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The Ubyssey Oct 6, 1966

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Array Vol. XLVIII, No. 9
THE UBYSSEY
VANCOUVER,  B.C., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 6,   1966
h
_.        ''J   t- J'W"..■->'%,
—kurt  hilger photo
RED-SHIRTED MOB of engineers made grand trek around campus Wednesday complete
with frisky horse and even friskier looking Lady Godiva. Alas, the fair maiden
didn't follow the script exactly and most of her manifold charms were covered.
Barge offered to students
but no place to keep it
By ANGELA OTTHO
Students who can't find
rooms on dry land can take
to the water.
They can live on a boatel
offered , to the university by
Roy Blanche of Burnaby.
The boatel is a 110- by 40-
foot   barge   with   six   double
rooms, private showers and
toilets.
There are six more unfinished rooms which, Blanche says,
he will finish in a month if
students are interested.
The boatel also has a 35
square-foot lounge which he
says could easily be converted
into a dormitory.
Board acts to build
more residences
UBC's board of governors
acted Tuesday to provide a 75
per cent increase in campus
residences by 1970.
The construction program
will increase the residence
space by 75 per cent and will
eliminate Fort and Acadia
Camps.
The program will be completed by 1970 and will involve construction of residences containing 3,000 beds.
The board also passed a resolution expressing its concern
to Vancouver city council over
the shortage of accommodation
available in the city for students.
With the completion of the
new residences, the total num
ber of housing units on the
campus will rise from 2,662 to
4,690.
UBC will soon call tenders
for 275 campus suites for married graduate students, to be
available next September, said
president John Macdonald.
The program for single students will provide housing for
25 per cent of 18,500 single
students expected on campus
by 1970, Macdonald said.
Residences will continue to
be operated on the revenues
they provide, he said.
"The prime objective is to
keep rentals as low as possible
—and with the largest amount
of campus accommodation in
Canada, our average rental
rates are still the lowest.
Blanche wants to charge $35
a person for the rooms and
$17 for dormitory beds.
If the university is interested, Blanche said, he will make
arrangements with the National Harbours Board for mooring the barge at Jericho or
Kitsilano.
But says harbor master B.
D. Johnston: "No house boat
of any description will be allowed within the harbor
limits."
Asked to comment on the
ruling, Blanche's wife said: "If
they will k e e p a whale at
Jericho, why shouldn't they
allow this boatel for housing
the student?
Foresters on top
in blood drive
Forestry and agriculture
are leading UBC's blood
drive.
Twenty-four per cent of
the foresters and 11 per cent
of the aggies had contributed blood by 4:30 p.m. Tuesday.
Dentistry with no contributors, law with .2 per cent
and education with 2.5 per
cent were the lowest faculties.
Answer to brief
ready
in a
week
A solution to UBC's housing crisis was stalled by Vancouver city council Tuesday for at least a week.
Council voted unanimously to refer a student request
to relax the housing bylaws to planning director W. A.
Graham for a report and recommendations.
The earliest possible date for
the report to be ready is a
week today.
Alma Mater Society president Peter Braund termed the
lack of action by the city council regrettable.
"We plan to try to mobilize
support of the Point Grey home
owners to endorse our cause,"
he said.
The AMS brief presented to
city council contained petitions
signed by 5,300 students and
628 Point Grey residents requesting a three-year relaxation of investigation of illegal
suites.
The brief outlined the UBC
administration's plans to meet
housing shortages by 1970.
PETER BRAUND
. . . regretable"
Brief met opposition
Attention of the council was
drawn to the city's closure of
1,500 illegal suites which has
put a severe squeeze on students who are unable to get
housing on campus.
Braund, first vice-president
Charlie Boylan and treasurer
Lome Hudson defended the
brief from alderman's questions.
Braund said: "The questions
were mainly asking how the
crisis might be alleviated and
were not a negative nature.
About twenty students accompanied the AMS executives.
The West Point Grey Civic
Association presented  a  brief
in opposition to the zoning
relaxation request.
"We object to any proposal
to liberalize the present bylaw
provisions," said Mrs. F. H.
Stevens on behalf of her husband who is president of the
75-member association.
She said Point Grey homeowners should not suffer simply because of lack of proper
planning by the proper authorities.
Another member of the association, H. C. Webber, said:
"I've been a resident of Point
Grey for 43 years.
"We (the homeowners) have
to stand up for things (single
family dwelling regulations)
that are good."
Law changes proposed
He referred to an incident
near his home involving "a den
of an illegal suite full of 60
drinking students."
Debate later began on the
issue when Alderman Bob Williams presented the following
resolutions asking that:
The final closing date of
illegal suites be moved from
the end of 1967 to the end of
1970;
An increase from two to
three boarders be permitted in
RS-1 single dwelling zone
areas;
And that the area bounded
by Blanca, Dunbar, Tenth and
Sixteenth be rezoned a two-
family area.
Alderman Earle Adams objected violently to the resolutions and referred to the war
years when similar zoning relaxations were permitted.
"It took us twenty years to
get rid of them. Anybody on
council who votes for these
resolutions without a hearing
from the people sure shouldn't
be here next year."
Alderman Tom Alsbury
termed the AMS presentation
one of the best ever."
Mayor Bill Rathie referred
to the married student Acadia
Camp housing project as an
indication of planned remedies
by the UBC adminisistration to
the housing crisis.
City council then voted unanimously to refer the matter
to the director of planning.
FOCUS LOOKS
AT CUP
(SEE PAGE 5) Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday,   October   6,   1966
TOURISTS DELUDED
Island dream dispelled
Seductive natives singing
under coconut trees in the
South Pacific is merely a deluded picture fostered for the
tourist, says an Anglican
bishop.
The Right Rev. J. C. Vockler,
Anglican Bishop of Polynesia,
dispelled any romantic images
of the islands Tuesday noon.
"For one thing no reasonable person would do anything under a coconut tree,
with those hairy shells falling
from heights of eighty feet,"
he said.
In one generation extreme
changes have caused a painful
gulf between the old village
life and new horizons, he said.
"Increasing opportunities for
travel and education turns the
younger generation in search
of a better life, whereas the
elders cling tenaciously to their
ancient rites," he said.
"A lot of romantic nonsense
has been written about village
life. In reality it is unsanitary
and extremely unhealthy.
In Suva, he said, the capital
of Fiji, the native meets disaster. He squanders meager
earnings on frivolities — these
newly available with the opening up of the tourist business.
"It is highly dangerous when
tourism becomes the main
economic backing of an emerging nation," Rev. Vockler said.
He said increasing population makes a demand for more
housing and new jobs.
