UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Oct 15, 1964

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0126853.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0126853.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0126853-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0126853-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0126853-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0126853-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0126853-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0126853-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0126853-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0126853.ris

Full Text

Array 'WERE NOT POLAR BEARS' SAY CAMPERS
Faulty valve
sends Hut 7
to girls dorm
By JOHN DILDAY
Forty students from a Fort
Camp hut marched to a
nearby girls' dorm and
threatened to stay there until their residence got heating Tuesday night.
The demonstration protested
the sometimes frigid atmosphere of Fort's Hut Seven for
the last four weeks.
Since the term began, heat
came either full on, or entirely
off, because of a broken regulating valve in the Engineering Building.
•    •    •
Heat comes on each night,
but sometimes not until after
midnight, one protester told
The Ubyssey.
"It's never on in the morning," he said, "and at night
when you're studying you almost freeze."
Their demonstration consisted of a march to nearby Isabel
Mclnnes House lounge, about
11 p.m.
Gruesome details, P 6-7
The Hut Seven residents carried signs saying, "This Is i.
Heat Sit-In", "Hut Seven Likes
It Hot" and "We Are Not Polar
Bears".
The Hut Seven residents announced they would stay in the
girl's dormitory lounge until
heating was restored.
Fort Camp student president
John Cairns was called in to
talk to them.
Cairns said that housing is
trying to get a new valve, and
there is nothing anyone can do
until it comes.
• •    •
Cairns said he didn't care
whether they stayed in the
lounge or not, but that he was
leaving.
Apparently the Fort Camp
porter did care, because he told
the boys that he had called the
Fire Department and was going to call the RCMP to throw
them out.
At this, the group left, and
sang songs outside the dorms
for a time.
• •    •
Housing Administration said
the four-week delay in getting
a new valve is because the
valve cannot be obtained in
Vancouver. They have sent off
for a replacement, they said.
"They must have ordered it
sent by slow camel," complained one cold Hut Seven resident.
AMS seeks talk
on housing crisis
The Alma Mater Society is
seeking a meeting with the
administration for a statement on housing.
Student council president
Roger McAfee said: "The
AMS wants a clarification of
the Administration's housing
policies."
He said council would
then decide what steps to
take on the housing problem
and form a committee to
carry out these steps.
Shivering Fort Campers from heatless Hut 7 huddle around stone cold radiator.
THS U8YSSEY
VOL. XLVII, No.  12
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1964
CA 4-3916
GEORGE CUNNINGHAM
. . . highest honor
Cunningham
fills the
prescription
George T. Cunningham,
member of the Board of Governors for 30 years, has been
awarded the Alma Mater Society's highest honor.
Cunningham was named
1964 Great Trekker at a ceremony Wednesday night.
He is only the second person
who isn't .a graduate of UBC
to receive the award—the other being former president Norman MacKenzie.
"I am pleased that this
award comes from a great student body and a great university,"  Cunningham said.
"The   growth   and   development of the university has been
so great and its future so great
(Continued on Page 5)
SEE:    CUNNINGHAM
CUS gets money
despite protests
The Canadian Union of Students will get $3,300 more
from UBC this year in spite of protests from AMS treasurer
Kyle Mitchell. Student Council voted the increased grant
Tuesday night after a heated three-hour debate.
Mitchell   said   student   pro
grams may have to be cut back
as a result of the CUS increase.
Council passed AMS president Roger McAfee's motion
that the increase be paid out
of discretionary operating expenses.
Mitchell said: "We can't go
cutting into our margin until
we know what it is going to
be. We can't afford another
disaster like last year.
"We must postpone permanent financial decisions until
after Christmas."
If the money can't be found
student programs could suffer,
he said.
(Last year the AMS cut its
accumulated surplus in half,
by going over $22,000 into the
hole.)
The increase in CUS fees
arose out of this summer's
CUS conference in Toronto.
Before this year CUS membership 'fees were based on a
sliding scale which averaged
41 cents per student for UBC,
or $6,025.
After the conference, UBC's
levy comes out to 60 cents per
student, or $9,300.
McAfee, at the beginning of
Tuesday's session, told councillors they need not make a
permanent commitment at this
time.
But at the half-way point
lie changed his tune:
"We must be responsible,"
he said. "We must decide right
now if our membership in CUS
is worth 60 cents.
"If we will not pay, chances
are slim we will be able to remain in the organization."
UBC CUS chairman Gordon
Gaibraith outlined its 1964-65
domestic program and urged
councillors give it their full
support.
"A national student means
survey, pressure for federal
scholarships, the student government research service, the
EXPO '67 project, and a com-
rehensive travel department
are only part of the domestic
projects planned," Gaibraith
said.
"The program is definitely
worth the expense, for what
it has done in the past and
what it will do in the future,"
said McAfee.
"Over  2,000   UBC   students
have made use of the loan pro-
(Continued on Page 5)
SEE:   MITCHELL
MONEY-MAD
ENGLISHMEN
See Page 3
Boost enough
for another
CUS wheel
By CAROL  ANNE   BAKER
The increase in Canadian
Jnion of Students fees will
ust cover the salary of a CUS
• xecutive  member.
An increase from 41 cents
to 60 cents a head in CUS fees
was mandatory for continued
membership, said Gordon Gaibraith, UBC chairman.
"This amounts to about $3,-
300 which just about covers
the annual salary of a CUS
executive member."
OUS has four paid executive
members who direct the organization's   activities.
"Actually this wasn't the
reason for the increase," Gaibraith said. "CUS felt there
was too much disparity between our 41 cents per person
and the $1 per person fees
some other universities pay
when benefits to all universities are relatively equal," he
said.
