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The Ubyssey Jan 9, 1968

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Array THE UBYSSEY
Vol. XLIX, No. 31
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, JANUARY 9, 1968
224-3916
— gross kenwart photo
THE WICKED RED-COATED MEN of Totem Park turned sweet Esmeralda — pure as the driven
snow — out into the cold Sunday. They laughed, rejoiced and marched around her as she
sat on the lawn, frozen to the spot. Brrrrr . . .
Radsoc suit withdrawn
The libel suit against former UBC radio
ociety president David Smyth has been dropped,
aid Alma Mater Society president Shaun Sulli-
an.
But Smyth does not have his job back,
iullivan said.
Smyth will   have  to   be   re-elected   by  the
PHOTO-PHIXER
The Ubyssey photogs have decided to start
photo column in which we will try to answer
ny questions you may have concerning
hotography. Please send any queries to:
The Photo Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Brock Hall,
UBC, Vancouver S, B.C.
Radsoc membership because his first election was
never ratified by council.
This was because no council action followed
a letter asking the council for ratification after
Smyth's election.
"It was simply an oversight on our part,"
said AMS treasurer Dave Hoye.
Smyth was fired in December after Vancouver
City College student James Robert Davis filed a
libel suit against Smyth and the Alma Mater
Society.
A letter written by Smith to Vancouver City
College student president Alan Poole allegedly
described Davis in derogatory terms.
Executive members of the radio society refused official comment, but sources said Smyth
would probably be re-elected if he ran.
Nominations for the position will open after
a Radsoc executive meeting within two weeks.
senate crisis
Three UBC student senators will ask students at an open
meeting today if they should resign from the senate.
Senators Kirsten Emmott, Gabor Mate, and Ray Larsen will
hear student wishes in Brock at noon.
Graduate student senator Mark Waldman may also be at
the meeting, although he has said he will remain on the senate.
Miss Emmott, who is leaving university for
personal reasons, said Monday she wouldn't
consider quitting the senate for any other
reason.
Larsen and Mate are considering resigning because they say student demands are
being ignored and that the senate concerns
itself with irrelevant issues.
They will not resign if students oppose
their decision.
"The senate has no right to reject student
demands," Mate said.  "The student body re- EMMOTT
presents the majority of the university population. Both it and
the faculty should be served by the senate instead of being
ignored."
The issue of senate secrecy is only a symptom of senate
inefficiency, not the disease itself, Mate said.
Senators at their last meeting voted 40 to 15 against a
motion for an open gallery.
UBC registrar Reg ParnaU senate secretary, said students
were not being ignored in the senate, and that speakers would
be inhibited if an open gallery were initiated.
At a student council meeting Monday night the AMS
deplored the action of the senate in rejecting the proposal for
an open senate.
However, council also voted to oppose the threatened resignation of the senators and urged all senators to work toward
a democratic senate.
At the meeting, senators Mate and Larsen were questioned
by representatives about their motives.
"By threatening to resign we are bringing the question into
the open," said Larsen. "Students should think very seriously
about whether they want the senate to continue as it is."
Larsen did not gain much support from
the council members.
"You're crazy to quit," AMS treasurer
Dave Hoye said. "Why should you cop out
when the going gets rough?"
Agriculture representative Gene Zabawa
said he didn't think there should be any student senators.
"I don't give a damn if they resign," he
said.
AMS second vice-president Kim Compbell
praised the senators for making the students MATE
aware of the senate situation.
Last year's AMS first vice-president Charlie Boylan said the
senators should stay in as activists to expose the inefficiency of
the senate.
Waldman, who was also present, said the senators had to
play by the rules of the senate.
"You have to put your own petty wants aside and work for
the greater whole," he said.
«*<** ,,-t '.
Arts calls early elections,
aim—orient new council
Arts elections will be four weeks early this year.
The decision to hold the elections Jan. 22 to 24 was
announced Monday by arts vice-president Harley Rothstein.
A special arts council meeting Friday made the decision,
Rothstein said, so the new executive will have time to decide
on new projects like the anti-calendar.
"The present council has reached a sort of plateau and
feels that it can no longer be useful. It requires fresh ideas
and enthusiam. We're dead horses in a sense."
This year's arts goverment has been successful in raising
essential questions and in "treating people as human beings
rather than as objects," Rothstein said.
The arts council will-hold a campaign hoping to triple
last year's voting turnout of 728 students. Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 9, 1968
Negro slave revolt
subject of speech
Herbert Aptheker is coming.
A major historian of Negro slave revolts,
he will speak Thursday noon in Brock. ,;
Aptheker wrote  a book attacking the .-
"moonlight and molasses" school of thought
that  Negro  slaves  were  content  in  their „'
1   state prior to the U.S. civil war. He found -„
H   that   there  were  at   least  250   revolts  by *
(   Negro slaves. 4
j| He will speak on recent developments £
1   in the  black liberation movement in the r
'1 us. i
Philosophy memorial
bursary founded
A bursary has been established at UBC in
memory of a student who lost his life in a
motorcycle accident in April, 1966 at the age
of 21.
Family and friends of the late James Rug-
gles Macdonell have contributed more than
$4,200 to a memorial fund which will provide
a bursary of $200 annually to a promising student entering his final undergraduate year in
philosophy.
Macdonell was to have graduated in honors
philosophy at UBC's 1966 spring congregation.
He was awarded the BA degree with first class
honors posthumously.
He had been nominated for a Woodrow Wilson Fellowship, one of the top academic awards
offered to graduating students.
Music building
opens officially
Canada Council director Jean Boucher will
open UBC's new music building at 8 p.m. Friday.
Although attendance at the ceremony is by
invitation only, a series of free public concerts,
beginning Jan. 18 with a medeival musical play
by Fleury, will commemorate the opening.
The ceremony will take place in the' recital
hall.
Chancellor John M. Buchanan's welcoming
address will be followed with remarks by Nathan Nemetz, chairman of UBC's board of governors, Welton Marquis, head of the music department, and Leslie Peterson, minister of education and labor.
Acting president Dean Walter Gage will introduce Boucher who is to give the opening address and unveil a plaque.
After the ceremony a concert will be given
by faculty members and student groups, followed by a tour of the department.
Staff explosion due
Canada's greatest paper doesn't go to press
tonight, but The Ubyssey office at noon will be
filled with fearless editors.
