes, which presumably can be
kissed off forever.
Although the government and the
company were never able to come to
terms, Miller's company initially
proposed that the government likewise
kiss off its investment and simply hand
the plant over.
To its credit, the government told the
company to get stuffed. Failing that,
Canadian Fishing wanted its repayment
of the loans to be tied to the amount of
fish caught — sort of a corporate
guaranteed annual income, and an
arrangement I invite you to try out with
your own banker. (Gosh, Royal Bank, it's
mean of you to take $83 a month on my
car, no matter what.) While the talks with
Canadian Fishing continued, Canso's
workers remained jobless for two months
and more, with the government telling
them that expressions of unhappiness
such as demonstrations tended to
jeopardize negotiations. Canadian Fishing
Company was said to be insisting on "a
stable labor situation" as precondition of
taking over the plant, and of course any
deal was going to be contingent on a
welfare payment from the department of
regional economic expansion.
No wonder Donovan Miller is
"reserved".
I have been away from British
Columbia since 1964, and I have no idea
what the concrete results of the board's
make-up are, in the same way that I could
not document the fact that the B.C.
courts are handmaidens of the
government and corporations. (I can —
and have — for the Maritimes, as others
have for various parts of the United
States.) But I am certain there are
consequences: programs in labor history
which somehow got stalled forever as
they went up the ladder for approval, or
visiting professors for which funds could
never be found, or promotion and tenure
decisions delayed by a year or two.
("Yes, yes, I know he's published in
Monthly Review, but that's hardly an
organ of unbiased scholarship, it it?")
These are not consequences of the
Canadian university, of which they are a
part. Our universities exist to provide the
kind of knowledge and the kinds of
professionals required by business and
government. We have faculties of
commerce and law, not faculties of labor
and organizing. We talk about how the
economic system "works", not about the
fact that it obviously doesn't work and
should be replaced. We produce social
workers rather than social animators. The
composition of the board of governors is
perfectly consonant with the function of
the university as a whole.
Try to imagine a board which included
Homer Stevens, the tough and
experienced marxist president of the
United Fishermen and Allied Workers;
and Grace Mclnnis, NDP Member of
Parliament for Vancouver-Kingsway; and
the most militant of Indian and Chinese
leaders in th'e province; and a couple of
The board of governors
a pure love of business."
militant clergy plus, say, a Saul Alinsky
and Kathleen Aberle. But the very idea of
a controversial board is a contradiction in
terms. The board exists to manage the
university on behalf of the existing
system of power relationships, not to go
around stirring up trouble and
encouraging people to examine awkward
realities.
But wait. Perhaps I am being unfair.
Doctrinaire. Ungenerous. Reflex
radicalism confronts knee-jerk liberalism,
a stale scenario.
Don't forget, says Volkoff, that being
a board member is hard work. Lawyer
Art Fouks says he spends a full day every
week on university business, poor fellow,
and he doesn't get paid. Volkoff
commiserates. It's "time spent away from
a lucrative job." So why does he do it?
Well, cynics might suggest that before
anyone dares answer that question he
should go over whatever he can get hold
of in the line of university financial
records and see who does the university's
legal work, and what relation there is
between the interests of Canadian Forest
Products, Rayonier Canada, MacMillion
and Bleedall and the kind of research that
does or doesn't seem to be encouraged in
forestry, biology, law, economics and the
like. He ought to look up the Directory
of Directors to see what other companies
have these uncles on their boards, and
what business if any they do with the
university. He ought to check to see how
many past board members and colleagues
of board members have been awarded
honorary degrees. He ought to look at the
movement between university positions
and positions in business, the provincial
government and the bench. He ought to
estimate the extent to which service on
the board brushes up both the corporate
and the personal image, and helps
confirm that one is what UBC's academic
planner, Dr. Robert Clark, describes as "a
person highly regarded in the
community", which may be roughly
translated as "a person who is recognized
by the provincial elite as one of
themselves."
But even if relations between the
board members and the university turn
out to be as clean and sweet as the smell
of a dew-topped rosebud, the point
remains that when a class sets out to run
a society, it has to undertake to run its
constituent parts, too, and to convince
the public (with the help of certain kinds
of journalists) that it really acts in the
public interest, that it really deserves to
retain the power it has gained. 'The
average taxpayer," opines Volkoff,
"trusts the business board member much
more readily than he does the academic."
Maybe — although the average citizen
often surprises the authors of these glib
comments. But if he does trust these
people, it's because he has been fed a line
of propaganda by the commercial media.
Donovan Miller's company is asking Nova
Scotians for between six and ten million
tax dollars in order to earn a profit for
some American entrepreneurs. And we're
supposed to regard the fellow as an
impeccable custodian of public funds,
uniquely qualified to manage $60 million
a year of our hard-earned dollars. Need
someone to guard the chicken coop? Ask
the fox.
Eleven personalities, says Volkoff,
operating "on individual strengths and
weaknesses." Gosh, just plain folks.
"They are simply a goup of 11 individuals
looking after the mechanics of operating
a university, leaving the academics free to
get on with the process of education."
And Volkoff knows the real reason
Art Fouks spends all that lucrative time
for nothing. "Their motivations," she
marvels, "are simply a desire to look after
the welfare of the old Alma Mater -
"Kind of brings a lump to your throat,
doesn't it?
