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The Ubyssey Mar 17, 2009

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Array for The Ubyssey's Board of Directors. Cast your
ballot before 4pm today either online with the SSC's
Webvote or at the south entrance ofthe SUB
fl
\
BYSSEY
March 17,2009 \ www.ubyssey.ca
Cel is smoking too much since 1918 | volume xc, number 45
UBC's official student newspaper is published Tuesdays and Fridays
BIRDS TAKE SILVER
Page 3 PAGE 7 2    EVENTS
THE UBYSSEY    WWW.UBYSSEY.CA
MARCH 17, 2009
Events
If you have an event, e-mail us at events@ubyssey.ca
VOTE FOR THE UBYSSEY BOARD OF DIRECTORS
TODAY!
GO TO SSC WEBVOTE
Teach Englishj Classifieds
Overseas
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• Intensive 60-Hour Progtam
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' Teacher Placement Service
• Money Back Guarantee Included
• Thousands of Satisfied Students
OXFORD SEMINARS
604-683-3430/1-800-269-6719
www.oxfordseminars.ca
We Want You!
Interested in learning about international health initiatives? Attend
Exploring Global Outreach -a FREE
speakers evening hosted by Global
Outreach Students' Association,
March 16th 5-7:30pm, Room 182 in
the Ike Barber Learning Centre.
Contact ubc.gosa@gmail.com
Thai Aiyara presents "2009 Thai
Night: Rong Rum Turn Plaeng"-A
Thai culture showcase: dance and
music.Thai food and drinks provided. 7-9 pm Fri. 27th March tix $8.
e-mail info@ubcthai.ca
Theatre at UBC Presents
March 19 to 28,2009
"...a wild free-associative ridel"
Frederic Wood Theatre
- THE NEW YORK TIMES
f/l& &&£&£& /c*Z4*tl4Vt4Z%€W^
by Christopher Durang
t^i
and Albert Innaurato
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Directed by
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Chris McGregor
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Tickets: $20 / $14 / $10
ter^b.
Call: 604.S22.2678
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Summer International Volunteer
Opportunity in Rwanda • Developing World Connections coordinates
groups that travel to the developing
world to do volunteer work and
this year will be running a trip out
of UBC. This summer's project
is five weeks with an additional
week to explore Rwanda. There
are still a few spots remaining for
this summer's student groups, but
time is running out so apply soon
• For more info please visit www.
developingworldconnections.org
or contact the student team leader
Steve Peat at peat_88@hotmail.
com. •
Action—Camera: Beijing Performance Photography • Examines
the trajectory from the underground performing arts community
centred in Beijing's "East Village"
in the early 1990s, to a current
nternationally recognized practice.
• January 16, 2009 Wam-Monday,
April 20, 2009 1 lam. For further
information please contact Naomi
Sawada at naomi.sawada@ubc.ca,
tel: (604) 822-3640, or fax: (604)
822-6689, or take a look at belkin-
artgallery.com/_email/_main_belkin/
Action Camera. •
Cinema Politica: Orange Revolution • The documentary focuses
on the Orange Revolution, a series
of protests and political events that
took place in Ukraine from late
November 2004 to January 2005,
in the immediate aftermath of the
run-off vote of the 2004 Ukrainian
presidential election which was
claimed to be marred by massive
corruption, voter intimidation
and direct electoral fraud. Weav-
ng together footage previously
unseen even in Ukraine, thoughtfu
conversations with the people who
were there, and the music that was
performed live at pivotal moments
during the protests, Orange Revolution captures the spirit and determination of the most successful
political protest of the decade—a
non violent victory with meaning
for citizens the world over. • March
17, 2009, 7pm, Norm Theatre,
(SUB). Visit www.cinemapolitica.
org/ubc •
March 18
Alpha Delta Phi Car Smash for
Charity • Feeling stressed? Feeling
down? Forget midterms, papers,
and finals! Come to the SUB on
March 18 anytime from 10am to
5pm and lift your spirits by smashing the crap out of either: a 1992
dodge caravan or a 1996 Mazda
Protege, both in great condition!
You can smash with your choice of
a bat or a sledgehammer! That's
awesome! Minimum donation
to smash is only two dollars! All
donations are going towards the
Uganda Rural Fund, which you can
check out at http://www.ugandaru-
ralfund.org/. Sponsored by Buster's
Towing and Vancouver Community
College • March 18, 2009,10am-
5pm, front of the SUB. For more
information emailjesseoryl01 @
hotmail.com •
Sliding Doors • Presented by UBC's
Department of Theatre and Film &
UBC Arts Wednesdays. Followed by
a Q&A with director Peter Howitt.
One of the most popular films of
1998, SLIDING DOORS is an exploration of how a person's life can be
changed by a simple twist of fate.
