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The Ubyssey Nov 7, 1969

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Array On page 3, two South Vietnam National Liberation front spokesmen give their side of the war, and a campus group plans a
Week of the Martyrs to tell us about some heroes that aren't
in the history books.
That Sir George Williams computer is in the news again as the
7-VF UBYSSEY
Vol. LI, No. 17
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 1969
48     228-2305
DR. BENJAMIN SPOCK ... 'Nixon's deceiving people'
-dirk visser photo
'Militant blacks see U.S. police state
The U.S. is a police state as far as militant
blacks are concerned, Dr. Benjamin Spock said
Wednesday.
The only reason it isn't a police state as far as
the middle-class white majority is concerned is that
their views happen to coincide with the ruling class,
the world famous baby doctor said at an airport
press conference.
"My indictment for aiding American
draft-resistors was made under a police state law,"
he said.
He said the trial cost him $80,000 in legal fees.
Commenting on U.S. president Richard Nixon's
Vietnam policy speech Monday, he said: "The
token withdrawals are meant to pull the wool over
the eyes of the people."
(At the present rate of 60,000 American troops
being withdrawn every year, it will be ten years
before all troops leave.)
"Nixon will discover he has dug himself in
deeper," Spock said.
'The war has turned more and more people
against him; it ousted Lyndon Johnson and it will
do the same to Nixon," Spock said.
He said there is a credibility gap between what
Nixon said in his speech and what is actually
happening.
"It will produce the increasing radicalization of
young people," Spock said.
Spock, originally a Republican, said he had
been forced into radical politics by the course of
events.
He said he first realized the nature of U.S.
politics when he joined SANE, a mild anti-war
group, and was shocked by the amount of
repression he encountered.
He said he had lost all faith in the two
established political parties in the U.S. and called
for new political party to the left of the Democratic
party.
"I feel we must have an anti - imperialist
political movement in the U.S.," he said.
Spock was in Vancouver as part of a speaking
tour in opposition to the Vietnam war.
Round 2 of
moratorium
under way
By BRIAN McWATTERS
Plans are underway for a Vietnam moratorium at UBC
next Friday.
The UBC Vietnam moratorium committee says the
program created to educate people about the U.S.-Vietnam war
is assuming gigantic proportions.
"We first got this committee together to show that
Canada and we as Canadians are interested in the war," said
committee member Dave Hill, arts 2.
Discussions will take place in common rooms throughout
campus on the morning of the 14th.
Students and faculty willing to head discussion groups
have already volunteered to speak in Buchanan lounge, the
Education lounge, the Angus lounge, the science common room,
the Grad Centre, the Arts 1 building and possibly the Fine Arts
building foyer.
A teach-in is planned for the SUB auditorium from noon
to 4:30 p.m. to highlight common room discussions throughout
the campus.
Speakers from the political science, plant science and
zoology departments have already announced their willingness
to discuss topics relevant to the war.
Canadian attitude, ecological effects, CBW
At noon, political science prof. K. J. Holsti will speak on
"the Canadian attitude to the U.S.-Vietnam war" and "the
impact of defense expenditures on North American economy."
At 1:30 Soil Science prof. Jan Devries will discuss
"Ecological Effects of the U.S.-Vietnam War".
At 2:30 Zoology prof. H. J. Kasinski will talk about
"Chemical and Biological Warfare."
Negotiations with other speakers to fill the bill are in
process.
Information booths in the SUB foyer will be manned by
various anti-war groups.
Representatives of the Campus Left Action Movement,
Quakers, Women's Caucus, Young Socialists, Vancouver Student
Movement, and the Canadian Medical Aid for Vietnam Civilians
will be present.
The groups will have literature and pamphlets to explain
their policies to the students.
Pierre to get telegrams
There will also be mimeographed copies of a telegram for
students to sign protesting the continuation of the war and
urging immediate troop withdrawals. The signatures compiled
from each of the copies (which will be located at all information
centers) will be transposed onto one telegram to be sent to U.S.
president Nixon and Canadian prime minister Pierre Trudeau.
The Voice of Women will sponsor a candlelight procession
Nov. 14 at 8:00 p.m., beginning at the courthouse fountain and
proceeding to Christ Church Cathedral for a public meeting.
M.P. Grace Maclnnis (NDP-Vancouver Kingsway) will be
one of the speakers.