". . . and," continues our informant,
"a pure love of business."
Yes. Yes, indeed. About as pure as
they come. Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 11, 1972
Slime
The Alumni Chronicle is a magazine that has
shown a marked improvement over the past few years.
Some of us figured this was because members of
the Alumni Association were somewhat more
progressive than, say, the people in the university
administration who keep an eye on UBC Reports.
Now it seems that instead of showing an
improvement because of the Alumni Association, the
Chronicle has improved despite it.
When UBC Reports appears, you know that
everyone from Walter Gage's great-grandmother on
down has read the copy in advance to check its
suitability.
What hasn't been known is that a similar procedure
goes on with the Chronicle.
And in this case the prime mover is Alumni
Association veteran Frank Walden, a one-time
newspaper reporter who moved to the more lucrative
field of public relations.
More specifically, Walden is a member of the firm
of James Lovick & Co., a gang of oily punks who have
had their greasy fingers in a helluva lot of Socred and
corporation double-dealing in this province.
And Walden, see, is the Chronicle's number one
guardian of truth. Walden, see, is the guy who's checked
over the Chronicle before our little eyes get a look at it.
Walden, see, is a snake-oil salesman for the people who
have power.
Of course, Walden isn't nearly as rich and powerful
as the people on the board of governors, but he's trying
— and that means doing a good job for the ruling elite.
He does it at James Lovick, and he's doing it
through the Alumni Association.
Only he goofed. He said in his Chronicle editorial
in August that open debate is one of the objects of the
magazine; • then he showed he was lying, pure and
simple.
He spearheaded a successful move to suppress an
article whose dimensions didn't coincide with his
definition of debate.
An article, in other words, that told the truth
about some of the activities of members of the UBC
board.
(And written by that all-time raving rabid radical
Maclean's and CBC lad Don Cameron, yet!)
End of any illusions about debate.
So the next time you pick up an Alumni
Association Chronicle, remember Frank Walden and the
people he serves.
Remember too that this isn't an isolated event.
There are lots of Frank Waldens and lots of boards
of governors.
The system is called capitalism.
We pass
It's only reasonable for us to now pee on
everything dumb and crummy and stupid that happened
since we last published, way back in early December of
1971.
As a matter of fact, we know this is expected. God
knows how many people we have passed this week who
have been muttering, "Well, I guess The Ubyssey will
pee on all the stupid things that have been going on over
the holiday."
Unfortunately, we haven't catalogued the dumb
things and are forced to perform an all-inclusive pee.
Details later, maybe.
THE UBYSSEY
JANUARY 11,1972
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the writer and not of the AMS or the university administration.
Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a
weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located
in room 241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial departments, 228-2301, 228-2307; Page Friday, Sports,
228-2305; advertising, 228-3977.
Editor: Leslie Plommer
Four sheets to the wind, militant Mike Sasges sailed Into battle, with
powerful Paul Knox gripping the helm and Plommer doing her imitation of
La Traviata in the hold. Bernard Bischoff raised the flags while Tricia
Moore clutched the masthead and a Gauloise much to the disgust of Finlay
who clutched Jan O'Brien. Jim Joly and Sandi Shreve rolled into the
scuppers and Gary Gruenke chased Art Smolensky up the rigging
brandishing a broken lens. Gord Gibson flogged Mike Gidora and Kent
Spencer with a Benday rule while Kathy Carney hissed. Persky appeared in
time to shoot an albatross and John Kula was made to walk the plank for
complaining about being left out of the masthead. Ginny Gait peered out
of sickbay, and Shane McCune gets an honorable mention because he paid
for dinner. And Nate Smith took Sandy Kass aside and gently enlightened
her on the meaning of Knox's word-of-the-week.
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Letters
Dick
I was most interested in the
editorial on page 4 of Ubyssey of
Jan. 7, headed Negotiations.
Presumably the initials N. S. at
the bottom indicate that the
author was Nate Smith.
I won't deal with the personal
comments that Mr. Smith has seen
fit to make about me and the
executive since their validity is
something which the students will
have to decide. However, I do feel
that certain factual errors should
be brought to students' attention.
In the first place, it should be
pointed out that we did not feel it
necessary to retain a negotiator
until we were faced with just such
a person working for the union.
Prior to the appointment of a
mediation officer (at the union's
request) negotiations were carried
on in a very direct and
co-operative manner.
However, the union saw fit to
have Mr. Bill Swanson represent
them before the officer. Mr.
Swanson has had many years
experience as a professional
negotiator and, consequently, put
us at a very rea) disadvantage.
On the advice of the AMS
lawyer and with the concurrence
of myself and our general
manager, we retained Mr. Ken
Martin. I believe it is to his credit,
given the very real differences still
existing after some months of
collective bargaining, that a
contract that was acceptable to
both sides was reached in a couple
of weeks.
That brings me to a second
error in Mr. Smith's editorial —
the time spent by Mr. Martin.
Rather than two and half days,
Mr. Martin in fact spent some four
or five days in actual negotiations
with   additional   time   spent   in
consultation with the AMS. I
appreciate the fact that his bill
reflects a reduction in his rate for
services to the society.