"Without investment of capital to open these new jobs
there will be a decline in progress before the end of the
century," said Rev. Vockler.
"The government is a conglomeration of various minority opinions. We think it is
preposterous and can't see it
lasting over five years."
Registration starts now
for leadership meeting
Leadership Conference will be held October 14-
16 at the Forestry Research Station in Haney.
The conference provides the opportunity for senior
students to have relaxed discussion with a cross-section
of UBC professors and alumni.
Interested students are asked to register in the
AMS office immediately  as  subscription  is limited.
Chairman Betsy Wood expects approximately 120
delegates to attend.
—don kydd photo
BEAUTIFUL BLONDE FROSH queen candidate displays
latest creation during fashion show in the Brock lounge
Tuesday at noon. The queen will be chosen Saturday night.
UBC sciencemen
fly to Toronto
GRAD CLASS
First General Meeting
Membership: all students in the winter session who are
registered in the final year of a course leading to a
Bachelor's or the M.D. degree shall be members of the
Grad Class.
—positions   open are: President, Vice-president, Treasurer,
Secretary, Social  Convenor,  Public  Relations  Officer,
—a meeting of the Grad class (all  graduating students)
for the first time on MONDAY, OCTOBER 24, AT  12:30
IN THE AUDITORIUM.
—nominations may be sent to the Secretary, AMS, post-
box 54.
mar them
anywise
Two members of the UBC
Physics Society were chosen
Tuesday to attend a Toronto
physics conference.
Mike Apps and Frank Flynn
will fly to Toronto later this
month for the three-day under-
Poor cooks
have an out
Students who live off-campus
but don't appreciate their own
cooking can eat at the UBC
residences.
Food services head Ruth
Blair said Wednesday: "Few
students are aware they can
buy tickets for up to three
meals a day at any of the four
residences."
Cost of three meals a day
for a month is $45, lunch and
dinner only $37 and breakfast
and dinner only $33.
Students can also buy single
meals at a cost of 60 cents, 80
cents and $1 for breakfast,
lunch and dinner respectively.
graduate conference on physics.
The conference is being
sponsored jointly by the
Physics and Math Club of the
University of Toronto and the
Canadian Association of Physicists.
Students and guest lecturers
from across Canada will present their scientific paparesfor
discussion.
There will also be a panel
discussion on student academic
activities in science.
UBC's Dr. Michael Crad-
dock will deliver a paper on a
high particle generator for
nuclear physics.
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4445 W. 10th
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at  Mackenzie Thursday, October 6,  1966
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
—powell  hargrave  photo
WEAVING A SPELL on her captive audience is Cree folk-
singer Buffy Sainte-Marie. She sang Tuesday night to a
packed gym.
Anthill facilities
irk faculty, staff
University faculty and staff
have been caught in a space
squeeze.
Teaching assistants, secretaries and graduate students
are the main victims, as staff
grows faster than available
space.
"There is definitely overcrowding," said Jeannette Tish
of the economics department.
"In our Angus building
office, three assistants share
one office. Seven graduate students are in one of the old
social work huts, two and three
to a room."
Said one secretary in the
philosophy department: "They
took away our lunchroom for
office space and gave us a
corner of the Buchanan penthouse. Next they'll be stealing
our washrooms."
Earlier this week, teaching
assistants in the English department complained cramped
conditions made it impossible
to conduct interviews with
students properly.
Dr. J. R. Mackay, of the
geography department, said:
"We're badly overcrowded. We
have close to 20 teaching assist
ants, and very few offices."
"Actually, I think our greatest concern is for research
space," said physics professor
Roy Noddwell. "Our graduate
students don't have enough
room."
'Russians backed czar
before war/ says exile
If it hadn't been for World
War I, Russia would be a
social democracy today says
former Russian premier Alexander Kerensky.
Kerensky said Wednesday
all forces in Russia supported
the constitutional monarchy
before the war.
"The 10 years before the
war were the best in Russian
history," he told an overflow
crowd in Bu. 202.
"Russia was destroyed because it was blockaded in the
the war from the rest of the
world.
"Europe was supported by
the allies but not Russsia," he
said.
He said this lack of support
gave growth to the Communist
movement in Russia.
Kerensky led the provisional
government in Russia between   the   czarist   and   com-
GRINDING HALT
help
Housing services
dying from debt
By TOM MORRIS
The AMS housing service is grinding to a halt and no
one is doing much about it.
"We went $600 in debt last
year and it will be the same
picture this year," said AMS
housing co-ordinator Ray
Larsen.
He said that two years ago
the administration ran a house
listing service.
"But the service was inadequate as they didn't post house
listings and weren't efficient,"
Larsen said.
"The AMS took over the
service but had to charge $3
a listing to keep from going
broke.
"Now we want money from
the administration to subsidize
our effort but they have been
unwilling to give us anything.
"The administration takes
listings but still doesn't post
them," Larsen said.
First vice-president Charlie
Boylan recommended that all
homeowners place an ad in
The Ubyssey if they have a
room for rent.
"The housing service doesn't seem very active now and
everyone might as well place
an ad in the paper," Boylan
said.
Asked if The Ubyssey would
act as a housing service next
year, Boylan said that he was
hopeful that the administra-
would come up with some
money to keep the AMS ser
vice going.
Picture group
collects
to pick works
The committee that picks
art for Brock Hall needs help.
The committee of seven students, fine arts head Prof. B.
C. Binning and Alvin Balkind,
curator of the Fine Arts Gallery, picks and buys paintings
displayed in Brock.
Students interested in serving on the committee should
contact the AMS office.
They work on a budget of
$1,500 a year from the Alma
Mater Society.
"UBC has gained prestige in
the art world because of this
daring collection," said
Balkind.
Committee members go to
openings of exhibitions and
visit local artists, and galleries.
Two years ago Vancouver
Art Gallery exhibited the entire collection downtown and
said Balkind the impact was
tremendous.
Individual paintings have
been borrowed by the National Art Gallery in Ottawa and
the Portland Art Gallery,
Balkind said.
All Brock paintings are
works of professional artists.
munist regimes. As the head
of the social revolutionary
party he ran the government
for five months in 1917.
In the 1930's he came to the
United States and now, aged
85, he is honorary professor
at Stanford University in California.
"It has been hard for Russia to develop a democratic
state because it is always on
the defensive against other
nations at its borders," he said.
Kerensky said Lenin fooled
the Russian people into thinking he would give them a
democratic state.
"If the Russians realized
Lenin wanted a totalitarian regime he wouldn't have lasted
two days," Kerensky said.
"Lenin won Russia as a
democrat and offered constitutionalism to the people.
"He later revealed his true
plan and the communist regime began," he said.