The occasion is open house for new reporters,
especially those from faculties other than arts.
If you can speak English, Swahili, or Russian, and the thought of journalism sends shivers
up your spine, stagger down to lower north
Brock.
A news seminar to acquaint beginners with
the rudiments of reporting will await you.
BRAUN SAYS: .
Marriage Is At
Least Three
Dimensional In
Ifs Oneness
| BRAUN SAYS: —.
Believe It Or
Not It Was
God Who Came
Up With The Idea
Of Sex
What You Can-And
Can't Do About
SLEEPLESSNESS
Are the conventional eight hours
really necessary? Do you know
why you don't have to worry if
you lose sleep occasionally? An
interesting article in January
Reader's Digest reveals some
misconceptions about sleep, and
how recent experiments have
produced a detailed profile of
the problem sleeper... pointing
to what can be done for sleeplessness. Discover exactly what
can and can't be done for the
problem ... and what shouldn't
be done, such as using barbiturates, tranquilizers, and over-
the-counter sleeping pills carelessly. Get the January Digest
BRAUN SAYS: ..
Free Sex
Isn't Free
at all
BRAUN SAYS: ~-
LOVE
WITHOUT FEAR -
THAT'S WHAT
EVERYONE WANTS
"I
FILMSOC PRESENTS
DR. STRANGELOVE
TODAY, JAN. 9 - AUD. - 50c
12:30, 3:30, 6:00, 8:30
Alma  Mater  Society
OFFICIAL  NOTICES
Committee Appointments
'Vive  le Quebec Libre!'  (?)
Interested in going to Montreal for a seminar on
Quebec Affairs, January 17-20? Or would you rather
travel to Winnipeg for a conference on International
Affairs, January 23-27? Those interested are asked to
contact Penny Cairns, AMS Secretary. Box 54, Brock.
5*5
Missing
someone
far away?
She's lonely like you
-phone her tonight!
&ara®
ityvti \
i ■<&£ A'
FILMS AT I.H.
EVERY THURSDAY • STARTING JANUARY 11th
(THIS WEEK) AT NOON    •    BRING YOUR LUNCH
"THE EYE OF THE BEHOLDER"
ROOM        402/403        AT        I.H.
WORKSHOPS
AT I.H. • HUMAN RELATIONS • LUNCH
COFFEE • THIS SATURDAY, JANUARY 13th •
10:00 A.M. • FILM "OVERTURE" DURING LUNCH
• PANEL DISCUSSION • BROW BEATING •
MORE COFFEE • • •
COME: THURSDAY NOON
COME:      SATURDAY      10:00      A.M.
CHARTER FLIGHTS
UNLIMITED
SUMMER
FLIGHTS   TO
EUROPE
738-4721   or   684-5344
1490 W. Broadway. Van. 9.
KOH-I-NOOR
SUPERB INDIAN CURRIES
AND CUISINE
Telephone 688-5236
796 Main St., Vancouver, B.C.
 Open from 5:30 p.m.	
Tuesday Through Saturday.
FORESTRY GRADUATES
are  invited   to discuss  career opportunities  with  Canada's
leading Forest Products Company.
Interviews will be held on campus
January 15, 16, 17, 1968
for   graduates   interested   in   Forestry   Operations,   Logging
Operations and in Wood  Products Manufacturing.
For   information   and   appointments   please   contact   your
Students Placement Office.
AA
MacMillan Bloedel Limited
THE RECREATION
ACTIVITIES PROGRAM
HAS STARTED AGAIN
Badminton Ballroom Dancing
Tennis Circuit Training
Skating Keep Fit
and many other activities are
offered free at any level of ability
Information:
Rm. 208 — Memorial Gym
or
Phone 228-3838
will student
power
take ouer
The Star Weekly Magazine takes an
in-depth look at the new force that's
sweeping our universities.
NOW in
.stan
MAGAZINE!
AVAILABLE AT THE BOOKSTORE
AND ALL NEWSSTANDS Tuesday, January 9,  1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
Homes surveyed
— kurt hilger photo
THE SEAT OF THE PROBLEM, ponders a lax student in Buchanan Monday, is that arts
students get their lumps when aggies give you one of these here contraptions during Aggie
Week. It certainly does drain one of the need to use faculty facilities when you're in a hurry.
Aggie week in with a flush
Agriculture students were flushed with enthusiasm as Aggie Week opened Monday.
Official opening ceremonies included the
presentation of what was alleged to be an outhouse to arts students in Buchanan.
No arts council executives were present to
receive the gift, but an arts spokesman said later
it was nice to see that the Aggies appreciated
basic human needs.
Many of the farmers involved in the stunt
cheered artsmen with hoarse voices. Several
arts students! looked sheepish.
At a fashion show, second vice-president
Dave Parsons and treasurer Al Watson displayed international couturier designs on the
library lawn, in a fashion first for UBC.
Instead of the traditional walk down a runway, the models, for maximum display value,
were tethered to nearby trees.
The fashions, white and grey feathers on
amber bees honey paralleled latest Victoria de-
designs: fluff from head to toe.
Potty profs?
WINNIPEG (CUP) — The University of
Manitoba is going to pot.
Four professors told the U of M student newspaper they smoke marijuana. One of them, an
English lecturer, said the use of the vile weed is
"fantastically high"   among students.
He said people who could never see symbolism in English literature could after using
cannibis sativa. He said the pot smoking experience reassured him that those insights which
had induced him to study English in the first
place were sound.
The third and final draft of the Alma Mater Society housing survey is almost finalized and ready for printing.
The 120-question survey, prepared by the AMS housing
survey committee, will be sent out the week of Jan. 27 to determine the present state of student housing.
The survey will also determine what type of housing at
what cost students want, said Don Munton, AMS first vice-
president and member of the survey committee.
"The results of the survey will also provide a great deal
of data suitable for backing up demands to' the university and
to all three levels of government," Munton said.
About 6,900 questionnaires will be sent out, complete with
with covering letter and stamped return envelope, he said.
All 1,900 married students attending UBC will receive
copies. The remaining forms will go to a random sample of
single students.
Molecule-colliding Bloom
wins $1,500 council prize
UBC physics professor Dr. Myer Bloom has been awarded
the National Research Council's $1,500 Steacie Prize.