This romantic comedy shows how
a young woman's destiny unfolds if
she catches a train, or if she misses
it. • March 18, 2009, Doors at
5:30pm, - 6pm start, UBC Robson
Square, Theatre C 1:50 pm, more
info: www.film.ubc.ca. Free. •
The Idiots Karamazov • Christopher Durang's antic, outrageous
and wildly comic send-up of
Dostoyevsky's classic novel •
Frederic Wood Theatre, March
18-28, 2009. 7:30pm, Tickets:
$20/$ 14/$ 10 and Fri. Box Office:
604.822.2678. More: www.the-
atre.ubc.ca *
UBC Improv: The Tournament •
UBC Improv and the UBC chapter
of STAND (Students Taking Action
Now: Darfur) are proud to present
their annual international improv
tournament—a part of IMPULSE
the UBC Improv Festival. Watch
your favourite improv artistes battle
it off to claim that special place in
your heart. • March 18-20, 2009,
7pm, Scarfe 100. For more details
on the competitors, check the
Facebook event •
March 19
What I Learned in Class Today:
Aboriginal Issues in the Classroom
• This research project developed
by two students in the First Nations
Studies Program at the University
of British Columbia responds to
reports of troubling and sometimes
traumatic discussions of Aborigina
issues in classrooms at UBC, which
often affect students' abilities to
function in their coursework, and
even return to class. This project
asks UBC students, faculty, administrators, and alumni to share
their experiences and reflections on
these situations in video recorded
nterviews. Pizza and pop provided
• March 19, 2009, 12:30pm -
2:00pm, Sty-Wet-Tan, First Nations
Longhouse. For more information
call 604.822.0307 or email issuesin-
theclass@gmail.com •
Second Annual Leadership Summit • It's ELU's biggest event. Each
year, ELU invites some top guest
speakers from a range of professions from student to CEO, to
come and speak for ELU Summit
nvitees. Guest and VIPs have a
chance to listen to speeches from
four different quest speakers about
leadership and their life experience
in it, and then to mingle with them
afterwards in a 'bites and pieces'
networking session where food
and drinks are provided • March
19, 2009. 7-9pm, Irving K. Barber
room 182. Admission $2 for non-
members, free for members •
BC Green Party leader speaks at
UBC • The leader of the Green Party
of British Columbia, Jane Sterk,
will be speaking at UBC about the
future of our province, the elections
and the Green Vision for BC. •
March 19, 2009. 5-7pm, at BUCH
D304. Free. •
March 20
Political Islam, Sharia Laws, and
Women's Rights • Presented by
Maryam Namazie, Spokesperson
for Equal Rights Now - Organisation
against Women's Discrimination in
ran. Organized by UBC Students
for Equality and Freedom in the
Middle East. • March 20, 2009 at
6pm SUB Room 214, Contact UB-
Cequalitymiddleeast@gmail. com. •
March 25
Thunderbirds Women's Ultimate
Beer Garden Fundraiser * Chill
with the T-Bird Women's Ultimate
team while they raise funds for
their season! Highlights include
a fire breathing show by Sergio
Bonatto and a fire juggling show
by Erin Brophy • March 25, 2009,
6pm, The Cheez Factory (2335 Engineering Lane). Cover by donation
(at least $5). 19+event*
March 26
Lola Dance: Provincial Essays *
Presented by the Dance Centre. A
stunning ensemble work that takes
nspiration from the natural world
and our relationship to it, Provincial
Essays will be featured in the next
edition of the popular Discover
Dance\ noon series. Created by
Artistic Director Lola MacLaughlin,
who is regarded as one of Canada's
finest contemporary dance choreographers, Provincial Essays is an
eclectic collection of choreographic
landscapes informed by nature,
and full of delicious humour and
ravishing visuals. It looks at modern
society's relationship with the
natural world-our dominance and
commoditisation of the environment contrasted with nature's great
power and beauty. • March 26,
2009, 12pm, Scotiabank Dance
Centre, 677 Davie St (at Granville),
Inquiries contact 604 606 6400 or
www.thedancecentre.ca •
Thh Ubyssey
March 17", 2009
volume xc, n"4S
Editorial Board
COORDINATING EDITOR
Kellan Higgins: coordinating@uhyssey.ca
NEWS EDITORS
Stephanie Findlay & Justin McElroy :
news@uhyssey.ca
CULTURE EDITOR
Trevor Melanson : culture@uhyssey.ca
SPORTS EDITOR
Shun Endo : sports@uhyssey.ca
FEATURES & PERSPECTIVES EDITOR
Joe Rayment: features@uhyssey.ca
PHOTO EDITOR
Goh Iromoto :photos@ubyssey.ca
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Paul Bucci:production@uhyssey.ca
COPY EDITOR
Celestian Rince: copy@uhysseyca
VOLUNTEER COORDINATOR
Kalyeena Makortoff: volunteers @uhyssey.ca
WEBMASTER
Adam Leggett: webmaster@uhyssey ca
MULTIMEDIA EDITOR
Tara Martellaro : multimedia@uhyssey.ca
Editorial Office
Room 24, Student Union Building
6138 Student Union Boulevard
Vancouver, BCV6T lZl
tel: 604-822-2301
fax: 604-822-9279
web: www.uhyssey.ca
e-mail: feedback @uhyssey.ca
Business Office
Room 23, Student Union Building
advertising: 604-822-1654
business office: 604-822-6681
fax: 604-822-1658
e-mail: advertising@uhyssey.ca
BUSINESS MANAGER : Fernie Pereira
AD TRAFFIC : Sabrina Marchand
AD DESIGN : Gerald Deo
The Ubyssey is the official student newspaper ofthe University of British Columbia. It is published every Tuesday
and Friday by The Ubyssey Publications Society. We are an
autonomous, democratically run student organization, and
all students are encouraged to participate.
Editorials are chosen and written bythe Ubyssey staff.
They are the expressed opinion of the staff, and do not
necessarily reflect the views of The Ubyssey Publications
Society or the University of British Columbia. All editorial
content appearing in The Ubyssey is the property of The
Ubyssey Publications Society. Stories, opinions, photographs and artwork contained herein cannot be reproduced
without the expressed, written permission of The Ubyssey
Publications Society.
The Ubyssey is a founding member of Canadian University Press (CUP) and adherestoCUP's guiding principles.
Letters to the editor must be under 300 words. Please
include your phone number, student number and signature
(not for publication) as well as your year and faculty with
all submissions. ID will be checked when submissions are
dropped off atthe editorial officeofThe Ubyssey; otherwise
verification will be done by phone. "Perspectives" are opinion pieces over 300 words but under 750 words and are run
according to space. "Freestyles" are opinion pieces written
by Ubyssey staff members. Priority will be given to letters
and perspectives over freestyles unless the latter is time
sensitive. Opinion pieces will not be run until the identity of
the writer has been verified. The Ubyssey reserves the right
to edit submissionsfor length and clarity. All letters must be
received by 12 noon the day before intended publication.
Letters received after this point will be published in the
following issue unless there is an urgent time restriction or
other matter deemed relevant bythe Ubyssey staff.
It is agreed by all persons placing display or classified
advertising that if the Ubyssey Publications Society fails to
publish an advertisement or if an error in the ad occurs the
liability of the UPS will not be greaterthan the price pa id for
the ad. The UPS shall not be responsible for slight changes
or typographical errors that do not lessen the value or the
impact ofthe ad.
Contributors
In the land of Zoe Siegel, the crazy stepmother Kristine
Sostar decided to pull a Gerald Deo and turn everyone
into weird Trevor Records and Kellan Higgins. Yawei Zhao,
Kie Shiroma, and Justin McElroy were the first people
to get transformed into inanimate objects. Stephanie
Findlay and Paul Bucci were next; they were turned into
dictionaries. Shun Endo and Goh Iromoto tried to stop the
crazy stepmother from turning Joe Rayment into a piece of
chalk, but failed. Coming tothe rescue was Celestian Rince,
armed with an Adam Leggett. He leaped over sleeping
Pierce Nettling, and jabbed frenzily. He hit Alyson Strike
instead, causing Matt Hildebrand and Chibwe Mweene to
cry uncontrollably. Shawn Li and Jon Horn ran blindly into
the foray, armed with toothpicks, but lost them to stuck
pieces of spinach. Kate Barbaria, Trevor Melanson, Kalyeena
Makortoff, and Tara Martellaro tried so hard to ignore everyone but Samantha Jung, Kathy Li, Keegan Bursaw and
Katarina Grgic made surethey were kept in the loop. Finally,
Alex Lougheed and Kyrstin Bain gave everyone beer and all
was well.