Speaking on the contemporary world, Kerensky said the
colored peoples of the world
are now sick of seeing the
white nations fight.
"The colored people have
decided to restore their rights
in the world and participate
in international life as they
see fit," Kerensky said.
But he warned that even
their idealism could eventually
end in a totalitarian regime
as it did in Russia.
"Marx and Lenin thought
after extermination of the
other classes a new era of freedom would come."
"But even from this idealism came the fiist totalitarian
dictatorship of Russia," Kerensky said.
He appealed to the new generation to live with their wars
and bombs but to live by love.
Literature prof
suffers  attack
A heart attack Tuesday
sent UBC comparative literature expert George Woodcock to Vancouver General
Hospital.
He is in fair condition in
Centennial Pavilion.
A well known writer,
critic and traveller, Woodcock teaches courses in
Canadian, European and
Oriental literature.
DEADWOOD AS FAR as the eye can see marks last weekend's science symposium at Rosario Beach. Delegates pondered
the problems of communication  in a society overflowing w ith knowledge. A good time was  had  by all. tMWyssw
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
the editor's and not of the AMS or the university. Member, Canadian
University Press. Founding- member. Pacific Student Press. Authorized
second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of
postage in cash.
The Ubyssey  publishes Page  Friday, a  weekly  commentary  and     review;
and   Focus, a   weekly   news  magazine  of world   university   affairs.   Prop.,
Ubyssey News Service (UNS).
City editor, 224-3916. Other calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo. Page
Friday,   loc.   24;   Focus,   sports,   loc.  23;   advertising,   loc.   26.   Night   calls,
731-7019.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and editorial writing.
OCTOBER 6,   1966
One of the benefits of a college education is
to show the boy its little avail.
—Ralph   Waldo   Emerson
; • - - „    - -. zm
Hard pie
Hard pie and a mouthful of brockburger to you,
Ruth Blair.
Miss Blair, who is food services' head growly lady,
says there's no difference in food between the Ponderosa
and the grad student centre.
We  accept;   it's  all brewed in  the same  cauldron.
But at the grad student centre, the line-ups are
short, the dining room is tastefully decorated, the wooden tables are pre-set with cutlery and a pretty little vase
of flowers, and a waitress removes the dirty dishes
after you've eaten.
In the Ponderosa, students have died of malnutrition
while waiting in line, the decor is ugly-modern arborite,
flowers are scarce as ketchup bottles and a large lady
threatens death to all who dare leave a table sullied
with one dirty mug.
And the good contre's minor refinements make food
edible while elsewhere it is not.
Miss Blair also poo-poos the idea of opening cafeterias until midnight or later — she says nobody would
come.
We would, Miss Blair — if the main library was
also open, which it isn't, because the cafeteria isn't
either.
In fact, over at Brock Hall, you can't get a hamburger after 2 p.m., because that's when the cook goes
home.
Not that anyone would want one — they fry the
day's supply en mass at 11 a.m., slather all the little
gray bits of meat with a pungent, pink, relish-like potion,
and carefully dry them out in a warming drawer.
Here are some ways Miss Blair could improve her
self-proclaimed really fine service and fair prices:
Set up a separate cash register for just coffee and
pie, and another for pop. milk and ice-cream and
another for sandwiches and hamburgers.
This is called island service, which 50 years of cafeteria research has proven serves more people faster
and more efficiently by eliminating draggy line-ups.
Break up a sea of ugly tables with partial partitions
enclosing about 50 chairs, thus making dinner less of
an army camp experience and more of a thing people
like to do.
Stop claiming food services prices are lower than
anywhere else, and take a stroll over to the CNIB cafeteria under the education building.
There, the food is cheaper, tastes better, and is
served faster by blind people than anywhere in the
whole sighted food services empire at UBC.
No, Miss Blair, UBC students aren't impossible to
please.
Students will be pleased when food services feeds
them pleasantly and well.
It doesn't now.
So put that in your sticky-bun and eat it.
Trees grow tall
Lots of trees grow tall beside University Boulevard.
They've been growing since the boulevard was
built, when it was the one, only and first access road to
UBC.
It wasn't too long after the trees started growing
that the boulevard became a cowpath where a freeway
was needed, and 8:30 a.m. traffic jams are regular
frustrations for all university traffic.
The provincial government both last year and two
years ago said it wasn't about to spring for a six-lane,
smoothly paved boulevard.
But the trees are big now, and tree roots pushing
up under the pavement make the boulevard dangerously
lumpy.
If the trees get much bigger, those roots may destroy
the old road.
It will have to be repaved, and why not widened at
the same time ?
Invest in UBC's future — buy a sack of fertilizer
and pitch handfuls from the car window to those
friendly, hungry trees.
"Blessed are the peace makers on earth." — Shakespeare
A CREATION BY GABOR MATE
A poem as lovely as me
I can't understand why I was asked to
withdraw from my creative writing class.
"Get out, you idiot!" my prof skrieked.
"Get out and return never!" (Creative writing profs have to talk like a Shakesperian
tragedy even when they lose their tempers.)
He had been picking on me ever since
the course began and we were asked to
submit some original piece of poetry. He
immediately singled out my poem for special criticism. "Garbage!" he yelled foaming
at the mouth. "GARBAGE!" He then read
my poem to the class:
I think I shall never see
A poem as lovely as me.
Our next assignment was poetic imagery.
We had to write some phrases "laden with
imagery as the fruit tree in the spring is
laden with fruit." I was the last to read my
composition to the class.
"May the rivers of your future," I began,
"flow into the ocean of happiness. May the
LETTERS
Shovel-in
Editor. The Ubyssey:
This is my fourth year here
at UBC and I feel it is only
my duty to finally throw in
my two-bits in the find-an-
issue - and-protest-a-little bee
on campus.
Let's have a shovel-in on
campus. Call it students' day
for the foundation of SUB.
This would be a co-operative
effort (similar to camp-in) in
which the students would be
asked to bring shovels as an
expression of their desire for
a SUB.
Another approach would be
to sell cheap plastic ground
sheets: call them Students'
Sheets To Eat Their Lunches
On.
R. L. HORTON
arts 3
Arts  apathy
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I am writing with regard to
the disgusting apathy present
in the arts faculty. Not only
apathy, but also lack of any
kind of sympathetic fellow
feeling.
The red horde today des
cended on Buchanan building
and seized two innocent arts-
men from their rightful positions on the grass.
It is not this type of competitive game I deplore, but
that although many artsmen
flocked to the lounge windows, or peered from behind
trees at the morbid spectacle,
not one came out to assist his
unfortunate friends or to administer retribution.
Trying to report this to the
Arts Undergraduate Society,
I was totally unable to find
its office or anyone connected
with it.