Bloom, 39, past recipient of the Alfred P.
Sloan Foundation and John Simon Guggenheim fellowships, won the award for his experiments investigating the properties of molecular systems.
His work has been concerned with chanlges
in the states of molecular rotation due to
collisions between molecules.
In 1966, he performed an experiment
demonstrating the alignment of atoms along
the direction of a rotating magnetic field. BLOOM
Bloom, is a graduate of McGill University and the University
of Illinois. He joined the UBC faculty in 1957.
t National housing studied
*; Eight experts have arrived at UBC to launch a na-   -
tional student housing survey. **
The study, commissioned by the Association of Uni-
'- versities and Colleges of Canada, is financed by the Central
v   Housing and Mortgage Corporation.
A meeting will be held at noon Wednesday in Brock
for students to meet the team and discuss housing problems   -
with its members.
The aim of the survey, to touch ten universities and
last about eight months, is to provide information to help
university administrations form  goals.
During the rest of the week, the experts will confer ;
with administration officials and students on campus hous- .
ing problems and needs. »
Sea-hopping
visits UBC this month
Hopping across the sea from England, new UBC president
Dr. Kenneth Hare will pop in to browse around UBC this month.
He will arrive Jan. 22 on a two-day visit to familiarize himself with the university, Arnie Myers, UBC director of information, announced Monday.
Hare will address the commerce undergraduate annual banquet, the day he arrives, free for the rest of his stay at UBC.
At premier Bennett's invitation, Hare will attend the opening of the legislature in Victoria on the 25th. After remaining
there a day, he will return directly to England.
He plans a similar visit for March, Myers said.
"THE FRONT LINE BAT A STAIvDST/LLKTWERE'S WQHERECOl\K£MlO'm'/mmW) (r£LLO^lEM[HAi€WM
m) .»<"?'., S3 >
THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services
of Pacific Student Press, of which it is founding member, and Underground
Press Syndicate. Authorized second class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. The Ubyssey publishes Page
Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City editor, 224-3916. Other
calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo, Page Friday, loc. 24; sports, loc.
23; advertising, loc. 26. Telex 04-5224.
Final winner Southam Trophy, awarded by Canadian
University Press for general excellence. Co-winner Bracken
Trophy for editorial writing.
JANUARY 9, 1968
Darkness
UBC senate, by a three to one majority, has voted
to remain in hiding. It rejected once again the longtime
student demand for an open gallery at meetings of the
senate — the body which decides university academic
policy. Senate's action shows a callous contempt for the
wishes of the vast majority of the university community.
A summary issued after the meeting claims those
senators who supported open galleries saw the senate's
function as "disputative as well as legislative" while those
who opposed open galleries saw the body's function as
merely "executive-legislative." That's all we're told. We
are to believe then that the senate majority wishes
closed meetings in order to avoid disputes and to continue to legislate the academic lives of 20,000 people
in anonymous comfort. We remind the senators that
any legislative process that does not involve dispute
is highly suspect. The legislative process in Franco's
Spain is one of many examples.
It is understandable that the student senators
should feel discouraged. It is understandable also that
they should feel ashamed of serving on an illegitimate
body like the UBC senate. But talk at this point of
quitting is wrong. Students should make clear to their
senate representatives at today's open meeting in Brock
that they wish them to continue the fight for a democratic
academic community. The chief responsibility of student
senators for the rest of the term will be to augment
the senate's fraudulent "summary of proceedings." The
senate must not be allowed to remain safely in hiding.
Book bind
Not enough books. Not enough copies of books. Not
enough room to sit and read the books. That's UBC's
library.
The library situation, says Slavonic Studies department head Michael Futrell, is "catastrophic." Heads
of other departments use similar adjectives.
Unless extra funds are found immediately, says
head librarian Basil Stuart-Stubbs, "it will not be
simply the future of the library that is in question. It
will be the future of the university."
Stuart-Stubbs is one of the more competent and
hard-working members of the UBC bureaucracy. Working under difficult conditions, he has done a remarkable
job of building and organizing UBC's library. When
Stuart-Stubbs writes a report indicating the library is
facing a critical situation it can be confidently believed
that the library is facing a   critical situation.
The board of governors will consider the report at
its meeting tonight. In choosing a course of action, the
board has three alternatives:
1. Call Stuart-Stubbs  a  liar.
2. Accept the fact of a library crisis but fail to take
action.
3. Revise its priorities and give the library the
financial support it requires.
Any course of action but alternative three will be
disastrous mismanagement of UBC's affairs.
y v
flndthe stems come in handv)
far digging out navel lint —
'A commercialized Sunday would lead to a moral breakdown of society.' —Premier Cecil Bennett, Dec. 20,  1967.
Shaun, AMS, and a
year of nothingness
fPU«li^or\
By STAN PERSKY
Having been something of
an insider through these ten
months of Shaun Sullivan's
Alma Mater Society administration, I was pleased to see
that a recent issue of The
Ubyssey carried a front page
story in which Shaun tells us
that student government has
been a big success this year.
It's a good thing he told us; we
wouldn't have known otherwise.
Shaun says our Greatest
Leap Forward has been increased dialogue between student government and the administration. Maybe for this
term he could shoot for increased dialogue between students and student government.
Jokes aside, inside the
panelled, carpeted AMS offices
and the horseshoe-table council chamber, you could have
discovered a different story.
I had a kind of serious talk
last month with treasurer Dave
Hoye, in between a stream of
purchase orders (for such vital
materials as pencil-erasers and
baby powder) and urgent
phone calls. Hoye is a nice
guy, i.e., he worries.
HOYE SAD
What I'm trying to say is
that when you talk to Hoye
about what AMS has accomplished, he expresses frank disappointment. He's disturbed
by the lack of meaning that
characterizes student council*
and its representatives. (Education student Bob Pollard put
it neatly in a letter to the editor: "In a period of developing student awareness, and
student involvement, I find it
distressing to see that so many
campus 'leaders' have . . . been
left behind . . . ")
I stopped going to student
council a couple months ago,
at the request of arts council
and in accord with my own
wishes. And if you're willing
to grant that such a "diplomatic break" isn't a publicity
stunt, I think you have to see
this move is a serious sign of
how far the situation has deteriorated.