V
Canadian
University
Press
Canada Post Sales
Agreement
Number 0040878022
printed on^l00%
'recycledpaper MARCH 17, 2009
THE UBYSSEY    WWW.UBYSSEY.CA
Online ballots hike voter turnout
Several schools see sharp increase with electronic shift
by Justin Bell
Intercamp
(Grant MacEwan College)
EDMONTON (CUP)-Students'
unions across the country are
moving to electronic balloting
with various levels of improved
voter turnout.
Both the University of Alberta
and the University of Ottawa
implemented e-voting for the
first time this year with an increase in voter turnout at both
institutions.
The U of 0 moved to electronic balloting for the first time
this year, doubling their voter
turnout to 27.2 per cent, more
than the previous two elections
combined.
"People underestimate the
number of students who are
part-time or doing co-op terms
or who have disabilities and
can't make it [to campus]," said
Wassim Garzouzi, the chief information officer for the Student
Federation of the University
of Ottawa election. "I think we
definitely reached out to those
students."
At the U of A, turnout increased by 6 per cent up to 20
per cent this year, due at least
in part to the move to electronic
balloting.
It's a marginal uptick, but Patrick Wisheu, the chief returning
officer for the U of A Students'
Union elections, says he hopes
that it will increase more in the
future.
"With the availability to send
out campus-wide e-mail and
getting people to vote works
very   well,"   Wisheu   said.   "It
makes voting incredibly easy
for people. They can just log on
and vote."
It was the first year at the U of
A where all students could vote
electronically, but smaller rollouts have been going on since
2002-03 when students studying abroad were able to vote
online. It was through gradual
upgrades that the all-student upgrade went out this year.
In the AMS elections at UBC
in February, 6027 of 6493 votes
were cast online—more than 90
per cent of the total. In order to
maintain the viability of paper
voting, Elections Administrator Sarina Rehal recommended
in her final report to council to
limit voting to popular voting
stations, such as the SUB and
Koerner Library. While online
voting has taken place in AMS
elections since 2003, this year
turnout increased from 6.4 per
cent in 2008 to 14.6 per cent.
Students at St. Francis Xavier
University in Antigonish, NS
broke records for student election turnout, pulling in just over
60 per cent of students in their
executive election this year-
higher than the last federal
election.
St. FX Students' Union President Matt MacGillivray says turnout at the school has always been
high—between 25 and 30 per
cent—before electronic balloting.
But, they've been using e-voting
for the last five years and have
seen increased turnout, making
the executives' job easier.
"We do care about having a
higher voter turnout, but it's not
just a show thing. It gives you a
lot more swing with the univer-
TOTAL VOTER TURNOUT 2008
sity, a lot more swing with governments," MacGillivray said.
The Students' Association of
MacEwan executive election
this year will remain a paper
ballot, but SA President Maigan
van der Giessen says she liked
the idea of electronic balloting and it could be one way to
increase the  stagnating voter
PAUL BUCCI GRAPHIC/THE UBYSSEY
turnout at Edmonton's MacEwan College.
"I think it's great. We have
a huge voter turnout deficit. I
think it would be a great way to
get those people out who aren't
on campus or who don't get out
to voting booths," said van der
Giessen. *2I
—with files from Justin McElroy
First international student seat election botched
by Yawei Zhao
News Writer
Nazanin Moghadami is the newly elected AMS international
representative for 2009/2010,
a non-voting position created
lastyear, but so far, her primary
concern is how she got elected.
The election was plagued with
problems such as a lack of
advertising, the absence of a
coherent definition of who is
an international student, and
problems simply counting up
the votes in time.
International students first
approached the AMS in 2007 to
ask about the possibility of having a non-voting seat on council.
Jeff Friedrich, AMS president at
that time, suggested they attend
as guests for a while first. The
International Students Association, which consists of less than
100 students, asked for a seat
again on November 5, 2008. On
November 19, 2008, an amendment to the AMS Code of Procedure to create the new seat went
to Council and passed.
Mitch Wright, a member of
election committee, said they
didn't have enough time to do
advertising, owing to the late
hiring of the committee. Wright
also pointed out that the committee was not informed that
they would have to run the international seat election until halfway through the AMS elections.
The three international rep
candidates also had no opportunities to participate in an all-
candidates debate, and could not
post statements on the AMS elec-
Nazanin Moghadami, AMS international student rep, raised issues with her election, goh iromoto photo/the ubyssey
tion website. According to 2009
Electoral Code, all candidates are
allowed to participate in debates
and to post vision statements on
AMS website. But Sheldon Gold-
farb, the AMS archivist-researcher and privacy officer, said that
those privileges are only for AMS
executives; current rules don't
say anything about debates and
statements for the international
rep seat election.
In addition, the unofficial result for international representative election was delayed for
two weeks. Nazanin blamed the
Election Committee for failing
to define eligible voters in time,
international student being a
vague term. However, Nazanim
argued "that should be thought
before the election day."
Sarina Rehal, the election ad
ministrator, said "international
student" was defined when the
seat was created. In her report
to the Council, she mentioned
that the delay was due to a privacy issue with International
House. According to Goldfarb,
the definition was discussed
before the election.
Reid Kaufman, president of
International Students Association (ISA) suggested that international student be defined as
those paying international student fees. The workability was
approved by Chris Eaton, a UBC
administrator at Enrolment
Services. He said Brock Hall can
identify those students so that
only they can vote.
At the end of the day, only 66
students voted for the international representative.  Nazanin
attributed the low turnout to
only International House and
the ISA doing any advertising
for the new seat. AMS VP External Tim Chu mentioned the
same problem. "I was so surprised when my friend told me
that she was running for international rep seat," Chu said. "I
didn't know about the seat until
she told me."
Nazanin says she is not attacking the AMS. "It's just something that the general student
body needs to know about and
that needs to be documented,"
she said. "I understand that it
was a stressful time and there
were a lot of things going on
with the election. Some of the
problems are understandable,
but some problems are just not
acceptable."*^
Pro-life
club denied
funding
by Sam VanSchie
The Martlet (University of Victoria)
VICTORIA (CUP)-In an ongoing
battle, the pro-life group at UVic
has once again been denied student union funding.