I am ashamed of this inactive arts faculty, and I say
that if artsmen are going to
act like doughnuts they deserve to get dunked.
DIANA CULLIS
arts 4
Oust frosh
Editor, The Ubyssey:
The new library policy of
allowing first and second
year students to enter the
stacks before 6 p.m. is, in
our opinion, a grave injustice
to the senior students.
sky of your life never be overcast with the
clouds of failure ..."
"Good, very good," said the prof. "Please
continue."
"... and may the organ of your fancy
never burst through the zipper of reality,"
I concluded.
There were no classes for the next two
days while the prof was busy recovering
from a nervous breakdown. On his return
he asked to see me.
"Come here, you mother . . . !" he screamed gently into my ear. (No longer was he
talking like a Shakespearian tragedy, I
noticed.)
I was given one more chance to prove my
creative ability. I decided to submit the
second half of my first effort.
Any fool can plant a tree,
But only God can make a me.
As I have already related, the sky of my
future was immediately overcast with the
clouds of failure.
EDITOR: John Kelsey
Managing Richard Blair
Newt Carol Wilton
City Danny Stoffman
Photo Powell Hargrave
Page Friday __ Claudia Gwinn
Features                        Rosemary  Hyman
Aee't Newt—.Pat Hrushowy, Anne Balf
Aet't Photo Dennis Gans
If the conduct of students
in the College library in previous years is any indication
of what would occur in the
stacks, we feel that studying
would become an exceedingly
hazardous occupation.
Furthermore, the seating
capacity of the stacks which
is already severely overtaxed
would be stretched beyond
belief.
For first and second year
students the college library
facilities are adequate and
we feel that the old policies
of open stacks after 6 p.m.,
paging, and special stack
passes should be continued.
The benefit to first and
second year students of this
open-door policy would be
negligible, compared to the
harm inflicted upon senior
students.
ROBERT C. BROWNELL
BARBARA CULBERT
PAM MAHONY
DOUG PLUMSTEEL Thursday, October 6,  1966
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
CUP: champagne tastes, beer budgets
From where's the copy
to a real news service:
By ROSEMARY HYMAN
Four years ago, a bujrly journalist from Toronto's
Ryerson Polytechnical Institute ran for the national presidency of Canadian University Press.
On promises of  reams of  copies   for  CUP's  member
papers, of a 5,000-word report  on conditions  in Kingston
Penitentiary   and  similar  largesse,   Sidney   Black   became
president and took up a one-year residency in Ottawa.
The copy was not forthcoming.
And angry editors — with
empty pages — wrote a song
to Sid Black:
"Where is the copy., where
is the copy,
Where is the copy, the copy
we lack?
Where is the boy who took
the course at Ryerson?
Where in the hell are you,
Sid Black?"
And that was CUP — in its
25th year, a flop.
Last December, Don Sellar,
20, three years a part-time reporter for the Calgary Herald,
staffer and past editor for the
Gateway at the University of
Alberta, became the 29th annual president of CUP.
NO FRIENDS
And, realized Sellar, it
wasn't just copy CUP lacked—
it was money, co-operation, accounts and friends.
"It's a case of CUP editors
having champagne tastes and
a beer budget," says Sellar.
"When I ran for this job, I
told the editors that and called
their organization two-bit. Our
immediate goals involve a
change for CUP into a responsible organization that doesn't
hide under a cloak of inadequacy offered by the adjective
'student'.
"We're hoping to start restoring CUP's name and to rebuild the organization."
Sellar's challenge went out
to the 43 editors of papers that
belong to Canadian University
presss, ranging from the 570-
circulation Marianews to the
13,500-circulation Toronto
Varsity.
NEWS SERVICE
CUP is a news service, based
on the same principles as Canadian Press and United Press
International.
University newspapers across
Canada mail in copies of their
papers to the Ottawa office
staff.
The national staff selects
the important stories from the
papers, rewrites and edits
them, mimeographs them and
sends them to the other members of CUP.
CUP also attempts to act as
a cohesive force among the
papers, creating a national concept of student journalism.
But problems that face it are
harsh.
The organization is several
thousand dollars in debt, with
nowhere to draw funds from.
NO RECORDS
No one is really sure where
CUP stands financially. No financial records have been kept
for two years.
Member papers have demanded such things as a photo
service and a sports service,
but any move to raise fees to
pay for the services is met with
strong opposition.
Co-operation between papers
and with the national office is
almost non-existent. Twenty-
five per cent of the papers' editors haven't even told the national when they publish.
And, warns Sellar in his fall
report, "without some sort of
dialogue among member papers
and between member papers
and the national office, CUP
will soon cease to exist."
NO MONEY
The $10,000 annual budget
is being dangerously stretched,
to pay the salaries of its three
employees, and all office expenses.
CUP is dependent on the
Canadian   Union   of   Students
THE UBYSSEY
16 EDITORS RESIG
'I' US* "ROTES
ana we      vtnced he it the devil*       *"_K_ ,.
He LANC
The Gateway
for services it should provide
itself.
Relations with the professional press are atrocious —
mainly because past CUP
officers have insulted professional journalists who have
tried to help in the past.
CUP national staff is overworked and underpaid.
The 43 papers of CUP encompass a huge range of
standards — some almost professional level, some closer to
high-school mimeograph sheets.
Last Christmas three papers
—The Ubyssey, The McMaster
Silhouette and the University
of Alberta Gateway — walked
off with every trophy offered.
CUP should help the worst
papers pull level with the
others   —   but without   staff,
Facts: world's oldest student press
The oldest student press organization in
the world, Canadian University Press is a
loose association of Canada's English language university newspapers.
• It has 41 members — 31 full and 10
associate — who publish bi-weekly, weekly
or semi-weekly.
• Headquartered in Ottawa, the association is directed by an annually-elected national president, who is assisted by two
part-time national secretaries and regional
presidents across Canada.
• The basic aim of CUP is to broaden its
members' outlook, to include national and
international viewpoints.
• Copies of all member newspapers are
sent to the national office, where stories are
picked out, rewritten and sent on to the
other members of CUP. When they arrive
at the second newspaper, they are usually
about four days old.
• The national president pays office ex
penses and his own staff salaries out of
$10,000 a year, garnered from fees levied
on members according to the size of the university. Ceiling for any university is $500.
• Representatives from the papers meet
each Christmas at a national conference,
where they conduct the organization's business. Trophies in various fields of proficiency are awarded.
• CUP members operate within its code
of ethics — guidelines on running a newspaper.
• It acts as a liaison between the student
and professional press, between the Canadian and the international student press.