I tried to look at Sullivan's
claims   of   "accomplishment"-
He says that AMS and the
administration have built up
"mutual respect." Isn't that
corny? I suppose I too have
built up this mutual respect
stuff with Gage (who's really
a person when he does what
he knows best: dealing with
students as kids-in-need) to the
extent that I have to occasionally wonder if I've been
"bought off" or "co-opted".
SISYPHUS
Housing — another wow
without a capital W. Every
brief and statement Don Munton has issued I've agreed with.
They've been great. But they
don't have much to do with
housing. Yes, progress. Like
the progress of Sisyphus rolling stones in hell. Housing is
still lousy for UBC students
and will continue to be lousy
despite the series of minor
changes that future AMS's
■(pronounced A-M-messes) will
herald as "student victories."
What I'm saying is: it's important to distinguish between
developments in policy and
actual  changes   in   the   world.
To Page 5
To resign
or to stay
By SENATOR GABOR MATE
It must be understood that
the issue over which we are
considering resignation from
the senate is not the simple
issue of open senate meetings.
If we were confronted merely
by the problem of closed senate meetings it would be far
wiser for us to remain in the
senate and work for the ultimate acceptance of our proposal for a public Igallery.
No, at stake is a principle
far more important than
whether or not the senate shall
conduct its largely irrelevant
proceedings behind open or
closed doors. At issue is the
entire question of democracy
in university government.
RESPONSIBILITY
If the seating of student
senators is to be more than the
meaningless publicity gesture
former president Macdonald
said it was, the senate must be
prepared to exhibit responsibility towards the students.
In other words, it must view
the students as any government must view a large part
of its constituency.
No government has the right
to reject the demands of its
constituents. Yet by rejecting
the principle of open senate
meetings this body has quite
consciously rejected a clearly
stated student demand.
Law prof C. B. Bourne, head
of the senate committee looking into the question, said:
"We can't really know what
the students want, and in any
case it does not matter what
the students say on this issue."
He said this at the last senate
meeting, despite the fact that
all the students elected to the
senate had made open senate
meetings a part of their platform, and despite the fact that
all the candidates not doing so
were defeated by convincinlg
majorities.
UP TO STUDENTS
Most senators apparently
agreed with this attitude, for
the proposal for open senate
meetings was defeated by a
vote of almost three to one.
Thus the senate stated it does
have the right to be non-responsible to the people it governs, the students.
Student senators who were
elected on platforms of responsibility to their electorate
cannot accept this decision of
senate. Our only recourse is
to offer our resignations to
those who elected us. It is up
to the students to decide.
EDITOR: Danny Stoffman
City   Stuart Gray
News  Susan Gransby
Managing   Murray McMillan
Photo    Kurt  Hilger
Senior   Pat Hrushowy
Sports   Mike .lessen
Wire       Norman   Gidney
Page Friday   Judy Bing
Ass't.  Editor    Boni  Lee
Sloshing through the snow and ice,
these arrived to put out a paper
and met a hail of paper clips and
crumpled copy paper: Mike Finlay,
councilled by Norman Gidney; Steve
Jackson, Irene Wasilewski, Mark De
Coursey, who stayed awake, Laurie
Dunbar, who plugged the science of
the times. Irving Fetish wouldn't
use his own typewriter, Lee Tse Hu
bitched and Ann Arky went down
the  ice   steps   derriere  premiere.
Gerry Goalscorer led the sports
scene with Mike Fitzgerald, Pio
Uran  and Bob Banno.
Fotogs suffered but worked, undaunted. They included Powell Har-
grave, Pio Uran, Derrick Webb,
stuffed-up Chris Blake, the inscrutable Bernard alias Bill Loiselle.
And  Bob  Brown. Tuesday, January 9,  1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
MORE    PERSKY
From Page 4
And if you want actual changes,
and don't get them, you should
say so.
SUB. There's a whole room
in Brock called the Sub room
where Dave Hoye (attired in
a construction worker's hard
hat) will gladly show you a
scale model and several million blueprints of next year's
People's Palace.
Paul Goodman writes, somewhere in Compulsory Mis-education, that the traditional non-
job of student government has
been to run the dance. In modern times running the dance
means putting up a $4 million
student union building. It does
strike me as odd that no one
has drawn any connection between building such a thing
and the emergency need for
study space at UBC.
FIASCO
Oh, yeah, the Canadian
Union of Students. Let me say
this flatly: the whole thing was
a lie.
Shaun, Munton, 2 legal-beagles (yes, law prexy emeritus
Jim Taylor, and Mike Coleman
were in on the ground floor of
this fiasco), and some areh
status quo professionals cooked up the whole issue as a
"crisis of conscience." So they
again got students out to vote
on something that didn't need
voting on in the first place.
I wonder if the AMS turn
ing down every decent resolution of the B.C. Assembly of
Students is also counted as an
achievement? The same guys
attacking CUS were supposedly boosting BCAS (we should
spend our money at home, they
said) — but when it came
down to a vote on council we
could see where they really
stood.
A real example of this is
the explanation offered by
AMS education rep Bob Gilchrist on why he voted against
the BCAS resolution condemning high school administration
censorship of the student press:
"I could not accept wording
that strong and I stated at that
meeting, and I still maintain,
that the high school principal
should have the final say on
any issue that concerns his
school." This kind of pontificating would be amusing but
for the frightening thought that
Gilchrist could be a school
principal in the future.
NICE AND VAGUE
And finally, Education Action or Action Education or
Why the Liberal Party is Nice.
Hoye himself knows what kind
of a political campaign would
have to be waged to unseat
Bennett and get a progressive
policy on education in this province. Education Action was
nice, was vague, and it brought
out about 700 students one
chilly noon-hour. (I suppose it
might be regarded as a measure of consciousness that 2,000
students attended a Vietnam
Day rally not sponsored by
student government, but of
course it was a day after a
small-scale student riot and I
suppose lots of people came to
see if there would be any further action.)
I think I've spelled out my
point about the "ten months
of accomplishment." (Someone
like Mike Coleman could no
doubt add a few hems-and-
haws, but the AMS record
wouldn't sustain too much rebuttal — anyway I would remind him of the idiotic council
effort to fire the Ubyssey editor, which was probaby the
year's low point.)
HOMECOMING
Accomplishment? Yes, some.