Previously fees were based
on a sliding scale where the
university with the fewest students had to pay the highest
fees. Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 15, 1964
Leper in
Ubyssey
reporter
a Greek
By BOB BURTON
Fraternities don't discriminate—they accepted me.
Me. A Ubyssey reporter. A
social leper.
Now I'm a frat rat along
with 250 other pledges. I
opened my envelope noon Wednesday and chose between my
three bids.
Outside the auditorium the
members of all the fraternities
waited to greet their new
brothers.
• *    •
There is nothing quite like
the feeling you get as you call
out your chosen frat and your
new brothers crowd about you,
congratulating you — then
another former rushee yells
"Sigma Chi!" and you find
yourself cheering and shaking
his hand along with the rest.
Now I'm someone — an entity.
But for the next few weeks
I'll be treated like the lowest
form of animal life by the
active members until I'm initiated.
I will be subjected to all
forms of humiliating serfdom.
I have to live in the fraternity
house for a week, washing
floors and windows and carrying out the whims of sadistic
members.   -
• •    •
I've been assured, though,
they are human beings.
Finally, there is a three hour
initiation exam, a true test of
physical and emotional endurance.
Last night, each pledge was
introduced to the girls of the
campus sororities and treated
to some free beer — the last
free gift I'll get from my fraternity — you only get out of
a fraternity what you put into
it.
And so are
250 others
Wednesday was Bid Day.
It was the day when 250
pledges joined 18 different
fraternities.
The ceremony took place in
the Auditorium  quadrangle.
The pledges were greeted by
cheering, singing, handshaking fraternity brothers as they
emerged, one by one, from the
Auditorium.
More than 200 persons
crowded the quadrangle, curious to see which way each
pledge went.
Sorority girls watched from
windows of the Old Arts building.
Friends and fraternity brothers congratulated the still-
dazed but excited new frat-
rats.
But the celebration only began there.
Beer-slinging, parties and
dinners occupied the rest of
the day.
Wednesday evening, the sororities serenaded the fraternities along Frat Row, on the
Eastern edge of the campus.
KIM CAMMfU
. . . mixed reaction
Tim shape
of things
to come'
Frosh have mixed opinions
about having a woman pr si-
dent.
Kim Campbell is the first
co-ed to be elected Frosh Undergraduate Society president.
A Ubyssey survey elicited
the following responses from
Frosh who were asked what
they thought of their lady president:
"She seems a lot more emphatic than the boys."
"Women are just the same.'
"A girl can't handle a man's
job."
"She'll be too dramatic."
"She bounces around a lot."
"I think it's an indication of
the shape of things to come."
Carleton money changer
Seventeen eyes
check greenbacks
OTTAWA (CUP)—"It's the first thing I've seen at this
university that looks at your money before grabbing it."
This was a Carleton University student's view of a dollar
bill changer, latest innovation
at a campus cafe.
The machine, equipped with
17 photocells, kicks out four
quarters in response to your
greenback.
The money changer is the
only one of its kind in the
Ottawa area and is considered
foolproof by canteen supervisor Carl Aver.
Bills which are torn, taped
together or written upon will
not pass if their defects interfere with the photocell's action.
The university student newspaper attempted to crack the
machine but failed, and got
their dollar returned.
Ulcelelet, from	
Guitars, from .	
Tuneabi* Bongos, from
Baritone Ukelele	
Used   Banjo	
_$ 3.99
..$10.99
-$16.50
.$14.99
..$39.95
Drum Outfit (Engli.h) $149.95
ARNOLDS
PAWN SHOP
986 Granville MU 5-7517
But the cafe supervisor
warned that any other rejected money could come back
sliced in two due to a blade
and roller action which normally folds and rolls away the
bill.
"THE" PLACE
io meet
your friend*
is at the
Do-Nut Diner
4556 W. 10th Ave.
Try Our Delicious T-Bone
Steak $1.35
It's really Good!
Full course Meals
within your income
Students Meal Tickets
Available
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
TRYOUTS
U.B.C.   DEBATING TEAM
OCT. 22, 1964
Apply in writing: Secretary,  Debating  Union, A.M.S.
Deadline: Monday, October 19, 1964, 12:00 Noon
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
FOR GRADUATES IN COMMERCE, BUSINESS
AND GENERAL ARTS
American Hospital Supply — a leading supplier to Canada's expanding
health and hospital market.
FOR GRADUATES IN SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING
Canadian Laboratory Supplies
Limited — a leading supplier to industrial, governmental, educational and
hospital laboratories.
The above firms, already foremost in fheir fields, offer interesting positions with
on excellent future. Both organizations are owned fay American Hospital Supply
Corporation, Evanston, Illinois, the world's largest company serving the rapidly
growing health and science markets.
Interviews Nov. 9th, 10th, 12th
Contact the Placement Office for detailed information
and interview appointment.
Jhouik
The
Canadian Red Cross Society
Free Blood Service
THERE WERE 2,101  DONORS
The Blood Donor Clinic will be back on Friday, October 16,
from 9.30-4.30, to accommodate our serum donors.
Persons who couldn't attend last week's clinic are also
invited to donate at this time.
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
1. Clients'  Committee -
Student  Union  Building
Applications for a Clients' Committee for the Student
Union . Building are now being accepted. This
Committee will be in 6peration during construction of the Building, working closely with the
architect, and will be involved from the time of
production of working drawings to the final
acceptance of the Building from the contractors,
up to three years.