The moratorium is only the prelude to the international
Vietnam protest march Nov. 15.
The main march will assemble at 11:15 a.m. at Thornton
Park in front of the CNR station and proceed to the courthouse
for a rally at 1:00 p.m.
Silent march honors war dead
A silent mourning march will also be held, the procession
to honour the war dead will assemble at the south end of the
Granville Street bridge at 11:15 a.m. and proceeding to the
courthouse.
Even the Alma Mater Society has taken an active role in
supporting the Vietnam moratorium.
At the Oct. 7 council meeting, the AMS approved a grant
of up to $150 for publicity of the two-day demonstration.
On Nov. 3 they agreed to have a speaker for the UBC
moratorium Nov. 14 and have approached the Nov. 15 Action
Committee sponsors of the rally for a place on the speakers
rostrum at th,e courthouse.
(As yet a speaker has not been decided on to represent the
AMS but anyone on campus who would like to talk over the
policy to be written into the speech should see AMS president
Fraser Hodge or external affairs officer Mike Doyle.)
"This march will be the biggest we've had in Vancouver so
far," said Brian Campbell, a member of the NOV AC executive.
"There are 3,000 posters downtown just ready to. go," he
said. Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, November 7, 1969
'University students learn
to be little pigs' - SDSer
By LESLEY MINOT
University intimidates,
manipulates, oppresses and
lies to students, a leader of
the Revolutionary Youth
Movement charged today.
Mike Klonsky, former
secretary of the Students for
a Democratic Society talked
to an assembly of 70 students
in the SUB ballroom on the
various aspects of "the
Revolution."
"University is the brain
centre of world imperialism,"
said Klonsky. "At university
students learn to be little
pigs—they learn to do the shit
work for the big pigs in
society."
Klonsky urged students to
get involved in the struggle
against oppression. He
expressed amazement at the
apathy he had seen in
Vancouver so far.
However, he warned
against "student chauvinism",
stressing that "students
should not unite as students,1
they must integrate
themselves in the struggle of
the most oppressed people,"
he said.
In reference to the student
strikes, at various campuses,
Klonsky said: "If the school
won't allow the working
people   in   then   the   school
STUDENT rests his feet on Betsy
Ross rug as Klonsky speaks.
must be shut down.
"The bourgeois press says
the student movement is
dead, but the opposite is true,
the student movement has
never been bigger or more
militant."
Klonsky also talked on the
basic struggles occurring in
society today and stressed
that     they     are     all
manifestations of the
imperialist capitalist system
which he describes as being
"based on the exploitation of
masses of people."
"Part of the mentality that
we've got to fight is the idea
that imperialism is too big to
fight," he said.
Klonsy talked briefly
about the splits that have
occurred in the SDS.
"The principal aspect of
the splits in the SDS was
unity," he said, but he added
that the splits had more
clearly defined the purpose of
the organization.
Klonsky also outlined
recent events in the SDS such
as the organized walk-out at
International Harvester in
protest of the U.S.-Vietnam
war, the anti-war action at-
Cook County Hospital, in
Chicago and the Young Lords
organized march to end the
war and to free Puerto Rico.
"The principal issue now is
the war in Vietnam," said
Klonsky. "This war not only
oppresses the Vietnamese,
but is also against the
interests of the people in the
U.S.
"The Vietnamese have to
come first."
'SOVIET ECONOMY & PEACE'
52nd ANNIVERSARY COMMEMORATION
SUN., NOV. 9, 8 p.m. — Vancouver Technical School
Auditorium  —  Broadway  near  Nanaimo
FEATURED SPEAKER
VICTOR PERLO
Renowned   U.S.   Economist,  Writer  and  Authority  on  the  U.S.S.R.
and Federation of Russian Canadians
MASS CHOIR
ADMISSION    FREE    —   Auspices   "Canada-U.S.S.R.    Society",   Vancouver
Law faculty members distrust
student parity demands
Many law faculty members
distrust the demands of their
students for parity on decision
making bodies, law student
association president Carey Linde
said Thursday.
Many younger faculty
members agree with the students
demands however, Linde added.
LSA academic committee
chairman Bruce Preston said he
fully expects to gain full parity
for law students.
"There is nothing but token
representation now," he said.
Linde said the curriculum and
examinations committees would
definitely be improved if there
was full student representation on
them.