As I told student council,
which approved my action, I
acted with what I felt were the
best interests of the students in
mind. I look forward now to
continued good relations between
the students and the staff.
In future, I would hope that
the staff of The Ubyssey will do
myself and others on the
executive the courtesy of
checking facts. Provided these are
correct, I have no quarrel with
whatever opinion you may wish
to express, though I may disagree
with that opinion.
Since I plan to run for
re-election as treasurer this spring,
the members of the AMS will have
ample opportunity to express
their opinion of my actions. I
trust that they will approve.
David S.Dick,
AMS Treasurer.
Daycare
Early this afternoon AMS
science rep Svend Robinson
dropped by the AMS offices to
follow up on his letter published
in today's Ubyssey (Daycare, Jan.
7).
Prior to speaking with me he
was under the impression that
psychology students and others
would be prevented from
contributing to what is essentially
a peoples' group day care centre.
The misunderstanding arose out
of my statement in an interview
given to the paper before the
Christmas recess, namely, because
of my personal convictions about
unethical social psychology.
To restate my point, hopefully
for the benefit of the students at
this institution: the proposed day
care facility is being planned along
the lines of the centres in Victoria
(UVic), the University of Hawaii
and Queen's University, Kingston.
The project is designed to utilize
existing courses in the faculties of
education, nursing, and home
economics. The school of
architecture has the building
requirements and is looking into
the feasibility of converting a
UBC hut into a co-operative day
care centre. Thus no architect's
fee.
There are, appropriately
enough, stringent provincial
government regulations covering
the operation of day care facilities
and any application for licensing
has to be carefully presented. We
are working with the university
day care council so as not to
duplicate existing services.
To reply to Svend's closing
epithet, alluding to my doctrinaire
male chauvinism, I received a
reply to the day care
questionnaire stating that some
male supervisors should be present
at all times to offset "the female
monopoly." So it will be.
I hope that this letter can be
reproduced in full so that more
people will be able to come
forward with constructive
proposals. I am trying to provide a
needed and communal service for
the children of staff, students and
faculty and would appreciate your
help.
Valuable time is wasted
clarifying points already made and
replying to letters that arise from
incomplete reportage. As it is
already, too much time is spent
by all parties creating election
issues and adding to the inane
political fires.
Michael Robinson,
Civil serpant. Tuesday, January 11, 1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
Clubs budget straightened out
The new university clubs
committee budget and
constitution were approved in
principle at a finance committee
meeting Monday.
The proposed reallocation cf
UCC grants and the reorganization
of its constitution, submitted by
science undergraduate society
representative Piers Bursill-Hall,
will be open to criticism from
campus clubs at an open finance
meeting in the council chambers
Wednesday at noon.
"It will then be revised, if
necessary, finalized and presented
to council for approval
Wednesday night," Bursill-Hall
said Monday.
The Alma Mater Society
council,    at    its    last    meeting,
suspended the UCC budget and
took over trusteeship of the UCC
because "the president, Ed
Beauregard, assigned an incredibly
arbitrary budget in which a few
clubs were receiving vast sums
while quite a lot were getting
none," said Bursill-Hall.
The rest of the UCC executive
resigned earlier this week because
of internal dissention.
The suspended budget showed
that only 36 of the 123 campus
clubs received grants.
Bursill-Hall, assigned trustee in
charge of the UCC, said he
"reassigned all clubs grants,
distributing them  more evenly."
Grants were made to all clubs
according to their membership -
each   club   receiving   a   specified
Bodyshop to open
amount such as $1  per member.
Bursill-Hall   said  the  financial
allocations   will   be  effective   as
soon as council approves them.
The proposed constitutional
revisions, if ratified by council,
will become effective next year.
According to the proposed
constitution, the UCC will retain
control of only the political clubs
- because of AMS constitutional
requirements — and of the service
clubs.
Bursill-Hall said the
educational clubs and
undergraduate societies will come
under the auspices of their
professional faculties and can
request funds from the AMS
through their faculties.
"Special   interest,   social and
recreational clubs will be
self-sustained," he said.
"They   can   hold   parties and
gatherings on their own money,
not AMS funds."
The proposed constitution
requires the UCC to allot the
same amount of money per
member to all political clubs and
to all service clubs.
"However, this amount does
not have to be the same for both
types of club," he said.
"This is to ensure that no club
is ignored and no club favored,"
said Bursill-Hall.
Mistake
On page one of Friday's
Ubyssey. D W. Thomson Co.,
mechanical engineering consultant
for construction behind the
Ponderosa Annex, was erroneously
identified as engineering
consultant. In the same story, on
page two, it was mistakenly stated
that the company purchases
material from General Electric.
WE ARE
SPECIALISTS
in VW, Mercedes,
Volvo, Porsche . . .
Our specialty is major repair
work, transmission repairs,
motor overhaul - we guarantee
the best quality workmanship
possible. Factory trained
mechanics and we also
guarantee to save you   money.
All you need is a pair of legs
and some guts to take part in the
Paula Ross dance workshops
coming to UBC.
The idea is to become
conscious of your body, since
devoting so much energy to
intellectual concerns means the
sensuality of the body is often
overlooked.
"In fact, the head often stops a
lot of body awareness," according
to Ross.