This is the Committee which will decide the detailed
planning of the areas within the Building and is
therefore most important.
Since this Committee'will be operating over a con-
sidable length of time, consideration will be
given to younger students, who might be prepared to spend more than one year on it.
Applications should be directed to Marilyn McMeans,
Secretary, Box 55, Brock Hall.
2. Nome   for  S.U.B.
The proposed new Student Union Building now needs
a name. Please forward suggestions in writing,
along with your name and phone number, to the
A.M.S. Secretary, Box 55, Brock Hall.
3. Submissions  for Government   Brief
Anyone having submissions for the Alma Mater
Society's annual Brief to the Provincial Government should leave them in the Secretary's box
(55) or give them to a member of the Executive
immediately.
4.   Agendo
The 1st Vice-President will be keeping an agenda for
Students' Council meetings. Would any students,
councillors or other persons wishing business to
be brought up at the meetings please see him
or leave a note in Box 53.
5.   A.M.S.   Cords
Any person wishing to punch one of the 14 numbers
on the A.M.S. card for any reason whatsoever
please check first with the Secretary. Thursday, October 15. 1944
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
'English materialistic
Money-grubbing
divides students
By AL DONALD
MONTREAL —"Money, money, money
English Canada means to us."
The speaker, a French
Guiana student studying sociology at the all French University of Montreal, condensed in
a mixture of French and English one of the main factors
that separates French from
English students here.
That is what
Al Donald, a Ubyssey staff
member, is hitch-hiking to
New York and then travelling by freighter to Europe.
Here is his en-route story
from Montreal.
&*&*>« §^jmbl
—don kydd photo
FORESTER GREG LAY warms up for logrolling contest at
noon today. AMS president Roger McAfee, Ubyssey editor
Mike Horsey and undergraduate society presidents have
have been challenged by Foresters to splash in Buchanan
pool.
Foresters' flag
aunts eagle
fl
Foresters say they wouldn't touch Canada's proposed new
flag with a forty-foot pole. So they hoisted a forty-foot pole
and ran up their own.*
Yesterday, noori, on the Library lawn, they gathered to
fly their flag.
The flag pictures an American eagle with a maple leaf
in its beak.
Brandishing clubs to ward
off enemies, they proceeded to
give president-elect Sandy
Gray a bubble bath in the
Library pool.
But the water wouldn't
bubble so Gray had to settle
for an ordinary dunking.
Later, at about-two o'clock,
15 Engineering students
stormed and stole the flag,
but four Foresters pursued
them and retrieved it.
Meanwhile more Engineers
knocked down the flag pole.
"It's getting pretty bad when
you have to guard your stunts
from the Engineers," remarked
one of the Foresters.
Foresters top
blood contest
UBC students gave 2,101
pints of blood last week.
Forestry was the top faculty
again with 141 per cent of its
quota. Agriculture was second
and the Engineers third.
fThe JE«ri|!Bsir Canadians have
culture," " he explained,
'They are too Americanized."
Many of the students I spoke
to during the morning I spent
at U. of M. recently had this
attitude.
They regard the English as
holding back the advance of
culture in Canada.
"Many French tend to look
down on the English students
because they don't have a liberal arts education before starting professional school," he
said.
French Canadian students
enter a classical college from
high school and study liberal
irts and theology there before
ntering one of the big uni verities  or   professional   schools.
The degree granted by the
college is the equivalent of a
B.A. degree from an English
university.
In addition the French regard the English, who control
most of the business in Quebec,
as materialistic. Very few
French Canadians enter a
school of commerce.
"The French regard the
three great professions as theology, medicine and law," said
a graduate student at McGill
who had spent a year at U. of
M.
"Only recently have they begun to take an interest in other
professions."
But in spite of this, McGili
CUS chairman, Ken Cabatoff,
thinks it possible that English
speaking McGill may join in
the split from CUS.
"There is a great deal of
sympathy here with the
French," he said, "They are
blazing a lot of trails we think
worth while."
He said the French Union
Generale de Etudiantes du
Quebec was concerned with
what he called serious problems.
"That is, problems on a scale
larger than the university."
He pointed out that U of M's
student newspaper, Le Quartier Latin, recently devoted
four pages to a newspaper
strike in Montreal.
"We have to leave a door
open to UGEQ. We might consider joining it," he said.
Diabetic clinic
UBC will establish a diabetic
research clinic at the outpatient department of the Health
Centre for Children at Vancouver General Hospital under
Dr. J. A. Birckbeck.
Tonight
Through   Saturday
BARBARA
DANE
plus
Walt Robertson
3607 West Broadway
(One Block East of Alma)
Doors 8:30; 1st Show 9:30
Reservations: RE 6-6011
SUB survey
WINNIPEG (CUP) — A student preference survey for a
new student union building is
being planned at the University of Manitoba.
mmmmt prescription mmmmm
EYEGLASSES
16"
Includes
Frame *
Lena
All Doctor's Eyeglass Prescrlp-1
Uons filled. Only first quality)
materials used. All work oer-(
lormea by qualified (^ticlaftsj
GRANVILLE OPTICAL
861 Granville MU  3-8921
■^■■Money-Back Guaranteej^M
EXPERIENCE:
A VITAL PART OF AN
ENGINEER'S EDUCATION
In addition to a high standard of salaries and
employee benefits, Columbia Cellulose follows
a policy of planned training for graduate and
undergraduate engineers.
We consider it to be one of the most advanced
training plans in the industry.
Ask one of our last year's trainees whether
or not he received real project experience on
a .specific, planned programme, or during an
interview with our senior recruiting team in
early November, ask to see the written plan
for scheduled training.