• CUP's French-language counterpart is
Presse Etudiante Nationale (PEN). The last
of the French newspapers withdrew from
CUP in 1962, because they felt it was impossible for one association to serve both
French and English and because of the difference in newspapering concepts between
the two.
money or help from the professional press, it can't.
SOME CARE
Sellar and two or three editors of the bigger papers care
enough about CUP to try to
revive it.
Sellar outlines a four-point
program to set the organization back on its feet:
• Beat the bushes for funds
— canvass every possible
source — to help expand services, erase debts and provide
some cushion for operations.
To this end, editors and
officers of CUP will go begging to publishers of metropolitan dailies and anyone else
they can think of in the next
few months.
• With the hoped-for better
equipment to provide more
complete news, photo and
sports services.
• Reorganize the national
office, and begin keeping up-to-
date accounts and files.
• Re-establish good relations with the professional
press.
Sellar has no patience with
past stupidities of CUP.
"CUP is the only organization I know of which takes
months to write a letter to a
firm that has offered to reduce
a CUP debt by $600," he comments.
"Our history is largely a disgrace. It exhibits itself every
time we find an unanswered
letter stuffed into a cubbyhole
here in the office. Our files are
hopelessly incomplete. Our
budget is almost a joke."
STAFF CHANGES
Sellar has two further suggestions.
He would like to see some
The Ubyssey
in CUP
The Ubyssey is Canadian
University Press' second-largest paper, with a circulation of
13,400.
It has won the Southam
Trophy, awarded annually to
the best more - than - weekly
paper, for the past five years.
It also holds the Bracken
Trophy, for editorial excellence.
The Ubyssey pays $500 a
year in CUP fees, the maximum prescribed under the
constitution.
One of 11 members of the
western region, it receives an
average of five releases from
the national office each week.
SFA council
hits paper
Simon Fraser's student newspaper, The Peak, will continue
to publish despite a drastically
curtailed budget.
Erick Pedersen, the paper's
administrative assistant said
the paper asked SFA's Student
council for $5,170, but was
given only $3,000.
"However, we have decided
to keep going anyway and the
student council will just have
to pay our bills."
Pedersen said the council,
which he described as "niggardly," said the paper wasn't
needed anyway.
He said The Peak's business
manager had been fired for incompetency because he refused
to submit a complete statement of the paper's finances.
"Some of our accounts -were
six months overdue," Pedersen
said.
Peak editor Mike Campbell
was not available for comment.
continuity among national
staff. Now, the staff changes
completely every year.
He suggests a board of directors with past national presidents serving as advisors to
current staff.
And he suggests that CUP go
looking for friends.
"Some of our best friends
have looked at CUP and found
it wanting," he says.
"Some of these persons are
no longer willing to help our
organization, because national
presidents have in the past
spurned their advice, personally insulted them by refusing
to reply to correspondence,
and accused them openly of
trying to 'take over' Canadian
student journalism for motives
of personal aggrandizement."
And somewhere, Sellar
hopes, in the rounds of beer-
drinking and story-swapping
that are CUP conferences, and
the confusion that is university
newspaper news rooms, enough
people will care enough to
keep the world's oldest student
press association alive. Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday,   October   6,   1966
—kort  hilger photo
CANADA'S GREATEST NEWSPAPER holds big interest edge over stuffy textbooks in Brock
sunny-day study area. Forty percent of Frosh teeny-boppers in picture won't be around
after Christmas  to  read  anything.
University, government
hit by student council
SASKATOON (CUP) — The
government of Ross Thatcher
and University of Saskatchewan have been told to provide
student housing at less than
"outrageous" cost by Regina's
student council president.
"It is inexcusable that in a
province and at a university
which has the highest percentage of out-of-town students in the country, we have
so very little provision for
student residences," Don Mitchell told a meeting of students and faculty Monday
at the opening of Student
Housing Week on the Regina
campus.
Mitchell said he hoped housing could be made available
to students at "reasonable
cost" and not at "an outrageous $96 per month" as charged
in Saskatoon.
Only six per cent of students
at the University of Saskatchewan live in residence as compared to an average of 12 per
cent in other Western provinces according to Mitchell.
"As the pressure increases
for   more   academic   facilities,
student residences are left for
the future," he charged.
The answer, he said, is for
students to build and control
their  own  residences  through
Government
wont touch
the problem
CALGARY (CUP) — The
Alberta government does not
have any immediate plans to
provide living quarters for
Southern Alberta Institute of
Technology students.
Education minister Randy
McKinnon says the government has attempted to provide
educational facilities on the
Tech campus rather than living accommodation.
"We had hoped that private
enterprise might pick up the
ball. There have been a few
nibbles and some discussion
but nothing definite."
McKinnon added the government thinks it best to stay
out of the housing field right
now.
"Once you provide housing
for one educational institution
you have to consider housing
for all."
housing associations and cooperatives.
"Students on the Regina
campus have taken this initiative," he said.
If assistance is received
from the university and provincial co-ops, Regina will construct a co-operative residence
within the next two years,
Mitchell told the meeting.
The University of Saskatchewan comprises the 9,000-
student Saskatoon campus and
the 2,800-student Regina campus.
Scholarship fund formed
to aid nursing students
A $22,000 memorial fund has been willed to UBC to
aid students in nursing.
Mrs. Agnes Eatock left an estimated $22,000 to be
held by UBC as capital in the Frederick and Agnes
Eatock Memorial Fund.
Income from the capital is to be used only for
nursing scholarships and bursaries, the will specified.
Mrs. Eatock, a nurse who trained in London and
Liverpool more than 60 years ago, lived in West Vancouver from 1928 until her death July 18.
SWIMMING   -   Any  Hour,  Any   Day
JUST SPEAK TO INSTRUCTOR IN CHARGE
Free instruction or swim for fun
No Charge — bring a friend !
Faculty Welcome Grads, too
School of PE & Rec.
Voluntary Rec. Program
Phone 228-2401
RED CROSS
BLOOD DONOR
CLINIC
OCT. 3-7
9:30 A.M.-4:30 P.M.
UBC ARMOURIES
RECORD SALE
BflW**
FAMOUS
(Jtz/u£&£
LABEL
Prose polishers in luck
as Lions pay for peace
Lions International is offering $50„000 worth of
prizes to people who write peacefully.
A total of $25,000 in educational and career assistT
ance will go to the winner of the essay contest, open to
anyone between 14 and 22 on Jan. 15, 1967.
Entries for the contest, Search for Peace, are due
by Dec. 10, 1966.
The essay, which must be on the subject of peace,
should not exceed 5,000 words.
Further information is available at the Alma Mater
Society office, or at FA 1-2230.