Grapes no gripe
California grapes will continue
to be served at the Faculty Club.
In a mail ballot, club members
voted 277 to 265 to allow the:
management to continue
purchasing the grapes. Total
membership is 2,011.
At a  general  meeting earlier;
this year, members voted 31 to 21
to join the boycott in support of
striking California farm workers.
A motion was passed Oct. 23
by a general meeting of the law
students association calling for
immediate student parity on the
lww school curriculum and1
examination committees as well as
parity at full faculty meetings.
As a result of the motion a
committee    consisting    of   four
students and four faculty
members was formed.
The committee is expected to
give a report on November 30
outlining the reasons why
students should be represented.
Law dean George Curtis has
refused comment on the students'
demands.
BETTER BUY BOOKS
UNIVERSITY TEXT BOOKS
BOUGHT AND SOLD
NON-FICTION PAPERBACKS
Specializing in Review Notes
and Study Guides
4393 W. 10th Ave.
224-4144
3261 W. Broadway   736-7781.
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
PLAYHOUSE THEATRE COMPANY
r»
Presents GEORGE KELLY'S
classical American comedy
THE SHOW-OFF
NOVEMBER 5 - 28
8:30 p.m. — Q.E. Playhouse
STUDENT NIGHT - NOVEMBER 11th
Includes  Free Coffee,  Discussions  with  David  Gardner,
P.T.C. Artistic Director and Cast
PLAYHOUSE 2 - CHARLES DYER'S STAIRCASE
Arts Club Theatre — 1181 Seymour St.
Held over to November 15th
Students '/2-price — Monday to Thursday
VANCOUVER TICKET CENTRE - 683-3255
Phone Mike Lewis, 922-8916, for Season Tickets
J
PARADE OF ROSES
$262.00
inclusive price for
16 day bus tour, Hotel/Motel
Accommodation, Sightseeing,
Disneyland tickets
and a Grandstand Seat
at the. Rose  Bowl  Parade
in Pasadena
Visit  Reno,  Salt Lake  City,
.San Diego etc., etc. en route.
SPECIAL CHRISTMAS DEPARTURE
December 20th — return January 4th
For Brochure and Reservations
call
On UBC Campus - 224-4391
5700 University Blvd.
(UNIVERSITY LOCATION)
Behind Bank of Commerce In The Village
Open 7 Days a Week for Campus Convenience
9 a.m. to 11:00 p.m.
SPECIALS
Christies Cookies 1 lbs. Reg. 61c	
NEW KRAFT DINNERS:
Italian Macaroni, Italian Spaghetti
Mexican Macaroni, Reg. 31c 	
49*
25*
European White Sliced Bread (15 oz.)	
Dads Assorted Cookies 1  Ib. Reg. 59c	
Blue Ribbon Coffee 1 Ib. Reg. 89c	
Sunlight 24 oz. Liquid Detergent
Reg. 69c	
-5/$ 1.00
49*
  75*
59*
Bananas
  2 lbs. for 29*
Mcintosh  apples   2 lbs. for 29*
Pomegranates Reg. 19c  2/29*
ft
ft
ft
Note:  7 pair of Donna Lynn nylons tree with
every purchase ot $5.00 or more Friday, November 7, 1969
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
'Most of South Vietnam controlled by NLF-envoy
By ROBIN BURGESS
Dicky Nixon and Huynh Van
Ba, charge d'affaires in Havana for
the provisional revolutionary
government of South Vietnam,
are in complete agreement.
Dick said it after the Vietnam
Moratorium Day last month, and
Ba confirmed it to 600 students in
the SUB auditorium Tuesday.
The growing dissent against the
Vietnam war among the American
and Canadian people is indeed
providing support to the North
Vietnamese cause, the National
Liberation Front spokesman said.
As a representative of that
cause Ba offered his "sincere
thanks" to dissenters in the
audience.
"Dear friends, by your
demonstrations the Canadian
students show their support
towards our struggle in Vietnam.
"Long live the solidarity
between the South Vietnamese,
American and Canadian people!"
Ba told his audience the U.S.
has climbed to the highest rung of
the escalation ladder in waging
war against his small country.
HUYNH VAN BA
NLF speakers ...
"Five-ton and seven-ton bombs
are being used for the first time in
the history of warfare," he said.