AMS was instrumental in getting two classes held in residence. SUB has been taken
care of. Senate elections were
held. Homecoming took place.
Special Events brought some
things to campus.
But this is the achievement
of maintaining a slowly moving
status quo. It's as though with
all the polite letters, fancy
committees, rhetorical statements of ideals and concocted
disputes about money, student
government is afraid to dirty
its hands with anything that
actually concerns the lives of
students.
'I wanted to
program computers.
-sit them.'
D wight Brady, a computer programmer with London Life
"That's why I joined
London Life. Of all the
companies I talked to
in my final year of university,
only London Life offered
what I was after in a
computer programming career.
They wanted me to be more
than a button-pusher.
They wanted me to roll up
my sleeves and do something.
London Life offered me
the chance to tackle several
types of programming problems.
And the opportunity to work
with one of the largest,
most modern and best recognized
computer departments in Canada.
It was exactly what I wanted."
Dwight graduated in math
and physics from the
University of New Brunswick
in 1966. If you would like
to know more about programming
or other careers with
London Life, see your placement
officer. Or write to the
Personnel Department,
London Life Insurance Co.,
London, Ontario.
London Life Insurance Company
Head Office: London, Canada
DR. STRANGELOVE
with Peter Sellers
TODAY, JAN. 9 - AUD. - 50c
12:30, 3:30, 6:00, 8:30
DATA-DATE
The computer-dating
service with fun in  mind
Please look in the Sun
on January 13, Saturday
for details.
DON'T MISS OUT
Graduate Scholarships
VALUE $6,000 PER ANNUM
A number of scholarships, each valued at $6,000 per annum
(tax free), are available to suitable graduates in any branch
of engineering—mech., elec, civil etc.—or applied science
who are interested in a career in the Mining Industry.
These are McGill University scholarships for an advanced
course leading to a master's degree in mining engineering.
Applications should be made, before February 5, 1968, to:
Chairman:
Dept. of Mining Engineering & Applied Geophysics,
McGill University, 510 Pine Avenue West,
Montreal, P.Q.
These scholarships are sponsored by a group of Canadian
Mining Companies.
will student
power
take ouer
The Star Weekly Magazine takes an
in-depth look at the new force that's
sweeping our universities.
NOW in
stan.
weekly
THE
MAGAZINE^
AVAILABLE AT THE BOOKSTORE
AND ALL NEWSSTANDS Page 6
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 9,  1968
'TWEEN CLASSES
Bomb lover plays today
FILM SOC
How I Stopped Worrying
and Learned to Love the Bomb:
Dr. Strangelove, 50 cents, today, auditorium, 12:30, 3:30,
6, 8:30 p.m. Alfie, Friday,
same place, time, price.
VCF
Nobody    Waved     Goodbye,
Ang.   110, Thursday noon,   10
cents.
NEWMAN CENTRE
The   Christian  Image:   How
Co-ed molested
at Acadia  Park
University RCMP are investigating an incident in
Acadia Park residence Saturday, in which a UBC co-ed was
molested.
An RCMP spokesman said
the woman, her name withheld, was alone in her residence at about 5 a.m., when a
young man broke in and attacked her.
"We are very active in our
investigation, but no arrests
have yet been made," said Sgt.
G. U. Strathde, head of the
detachment.
Strathde warns all Acadia
Park residents to make sure
their doors are securely locked at night, even though they
are in residence  buildings.
to   Destroy   It,   Wednesday,   7
p.m., St. Mark's music room.
SPORTS  CAR CLUB
Meeting Thursday noon,
chem. 250.
IL CAFFE
Conversation in Italian at
IH 402, Wednesday, noon.
IK
Program meeting, Wednesday noon, IH 400.
CIASP
Training meeting Wednesday
noon, Bu. 1221.
ONTOLOGY
Jekyll or Hyde: is this our
choice? Wednesday noon, Bu.
223.
INTERNATIONAL  HOUSE
Film, Thursday noon, room
402-3. Human Relations workshop Saturday, 10 a.m. Coffee,
frustration, discussion, all free.
VOLLEYBALL TEAM
Practices,  Tuesday   6:30  p.m.,
Thursday  6  p.m.  and Sunday
1 p.m. in War Memorial Gym.
MUSSOC
Costume makers meet in
club room 7 p.m. Thursday.
SLAVONIC   CIRCLE
Prof. Revutsky will show
slides and speak on Russian
actors in Ostravsky's plays,
Wednesday noon, Bu. 102.
NEWMAN  CENTRE
Retreat at Mission this weekend. Those girls interested in
attending meet Wednesday
noon at St. Mark's.
PRE  DENTAL  SOC
Dr. Ross Upton speaks Wednesday noon, Bu.  205.
FULL   GOSPEL  STUDENTS
Renewed Christianity is
theme of lecture series, noon
each day this week in Bu. 202.
Tuesday — Mel Boring, Wednesday — Dr. George Pattison.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Karl Burau orates: Is Canada
A Police State? Wednesday,
1:30 p.m., Bu. 204.
PRE SOCIAL WORK
Field trip to Woodland's
School leaves Thursday, 9:30
p.m. outside Bu. Ext. on East
Mall.
PRE-LIBRARIANSHIP
Meeting Wednesday noon
Bu. 225.
NDP CLUB
General meeting Wednesday
noon, Bu. 203.
CONSERVATIVE  CLUB
Meeting Wednesday noon,
Bu. 214.
ARTS U. S.
OFFICIAL  NOTICE
ELECTIONS
will be held January 22-24, 1968
Candidates for the offices of President,
Vice-President, Treasurer and Secretary
may declare their candidacy between
now and January 17 by registering at
the Arts Council office, in the lounge of
the Buchanan Building.
$ BRAUN SAYS:
The 'New
Morality1 isn't
Morality at
all.
Is Hippieland
Breaking Up?
Only two years ago the hippies
proclaimed that hatred could
be overcome by beauty, love
and freedom of expression. But
now the dark side of the hippie
moon has become increasingly
visible — murder, rape, disease,
suicide. January Reader's Digest tells the whole tragic story.
What are the horrible facts
about the new "speed" drug
that is scaring even its users?
Read about the lucky ones who
have decided to work, and the
unfortunates who will never
again adjust. It's in the January Digest now.