Arrange an appointment through your university employment office.
e
COLUMBIA CELLULOSE
COMPANY, LIMITED
VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA
■SPECIAL  EVENTS-
TODAY
presents
3>&Ux $M&n
"THE MAN FROM INSIDE CHINA"
An internationally noted journalist lecturing on
"China,  Russia, and"the West"
12:30 Auditorium
OCT.   19, MONDAY
Robert Cohen's brilliant film  lecture of Cuba
"QnMds Ca&tto'A Cuba"
personally narrated
12:30 Auditorium
OCT.  20, TUESDAY
Noted pianist on West Coast tour —
TTlBAeck $abbnlJu
"Most important pianist since Glenn Gould"
12:30 Auditorium
We bend an ear to undergraduate money
problems of all kinds, from setting up a savings
account, to budgeting, to discussing your financial
future. Any time we can be of help ...
ROYAL BANK THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial opinions
expressed are those ol the editor and not necessarily those of the AMS
or the University. Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office, CA 4-3242,
Loc. 26. M«mber Canadian University Press. Authorized as second-class
mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of postage
in cash.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and editorial writing.
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1964
CUS and US
The often waffling and usually whining Canadian
Union of Students has attempted to make a big name for
itself in the obscurity market for the last five years.
Its ludicrous and pious statements on world affairs,
which it obviously knows nothing about, have endeared it
to the hearts of hundreds of editors waiting to hack at
something.
Last year it told its French Canadian members one
thing about education policy and the English Canadians
another, assuming communications systems in Canada
were in the wagon-train stage.
While the sweeping statements on international
affairs haven't helped general student opinion of the
organization it has some claims to fame.
Briefly, without trying to sound like a super snow
job, it:
• acts as an Ottawa lobby for students;
• first suggested the 1,000 scholarships plan later
adopted by uncle Mike Pearson;
• holds annual seminars which gather odd students
from all parts of the country — yes even our ill-
tempered French friends;
• is a clearing house for information about residence
costs, fees and other problems university students
face;
• will be conducting a student means survey.
• hands out exchange scholarships and a multitude
of other lesser services;
Looking at the black side of CUS, it will continue to
spend vast amounts of your money piddling around in
international affairs. (Yes Martha, many universities
think Canada is a big spoke in the wheel of world
affairs.)
It will also spend large gobs of cash administering
its own bureaucracy, failing to contact Joe Student on a
personal level and equivocating on vital issues.
Council voted Tuesday to hike our dues in the organization from 41 cents a head to 60 cents, at a cost of
nearly $10,000 to UBC students.
If students don't think there are any benefits to be
derived from the organization then they should start
screaming.
We think CUS is worth the 60 cents, that its positive
aspects outweigh the negative. How about you, Joe?
Martha?
Or an act ot murder
g^-^  Love  Sc?ci^tY
Abandon
ClOTHfs
AIL  Y£
WHO ENTER
Here" —
"Chap here wants to know which kind
lliii£s tomHE.M§m^R
Sweet Mr. Kent
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Nothing but profuse praise
and congratulations can be
handed out to Mr. Kent and
his marvellous cast et al, on
their terrific and precise portrayal of that stage called
adolescence in which these
problems arise.
However, although Mr.
Kent had promised that the
film would permeate sex, I
for one, regretfully, did not
find it quite so.
Surely in the next film Mr.
Kent, in good style, will be
able to add a little more female spice (or vice, heh, heh)
and still get it past the insult
and social scourge called censors.
The central theme is loud
and clear and one can only
be astounded at such accurate and thoughtful treatment
of the subject; most of us
must at some stage of the
game be able to honestly identify ourselves with  the cast.
I could say more but one
must see it to truly appreciate
it.      .
Hurrah for Bob Howay,
hurrah for Angela Gann, hur
rah for the rest of the cast,
and best of all hurrah for Mr.
Kent — a standing ovation
to all and keep 'em coming !!
ANDY   MUNDELL.
Science III
A French challenge
Editor, The Ubyssey,:
The UBC Creditiste Club
has been formed with the
primary objective of "informing" students on this campus
of the "French Canadian
fact."
I applaud this ambitious
venture when western Canadian awareness of the crisis
in Canadian confederation is
alarmingly inadequate.
However, hawing read the
Creditiste constitution and
having listened to the statements of Creditiste "officialdom", I remain somewhat
confused and dubious as to
the efficacy and value of the
organization.
To enable this infant society to better state its philosophy and more clearly expound its objectives I suggest
a debate.
It should take place in
Brock sometime next week
between two members of the
Creditistes and two members
by Wulfing von Schleinitz
Abortions: the woman's prerogative
The right to have an abortion is recognized in but few
countries. The sticky web of
christian morality has so far
managed to prevent the legalization of this act. (In fact
christian morality, and that is
the climate We live in, has so
many prohibitions against
various acts which are of concern only to the individual or
individuals concerned that a
non-christian moralist shudders in disgust.
There is a phony argument
to the effect that an albortion
tends to be an act of murder
as s l:fe is being destroyed.
11 tfcf sacred cow is "LIFE",
then perhaps we should take
the argument one step further
which would bring it to the
conclusion that the production
of life is a duty.
Hence, all our spare time
should be taken up with sexual endeavors for the purpose
of bringing about an increase
in population.
Naturally all contraceptives
and knowledge of contraceptive methods would be forbidden and the use of either punished with the penalty of
death. Furthermore, artificial
insemination would be used to
supplement the more usual
method of reproduction.