The pro-life student club Youth
Protecting Youth (YPY) was denied
club money again by the UVic Students' Society, despite Clubs Council voting in favour of the funding.
Clubs Council is made up of
student club representatives who
meet each semester to debate and
decide how to spend their money.
Clubs Council voted to fund the
YPY at their most recent meeting.
This was a change from the fall
meeting, when the majority voted
against funding YPY. The fall
decision was upheld by the UVSS
board of directors, which has the
final say on funding issues.
At the time, all the executive
members of the board said it was
best to uphold the decision of
Clubs Council.
"Those are students telling us
what they want," Christine Com-
rie, director of services, told the
UVSS last November.
But this term, Comrie, who
chairs Clubs Council, told the
board the recent vote in favour of
funding was less representative
of students' wishes because fewer
clubs attended.
However, both meetings had
18 voting clubs. At the fall meeting, only four clubs supported
funding YPY, while at the more
recent one, a 12-club majority
agreed they could have funds.
YPY President Anastasia
Pearse says people who wanted
to vote against the club receiving
funding did so.
"We're really frustrated,"
Pearse said. "Clubs funding is for
Clubs Council to decide on, not
the UVSS."
Meaghan Kerr and Erin Lachar-
ity, the two directors-at-large who
voted to give the club funding in
the fall, were again the only ones
who voted against the motion to
deny funds.
No YPY member was present to
defend the club's position.
Pearse said she did not receive
notice of the meeting, despite a
point in clubs policy that states
that clubs must be given one week
notice before a Clubs Council.
However, there was no specific
complaint filed against the club.
Luam Kidane, the board rep for
the Students of Colour Collective,
added the motion to deny funding
mid-meeting.
Pearse said the board also
failed to notify them after the
meeting that they wouldn't receive
funding.
She was only informed of what
happened by The Martlet, and
subsequently contacted the board
herself to appeal the decision at
the next board meeting.
But Comrie says it's unlikely the
board will overturn their decision.
"Their feelings are pretty clear
on this. We've discussed it so
many times at different meetings," said Comrie.
While clubs do not have to comply with Society policy, the UVSS is
mandated to support freedom of
choice on the matter of abortion.
In past years there has been
support for the club. In 2005, at
YPY's annual general meeting,
more than 600 showed up to vote
to uphold their pro-choice mandate. ^ 4 | NEWS
THE UBYSSEY    WWW.UBYSSEY.CA
MARCH 17, 2009
THE UBYSSEY'S EDITORIAL BOARD
ELECTIONS ARE COMING UP
POSITION PAPERS ARE DUE FRIDAY MARCH 20
OPEN POSITIONS INCLUDE:
- Coordinating Editor
- News Editor
- Culture Editor
Sports Editor
Features Editor
Multimedia Editor
- Photo/Graphics Editor
- Production Manager
- Copy Editor
FOR MORE INFORMATION, EMAIL ZOE.SIEGEL@GMAIL.COM
It all begins with a clear
vision for climate action,
generated by you.
UBC is taking decisive action on climate change by creating a Climate
Action Plan for the Vancouver Campus. This plan is a central element
of our commitment to sustainability leadership and a critical step in
fulfilling the President's Statement of Action on Climate Change for Canada.
Vision Generation Workshops
Tuesday March 17th, 5-7pm, GSS Ballroom
Friday March 20th, 9-11am, GSS Ballroom
Vision Presentation Town Hall Meeting
Tuesday March 31st, 5-7pm, GSS Ballroom
Everyone is encouraged to attend. Register for a workshop
and bring your voice to this important conversation.
sustainability   www.climateaction.ubc.ca
PAUL   RUDD
JASON   SEGEL
I LOVE YOU,
MAN
ARE YOU
MAN ENOUGH
TO SAY IT?
HIM
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EXECUTIVE |
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V   SEXUAL LANGUAGE SOlilMI MM Oil LlEHiii BOIIS PICTURES"
ILoveYouMan.com
STARTS FRIDAY MARCH 20
Parade of nations
Yesterday, International Week participants held a flag parade to kick
off the event. According to their website, iWeek is a celebration of
UBC's diversity and a way to "create connections across disciplinary
and national borders." kathy yan li photo/the ubyssey
SFU to privatize residences
by David Dyck
The Peak (Simon Fraser University)
BURNABY (CUP) - Simon Fraser
University might follow the lead
of other universities by contracting a private company to fund,
manage and maintain on-campus student residences.
Requests for expressions of
interest, issued last month, are
rooted in the lack of capital available to SFU to execute major
repairs to Louis Riel House and
other residence buildings.
"We're just testing the waters,"
Pat Hibbits, SFU's VP Finance,
told reporters. "We're just looking for creative ways to try and
deal with residences."
The university is looking for a
company capable of dramatically
expanding residences. The company would also assume responsibility for no less than $35 to
$40 million necessary to repair
Louis Riel House. The document
for the solicitation reads that
SFU does not have the capital
necessary "and does not want to
borrow for these projects."
Currently, SFU's on-campus
residence houses about nine
per cent of students. SFU hopes
to hike that by up to 15 per cent
and double on-campus housing
space over the next five years.
Hibbits says Thompson Rivers
University in Kamloops, BC, and
the University of Ottawa already
boast privatized residences.
Thompson Rivers University has always had privatized
residences, says Mark Woloski,
TRU's residence manager.
He also points to a trend in
the privatization of university
residences across Canada.
"Going to different conferences, they are turning the housing around to the private sector
due to the fact that the price to
operate is definitely high," said
Woloski.
"We can control the prices we
offer the students because we're
not paying a hefty wage to all our
staff, so that's probably why a lot
of universities are changing to
private sectors, because the cost
of operations are skyrocketing,
being a union-run facility."
In terms of price, Woloski says
it is "virtually the same" as off-
campus housing.
"We follow everyone else's
lead. We keep in regular communication with all the other on-
campus housing units throughout BC, and we don't like pricing
ourselves out of the market or
wanting to gouge," he said.
As for a potential increase
in rent, the document does not
stipulate a rent hike limit.
Though nearly all of the aspects of residence will be run by
a private firm, the document explicitly states that "SFU intends
to retain responsibility for all
Residence Life functions for all
SFU students living within all on-
campus housing."
Matthew Lloyd, a fourth-year
kinesiology student and one
of the community advisors
in the McTaggart-Cowan residence building, is skeptical of
privatization.