37
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
THE PHYSICISTS"
xs
(An Intellectual Thriller)
by Friedrich Durrenmatt
with
Tom Wheatley
Barney O'Sullivan
Dorothy Davies
Joseph Golland
ki
Directed by Klaus Strassmann
Designed by Richard Kent Wilcox
JANUARY 12 - 20, 1968
Student Tickets $1.00
(available for all  performances)
-    SPECIAL STUDENT PERFORMANCES    -
Monday, January  15th — 7:30 p.m.
Thursday, January 18th ~~ 12:30 p.m.
Tickets: Frederic Wood Theatre, Room 207 - or 228-2678
One of the few contemporary German plays to win international acclaim
SUPPORT YOUR CAMPUS THEATRE
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
d
Payment of Fees
Second installment now due.
Payment should be made at the
Accounting Office
on or before
Monday, January 15,  1968
INTERESTED  IN  DENTISTRY
OR  DENTAL  HYGIENE?
The Pre-Dental Society Can Help You
Meeting Wed.  Noon, Jan.  10  BU. 205
New Members Welcome
Speaker: Dr. Ross Upton, Exec. Sec. B.C.D.A.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students. Faculty & Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 75*. 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00, 3 days $2.50.
Publications Office, BROCK HALL, UNIV. OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
Lost & Found
13
FOUND:     NUCLEAR     DEVICE     IN
Aud.,  Jan.  9,  Tues.  50c,  12:30,  3:30,
 6:00,   8:30.   Please   claim.
LOST: GREEN PATENT LEATHER
Handbag, vicinity Village, $10 reward.   Phone  224-5369.
FOUND: GIRL'S WATCH, NEAR
Extension dept. Pis. phone 228-2522
or Ext. Aud. Visual Service.
WALLET LOST, JAN. 4, VICINITY
Hennings. Finder call 224-9711 after
7  p.m.   Reward.   RM  130,   Tom.
OUND: PAIR OF GLASSES WITH
brown rims on University Boulevard, around the First December.
Phone   224-4105.
REWARD FOR RETURN OF OR
information about maroon jacket,
lost Saturday night, Brock. Phone
321-8789.
POUND THURS., BROCK, NOON,
Cheque Book belonging to Robert
Gelwicks. Collect Publications
Office.
Rides 8c Car Pools
14
f^ARPOOL WEST RICHMOND, 8:30s,
Blundell and Railway. Needs pas-
sengers.   277-7463   after  6  p.m.
9:30 CAR POOL NEEDS RIDERS.
Phone Gerry, 261-6430. From 41st
and   Dunbar  area.
RIDER WANTED FROM PATULLO
Bridge. Travel via Marine Drive
for   8:30s.     526-4903.
URGENT! RIDE WANTED FROM
1700 block Broadway for 8:45. Phone
Marilyn,   738-3385' after 6  p.m.
DRIVER WITH CAR WOULD LIKE
to join British Properties carpool.
Phone  John,   926-2572.
Special Notices
IS
FOR RELIEF FROM THAT YEAR
end hangover—see Peter, The Campus  Barber Shop,  Brock  Hall.
PHI KAPPA PI, CANADA'S ONLY
National fraternity, invites you to
participate in their annual spring
rush. Sign up at I.F.C. office, Brock
Extension.
U.B.C. BARBER SHOP IN THE
Village. 3 barbers. Open weekdays 8:30-6 p.m. Saturdays 'till
5:30.
Trarel Opportunities
16
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE & MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
31
L951 CONSUL, $65. NEW} CLUTCH,
brakes, ignition. See Jim, Hut A3,
Rm.   7,   behind Auditorium.
1960 FORD, ONE OWNER, 6 CYL.
Std. Good condition, $375. Phone
TR   9-3419.
Automobile Parts
23
TWO NEW 165-15 SEMPERIT RA-
dial snow tires, with studs, on
Triumph   rims.    431-2131.
Motorcycles
26
HONDA-FIAT
Motorcycles -  Cars
Generators - Utility Units
New and Used
•SPORT  CARS
N T
O      Motors      S
R E
T      W
145 Robson H 688-1284
BUSINESS SERVICES
Scandals
37
HAIR PIECES CLEANED AND
styled. Reasonable rates, U.B.C.
Beauty Salon in the village. 228-
8942.
WHAT'S IT ALL ABOUT? ASK
Alfie. Jan. 12. Friday, 12:30, 3:30,
6:00,  S:30.  Aud.,  50c.
ALFIE FRIDAY, JAN. 12, AUD., 50c.
12:30, 3:30, 6:00, 8:30. What's It All
About,   Baby.
candals (Conl.)
37
TODAY DR. STRANGELOVE, AUD.
50c, 12:30, 3:30, 6:00, 8:30, starring
Peter  Sellers  and   Keenan  Wynn.
"STAR TREK" FANS UNITE! TO
save this show. Write to NBC-TV,
Burbank, California, BEFORE Jan.
31.
ARE YOU DISSATISFIED WITH
Religion? Come to Rm. 301, Music
Rldg.   tonight   7:30.	
38
Sewing - Alterations
'SUPERB PARISIAN FINE TAIL-
oring at a special discount for male
and female students". Y. Roun-
ditck, 2754 W. 4th Ave., Vancouver,
B.C.
Typing 40
TYPING: PHONE 731-7511 — 9:00 TO
5:00.  Phone  266-6662 — after 6:00.
TYPIN3   25c/PAGE,   CARBON   COP-
ies.  lOc/page.  685-7876 after  12 p.m.
EXPERT   ELECTRIC   TYPIST
Experienced   essay   and   thesis   typist
Reasonable   Rates   TR.   4-9253
ANY AND ALL TYPING EXPERTLY
done. Reasonable rates. Phone
277-3521.
EMPLOYMENT
Male or Female
S3
MATHS AND SCIENCE TUTORS
required, 3rd or 4th year students,
736-6923,   Tuesday:   4:30   -   7:30  p.m.
INSTRUCTION
Tutoring
 84
ENGLISH, FRENCH, HISTORY,
Russian. Individual, no contracts,
$3.00 hr. by B.A., M.A., B.L.S. 736-
6923.