"By learning to move and
stretch our bodies, we become
conscious of another dimension of
ourselves. Everybody is going to
become aware in a different way
- it's a full circle of energy from
teacher to student and back to
teacher."
The workshops, beginning
Thursday, are to be conducted by
Ross and her dancers. Classes will
included a discipline warm-up as
well as a study of dance through
various body movements and
techniques; a different mode each
workshop.
Sponsored by the Alma Mater
Society special events committee,
the workshops will take place in
the SUB ballroom at 2:30 p.m.
every Thursday and Monday until
Feb. 7.
Ross and the company will
then present two performances of
recent work on Feb. 8 and 10.
Cost is $2 for each workshop or
$10 for the whole series of eight
classes.
For more information phone
873-2594.
TUXEDO
RENTAL & SALES
+ D.B. & S.B. Tuxedos
+ D.B. & S.B. White Coats
+ D.B. & S.B. Suits
+ COLORED SHIRTS
Parking at Rear
BLACK & LEE
Formal Wear Rentals
631 Howe 688-2481
Beautiful
clothes. .
for
beautiful
people
LE CHATEAU
"a step ahead"
776 Granville 687-2701
GOVERNMENT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
COUNCIL ON DRUGS, ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO
Hon. D.LBrothers, Q.C, Minister of Education-Chairman Page  6
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 11, 1972
Hot flashes
lost arti€les
to find homes
Have an need for some mitts,
socks, keychains, wallets or
rubbers — cheap?
The lost and found is having its
big sale of unclaimed articles from
last year Thursday noon in the
SUB main concourse.
As an added attraction Grant
Burnyeat's pants will be on sale.
Wotore
University Endowment Lands
manager Robert Murdoch will
speak on the future of the
endowment lands Thursday at
noon in Buch. 104.
Ski lessons
The Varsity Outdoors Club is
sponsoring a series of ski lessons
II
at    the    Grouse    Mountain    Ski
School.
Students who want a 20 per
cent discount on the lessons
should come to a meeting
Wednesday, at noon, in Angus
104.
Crisis
The Surrey Crisis Centre needs
university students to work on its
phone lines and in the drop-in
centre.
A training program for the
work begins Jan. 19. There is
some money to be made for those
working.
For further information, call
Steve Torrence at 596-0612.
'Tween classes
TODAY
NEWMAN CLUB
General   meeting,   noon,  St. Mark's
music room.
VARSITY CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 215.
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Beginners     French,     noon,    Buch.
3201.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Nietzsche, noon, SUB 111.
CIC
Campus   canadianism,    noon,   SUB
105B.
PRE-MED SOC
General   meeting,  noon, Wesb  201.
CONTEMPORARY DANCE CLUB
Creative     movement,     5:30     p.m.,
Armory 208.
STUDENT LIBERALS
Executive meeting, noon, SUB 115.
CUSO
Volunteer from Borneo, 7:30 p.m.,
IH 402.
WEDNESDAY
AUCM
Celebration, noon Lutheran Centre,
supper, 5:30 p.m. Lutheran Centre.
TAEKWON-DO CLUB
New    members,    4:30   p.m.,   Place
Vanier ballroom.
KUNG-FU
Hand practice, noon, SUB ballroom.
BOWLING CLUB
Free    time    and    instruction,    8:30
p.m. Games room.
ONTOLOGY
The Way to the Way of Life, noon,
Buch. 216.
ACEI
The role of the area co-ordinator —
help to the classroom teacher, noon,
Ed 204.
CAMPUS MINISTRIES
Opem,Bible forum, noon, Lutheran
Campus Centre.
INTERNATIONAL FOLK
DANCE CLUB
European   moves,   8   p.m.,  Armory
208.
voc
General meeting, noon, Angus 104.
THURSDAY
SKYDIVING CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 119.
NFB
Two   tree   films,   noon,   IH   upper
lounge.
VCF
National     student     leaders     team,
noon, SUB art gallery.
ALPHA OMEGA
General meeting, noon, SUB 213.
LOST AND FOUND
Sale   of   unclaimed   articles,   noon,
SUB main concourse.
CRAFT CO-OP
The  future of the pottery section,
noon, SUB 251.
WARGAMERS
Fierce practice, noon, SUB 111.
VOC
Climbing    schedule,    noon,    Chem.
150.
FRIDAY
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
What is wrong with UBC with
Malcolm McGregor, noon, SUB 111.
SUNDAY
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
What do we do with the rotten fish,
7:30 p.m., Lutheran Campus
Centre.
A very special offer!
GRADUATION
PORTRAITS
in
NATURAL
COLOUR!
Select from a series of 8 poses
taken in natural colour. We will
finish:
• One 8" x  10" portrait  in
natural color (one person)
$21.95
• One  8"  x   10"  portrait  in
natural color (group) 4:24.95
Ask about our special reduced
prices on additional portraits
ordered at the same time.
• Complete selection of Caps
and Gowns available.
T1
campbell
studios
2580 BURRARD STREET,
VANCOUVER 9, B.C.»
736-0261
PAYMENT OF FEES
The    Department    of    Finance,    General    Services
Administration Bldg., wishes to remind students that
the second instalment is due on or before
Friday, January 14,1972
Fees
The registrar's office has set
Thursday as the deadline for
payment of second term fees and
for course and section changes.