"They said that it would actually be beneficial because the
pricing right now is above what
it is in the market," said Lloyd.
"But that came with an arrow
of, 'Oh yeah, don't worry, this is
beneficial.' So I was like, 'Well,
I'm not sure about this.'"
Although this is his last semester in residence, the possible
increase in cost as well as overall
maintenance concerns Lloyd.
Nichole DeMichelis, a second-
year political science student
living in McTaggart-Cowan, is
more optimistic about what
privatization could bring to the
residences.
"SFU is lacking a lot of funding
and one of the big priorities is to
build more residences to secure
that sense of community," DeMichelis said.
If private investors were involved, "it could be run like a
reasonable residence," DeMichelis said.
"I would be all for having new
buildings with proper kitchens.
I think it sounds like a great
idea." U Culture
Editor: Trevor Melanson | E-mail: culture@ubyssey.ca
March 17,20091 Page S
The Carnival Band brings together community
Activist street band meets every Monday to make music
by Trevor Record
Culture Staff
The Carnival Band is a community music project that plays a variety of music ranging from swing
to funk adaptations. I went to see
them last Monday at their weekly
practice in the senior's lounge at
Britannia Community Centre. Arriving a little early, I found a
group of drummers already there
in a pre-practice sectional.
I had been invited there by
Brandon Walker, a fourth-year
UBC civil engineer and the president of the Open Air Orchestra
Society. Walker got involved in
the band around four years ago
(it was created a decade ago),
and following the departure of
one of the band members, the
society was formed. The Open Air
Orchestra Society is non-profit
and promotes environmental
and social issues. Its members
comprise of performing artists,
a community choir and dance
group and the Carnival Band.
I introduced myself and was
soon talking to Ross Barrett, the
musical director of the band.
One of the founding members,
Barrett said he has been playing
saxophone at a professional level
since 1959, and is a UBC alumnus from the school of music
(which he attended in the 60s).
He says that his work with the
band is to facilitate, not necessarily to direct.
"As mathematics is music's
first child, so is music love's first
child," said Barrett. "There's a
great, great sense of community in this band. There's a lot
of friendships, and it's spawned
a lot of other bands as a result-
people come together through
this group."
By a bit after seven, a fair
number (maybe around 30) had
arrived and were getting ready
to start playing. Walker says their
extended membership hovers
around 105, and that the band
usually gains new members directly off the street—from people
who see them playing. The group
present was a genuine sampling
With members' ages ranging from eight to in their sixties, The Carnival Band is one very inclusive musical conglomeration, kathy yan li photo/the ubyssey
of the community, with members
of all colours and ages attending.
There are a few members in their
sixties, with Rowan, an eight-year-
old drummer, as the youngest. He
and his trumpet-playing brother
Trevor (age 12) have been playing
with the band for about a year,
their mother informed me.
"Within the context ofthe band,
music in a social setting is a way
to build empathy," said Walker.
"In the modern culture, recorded
music seems to be more popular.
We think that's sort of a shame
because people are missing out
on the value that is inherent in
ensemble playing....Part of that is
making our group as inclusive as
possible."
As they finished each song,
Barrett would call out the name
of the next. To my surprise, most
of the band seemed to be working
from memory, with only a few
of the musicians keeping sheet
music in front of them. They
were playing songs ranging from
Duke Ellington's "It Don't Mean a
Thing (If it ain't got that Swing)"
to Dylan's "Rainy Day Women
#12 & 35," all for members of a
burlesque group, Girls on Top.
The Girls on Top are a charity
group, and will be performing
at an Open Air Orchestra Society
fundraiser at the Fairview Pub
on April 3, so the Carnival Band
are playing songs so that the girls
might be able to work out a routine too. The relationship with
the burlesque group is new, but
dance and theatrical elements
are a part of the Carnival Band's
performances. Walker had originally gotten in contact with me af
ter I had seen them playing at the
Poverty Olympics where they had
dressed up in bright, outdated
sportswear.
"We don't get out there thinking that we're real maestros,"
said Walker. "I mean, we do rehearse and we take a lot of pride
in our sound, but we also realize
that if people are looking for a
real precise sort of sound, they'll
go out and see a professional
band. One of the real attractions
of the Carnival Band is the crazy
visual aspect. So the costuming
and the theatrics is a big part of
the aesthetic we try to sell."
At the break, several of the
board members began making
announcements. Their performance coordinator Cory Sweet
went over a number of their
upcoming gigs. In addition to a
number of local events, they are
going down to Seattle next month
to play at Honkfest, a festival for
other activist street bands. This
isn't the first time they'll travel,
having toured to the Northern
Gulf Islands, the eastern seaboard
of the US, Europe and China.
Even if they aren't the most
precise band, they're an inclusive
group and they do have a number
of strong players in their midst.
When they were playing "Rainy
Day Women" even I started
singing along. But if you're not
convinced, you can always check
them out when they play at the
Great Farm Trek this year. Or, if
you're feeling like you'd want to
join them or get them to play at an
event, go down to the Britannia
Community Centre any Monday
and meet them for yourself. \a
Correspondences Interdisciplinary Speaker Series at SFU
The GSS presents talks by speakers dedicated to truly
interdisciplinary work that bridges, trespasses or redraws
traditional academic boundaries. We explore issues and
questions that cannot be addressed from the standpoint of
a single discipline.
Join us Wednesday, March 25, 1 2:30pm 1:30pm
in the Graduate Student Lounge (MBC2212)
as Richard Vaughan, Assistant Professor of Computing
Science, SFU, presents "Assault and Batteries:   On the
utility of robot aggression, competition and violence"
Abstract:
For robots, as for animals, aggression, competition and
violence can be useful. In the context of robots,   useful
means increasing the value of the robots to their owners.
In the first part of this talk I will describe my laboratory's
work in using aggressive behaviour to improve the overall
efficiency and utility of groups of robots. Second, I survey
some examples of robots with competitive or aggressive
behaviour, and consider their impact on the field and on
wider society. Finally, I consider the current and future
value of robots designed to perform physical violence, and
the peculiar ethics thereof.
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EVERYTHING 8     SPORTS
THE UBYSSEY    WWW.UBYSSEY.CA
MARCH 17, 2009
UBC baseball off to a smooth start
by Keegan Bursaw
Sports Writer
The UBC Thunderbirds opened
up their first ever series at
brand-new Thunderbird Park
with four dominating wins
against Corban College over the
weekend. The T-Birds started off
by winning both games in their
doubleheader on Friday 10-6
and 5-1, and finished up the
sweep Saturday with a pair of
commanding 7-2 and 10-2 wins.