Our Entire $4.20 Group
$*_».19
NOW
ONLY
each
Thousands to Choose From
Here are a few examples:
• Bob   Dylan    • Blues   Project
• Elvis Presley • Simon & Garfunkel
• Jose Felicia no    • Josh White
• Peter, Paul & Mary    • Animals
All the Great Artists—Latest Hits—
Broadway Musicals—Rock and Roll—
Popular—Folk Music, Etc.
Hurry   down  —  pick  out  your  favourite   record
and save. Choose from Pops, Classics, Show tunes.
All are  now in stock at our Record  Department.
LOWEST PRICES IN TOWN
AB SOUND
Open Friday Until 9 p.m.
571  GRANVILLE  (at Dunsmuir)
MU 2-4846 Thursday, October 6, 1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
INJUNCTION ATTEMPT
Court cops CUS case
EDMONTON (CUP) —- The
University of Alberta's withdrawal from the Canadian
Union of Students will likely
be tested in Alberta Supreme
Court here.
A student committee has
hired an Edmonton lawyer to
apply for a court injunction
suspending the 12-4 student
council decision which severed
Edmonton's ties with CUS
Sept. 19.
The group, called Pro-CUS,
will attempt to prove the U of
A students' union, a body incorporated under the Universities Act of Alberta, is obliged
to provide its members with all
the benefits of CUS membership outlined on membership
cards held by more than 11,000
U of A students.
Backed by a substantial do-
Students upset
over withdrawal
EDMONTON (CUP) — A militant student group is
attempting to muster student support in its fight against the
University of Alberta withdrawal from the Canadian Union
   of Students.
Co-op books
at Carlton
may up fees
OTTAWA (CUP)—A Carleton University student group
has proposed establishment of
- an off-campus co-operative book
store.
Claiming high prices and
poor service abound at the
university-operated book store,
group spokesmen said they
intend to establish their own
co-op book store by next fall.
Student support for such a
project was indicated last
month by sale of $5,000 worth
of books at a student-run store
on campus. It was reported
this operation resulted in a
five per cent drop in university book store prices.
University president Davidson Dunton has said the Carleton administration is neither
for nor against such a project.
Explaining the 10 to 30 per
cent profit on book sales at the
university store, the president
said this money is invested in
student activities.
"The province does not support such activities as athletics,
residences and cafeteria," he
commented, "and the $18 students pay each year doesn't
cover these costs."
Dr. Dunton warned that if
book store profits were eliminated, Carleton students would
likely face a fee increase.
Monday night the pro-CUS
group presented a petition containing 350 signatures to Edmonton's students' council in
an attempt to force a general
meeting of the student body
on the CUS withdrawal.
The group is attempting to
obtain the more than 1,100 signatures it requires in order to
have a general meeting called
on the issue.
A two-thirds majority vote
by a general meeting would
automatically upset the council's Sept. 19 decision to sever
Edmonton ties with CUS, pending a referendum set for next
March.
A GO GO
Stot$.
at
the
presenting
"SOUND  UNLIMITED"
and  the
A GO GO GIRLS
Dancing 9 to 3 Every
FRIDAY   and   SATURDAY
Ample Parking
821   RIVER  RD.,   RICHMOND
at Richmond Marina on
the Airport  Road
Reservations,   CR   8-2624
FORMAL
AND
SEMI-FORMAL
rental and sales
Tuxedo, tails, white dinner
jacket., morning coots.
Formal and informal business wear — complete
size range.
MCCUISH   'ORMAMtfEAR
STUDENT RATES
2046 W. 4st - Ph. 263-3610
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
STUDENT-ALUMNI COMMITTEE
Students interested in serving on this Committee
are to see Mr. Hollick-Kenyon, Alumni Director,
Brock 252.
NOTICE OF POLL - 2nd VICE PRES.
1.
Brock North
8.
Education
2.
Brock South
9.
Engineering
3.
Buchanan 1
10.
Henry Angus
4.
Buchanan 2
11.
Library
5.
Bus Stop
12.
Physics
6.
Cafeteria
13.
Ponderosa
7.
College Library
14.
Wesbrook
nation from a prominent U of
A faculty member, the group
is now soliciting funds to finance the breach of contract
action.
Group spokesmen said they
intend to keep Alberta in CUS
at least until the student body
votes on CUS membership in a
referendum March 3. The Edmonton council voted to leave
CUS pending the referendum.
A poll taken among U of A
students has shown the council
decision has not received widespread approval on campus.
In reply to a question asking
whether students approve of
council's decision, 25 per cent
said no; 23 per cent said yes;
51 per cent refused to comment
because of a lack of information on the subject and only
one per cent said they did not
care.
Special polls will be held at the Vancouver General Hospital, the B.C. Vocational School, and Shaughnessy
Hospital.
Classical Guitar
Instruction  in  Technique
and  Repertoire
W. Parker, 682-1096 or 874-3547
Studio   at  2695   W.   Broadway
RE   3-4022
Daily library tours booked
to educate lost students
Students still confused by the UBC Library can
become experts in an hour next week.
Sedgewick librarian Ture Erickson will conduct
lunch hour library tours and question periods every
noon hour.
The tours will go through all parts of the main
library — including areas normally closed to students.
Tours will begin with a question period in Rm.
861  cf the  library  every  day at  12:30.
U.B.C. THUNDERBIRD
WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
SKATING SCHEDULE -  1966-67 SEASON
Effective September 12, 1966 to April 15, 1967
2:45 p.m.*
3:30 p.m.
9:30 p.m.
5:00 p.m.
9:30 p.m.**
5:00 p.m.**
9:30 p.m.
2:45 p.m.
7:30 - 9:30 p.m.
*Special Student Session — Admission — 15c
**Except when Thunderbird Hockey Games scheduled:
Jan. 13 & 14 - Jan. 20 & 21 - Feb. 3 & 4 - March 3 & 4
ADMISSION: Afternoons —    Students .35      Adults .60
Evenings      —    Students .50      Adults .75
Skate Rental — .35 pair — Skate Sharpening — .35 pair
For further information call — 224-3205 or 228-3197
TUESDAYS   —
12:45
WEDNESDAYS  —
2:00
7:30
FRIDAYS   —
3:00
7:30
SATURDAYS   —
3:00
7:30
SUNDAYS   —
12:45
come on
strong!!
Give a girl a whirl in Forward Fashion Coats and Slacks. There's a thrust in tho
shoulder, a lean line of lapel that they fall for. Tho Daroff Personal Touch does
it with tapered-trim design, a custom collection of fabrics and proud tailoring.