From Jan. 14 to 31, students
paying fees will be assessed a $25
late fine on top of their normal
fees. Fees will not be accepted
after Jan. 31.
THE GLASS MENAGERIE
by TENNESSEE WILLIAMS
An M.A. Thesis Production
Directed by Roger Dunn
January 12-15—8:00 p.m.
Tickets: $2.00
Students: $1.00
SPECIAL STUDENT MATINEE
Thurs. Jan. 13-12:30 Noon
Reservations-
Room 207-Frederic Wood Theatre
UBC SOMERSET STUDIO
CLASSIFIED
w in#%«p 4#iriki#
Rates: Compos - 3 lirws, I day $1.00; 3 doyi $2.50.
CoRiRMttkil -'3 Unas, 1 clay $1.25; additional lines
Classified ads aim not accepted by
11:30 aon., the ctoy before publication.
and am payable
Office, Rm.
30c; 4 days price of 3.
in advance. Deadline ia
241 SUB, UBC, Van. $.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
D knees
11
FARMERS FROLIC JAN. 22 HARD
times. All Heifers and Bulls come
to   SUB   Cafeteria   9:00   p.m.-l:00
a.m.
Greetings
12
Lost ft Found
13
PLEASE RETURN  KONICA CAM-
era left in re'd Datsun on Fri., Jan.
7 by UBC hitchhiker, reward. 732-
0893  or 224-7315.
Rides & Car Pools
14
RIDE   WANTED   TO
after   most   3:30   and
Phone 085-3697 after
WEST   END
4:30  classes.
6:00 p.m.
Special Notices
15
  3 FOR $1.00 ???? 	
Why pay this much for your prophylactics?
We will mail you 24 assorted brand
name prophylactics for only $2.00 in
a plain sealed envelope by return
mail.
Clip and enclose this ad. for additional bonus of 3 prophylactics to:
POSTTRADING
Box  4002 Vancouver,   B.C.
GENTLEMAN   FLUENT^ IN   POR-
tuguese   wishes   to   exchange   lessons with person fluent in French
_224-0392.	
FIRESIDE SUNDAY JAN. 16, 8:00
p.m. Lounge 6050 Chancellor:
"The Place of V.S.T. on the Campus", Dr. R. Clark (UBC), Dr. W.
S.  Taylor  (VST).  Worship in- the
 Loft,   7:00-7:45   p.m.   Welcome.	
I NEED SENIOR POLL SCI. STU-
dents for exciting (non-profit)
project on civic affairs. 732-3470.
AN EXPERIENCE iN LIFE AND
growth, Gestalt Awareness Groups.
$12 month. Contact Allan Cohen,
224-5445 or John Mate, 922-4481.
Travel Opportunities
16
TRAVELLING OVERSEAS ON A
budget? Then visit your youth
hostels information desk which is
open every Wednesday from 12:30-
1:30 p.m. opposite the concession
stand in the Student Union Building. Canadian Youth Hostels Association, 1406 West Broadway,
Vancouver 9, B.C., Phone 738-3128.
Wanted—Information
17
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
1969 PONTIAC LAURENTIAN 4-
door, PS, PB, automatic. Excellent
condition. $1650. A good buy! 278-
6354.	
1961 V.W.: NEW ENGINE, KING"
pins, clutch, radio. Phone Penny
738-3392 eves.
Auto Repairs
24
If you own a British Car
we can offer:
■ir Low Labour Rates
* Below   Retail   Parts
■k Repairs  and  Modifications
ic Personalized Attention
■dt Guaranteed Work
BRITISH CARS ONLY
1906  W.  43rd       266-7703
(rear) at Cypress
Bring in this ad.  It entitles you
to  a   10%   Discount  on   labour.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Duplicating &  Copying
33
Photography
35
utlje Htm ana gutter
Nil,?      Cameras!
3010 W. BDWY. 736-7833
alto  at  Denman   Placa
Some High-Quality
GADGET BAGS  LEFT
at $13.88
ENLARGERS
Starting from $49.50
Scandals
37
RECORDS—WE HAVE THE LAT-
est releases in rock, folk and
blues only. Trade-ins accepted.
Drop in and listen to the music or
play a game of scrabble. Joy
Music Sanctum, 6610 Main (at
50th).  11 a.m.-7 p.m.
DO YOU DRIVE A MAZDA, TOY-
ota or Datsun? Does Henneken
Auto service it for you? If not —
you're going to the wrong place—
phone us for a free estimate at
263-8121 or drop into 8914 Oak St.
(at Marine Drive).
Typing
40
Babysitting & Day Care
32
EXPERIENCED TYPIST. ESSAYS,
theses. Reasonable rates for quali-
ty work. Telephone 682-4023.	
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING,
my home. Essays, Thesis, etc.
Neat, Accurate Work, Reasonable
Rates. Phone 263-5317.
IBM SELECTRIC TYPING SER-
vice. Theses, Manuscripts, Term
papers, etc. Mrs. Troche—437-1355.
FAST ACCURATE TYPING OF
essays and thesis. Reasonable
terms. Call Mrs. Akau, days 688-
5235 — evenings 263-4023.