After giving up key runs in Friday's games and making errors
that cost them the win against
UBC, Corban College's frustration was evident before Saturday's doubleheader started.
Head coach Nate Mayben placed
eight baseballs by the outfield
fence and had his team race
from the infield to claim them
for starting positions.
Despite the undesirable
weather conditions that mixed
cold temperatures with brisk
winds and on-and-off rain, UBC
jumped to a 3-0 lead in the
second inning with RBIs (runs
batted in) from Scott Webster
and Sammie Starr. The T-Birds
capitalized off critical errors by
the Corban infielders and made
them pay.
T-Birds freshman pitcher Danny Britton-Foster picked up the
win in game one. "Danny was
our top pitching recruit this year
and he has been really good for
us so far this season," explained
UBC coach Terry McKaig. "For
him to hold them like that and
give us a chance to win really
didn't surprise me because he
has a lot of composure for a
freshman."
The concluding game of Saturday's doubleheader started similarly, with the T-Birds capitalizing
off Corban mistakes and driving
Jon Syrnyk swings for the fences Friday afternoon against Corban College. UBC swept the series against their NAIA rival, jon horn photo/the ubyssey
in three runs in the third inning
to take the early lead. The Birds
picked up another three runs in
the fifth inning, and after a shaky
relief effort by Corban's Chris
Trammel in the sixth inning, UBC
picked up another four more runs
to seal the victory.
In the pitching department,
Eric Brown threw the opening
six innings for UBC,  allowing
one earned run on six hits before
turning the ball over to Shawn
Hetherington for the game's final three outs.
"Eric has been coming out of
the bullpen for us for most of
the year but with Matt Banister's
injury we put him in the rotation
and we always know what we are
getting with him," said McKaig.
"He kind of came out of nowhere
for us to have a great freshman
season lastyear, and he is an important part of our staff. Whether
he starts or relieves for us, in big
games further down the line, he
is going to be involved.
"A lot more good at-bats today
and we managed to spread our
offence out a bit more," McKaig
said. "Still struggled today with
runners on third and less than
two outs, but overall today was
just a much better effort offensively, and our pitching and defense were really good also."
With the four wins this weekend, UBC climbs to 16-1 on the
season and 10-1 in NAIA West
play. The T-Birds take to the road
next weekend with a pair of dou-
bleheaders against the College of
Idaho. ^
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Agenda for staff meeting
1. Admittance of new members
2. Colours Issue
3. Election stuff for editorial
4. Ubyssey Board results
5. Spoof Issue (Elie)
6. Bonfire
7. Nash Update
8. Other Business MARCH 17, 2009
THE UBYSSEY    WWW.UBYSSEY.CA
SPORTS & PERSPECTIVES | 9
Courtside Comment
Birds hold head high in defeat
by Justin McElroy
StaffWriter
There we all were, crowded into
Mahony & Sons on a Sunday afternoon to see if UBC could win
the national championship. It
was halftime, and Birds were up
against Carleton, the no. 1 team
in the country—a team that had
only lost one game all season, a
team that had won five of the
past six national championships, a team that had thousands and thousands of hometown partisans cheering them
on. And they were winning. By
the smallest possible margin,
sure (37-36), but still, they were
winning. Back at Mahony's, you
got the sense that if they kept
outhustling Carleton, and if
graduating guard Chris Dyck—
christened "The Dycktator" by
fans—kept up his hot streak, it
could happen. UBC could win its
first men's basketball championship since 1972. Graduating
seniors Dyck, Matt Rachar and
Bryson Kool could put the ultimate cap on their university career, and this team could, and
would, complete the goal that all
of them had sacrificed their
grades and social lives for.
Then the better team started
playing like the better team.
Carleton started making their
shots, playing stifling defense,
and got the breaks that championship teams get. They grinded
out a five-, then a ten-point lead
by the end of the third quarter,
and that was effectively that.
Inspirational upsets are only
inspirational because they're
rare. Most of the time, the
house wins. Such was the case
Sunday in Ottawa. UBC came up
short, 87-77, pushed to the side
as Carleton got to celebrate its
sixth win in seven years in style
at home.
As all the attention, cheers
and cameras showered down
upon the Ravens after the game,
it fell to Dyck and coach Kevin
Hanson to answer the obligatory
questions about how they felt
about their team's performance.
Hanson: "Our goal was to play
our best basketball and we did.
I'm very proud of the guys and
very happy with the season we
had."
Dyck: "We're proud of what
we were able to do this weekend. It's an honour to be able
to play in the national finals
in your fifth year, and I'm just
proud of my teammates."
More often than not, it's easy
to pass off such pride-in-the-
face-of-heartbreaking defeat as
cliche spouting to avoid being
a sore loser, or a pure coping
mechanism. But in this case, I
doubt it.
Consider that the last five
times UBC had advanced to
the national championships,
they had been unglamorously
eliminated in the first round.
Many of the defeats being of the
head-scratching "weren't they
supposed to be an elite team?"
variety. The perception existed
that this was a team that could
never get over that hump. That
was before a 78-54 evisceration
of Dalhousie Friday, where the
T-Birds ended any doubts of being an elite team.
They reinforced their climbing
status on Saturday, playing the
Calgary Dinos for the right to go
to the championship. Two weeks
after Calgary humbled UBC in
the Canada West finals, the Birds
gutted out a tense victory, never
trailing in the second half, with
Dyck making six free throws in
the final minute to clinch an appearance in the finals.
Yes, people will talk about the
loss, but in those two victories
before the loss, UBC proved they
had the character and talent that
defines a successful team, and a
successful program. They are
surely disappointed. But after
a remarkable season, they each
head back to the mundanity of
term papers knowing that they
played the best they could, and
proved their doubters wrong.
That's as good as anyone can
do, and though Dyck, Rachar
and Kool will leave this campus
without a championship, they'll
leave with heads held high. And
as for the returning players, the
coaches and the thousands of
fans that hopped on the T-Birds
bandwagon? Well, they have the
four words that unite anyone
who has ever cared too much
about whether a puck goes into a
net, or a ball goes into a basket:
Wait till next year. \a
Perspectives
Where do we go from here?
by Pierce Nettling
Perspectives Staff
As this decade comes to a close,
we need to start asking where this
university is headed and where it
wants to go. In the years to come,
we need to fight for the notion
that the social component of university life has value. That aspect
helps nurture the academic cross
breeding that makes a university
the spawning ground for new
ideas. It's a philosophy that's
epitomized in the arts department, which has a breadth of
courses that can allow students to
step out of their comfort zones to
learn something truly new. And
yet, it seems the administration
has forgotten this.