ENGLISH, FRENCH, HISTORY
tutoring given by B.A., M.A.,
B.L.S. Individual, $2.95 hr. Phone
736-6923. ___
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE 71
Still a few left
—    BIRD CALLS    —
on Sale at: Publications Office
"rock   Hall   or   UBC   Bookstore
AQUALUNG,     SINGLE     70 TANK,
with    Scubapak    harness, J-valve,
and    tank   boot.    $50.    Call 224-0250
after  6.
-TRANS. CAR RADIO, GM CARS.
New, $80.00, steal at $40.00. Evenings,    526-6884.    Ask   for   Ray   only.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
ROOMS ON CAMPUS—AVAILABLE
Now. 2250 Wesbrook. $40.00. 224-
9662.  Close to Meal  Services.	
ROOM AND BOARD ON CAMPUS.
Quiet, comfortable. Phone Don, 224-
9665, after 6 p.m.
ROOMS FOR RENT, MALE ONLY.
Near Arbutus and 16th Ave. Phone
733-5255  after  6  p.m.	
SINGLE ROOM — MALE  STUDENT
—and   breakfast,   266-9280.
ROOM FOR TWO GIRLS NEAR
bus and shopping area. 261-6692.
3513  West  31st,  Dunbar area.	
83
Room & Board
ROOM & BOARD AVAILABLE IM-
med. for one male student. Call 224-
3504.	
ROOM AND BOARD ON CAMPUS!
5745 Agronomy Road, 224-9667,
5-7   p.m.
LARGEST ROOMS ON CAMPUS.
Singles and doubles. Phi Delta
Theta    Fraternity.    Phone    224-9073.
BE   A   BOARDER   AT   PHI   GAMMA
Delta.  First-class  food and  friends.
$85  mo.  Call Jake or L.B., 224-9769.
FEMALE   GRAD  STUDENT   WANT-
ed   to    share   furnished   apartment.
Phone   738-4280.
GIRL WISHES TO SHARE APT.
with 3 others. Phone 738-3385 after
6 p.m.
FURNISHED APARTMENT IN NEW
block to share near Broadway and
Granville.   Phone  731-1056. Tuesday, January 9,  1968
THE      U BYSSEY
Page 7
MARY CHRISTMAS in her entirety proves a titillating sight. Sex-crazed, exam-ridden students
had to paste and glue pieces of Ubysseys together in December.
Ice hockey Braves still on warpath
An all-out team effort led
the UBC ice hockey Braves to
a 10-2 victory over Ladner
Monday night at the Winter
Sports Center. The win was
the eleventh straight in Rich-
Basketball victory
The UBC basketball Jayvees
waltzed to an easy 77-43 exhibition victory over the Simon
Fraser Frosh Monday night at
War Memorial Gym.
The JV's, who led 35-24 at
half-time, got top efforts from
tall centre Terry MacKay who
scored 16 points and Keith
Margetson who added 14. Top
SFU point-getter was Bob
Hearn with 11.
mond     Intermediate    Hockey
League play for the Braves.
Wayne G'Froerer topped
UBC marksmen with three
goals. Singles were scored by
Brian Shillington, Bob Berrie,
Dwayne    Biagioni,   Wes    Bor-
kowski,   Ernie   Lawson,
Beech and Stan Stewart.
Jack
Braves' goalie Don Cram
continued his excellent net-
minding and kept his goals
against average at a sparkling
2.00.
Fiddler on the ice
salvages victory
CALGARY (UNS) — An overtime goal by Don Fiddler gave
the UBC Thunderbirds a 5-4 win over the University of Calgary
Dinosaurs in the second game of their two game WCIAA series
Saturday.*
The win earned the Birds a split in the series with the
Dinnies who took a 4-2 decision in the first game Friday.
Dave Smith led the Dinosaurs in the first game with two
goals while Ken Knowles and Skip Holmes added singles.
Calgary dominated play throughout most of the game except
for lapses in the second period when Bob Richards and Jack
James beat Dinosaur goalie Don Vosburgh.
The Dinnies appeared headed for another win in the second
contest as they took a 2-0 lead in the first period on goals by
Fred Sloah and John Toner but a power-play counter by Fiddler
and Miles Desharnais' first tally tied the score at 2-2.
Smith gave Calgary the lead again with two goals, one late
in the second period and the other at 3:25 of the third.
From there the Birds took control. Desharnais' second goal
chopped the Dinosaurs' lead to one goal and Terry Elliott tied
the score at 4-4, sending the game into overtime.
Th birds dominated the overtime period till Fiddler wrapped
the game up after fourteen minutes of overtime with a screen
shot that trickled through Vosburgh's pads.
UBC is now 3-3 in Western Canada Intercollegiate Hockey
League play, sharing second place in the standings with the
Saskatchewan Huskies, who have three wins and one loss.
Edmonton leads the league with four wins and two losses.
THEA KOERNER
MEMORIAL LECTURE
DR. THEODOR ROSEBURY
Professor  Emeritus  of
Bacteriology
Washington University,
St. Louis, Missouri
SCIENCE AND SOCIAL
RESPONSIBILITY
Friday, January 12th, 1968
12:30 noon Henry Angus 104
5th ANNUAL SCIENCE SYMPOSIUM
THE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY
of
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
At Hosario Beach near Anaeortes, Washington
January 12, 13, 14
Main speakers:— Dr. Robert Rowan—U.B.C. Philosophy
Dr.  Theodor  Rosebury—Professor  Emeritus  of   Bacteriology
at Washington University in St. Louis
Gene Marine — Senior Editor of Ramparts Magazine
$7.00 students — $11.00 faculty
Register before January 10 at AMS or AAC
CANADIAN   UNION
OF   STUDENTS
Presents
TRAVEL TO EUROPE
CALGARY TO LONDON VIA
DC-8 JETLINER
$325 ROUND TRIP
MAY 8 to SEPTEMBER 9
Ask about our 3 week plan
For further information contact Mr. Mike Pearce AMS/CUS
Services Chairman in Brock Hall or write to Rod M. Mac-
Kenzie, CUS Chairman, MacEwan Hall, The University of
Calgary, CALGARY, Alberta.
EFFECTIVE
RAPID
READING
can help YOU
There's still a lot of reading to be accomplished, understood and remembered.
The Reading Dynamics method GUARANTEES to at least triple your reading speed
'while retaining or increasing your present comprehension.