EXPERT IBM SELECTRIC TYPIST
Experienced essay and thesis typist. Reasonable Rates — 321-3838,
Mrs.   Ellis.
TEDIOUS TASKS — PROFESSION-
al typing. IBM Selectric —■ Days,
Evenings, Weekends. Phone Shari
at  738-8745—Reasonable   Rates.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
31
INSTRUCTION & SCHOOLS
Music Instruction
61
CLASSICAL GUITAR INSTRUC-
tion at The Guitar Centre. Semester plan; group; private lessons.
Phone Chris Jordan, 688-3816.
Special Classes
62
POT at Potter's Centre
another   12   week   session
to   start   JAN.   10
Register   early
wheel work,  hand  building,  etc.
for   details   phone:    261-4764
G.   ALFRED
MAKE YOUH OWN POT ! MUGS,
bowls, jugs, etc. Morning or evening, all levels. Just outside UBC
gates.   224-5194,  733-3019.
Tutoring Service
63
MATH    TUTOR   WITH   MASTERS
degree.  Telephone IAN 278-8274.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
SKIS: FISCHER ALU 215 cm.
Salomon competion bindings $90.00
Camera: Ricoh underwater case
$80.00. Call Phil, 874-2537.	
MUST SELL BRAND NEW OLYM-
pid skis,  190's, call 596-0680.	
LEAVING CANADA. FOR SALE —
Troubadour harp, with music and
stand. Ph. 224-6733.
RENTALS ft REAL ESTATE
Rooms
•1
CAMPUS ROOMS WITH KITCHEN
privileges <$60/month, co-ed. phone
224-9549. 5745 Agronomy Road, be-
hind village.	
WAN TED: QUIET RENTED" ROOM
to serve as writer's studio. Please
phone  266-4028 or 266-5577.	
MEN ONLY. BSMT. ROOM. WARM,
quiet, private entr. near gate,
ready now.  Non-cooking.  224-6753.
GIRL TO SHARE HOUSE NEAR
campus. Furnished private room
and all facilities $75. per month.
Phone 733-3276.	
BASEMENT ROOM PRIVATE EN-
trance, bathroom, 3360 W. 29th
Ave. $50 monthly. 261-0771, male
only please.
Room & Board
82
BEST FOOD ON CAMPUS, PLEAS-
ant surroundings. Also meal
passes. Call 224-9841.	
ROOM & BOARD—$110/MONTH —
sauna, colour T.V., excellent food.
5785 Agronomy Rd. 224-9684.
HALF DOUBLE ROOM ON CAM-
pus residence;  St. Andrew's Hall;
224-7720.
DO YOU NEED A PLACE TO
live? We offer large rooms, comfortable lounges, colour T.V., and
excellent food. Sigma Chi Fraternity, 5725 Agronomy Rd. Phone
224-9620.
IT'S NEW
STAY AT
THE DKE HOUSE
5765 Agronomy Rd.
224-9691
The Modern Accommodation
on Campus!!
—Large,  spacious rooms  with
Balconies
—Semi-Private Wash Room
—Color   TV
—Complete   Laundry   Facilities
—Sound-Proof   Rooms
—And  Much   More
MEAL PASSES —ALL COMBINA-
tions/per month—dinners: 5 days
wk.—$30, 7 day wk.—$40. Lunches
—7 days—$20; combined L.&D.—
$55 or 20 meals good anytime—$25
on  campus 224-9691.	
ROOM AND BOARD FOR FEMALE
iK exchange for. babysitting services. Private room and bath. All
facilities of home available. Close
to campus. 263-4764.
Furnished Apis.
83
3—4TH YR. FEMALE STUDENTS
want one female to share 2-bdrm.
furn. apt. $50. mo. & phone &
hydro.   733-4466.
Unfurnished Apts.
84
GIRL WANTED TO SHARE 2-
bdrm. apt. with same. Dunbar
area $60 mo. Available now. Phone
224-7438.	
SELF-CONTAINED 3-RM. BASE-
ment suite. Carpeted, Kitchen.
Furnished. 4000 Blk. W. 11th.
$120. Utilities included. Feb. 1st.
731-8744.
Communal Houses
85
Houses—Furn. & Unfurn.
86
Tutors—Wanted
64
FOURTH PERSON NEEDED TO
share house near 4th & Macdonald
phone  732-0454.	 Tuesday, January 11, 1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 7
SPOR TS Basketba"/Birds
ar u       a  lose to Bears
Puck 'Birds split games
By KENT SPENCER
The UBC Thunderbird hockey
team split a pair of weekend
games with the University of
Alberta Golden Bears, losing 5-3
Friday and winning 7-4 Saturday.
Friday, the 'Birds were losers.
Behind the crisp goaltending of
goalie Barry Richardson, and
shaky UBC netminding, the Bears
out-maneuvred UBC to the win.
This made the Bears four-point
leaders in the Western Canadian
Intercollegiate Athletic
Association standings, and marked
Saturday's return bout as doubly
important.
In the first period Saturday,
the 'Birds came out and promptly
went down 2-0. But they kept
firing away and early in the
second, forward Bill Cartwright
deflected defenceman Steve Fera's
point blast to make it 2-1.