To get an idea of what the
school values, take a look at the
latest edition of UBC Reports, their
public relations publication. There
are five major stories: three of the
articles are science and technology related, one is a profile on the
First Nations history and involvement, and the last is a music department piece that focuses on climate change and environmental
awareness instead of music. If you
head over to the public relations
website to take a look at the press
releases you won't find a single
one that's arts specific.
It's hard to give a single reason
for this focus. It probably has
something to do with the grants,
which are often tied to the sciences. It could be because most international ranking schemes put
a high value on research output
and publishing in journals. And it
could have something to do with
the media, which gobbles up the
headlines studies provide them.
So when it comes to the economics of UBC, arts does not
make money, and therefore it
is not worth spending school resources on. We are just the happy
little pawns on the chessboard
or the kid at basketball camp
getting the "best team player"
award. This is the great shame, as
there are so many wonderful arts
departments that are chronically
underfunded and ignored.
The goal for universities should
be in educating and opening horizons. My favourite classes at UBC
are always the literature courses
that incorporate films. I love going over to Lasserre and watching
a foreign language film from the
film studies department. Those
few interactions I have had in that
small room have persuaded me
to take a film studies class in the
future, which is a departure from
my usual focus of political science
and geography. This is what the
university system was designed to
do—to explore one's mind.
As I have reached the half
way sign on this racetrack of the
"greatest years of my life," I can
honestly say that so far the university experience has left me
wanting, wl
am.S Insider weekly
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AHi      WED.
■ ■ _^_W_W APRIL 8th
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PAH'T    8:00p.m.
BAND WARS
March 19th
at Pit Pub, UBC
FREE
Plants & Animals
with DRMHLLR
March 18th, Biltmore Cabaret
Tickets: Ticketweb, Zulu,
Scratch, Red Cat
Great Lake
Swimmers
with Kate Maki
March 29th, St James Hall
March 30th, Norm Theatre
Tickets: Ticketweb, Zulu, Outpost
$15.00 advance
UBC
Responsible
Consumption
Week
Vote with Your
Dollar Fair
March 19 & 20,2009
SUB Concourse
9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.
03.17.09
THE SPRING      4fe#
SHOPPING    3£.
SPREE   J»
March 23rd—27th JP^£»
10:a.m.— 5:00 p.m. 2Jf
Main Concourse        *1!5*
New and returning vendors everything
from clothing, jewellery, electronic
gadgets to the latest travel, banking
and cell phone deals.
^^^ wvjw.ai"b An initjatjve from your
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STUDENTS
WORKING FOR
STUDENTS
The ams Student Society is Now Hiring
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Executive support positions
for the 2009/2010 term
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Meaningful, engaging and exiting part-time
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Full position details, compensation and
application procedures are available on our web
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SAVE»^FARM
JOIN      THE     TREK
GREAT FARM TREK09
APRIL 7th
The Trek will depart from the
Student Union Building at 3:30p.m.
and trekkers will walk to the UBC
Farm on south campus.
Please join us at this family-friendly
event to support the farm remaining
in its current size and location.
For more information:
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UBC Alma Mater Society Editorial
If you'd like to submit a letter, please contact feedback@ubyssey.ca
March 17,2009 \ Page 10
Where is our Michelle Obama?
Michelle Obama is smiling at you from the covers of Vogue, New York
Magazine and O(prah). She's commanding almost as much coverage
as her husband, the president of the USA. Which raises the question:
where is our Michelle Obama?
When Michelle Obama was in 0, Oprah shared her cover of the
magazine—the first time in the magazine's nine year history that
the cover has featured anything other than just Oprah. America's
talk-show giant had given her kudos, as had just about every other
regular bloke. Michelle Obama has metamorphosed from fist-
jabbing terrorist to ultimate female icon in a matter of months. The
Harvard-trained lawyer/hospital executive has energized the first
lady position.
Once, before Barack was America's greatest hope, she was the
highest salary earner in the relationship. Last February, 2008, Newsweek quoted her as saying, "Somehow I've been caricatured as this
emasculating wife....Do you think anyone could emasculate Barack
Obama? Really now."
But still, her relationship with the president isn't anything we've
seen before. To be frank, it seems like she wears the pants.
Recently, the media has had a weird fascination with her biceps.
A particularly endearing article voiced comfort in the fact that the
first lady looked as though she could clock anyone in Congress if it
came down to it. Indeed, A 22-page biography of the first lady will be
released in the US as the latest in a "Female Force" series focusing on
female politicians.
Where is the Canadian "Female Force" team member? While
Michelle is busy tearing down and reconstructing the definition of
a first lady what is Laureen, Prime Minister Stephen Harper's wife,
up to? Is she pitching economic policies, touting the benefits of a balanced meal? Do you know who Sheila Ann Cowan is? Milica Pivnicki?
Hilary Clinton had forged new paths for first ladies. Michelle
Obama is set to do the same. Heck, let's not forget a nod to Sarah
Palin, because she, too, inspired and represented a voting demographic that is chronically underrepresented. They have a cause,
these women. They can even band together: this Wednesday CNN reported Clinton and Obama celebrating the State Department Women
of Courage Awards, highlighting women's rights across the globe.
Canada's parliament has an embarrassing number of female MPs,
hovering around 23 per cent. As the prime minister's wife, there is a
tremendous opportunity for outreach and change. On an highly visible platform, a politician's partner has immediate media access—a
soap box that should be stood on more often than not.
Sure, being first lady doesn't pay much. The ceremonial baggage
is claustrophobic, and probably too decidedly domestic for many
people's taste. That being said, the option remains to use the position
to inspire and reach out to an increasingly apathetic population.
It's not that we want a Michelle Obama, it's that we need one.Xi
Botched remodelling, again
So if you haven't noticed, campus is going through a bit of a remodelling stage. If you've had a class in Buchanan in the last few years, you
will have noticed that the D section of the building looks a lot prettier
than the rest of the building. Especially compared to B block, which
has been ripped asunder in order to fix up the aging building.
Now all this remodelling is nice. For those of us who have been
here for manyyears, the old Buchanan D block was filled with
uncomfortable chairs and chipped walls, not to mention offensively
gross linoleum lining the floors and doors in poor condition. Of
course this old barn couldn't be torn down—it's a historical building
after all—so remodelling and upgrading the structure to survive a
horrible earthquake was a must.