Within a space of about
twenty  years   the population
could undoubtedly be tripled
if everyone did his or her
part.
Perhaps after a hundred
years the proponents of the
no-abortion laws' would reconsider their position as they
trample on each other's feet.
However I do not wish to
argue from the standpoint of
overpopulation but from each
individual's right (of course,
women only) to decide whether not she should have the
child or abort it.
If possible, this stage should
not have been reached as
proper contraceptive methods
should have prevented any
conception unless a child was
desired.
Unfortunately     the     moral-
mongers   have    theoretically,
although not  practically  (the
hypocrites) closed off this escape hatch too.
This is like being allowed
to drive an automobile but
without a steering wheel.
It is arguable whether a
human foetus represents a life
and I am sure that a good argument could be advanced for
this point of view. Nevertheless I consider it a wc npn's
right to decide for he^elf
v/hether o not to put another
child into he world (not just
canon-fodder for some political or religious creed). Life is
only worth livin'g on certain
conditions.
of the UBC  debating   union.
The resolution which will
Ibe supported affirmatively by
the Debating Union is: "Resolved, That French Canada
has gone too far."
Gentlemen, this is a challenge.
TOM D'AQUINO
UBC Debating Union.
Challenges galore
Editor, The Ubyssey:
In view of the challenge
that Byran Belfont, head of
the Cuban Affairs Committee,
has issued to me and the New
Democratic Club, I submit the
following reply:
"I read in last Friday's
Ubyssey that you have challenged the New Democratic
Club collectively and me personally to defend the second
part of the resolution of the
B.C. Young Democrats, who
went on record as admiring
Fidel Castro's basic economic
reforms, but deploring the
lack  of  democratic  freedom.
"I was astonished that you
did not even have the basic
courtesy of notifying either
the club executive or me.
Furthermore, you went ahead
and arranged the time and
place for the discussion without consulting us. Consequently, you cannot be surprised
that I must inform you that
because of academic pressure'"
and other commitments this
week is out  of the question.
"However, if it is convenient for you, the noon-hour
of the following Thursday
will be acceptable.
PETER PENZ
UBC New Democrats
EDITOR:   Mike   Horsey
News  _  Tim  Padmore
City   -  Tom Wayman
Art _  Don Hume
Sports   George Reamsbottom
Asst. Managing   Norm  Betts
Managing     Janet  Matheson
Asst. City  Lorraine Shore
Asst. Newt  Carols Munroe
Associate  _  Mike Hunter
Associate   Ron Riter
Magazine  Dave Ablett
Workers today are Al Donald, Art
Casperson, Rick Blair, Al Birnie,
Lome Mallin, Coral Smith, Jim
Adams, Donna Pirrie, Bob Weiser;
Bob Osmak, Fred Ogden, Paul Wood,
John Dilday, Mark Francis, Dennis
Wheeler, Linn Curtis, Robbi West,
Carol Anne Baker, Bert McKinnon,
Bob (I'm a frat man) Burton, Al
Francis and we didn't forget anyone
today—did we? Thursday, October 15, 1964
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
Tries again
McGraw
2 times
unlucky
By  CAROL  ANNE   BAKER
The third time is the Good
Time.
The Good Time Singers are
now the half time entertainment for the Homecoming
dance Oct. 24, at least if they
don't cancel out as two other
groups have.
The Rooftop Singers, who
were signed Aug. 11, broke
their contract Oct. 3.
"The Brothers Four could
have come if it hadn't been
for their tight schedule,"
Homecoming chairman Rick
McGraw, said.
They  cancelled   Wednesday.
They are appearing Oct. 23
in Atlanta, Georgia and Sunday, Oct. 25 for President
Lyndon Johnson in Phoenix,
Arizona.
"Unfortunately," said McGraw, "we have all the publicity printed for the Brothers
Four."
"We are still having the
four bands," he said.
Lance Harrison plus Little
Daddy and the Bachelors will
play in the Armory while Dave
McMurdo and the Chessmen
play in the Field House.
"Of course there will be a
change in the ticket price,"
McGraw said. The tickets will
be reduced from $4.50 to $3.75.
The Good Time Singers
which consist of two girls
and seven boys, are regulars
every week on the Andy Williams Show.
ART LAING
. . . liberal policies
3 ministers
to present
lectures here
Three federal cabinet ministers will speak at the Vancouver Institute's 1964-65 series of Saturday evening lectures.
Northern Affairs Minister,
Arthur Laing will open the
18th consecutive year of the
'.ectures at 8:15 p.m. Saturday
in Buchanan 106.
He will speak on National
resource   management.
Laing will be followed by
External Affairs Minister Paul
Martin on Oct. 31 and Postmaster-General John Nicholson on Feb. 20.
Laing will also speak Friday
noon in Brock on Liberal legislation in the current session
of Parliament.
Many delays
Stacked library
unveiling soon
By MONA HELCERMANAS
The Grand Opening of the library is coming, in spite of
delays that have held up several hundred thousand dollars
worth of improvements.
CUNNINGHAM
(Continued from Page 1)
that I am very proud to be associated with it."
Cunningham is present ly
chairman of the Board, but is
to retire soon. He is 75.
He has been chairman of the
finance committee since he was
first named to the Board.
Cunningham, a prominent
city druggist and a former
Vancouver alderman, helped to
establish UBC's faculty of
pharmacy. The new pharmacy
building is named for him.
Student president Roger McAfee, presenting the award,
said Cunningham had served
UBC long and faithfully.