ENROLLMENT IN READING DYNAMICS
WILL ENSURE THE FOLLOWING
You are guaranteed a three fold increase
in reading speed
You will also acquire greater comprehension.
You will enjoy our modern up-to-date class
rooms
You will meet our top rated teaching staff
You will be impressed by our detail and
personal attention
No classes have more than 26 people
During your classes you will meet and get
to know some interesting people
Your fee is tax deductible
On graduation you receive life time membership and without cost receive additional tuition at any Reading Dynamics office throughout the world.
LEARN THE MOST RECENT STUDY
PROCEDURES AND RECALL SKILLS
Attend One of Our
FREE Demonstrations
Tonight 8:00 p.m. Grosvenor Hotel
Douglas Room
Jan. 10 8:00 p.m. Georgia Hotel
Kent Room
Jan. 11 8:00 p.m. Frank Baker's
Capilano Gardens
Copper Room
Jan. 13 8:00 p.m. Grosvenor Hotel
Douglas Room
Jan. 15 8:00 p.m. Grosvenor Hotel
Douglas Room
For further information contact one of
our   U.B.C.   Representatives
PERRY SEIDELMAN-261-1809  or  leave
a message in the Student Mail
Box in the law building.
MIKE MENARD     -    -    -    -    266-5574
JIM RUST 266-0403
(Ow/u/n,  Wood READING DYNAMICS DF B.C.LTD.
60C-IQ7& MELVILLE STREET. VANCOUVER S. B.B.       PHONE SB5-2374 Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 9,  1968
£pwt6
EDITOR: MIKE JESSEN
Run, hop, skip and jump
The UBC track and field team performed remarkably well
over the weekend in Edmonton, winning the Collefgiate Indoor
Championships on Friday with 50 points and individual team
members performing well on Saturday in the Canadian Track
and Field Championships.
Gordon Dong was the individual star of the UBC team as
he came first in the long jump (23' 1W), second in the 60 yards
(6.5), second in the 60 yard hurdles (7.8), and second in the triple
jump (44'8W).
Mike Dowty won the shot put Saturday with a heave of
45' \W while Ray Stevenson took the triple jump with 45' 3Vz".
Ken French came second in the mile with a time of 4:17.8
and was invited to the international track meet in Calgary for
his efforts.
Coach Lionel Pugh credited the girls with their fine performance on both dates.
Leona Sparrow threw the shot 38' 11" for fourth place,
Joanne Heatherington and Anka Toelstra came third and fourth
respectively in the 60 yards with a time of 7.3 each.
Pat Mills finished second in the woman's mile in a time of
5:22.1 and second in the 880 in 2:22.8. UBC's women's team also
won the 4x160 yards in 1:21.5.
In other men's events, Tom Howard won the two mile with
a time of 9:55.8 and Craig Nixon came second in the 440 with
53.3.
— derreck webb photo
"WHERE'S THE BALL?" . . . "What ball ?" . . . "I don't see a
ball, do you see a ball ?" UBC's Dave Rice (33) leaps higher
than anyone while Calgary's Dale Stuckey (11) sticks his
arm ,in and hopes. UBC won twice in weekend action.
READING IMPROVEMENT
AND STUDY SKILLS CENTRE
Special student and faculty classes begin the
week of January 15 — Room 119, East Mall Annex
OFFERED BY THE UBC EXTENSION DEPARTMENT
Mon. & Wed. - 2:30 to 4:00 p.m.
Mon. & Wed. - 5:00 to 6:30 p.m.
Tues. & Thurs. - 5:00 to 6:30 p.m.
Tues. & Thurs. - 7:30 to 9:00 p.m.
10 Sessions: Student fee: $35; Faculty fee: $55
Classes are limited to 21  persons
To register or for further information, contact:
Education-Extension, the Extension Department, 228-2181.
ASH VALDAL, of UBC's Thunderbird soccer squad was outnumbered three to one on this play
in Saturday's game with Firefighters but managed to scramble away to assist on the Bird's
only goal in a losing cause.
AS RICE LEADS  WAY
Birds demolish  Dinnies
By BOB BANNO
The UBC basketball Thunderbirds proved
they don't belong in the painfully weak Western
Intercollegiate Conference running and shooting their way to a pair of easy weekend wins
over University of Calgary Dinosaurs at War
Memorial Gym.
Playing without injured top gun Ian Dixon,
Birds won 99-54 Friday and 111-76 Saturday.
The victories left the Birds in a first-place
tie with Manitoba.
Pacing UBC Friday with 23 points was
senior forward Neil Murray.
Junior forward Dave Rice, filling in for
Dixon, pumped in 22 points, and spunky little
guard Larry Donaldson added 18 points for UBC.
Birds held Calgary high scorer Al Kettles
to five points, all comin'gi from the foul line.
The powerful but clumsy Kettles came alive
Saturday, however, ignoring catcalls from the
crowd to barge his way to 23 points in the losing
cause.
Rice and guard Phil Langley, playing his
finest game of the season, led UBC scorers with
25 points each.
UBC coach Peter Mullins, showing uncustom
ary compassion,  refrained from the  zone-press
and gave his subs a lot of floor time.
Birds travel to Winnipeg this week for a
series which may decide the conference championship.
Only second loss
for soccer team
The UBC soccer Thunderbirds suffered their
second defeat of the Pacific Coast Soccer League season, 2-1, at the hands of the Firefighters
Saturday at Callister Park.
The scoring began five minutes into the
second half when Fireman Bill Cooksley made
it 1-0.
With the Birds fighting back and missing
the net by inches, Fireman Ken Ferrier rubbed
it in by upping the score to 2-0.
The Birds then tried harder. With two minutes left in the game Ash Valdai passed to John
Haar to score.
SPECIAL EVENTS  PRESENTS
DR. HERBERT APTHEKER
BROCK  LOUNGE - NOON
THURSDAY, JANUARY   11th
American  Marxist —  Director of  the American
Institute of Marxist Studies
Speaking   on
THE NEGRO REVOLT''
AMS Experimental College Meeting
Thurs., Jan. 11 - 12.30-2.30- Bu. 226
of Mr. Stockholder's Course on Literature and  Imperialism
READINGS:
Camus-The Outsider
Franz Fanon-The Wretched of the Earth (Grove Press)
Barrington Moore-Social Origins  of Dictatorship
and Democracy-chapt. on Fanon

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