Now remodelling is great and all, but there is something you have
to ensure when you rip apart a building: that the new stuff actually
works! Many buildings built before the glorious revolution of laptops
have no outlets. Some of the classrooms in Buchanan have broken
electrical plugs, which have been neglected by repairmen (or their
supervisors) for years. Classrooms that are use often are being
remodelled. And perhaps one of the worst failures in recent history,
parts ofthe Dorothy Somerset Studio have been deemed an electrical hazard. This means that super-awesome beer gardens (such
as the one The Ubyssey tried to hold) can't be held in the building
recovering from $3.7 million plastic surgery. Lasserre often doesn't
have enough chairs in its seminar classes, and in the beginning of
the term, some students were sitting on the floor. The visual arts
students are getting screwed over before they even graduate.
Maybe Classroom Services is just trying to condition students
to their potential lives of poverty, so the transition won't be such a
shock. Well, thanks for the sentiment guys, but we would like to be
able to turn on the lights, and use our handy electric note-taking devices, and have class without a light coat of drywall coating our desks
(when we have them). There is something distinctly dissatisfying
about paying for "improvements" only to have them collapse—sometimes literally— in the aftermath. Looking forward to the new SUB
renovations? vi
Quote ofthe Day
It seems to me as if we were
the only ones in this process
with any willingness to come
to the table.
—AUS President Avneet Johal, complaining
that the RCMP and Classroom Services would
not allow a revival of Arts County Fair, entitled "Arts Campus Fest,"for April of this year.
IMUIRISDALE GANGSTE
THREATEN ALL OF VANCOUVER
by Katarina Grgic
Info and Fun
WorldRecordHolder!
ANNAMAY PIERSE
After coming close at last month's CIS Championship, UBC Thunderbird Annamay Pierse has achieved the ultimate goal of any athlete: a
world record. At last weekend's Canadian Spring National Championships, Pierse swam the women's short course 200-metre breast-
stroke in a time of 2:17:50, bettering Leisel Jones's 2003 mark of
2:17:75.
"It feels absolutely amazing," said Pierse after the race. "All the
hard work I put in is paying off. It's my goal to be the best in the
world. I planned to get the record tonight and I really believed in
myself that it could happen." *2I
This day in the Ubyssey in 'S6
MASCULINE SCENERY TO
ADORN FEMALE HAVEN
The women's common room
of the Arts Building is now
complete with a picture of a
typical college man. Mamook
officials presented the work of
art to WUS president Lynda
Gates at the general meeting
Thursday. The artists claimed
they had heard, common room
frequenters complaining about
the lack of masculine scenery in
the room. Deciding to do something about this deplorable
condition, they co-operated on
a painting of an anemic freshman, complete with booster
scarf, which will decorate the
common room until the Arts
building collapses. *2I
Editors' note: The current Ubyssey staff do not know if this is satire or not.
Streeters
Are you concerned about gang violence?
Nathan Wendel
Film Production 3
"I think that
the police
are definitely
exploiting it to
their advantage,
I think the press
is muckraking
it."
Steve Quilala
Geography 2
"I had a really
close call when
I was downtown with like
a gang... and
it kinda scared
the shit out of
me. But I think
ultimately they
should just all
kill each other
and we should
all go home."
—Coordinated
Camille Cacnio
Science 2
"I don't really
personally feel
like threatened,
but I mean I live
in a pretty safe
neighbourhood
and just as long
as I don't go
to the wrong
places then I
feel like I'm
fine."
Aleksandr
Aleksandrov
Comm 1
"I don't encounter this problem
everyday...when
you hear the
story about violence and when
you encounter
it in a different
situation, you
realize that this
is a problem."
Jasmine Ramsey
Arts 1
"Personally
no I don't. I've
never had any
experience with
gang violence.
Mostly it's in
the newspaper
so it feel really
distant from my
personal life."
by Tara Martellaro & Katarina Grgic, with photos by Chibwe Mweene MARCH 17, 2009
THE UBYSSEY    WWW.UBYSSEY.CA
GAMES & COMICS     11
solution, tips and computer
programs at www.sudoku.com
su do ku   Crossword
Puzzles by Pappocom
by Kyrstin Bain
4
6
2
5
3|7|
9
2
2
7
3
3
4
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8
2
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34. Another name for the Newfound
1. Sharpen
land turr
6. Mrs., auf deutsche
36. Scent
10. Sound of surprise
37. Moonfish
14. A henchman in The Lion King
39. The total collection of organisms of
1 5. Another name for the Sami people
a geographic region
16. Woodwind known as the French
41. Determination
hoboy
42. Knot again
17. Disguised
44. Coal like
19. Have a bad poker face
46. Ontario time zone: abb
20. Overflow
47. Stay in pace with
21. Tint
49. Easily irritated
22. Certain nocturnal wildcat
51. Carnival
24. This symbol: A
52. Iraq's main port, known as the
26. Smear
home of Sinbad the Sailor
27. Over-indulger
53. Starch
29. Jet engine
56. 1/60 of a min.
33. A high rocky hill
57. " that a surprise!"
60. Greek goddess of the earth
61. Jetty
64. Nestling hawk
65. Sinatra's "I Only Have For You"
66. Icy dwelling
67. Unenlightened age
68. The rock opera based on La
Boheme
69. Wee
DOWN
1. Closed
2. The two English rivers converging at
The Meeting of the Waters'
3. Repaint, reupholster, redo..
4. Single-person
5. Golf-course standard
6. Laugh off, as rules
7. Enthusiastic review
8. Simian
9. Loud crowd reaction
10. City of Ace of Base's origin
11. Eve's son
12. Leia's Han
13. Fur coat
18. Common depiction of Cupid
23. Castro's island
25. Dream state
26. Because of
27. Baby bringer
28. Safari helmet
29. March
30. Sailors' living quarters
31. Religious group often associated
with Pennsylvania Dutch
32. Dapper
35. Platform
38. Portable liquor container
40. Plan of _
43. Genesis figure who traded his
birthright
45. Ja, oui, si...
48. Lumberjack's cry
50. Emergency room subdivision
52. Beauty's admirer
53. Elderly
54. Poet and autobiographer Angelou
55. Winter, spring, summer and fall are
all a part of it
56. Witnessed
58. Day-glo
59. Paris and Helen's unsuccessfu
hideaway
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