Houses closed
to soften image
TOKYO (UNS) — Coffee
houses in Tokyo are closed
at 11 p.m. for the rest of the
Olympic games.
Officials decided on the
curfew to soften the city's
reputation as a metropolis of
vice. They said the houses,
normally open all night, are
hangouts for hoodlums and
teen-age gangs.
AUTO  INSURANCE  AT
SUBSTANTIAL  SAVINGS
For Drivers 24 yrs. & up
Call Bob Baker of A. R. Baker Ltd.
1327 Marin*, W. Van.       922-6188
The award, in memory of the
1922 Great Trek which helped
establish the Point Grey campus, will be formally presented
to Cunningham at the Homecoming Pep Meet, Oct. 22 in
Memorial Gym.
Parts of the library have
been closed because of alterations and rebuilding for the
past six months.
The present stacks were closed for several days while steel
beams were placed in the roof
of a new stacks area; the reserve book room and the circulation desk have been
moved; the fine arts room was
closed.
Basil Stuart-Stubbs, head librarian, said that he is extremely hopeful the stacks and
other rebuilt areas of the library will be open for the use
of the students by Nov. 15, of
this year.
Stuart-Stubbs gave several
reasons for the slow completion of the new part of the
library.
One of the main reasons is
that workers are attempting
to be quiet so they won't disturb the students, Stubbs says.
They also tried to work quietly during summer school and
therefore the contractor was
unable to stick to schedule.
For example the workmen
are carrying the mortar up
the back stairs in pails instead
of using the elevator, he said.
And some manufactured
goods have not turned up on
time, Stubbs said.
Then the fans did not arrive
for the air conditioning and
the weather was so bad cement could  not dry properly.
There was also a lack of
available tradesmen to carry
out the more skilled phases oi
construction, he said.
"The architect predicts the
library will be completely finished by January, 1965, tout he
does assure us that only odds
and ends will be left after Nov.
15," Stubbs said.
He also said completion of
the  odds   and   ends  will  only
hinder library staff — not the
students.
Stubbs said he hopes students will be sympathetic as
the situation is completely out
of his control.
MITCHELL
(Continued from Page 1)
gram, and only because of
pressure from CUS was the
program instituted as fast as
it was.
"We have a fantastic obligation to support it as a pressure
group for Canadian students."
Music president Bob Hamper summed up Council's feeling.
"It is a question of ideals,
not merely a decision of the
merits of its program; can we
afford not to have it?" he
asked.
"Lets take a chance on the
money. We should stay despite
the costs."
X..
ARLBERG    PRE-SEASON
SKI SALE
ENDS OCTOBER  17th
Norwegian Sweaters
Reaular    $18.95 to $35.00,
Reduced   $13.95 to $24.95
Ideal for Campus Wear
Before you buy see the
ARLBERG selection
Open House October 21 & 22
7-9 p.m.
Arlberg
SPORT   HAUS
»1* W. fender R. «i Moire
VOMeanr 1. IC.     Mil 2-42:
at »c ten
UK K*
British Scientists
Senior scientists from Imperial Chemical Industries
Limited, England, will be visiting the Campus on
Monday, 26th October.
They wish to meet graduates in any scientific
discipline from Britain or the British Commonwealth
who would like to discuss careers with I.C.I, in the
United Kingdom. Recent arrivals, as well as those
who are considering the possibility of returning to
Britain, are invited to get in touch with them through:
Mr. M. E. Hacking,
Student Employment Officer,
Office of Student Services,
West Mall.
Available  at these  Canaday  Dealers:
FINNS
Clothing   Stores
Limited
3031 W. Broadway
2159 W. 41st Ave.
6495 Fraser Street
4000 East Hastings Page 6
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 15, 1964
Just like night
Barren, splintery desk, paper walls
A bare, darkened Hut hallway
Feet in closet—room's only 6' long
OPEN FRIDAY AND SATURDAY, FROM 8 P.M.
Cabaret-Restaurant
FAMOUS FOR MUSIC, ATMOSPHERE
AND TENDER SCHNITZELS
Reservations 682-9140 (after 7:00 p.m.) 1023 West Georgia
A PROTAGONIST for HUMANISM
on the Avenue KEN    McA|_USTER
<£}]( ^ {a
cfit-'Zwo
UBC Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre
For   SKATING,   CURLING,   HOCKEY
Pleasure Skating Hours:
12.45 p.m. to 2.45 p.m. Tues., Thurs. and Sunday
3.00 p.m. to 5.00 p.m., Friday and Saturday
7.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m., Tues., Fri., Sat. and Sunday
THURSDAY STUDENT SPECIAL 15c
Skating Parties each Wednesday, 7:30 p.m. - 9:30 p.m.
SKATE RENTAL AVAILABLE, ALL SIZES
Book Now for Your Club
Skating Tickets at Reduced Rates Available
For Information Phone Local 365 or 224-3205
By JOHN DILDAY and PAUL WOOD
What's it like to live and study in 25-year-
old Army huts?
That was our assignment, so the two of us
—both resident students, one from Totem
Park and one from Lower Mall—went down
through the Faculty Club rose garden to Fort
Camp to observe conditions and talk to some
of the boys in the Huts.
The lounge was the first place we saw—
the only one for the entire Fort Camp male
population of more than 400. There is one
TV set.
The recreation room is in another building.
The walls are barren, except for some ornamental heating pipes.
Boys were crowded around two old pool
table&—qne with a ripped felt. They had to
share the use of the two cues.
"Another good thing about Fort;
i! we break anything, it doesn't
cost very much because everything is so cheap."
There were also two scarred ping pong
tables but only one had a net.