If you get hounded, sourrounded, you'll have to figure out how to send a girl
home reluctantly, but firmly. You'll need this technique while enjoying all
'Bontany' 500 Forward  Fashions. Sport Coats from  $49.50.,  Slacks from  $25.00.
go all the way with 'BBMNrSOB tailored by Daroff
sport coats - slacks • suits • outercoats
a?
DISTINCTIVE MEN'S STORES
4445 West 10th Ave.        —        East of Sasamat
2901 West Broadway at Mackenzie Page  8
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday,   October   6,   1966
'TWEEN CLASSES
Poverty is no excuse
SPECIAL EVENTS
Last Minute Tickets available for V.O.A. productions of
Pagliacci and Cavalleria Rus-
ticana, the Cave and Isy's.
Apply at Special Events, Brock
Extension 255.
• •    •
SPORTS CAR CLUB
Meet executive, collect
membership cards, discussion
of    proposed    events,    racing
films today at noon in Chem.
250.
• •    •
PRE-MED  SOC
Mr. Watts speaks to those
interested in making weekly
trips to Okalla Prison, Friday
noon in Wesbrook 201.
• •    *
CAMPUS   CAVALIERS
Students interested in
square dancing come to Hut
L-5 near Field House today at
noon.
• •    •
RADSOC
General meeting today at
noon in Bu. 217. All members
and interested students attend.
• •    •
PRE-LAW SOC
First general meeting today,
noon in Bu. 221. All welcome.
• •    •
DANCE CLUB
Free introductory instruction, noon Monday, Tuesday
and Friday in the dance
lounge, second floor of Brock
Extension.
FILM SOC
See Lolita in the auditorium
Tuesday, 8 p.m. Admission by
series pass only — available
from the AMS office.
• *    •
COMMERCE US
Panel discussion on options
in commerce, noon today,
Ang. 104.
• *    •
CHRISTIAN   SCIENCE
Testimony meeting every
Friday noon in Hut 0-12. All
welcome.
• *    •
PHYSICS SOC
Dr. Volkoff will present a
talk on graduate studies today,  1:30 p.m. in Henn. 307.
• •    •
NISEI   VARSITY
General meeting today noon
in Bu. 212.
• •    •
UBC CREW
Rowing films Friday noon
in Gym, room 211 and 213. All
welcome.
• •    •
VOC
Long hike registration for
membership requirements —
12:30 to 2:30 today, 12:30 to
1:30 Friday.
• •    •
LIBERAL CLUB
General meeting noon in
Bu. 102. All old and new members urged to attend.
• •    •
NEWMAN  CENTRE
General meeting 1:00 p.m.
in Newman Lounge at St.
Mark's.
IS1L    PATH   PAGE
OCT. 13 - 22
JOHNNY
RIVERS
Early Reservations Advised
AQUA SOC
New divers: consult instruction bulletin posted in club
room by  5:30 today.
•    •    •
UNIVERSITY  BAND
Practice today, 3:30 in Music
104. Percussion is especially
needed.
•k    ir    -k
SAILING CLUB
General meeting noon today
in Angus 104.
THE GUNS OF
NAVARONE
NOW SHOWING
TODAY
12:30, 3:30, 8t00
AUD. 50c
From the
OCT. 26 - NOV. 5
Joyne Mansfield1
THE C3-A__V__E_.
THEATRE RESTAURANT
626 HORNBY - VANCOUVER, CANADA
Style Centre
Richards & Farish
LIMITED
786 Granville
&
THE COLLEGE SHOP
802 Granville
YOUR SHOPS
DON'T MISS
THE OPENING OF CINEMA 16's
AMERICAN OFFBEAT SERIES
with • PETER SELLERS
• SHELLEY WINTERS
Tues., Oct. 11th, Aud. 8 p.m.
Other Films in this Series are
Orson Welles      MacBETH • Oct.  31st
Forbidden   Planet • Dec. 5th    —    Manchurian  Candidate • Jan.   10th
Hitchcock's The Trouble With Harry • Jan. 31st
Antony Quinn  in  Barabbas *  Feb.  27
Paul Newman in Hud • Mar. 13th
ALL SHOWINGS IN THE UBC AUDITORIUM AT 8:00 P.M.
ADMISSION BY SERIES PASS ONLY ^om ^"ISS*
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office: Brock Hall, Ext. 26. 224-3242
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost & Found
11
LOST KEYS FOB OFFICE, HOME,
car. If found deposit at AMS of-
fice  for  Charlie   Boylan.	
FOUND LADIES RINGS PHONE
Liz  RE  8-1124,   Laserre  Bldg.	
LOST PAIR OF BROWN LADIES
glasses if found deposit at Publi-
cations   Office,   Brock.	
URGENT LOST NAVY SHOULDER
purse, Tuesday, p.m. in Buchanan
or Chemistry. Contact Rm. 180 at
224-9638   or  RE  6-6551.
FOUND PHYS. TEXT NEW IN
Men's room, Hebb Theatre, 4th.
Call Col 224-0413 after 6.
LOST BLUE-GREY SUITCASE ON
return from Frosh Retreat. "Traveller" brand name. Contact Ken
Pickering 321-3832 or return to
AMS office.
LOST ONE ELECTRIC SHAVER
and accessories on late bus, Sept.
13.   Phone  Randy  224-4213.
Greetings
12
SORRY, OLD BEAN! BELATED
birthday wishes! Happy Day,
Kellie. Luv  to  tj
Coming Dances
12A
Special  Notices
13
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rates? If you are over 20
and have a good driving history
you quailify for our good driving
ates.   Phone  Ted Elliott,  224-6707.
BLABNIGHT: ADVANCE MAT-
tress Coffeehouse. Make your own
harangue or comedy on stage.
10th and Alma. Tonight and every
Thursday.    	
WANTED: STUDENTS FOR
Homecoming '66 Western Movies.
THE UNPORGIVEN, Wednesday,
Oct. 12th. Auditorium 12:30-2:30,
admission 50c.
WANTED: STUDENT FOR HOME-
coming '66 Western Movies. THE
MAGNIFICENT SEVEN. Auditorium, Friday, Oct. 12th. 12:30 -
2:30, admission 50c.
WANTED: STUDENTS FOR
Homecoming '66 Western Movies.
THE SHERIFF OF FRACTURED
JAW. Auditorium 12:30-2:30,
Tuesday, Oct. 11th. Admission
50c.
SURF LONG BEACH THANKS-
giving weekend. Phone Don Ek-
roth  224-9774.
DARING
David needed for laughing Linda.
Phone 239-0892.
Transportation
14
TRANSPORTATION WANTED
9:30 T.,Th, 5:30 M-F vicinity of
25th  Arbutus.   Ulrlka  733-7963.
WEST VAN CARPOOL NEEDS
driver. 25th to Taylor Way. Phone
926-2540. 	