This goal shifted the
momentum of trie game in favor
Refereeing bad
By GORD GIBSON
The quality of refereeing that
the UBC Thunderbird hockey
team has to endure defies
description.
Words like terrible, disgusting,
unbelievable, or 'needs improving'
come nowhere near describing
that one man who had control of
the action on the ice.
Friday night at the Winter
Sports Centre, 2,500 fans, perhaps
the largest turnout ever for a UBC
hockey league game, saw the
worst example of refereeing they
hopefully will ever witness in their
lifetime.
It is fully realized that the
referee is human and can make
mistakes, but when a man
deliberately closes his eyes to
penalties because the crowd is
antagonizing him, then he is not
doing the job for which he is paid
a substantial sum.
Intramurals
UNIT MANAGERS MEETING
is postponed until Jan. IS when it
will be held in SUB Council
Chambers at 7 p.m.
BASKETBALL league play
starts Wednesday at 7 p.m.
SOCCER league play has been
postponed until further notice.
WRESTLING deadline is Jan.
17.
If these are the same men who
are charged with controlling the
junior hockey league games in this
province, it is no wonder that the
big feature of these games is the
constant brawling that erupts
between the teams. A man who
can't control the play on the ice,
certainly can't control the players.
Take the action that happened
after the first period Friday as an
example. A fight erupted after the
buzzer to end the period had
rung, but no penalty was assessed
to any players involved even
though the rule book clearly
states that there should have been.
Letting the players get away
with that fight, only incited them
to more violence in the remaining
periods.
Surely better referees could be
found. Hockey is now the major
spectator sport at UBC and
deserves the best refereeing that is
available. Spectators want to see
good, fast action and not the stick
swinging duels that are so
common-place these days due to
poor refereeing.
If the quality of refereeing
does not improve at UBC, hockey,
and subsequently the spectators,
will suffer.
of the 'Birds, giving them some
confidence. They scored twice
more in the second, and added
four more in the third to win it,
7-4.
Centre Alex Dick scored two,
while the other 'Bird goal-getters
were Bob MacAneeley, Tom
Williamson, Bill Gaston and
Arnold Pederson.
The 'Birds, now with six wins
and two losses, must still pick up
a game somewhere to close in on
the league-leading Golden Bears.
There is a strong possibility
Alberta will lose at least one game
against Calgary or Manitoba.
Failing that, the 'Birds would be
forced to take both remaining
league contests with the Bears in
Edmonton.
Assuming that the Bears will
not be upset, UBC will have to
rely on their road form for the
shot at first place in the WCIAA.
To date, that record has been
perfect. The 'Birds beat Manitoba
8-3 and Brandon 12-4 for the 2-0
record.
Their next games are on the
road against Winnipeg and
Saskatoon this weekend.
Help
WANTED - Two coxswains
are needed for the UBC Freshmen
Crew. If you are at all interested
and weigh 115 pounds or less,
come to the meeting in SUB 206
at noon Wednesday.
Rowers are also wanted for the
Freshmen Rowing Crew. If you
weigh 150 pounds or more, come
to the meeting on Wednesday.
The UBC Thunderbirds are a good basketball team. No one
doubts that, but then, so are the University of Alberta Golden Bears a
good basketball team.
Just ask the 'Birds.
Over the weekend, the Bears put the skids to the UBC hoop
crew dumping them 78-64 Friday and then tripping them up by a
score of 72-69 on Saturday night in Edmonton.
Despite fine individual efforts by Stan Callegari who scored 30
points Friday and Darryl Gjernes who came through with a career
high of 26 points Saturday night, the 'Birds were unable to neutralize
Bear centre, 6'8" Mike Frisby.
DARRYL GJERNES . ..
STAN CALLEGARI
'Bird coach Peter Mullins gave Alberta credit for the two wins.
"I was quite pleased with the way we played. They've got a good ball
club and we had a little trouble with Frisby," he said.
UBC and Alberta now have identical 6-2 records and share first
place in the Rockies division of the WCIAA. They meet again at War
Memorial Gym for two games Jan. 21-22. Those two games should
decide the conference championship.
Before that though, the 'Birds have a date at Pacific Coliseum
for Jan. 17 when they play the SFU Clansmen in the Buchanan
Trophy Classic.
HONG KONG CHINESE FOODS
Just One Block from Campus in the Village
WE SER VEAU THEN TIC CHINESE FOOD
A T REASONABLE PRICES
EAT IN -  TAKE OUT
We have enlarged our dining room
to offer you better service.
Open Every Day from 4:30 p.m. to 11 p.m.
5732 University Blvd.
Phone 224 6121
HILLEL EVENTS
HILLEL'S NEW BET CAFE
will be open every Tuesday during the noon hour, offering a variety of Kosher Foods —
sandwiches, franks, in an appropriate musical setting. BET CAFE opens TODAY at
NOON at HILLEL HOUSE.
THE WRITINGS OF ELI WEISEL ON "THE HOLOCAUST•"
presented by PINCHOS BAK. Mr. Bak is presently principal of the Vancouver Talmud
Torah. He has a B.A. from Yeshiva University and is a graduate student in
Communications from U.B.C. Mr. Bak will speak at HILLEL HOUSE on Wednesday,
January 12th at 12:30 p.m.