And two doors lead to quarters for four
students just off the recreation room.
Through the thin walls the sounds of their
fellow-residents enjoying themselves carry
clearly.
In contrast with the barely utilitarian Fort
Camp, Totem Park Residences have small
Ibunges on each floor and a large social gathering rooms on the first floors. Basements
are soundproofed for musical instruments
and record players.
In the Totem Common Block are three
large lounges divided by partitions. In addition, there is a canteen, a TV room, pool and
ping pong tables, although most facilities are
not yet finished.
Lower Mall has a small lounge in every
house and two lounges in the Common Block.
There is also a canteen, dance floor and basement lounge with pool, ping pong, TV and
shuffle board.
"You can hear all the noise from
the first floor because the main
corridor is right over my ceiling."
Meanwhile back at Fort, we entered a hut
and found the dark, narrow, hardwood halls
a far cry from Lower Mall's and Totem
Park's-wide, well-lighted, carpeted hallways.
While we stood in the hall, the lower metal
part of a bulletin board clanged noisily to
the floor. A student casually tacked it on
again as though .it happened every day.
Toilet facilities in Fort Camp are shabby,
to say the least.
While we were taking notes, one student
tried to get a drink from a water faucet.
"Sometimes they work," he remarked
when nothing happened.
Some of the showers had no soap holders.
One resident chuckled when we stepped into
a puddle of water. "The drainage isn't too
good around here," he pointed out.
This same student, in first year Commerce,
said he liked the accommodation and offered
to show us his room. The thin plywood walls
contrasted sharply with those concrete-
blocked and wood-panelled walls of Totem
Park and Lower Mall.
Grimy basins, tiny Fort mirrors Thursday, October 15, 1964
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 7
and day - that's residences
•   •
He showed us a crack he used to pass notes
to a friend next door. "An added advantage," he claimed.
He criticized Totem Park: "Can you
imagine how bad it must be, so quiet and
all?"
"Here we can make all the noise we want."
"And another good thing about it is if we
break anything, it doesn't cost very much
because everything is so cheap."
Wje talked to another student who had a
basement room which he described as "lousier than most".
"You can hear all the noise from the first
floor. The corridor is right over my ceiling,"
he said.
"There aren't any phone connections in the
basement either."
"When someone calls, the guys from the
first floor have to hunt around until they
find us," he explained.
Phones in all dormitories are pay phones.
Fort Camp rooms, even doubles, halve only
one light bulb. Totem Park has four lights
for every resident.
No lights are provided over the plywood-
slab desks in Fort Camp, but Lower Mall and
Totem have long incandescent tubes over
each surfaced-wood-and-metal desk.
And both Totem and Lower Mall have
more closet and shelf space, and have room
extras such as mirrors, towel racks, drapes
and bulletin boards.
The Hut reps said every time Fort Camp
complains about conditions, Housing threatens a fee raise.
'This place isn't a slum, but it's
pretty ramshackle"
An even worse section of Fort Camp is
called Dogpatch because of the similarities
between conditions in its rooms and L'il
Abner's cabin.
The halls are so narrow that two people
cannot stand abreast. They are even more
poorly illuminated than others in the Camp.
The rooms are smaller than everywhere
else—9'x7'—but residents there pay as
much as the rest of the Camp.
These rooms have no closets and very little
shelf space.
Six washbasins have to serve the 72 residents of Dogpatch.
And that can create quite a line-up at 7:30
in the morning.
A Dogpatch resident said; "This place isn't
a slum, but it's pretty ramshackle."
He said he had learned to accept the sorry
conditions.
"When I first moved here, the banging
pipes and noise from the other rooms bothered me. After So long, you get used to it
though."
There was one thing he said he had trouble
getting used to.
"If there's any noise, it carries all over the
building."
Another student displayed the general
apathetic attitude among those wHo live in
Fort Camp. "We might as well accept it," he
said.
"Most guys around here just don't giive a
damn anyway," he added.
We found his summation true, but there
were a few notable exceptions—such as
the hut reps.
For despite their squalid surroundings
and little hope for improvement, most Fort
Campers said they felt at home and found
making friends there easy.
Out of place? Sure—Fort lighting!
Prad Photographs |
NOW BEING TAKEN
MOBILE STUDIO  AT  STADIUM
Hours: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m ,
Limited Time Only - Don t Delay
This service, covered by your Grad Fee
CAMPBELL STUDIO
10th & Burrard RE 1-6012
and shiny, tiled Totem version.
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
TRYOUTS
U.B.C.   DEBATING TEAM
OCT. 22, 1964
Apply in writing: Secretary, Debating  Union, A.M.S.
Deadline: Monday, October 19, 1964, 12:00 Noon Page 8
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 15, 1964
'tween classes
Film tears down snobs
Alliance Francaise presents
Les Snobs, an iconoclastic
comedy feature film, noon today in Bu. 106. Admission is
35 cents to non-members, 25
cents  to   members.
• •    •
LAING SPEAKS
Northern Affairs Minister
Art Laing will speak on Liberal legislation in the Twenty-
sixth Parliament noon Friday
in Brock lounge.
• •    •
SAILING CLUB
Lecture noon today in Bu.
104. Everybody welcome.
• •    •
PSYCH SOC
See "The Effect of Electrical
Stimulation in the Destruction
of the Hypothalamus in Cats"
Thursday noon, Room 19 Psych
Huts. Non-members  25c.
• •    •
TOC
Guest speaker at noon today.
Transportation option club
presents Frank Nelson, MB &
PR distribution analysist
speaking on Changes in the
Transportation Industry in Bu.