RIDE WANTED TO SAN FRAN-
cisco. Will share! Leave Fri., Oct.
7.  3 p.m.  Call 736-5291  Bruce.
YOUNG MAN WANTS RIDE
from South Burnaby to Dunbar
and 41st early. Call Jim. 434-8168
after 7 p.m.	
RIDERS WANTED, WHO CAN
drive one day a week, leave for
nine-thirty classes, Oak and Cambie, Forty-first to Twenty-fifth
area, Phone Helen: TR 4-9592, or
Brenda: AM 3-5535.
ONE DRIVER NEEDED FOR CAR
pool from Capilano Highlands,
North Van.  988-0566. .
RIDE NEEDED TO OLIVER ON
long week-end. Willshare ex-
penses.   Phone   Linda  at   261-8900.
RIDE WANTED, KINGSWAY AND
Jersey, 8:30 classes M-F. Phone
Dave,  434-0422.
WANTED—RIDE TO AND FROM
Seattle this weekend for two girls,
Carlene RE 3-0155, Pat AM 3-
5598.
Wanted
15
I  WILL  PAY  $10 FOR  THE  COM
plete   English   40   Correspondence
course.   Phone  Karen   261-7119.
WANTED: SECONDHAND BOY'S
3-speed bicycle. Will pay approx.
$25.   Phone Ed,   224-9667.
AUTOMOTIVE   8.  MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
1954 CHEVROLET. IN RUNNING
order. Radio, new batery, good
tires.   $125.   Phone   Ed.   224-9667.
1957   PLYMOUTH.    GOOD   RUNN
ing  condition.   $400  or  best   offer.
Phone Ken.  224-7230 between 5:30
and 6:30 p.m.	
1957   DODGE.   GOOD  TIRES,   RUN
ning    condition,    radio,    heater
$135.00,    1953   Consul,   runs   $25.00.
Phone    Murray   224-9986    between
4 p.m. and 8 p.m.	
A STEAL—1964 TRIMUPH SPRITE
—- only $1,050 — Excellent mech
anical cond.,  radio.  Buy now and
save  $200.   Phone  224-6857.
AUTOMOBILES FOR SALE
60 FURY V8 AUTO. 2 DR. HT;, 2
spkr. radio. Body and Engine perfect   cond.   $1,095.   327-5056.
1956 DODGE. GOOD TRANSPOR-
tation $300.00 or nearest offer.
Call  Bernle  266-8702.    	
1957 MORRIS 1000 CITY TESTED,
Starts well, runs well, (to 70),
$275 or best offer 224 7793 after 6.
FOR  SALE:   1948   MGTC.   RESTOR-
ed.  Phone 733-6850.
65 CORVAIR MONZA 4 SPD. BKT.
Seats, radio, etc. Like new. Sacrifice sale. 224-5979.
Accessories & Repairs
22
FOR SALE: SET OF SNOW
chains for Mini Minor tires. See
Richard  in  Ubyssey  Office.
2 NEW 710x15 NYLON TIRES. 1
used 670 x 15 for sale. Call Bob
Bloom 224-3121.
Motorcycles
27
55 CC. HONDA SPORT. ONLY
2,400 miles. $150.00 or offer. AM
1-6279.
WANTED      TO      RENT:      MOTOR
bike    or   scooter.    AM    6-6398    or
261-4474.
BUSINESS  SERVICES
Orchestras
35
'59 SIMCA, LOW MILEAGE, GOOD
transportation, tested. Reasonable.   4536  W.   8th,   228-8904.
1964 GREEN VW deluxe, like new
new radio, white walls, vlnyll, etc.
Phone after six 733-6805.	
'53 FORD. RADIO, NEW BAT-
tery. Good tires, Running condition $85. Call 738-1672, 6:30 p.m.
to  7:30 p.m.
Typewriters  8c  Repairs
42
GOOD CLEAN TYPEWRITERS, $20
up. Also Typewriter repairs at
50 percent savings. Poison Typewriters, 2140 W. 4th. Phone RE
1-8322.
Typing
43
THESIS ETC. TYPED ON ELEC-
tric typewriter at reasonable cost.
Call Lorna Hagen or Jean —681-
6472.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
Instruction-Tutoring
64
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BIRD CALLS—the most useful book
on the campus. Student telephone
directory available latter part of
October. Limited Number. Order
now, only 75 cents from Phrateres
or publications office, Brock.Hall.
PURE COCONUT OIL — UPPER
Tenth Barbers & Toiletries. 4574
W.   10th.
SONY TC200 STEREO TAPE RE-
corder. Used 80 hrs. Complete
unit $200.  Ph.  876-2735.	
CHEM   101
Hurry — only a few  Lab Guides
left.   College  Shop,   Brock  Ext.  —
$1.95.
21" CONSOLE T.V. SET $35.00. IN
good working order. MU 1-1537.
BOOSEY H A W KB CLARINET
with case for sale. Phone 922-4633
after  6.     	
FURNITURE FOR SALE, USED,
5-piece Dinette, Day-bed, Armchair, 6-drawer chest all for
$73.95. Call Irma after 7 p.m.
CA 4-0591.
RENTALS  8c REAL  ESTATE
Rooms
81
WANTED GIRL TO SHARE BIG
view apt.  Kits.  Reas.  733-4557.
LARGE ROOM FOR 2 MALE STU-
dents. Vicinity 6th Ave. and Main
$40 per month.  TR 6-0179.	
LARGE ROOM, T.V. AND PHONE.
Semi-private bath, laundry and
cooking facilities. Ideal for quiet,
studious male. $40 per month. TR
6-0179.	
SLEEPING ROOM. GENT. 4TH &
Larch. $45 mo. Coffee & laundry
incl.   738-7474.
3 LEE PING ROOM. OR WITH
kitchen privileges. 3 blocks from
bus.   CA   4-5905.
AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY,
housekeeping rooms. One or two
girls. 10 mins. to UBC. D.H.,
731-5197.
ROOMMATE WANTED TO SHARE
house with two male MBA Grad
students. Preferably Grad or
Senior. One mile from UBC gates.
3928 West 10th.
BASEMENT ROOM. 4 BLOCKS
from campus. Clean, warm, furnished. Linen. $37.50. Phone 224-
9822 after 6:00 p.m. for Bill Graham.
Room 8c Board
82
Furn. Houses 8. Apis.
83
LARGE FURNISHED APT. TO BE
shared with male senior student.
1% blocks from Brock Hall on
campus. Utilities paid. $35.00 mth.
Phone Eugene between 4:30-6:30
Thursday or Friday at 224-4629.
BUY -  SELL  -   RENT
WITH
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED

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