THE MOVIE
11
THE RISE AND FALL
OF THE THIRD REICH
Saturday, January 15th
8:00 p.m.
Admission: Hillel members—50c
Non members—75c
Vancouver
Jewish Community Centre
41st & Oak Streets
Refreshments Available Page 8
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 11, 1972
HOME   IS   WHERE   you   can  throw   your feet on  the  sofa,  as  Michael  Sasges
demonstrates in new Wally Gage tower next to SUB. Living room area will serve six
-garry gruenke photo
students — each with own bedroom — who will move in with rest of horde willing to
pay about $75 a month beginning September.
a consumer column
Canadian Sports Notes:
The Canadian Football League,
that upholder of Canadian
content, the import rule and other
such gestures is currently holding
its annual convention in that well
known Canadian city of Miami.
Among      the       28
recommendations that are being
voted on is one to make the game
more Canadian, you know, sort of
different. One of the major
recommendations is that the CFL
adopt the four down rule to
replace the current three downs in
10  yards necessary  to  maintain
possession of the ball.
And why not? After all when
every head coach of every
Canadian (?) football team is an
American citizen why shouldn't
we change the rules to
accomodate them.
The  three down thing is just
too confusing when you've been
used to four all your professional
life and its no time to start
changing.
Luckily, as Jim Taylor of the
Sun put it to me over the phone,
"it hasn't a snowball in hell of
passing."
Love, romance, sexuality to be discussed
If you missed out on the fall term of The
Canadian Woman: Our Story, you can catch
up this term by registering Tuesday at 7 p.m.
in the SUB ballroom.
There is no limit on the number of new
registrations for UBC's Women's studies
course. The lectures this term, held in the
ballroom every Tuesday night, will be grouped
around the general theme of the situation of
women in contemporary Canadian society,
following from the fall term's lectures on the
theoretical aspects of women's position.
Tuesday night's lecture is entitled Love,
Romance and Sexuality, and is actually a
panel discussion featuring Arts 1 instructor
Shelagh Day, former social worker Liz
Briemberg and political science student Paul
Knox.
Discussion is expected to centre around
definitions of sexuality and its context in
Canadian society, together with a historical
and contemporary examination of love and
romance.
The panel discussion will be followed by
hopefully unlimited questioning, course
co-co-ordinator Jan O'Brien said Monday.
PANGO-PANGO (UNS) - Pliable sources
in this tiny island republic south of Arbutus
Ridge today reported the discovery by the
obknoxious news editor of the Pango-Pango
Tri-weekly Tribune and his blond blorg sidekick of a mysterious collection of objets d'art
hidden deep within the depths of the west-
side area of the island. Investigations are in
progress.
Other lectures during the spring term, she
added, will include alternate life styles, the
suffragist movement, the women's liberation
movement, a discussion of the federal status
of women commission report and women in a
revolutionary country.
Highlight of the term will be a lecture by
Canadian writer Margaret Atwood, author of
The Edible Woman and five books of poetry,
who will discuss her work March 21 in the
final lecture of the series.
The co-ordinators are trying this term to
include more panel discussions, slides and
films rather than straight lectures. One
example of this will be a presentation of
Media and Women.
Registration fee for the second term is
$1.
FOOD SERVICES: Real dishes
are back in SUB and the major
casualties have been our stomachs
and the administration's
credibility.
In its mistaken attempt to con
the students into accepting paper
and plastic utensils it placed signs
in SUB listing all the advantages
(?) of the disposable items.
"Ecology," the sign said.
"Disposables are bio-degradable."
In discontinuing the
disposables food services
committee head Byron Hender
stated to UBC PReports, " a
substantial number of students
and faculty members protested
against the use of disposables
because they were not
bio-degradable."
Hender admits the dishonesty
of those signs by acknowledging
that the disposables used were not
bio-degradable.
How many more undiscovered
lies are beine told to students at a
university which is supposedly
"searching for the truth"?
- ART SMOLENSKY
■FREDERICWOOD THEATRE-
DO YOU WANT TO
QUIT SMOKING?
Money Back
Guarantee
QUICKLY—PAINLESSLY
LET THE SMOKE WATCHERS HELP YOU . . .
Weekly meetings — Start anytime
WEST POINT GREY UNITED CHURCH
4595 W. 8th at Tolmie - Tues. Jan. 11 , 8 p.m.
KITSILANO SECONDARY SCHOOL
2550 W. 10th at Larch (Rm. 113) Wed. Jan. 12, 8 p.m.
For Further Information
call 736-6701 anytime
Everyone
Welcome
SMOKE WATCHERS OF CANADA
THE
BIRTHDAY PARTY
by Harold Pinter
JANUARY 21-31     8:00 p.m.
Directed by KLAUS STRASSMANN
Set and Costumes by KURT WILHELM
Lighting Designed by RICHARD KENT WILCOX
SPECIAL STUDENT PERFORMANCE
Thursday, January 27       12:30 Noon
. S-1»wv-; $>-*ZS&;&lv& ^isW V" & v x,
Student Ticket Price: $1.00 - AVAILABLE FOR ALL PERFORMANCES
* Box Office    FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE    • Room 207
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