2230. Admission free.
• •    •
EL CIRCULO
First meeting of the year
Friday noon in Bu. 204. All
students interested in Spanish
culture are cordially invited to
attend.
• •    •
SLAVONIC   CIRCLE
Informal Polish conversation
groups Thursday noon, International House music room.
Beginners  welcome.
• •    •
FIGURE SKATING
Team needs more skaters.
All those interested phone
Trudy, AM 6-4584. Low test
skaters urgently needed.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
All students are welcome to
attend a film and a discussion
entitled The Flags are Not
Enough at IH at noon today.
•    •    •
BOURGEOIS  ARTISTS
Pick of Pique meets noon
today in Brock Conference
room   upstairs   to   plan   Led-
pharttes's successor. All
YBAAAs welcome, and so are
manuscripts — to c/o Wayne
Nyberg, 6560 N.W. Marine
Drive.
•    •    •
SPORTS CAR CLUB
Noon hour sports car rally
noon today. Start at top of C
Lot.  Anyone can enter.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, 75c—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office: Brock Hall.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost & Found
11
FOUND ADS inserted free. Publications office. Brock Hall., Local 26,
224-3242.
LOST—Silver ring, onyx and diamonds. Washroom at Buchanan
11:45 Tuesday, Great personal
value.  Shirley. LA 1-3928.
LOST—One cosmetics case, desper-r
ately needed to cover up bare face.
Please contact Nina, WA 2-0095,
right away.            	
LOST—In Buch. 102 Polish Wed.,
raincoat, exchange may take place
Friday, same place. Or call Barrie,
224-9035.
LOST — Lady's wrist watch, black
strap, between C'Lot and West-
brook, Tuesday. Phone WA 2-8958,
Ariel Sones.
Transportation
14
RIDE WANTED for 8:30 classes
from 35th and Granville. Phone
AM 1-1164 after 7 p.m.	
2 GIRLS WANTED for car pool. Vic.
Burrard and Harjyood for 8:30s,
Mon. to Fri. Call Grant, 684-0866
(after  6).
RIDERS WANTED, vie. 49th or 41st
Ave. west of Oak, 8.30 classes, Mon.
to Fri. AM 1-5880 after 6.
Wanted
15
WANTED IMMEDIATELY competent electric bass player with heavy
duty equipment. Phone 224-6356
after 4.
SPANISH TUTOR required for 3rd
Yr. student. Occasional help in
conversation, translation. Phone
Annette eves, after 6, 224-7748.
AUTOMOTIVE   &   MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
'60 HILLMAN, low mileage, excel,
condition, 4 dr. Sedan. RE 3-4526,
3579 W. 22nd.
Autos For Sale Cont'd.
21
I960 STUDEBAKER LARK, radio,
excel, cond. N. Pollock, Geography
Dept., Mon. Wed. Fri 10.30 to 1
p.m., or 3353 W. 29th.
FOR   SALE   —   Austin   A-40   1S64
Sedan, $160.  738-1107.
BUSINESS   SERVICES
Typewriters 8c Repairs
42
Typing
42A
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
PEOPLE ARE NEEDED to decorate the Field House & Armouries
Sat. aft., Oct. 24, for the Homecoming Dance Sat. Pay $1.00 per
Hour. $2.00 per hr. overtime. Apply
Arts Office, BU.  115.
INSTRUCTION SCHOOLS
Music
63
CLASSICAL GUITAR tuition to advanced level. Segovia technique.
W.  Parker,  682-1096.
Tutoring
64
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BIRD CALLS—the most useful book
on the campus. Student telephone
directory available latter part of
October. Limited number. Order
from the Phraterea Club. Only 75c.
TOTEM   PRE   SALES   now   at   the
AMS office.
SCOOTER FOR SALE, "Allstate"
second hand (one owner). Please
phone Don at RE 8-8859.
RENTALS   &   REAL   ESTATE
Furn. Houses & Apts.
83
LAST    CHANCE
Football Charter
to San Francisco and Return
This Weekend, Oct. 16-18
ONLY
Join the Fun - ^oa a a - Everybody's Going
Leave Friday, 6 p.m., Return Sunday, 7 p.m.
•
DEADLINE   EXTENDED  TO  FRIDAY
FOR FEW SEATS LEFT
APPLY AT THE ATHLETIC  OFFICE
MEMORIAL   GYM
Come One — Come All
(VENGAN TODOS)
TO THE MEETING OF
EL CIRCULO
FRIDAY NOON    -    BU 204
EDUCATION     UNDERGRAD    SOCIETY
presents
BRYAN    BELFONT
on
CUBA
Friday, October 16, 12:30   New Education Bldg., Rm. 100
4?
\
Blazers ire basic
Basically correct for so many occasions, blazers
bespeak good taste now as much as they ever
did.
Butlookatthenewones! Slimmed-down natural-
shoulder styling. Authentic traditional tailoring
with deep-hook center vent, raised seams,
stitched edges, patch-flap pockets. And colors !
Burgundy, dove grey, French blue, bottle green,
deep olive, camel, navy, black. We've tailored
them impeccably in rich all-wool flannel and
hopsackto bring you a new natural-line interpretation of the classic blazer.
They look so correctly casual—slip one on
and see.
Only *36.95
FORT O'CALL
AUTHENTIC  TRADITIONAL  CLOTHES   BY
TIP TOP TAILORS
PORT  O'CAIL MEN'S SHOP
637 Granville ... a few
steps north of the Bay.
^
f

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0126853/manifest

Comment

Related Items