"Our people have no choice
but to tight back for our freedom,
united behind the glorious banner
of the National Liberation Front.
"The U.S. can only lose when
faced with the invincible will of
the united people of Vietnam."
He said "liberated areas", parts
of South Vietnam under the
jurisdiction of the provisional
revolutionary government,
constitute four-fifths of the
country.
"Even in the midst of war the
liberated areas of South Vietnam
are developing their economy,
culture and education," he said.
By announcing the withdrawal
of a token number of troops,
Nixon is attempting to trick
demonstrators, he added.
Ba outlined the 10-point
program for peace put forward by
his government.
The program emphasizes that
the South Vietnamese people
must be allowed to choose their
own political regime through free
democratic elections and that
unification between north and
south Vietnam be achieved
through discussion between the
two zones without foreign
interference.
Following Ba's speech, his
colleague, Le Psuong of the North
Vietnamese    embassy    in
LE PSUONG
... thank dissenters
Stockholm, answered questions
from the audience. Both
Vietnamese representatives then
came down from the platform to
talk informally with students.
When asked to defend Ba's
statement that four-fifths of
South   Vietnam   is   under   the
—bruce stout photo
FOLK SOC HOLDS a concert in SUB art gallery for the 7-Up and Coke signs, while several non-commercial artifacts dig the vibrations.
Class warfare martyrs commemorated
Ever   hear    of   Joe    Hill? ... Ginger
Goodwin? . .. Wesley Everest?
The deaths of these men and all who
have    died    in    class    warfare    will    be
commemorated from November 12 to 15 in
a week of the martyrs sponsored by the
Industrial Workers of the World.
The IWW will present radical speakers
and films during the week.
Louis Feldhammer of the Simon Fraser
University political science, sociology and
anthropology department will speak on what
went wrong with the PSA strike in the SUB
ballroom Nov. 12 at noon.
Strike and credits lost
BURNABY (CUP) - The strike at
Simon Fraser University is over, but the
tribulations of faculty and students in the
department of Political Science, Sociology
and Anthropology may have just begun.
v Approxmately 150 PSA strikers voted
Tuesday to end their confrontation with the
>FU administration, 41 days after
idministration president Kenneth Strand
?orced the conflict over restoration of
tutonomy to the only university department
in Canada which had instituted complete
student parity.
After the vote to end the strike, the
eight faculty offered to help students catch
up in their work-provided it did not violate
suspension regulations imposed on them two
weeks after the strike began Sept. 24.
But SFU arts dean Dale Sullivan
reminded the strikers Wednesday of an
academic senate decision made Oct. 9,
cancelling all but one PSA class taught by
suspended faculty.
Radical workers Jack Scott and Alec
Ferguson will speak on the history of class
warfare in British Columbia in the old
auditorium Nov. 13 at noon.
Fourth year arts student Joseph Apathy
will be tried for complicity in crimes against
the Vietnamese in the old auditorium Nov.
14 at noon.
Radical films will be shown every day
during the week from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30
p.m. and from 1:30 to 2:30 p.m.
They include films on the Richmond,
California oil strike, the strike at San
Francisco State University, the Black
Panthers, Latin American revolutionaries,
and the California grape strike.
The films will be shown in SUB
auditorium Thursday and in the old
auditorium Friday.
Further information is available at the
IWW-Black Cross food co-op at the south
entrance to the SUB cafeteria.
control of the provisional
revolutionary government, Psuong
explained: "The Vietnamese
people are very poor, but the U.S.
is very rich and their propaganda
machine is very strong. When we
say we have liberated four-fifths
of South Vietnam our people
know it is true."
With obvious relish Psuong
described details of NLF tactics in
their struggle to sabotage the
ponderous American war
machine.
"Every day, girls and shoeshine
boys, go in and out of the
American bases. We organize them
to obtain information," Psuong
said.
He said other NLF fighters
dressed in South Vietnam
uniforms infiltrate the air bases
and plant small mines on planes
and other pieces of military
hardware.
"We can put on the uniform of
the soldiers of the puppet regime.
It is easy for us," he grinned.
"The Americans don't
k n o w — Vi e t n a m e se are
Vietnamese."
PLEA IGNORED
Canadian
graduates
need jobs
OTTAWA (CUP) - Canadian
university administrators
Wednesday waffled in the face of
a plea to give more assistance to
Canadian graduate and
post-graduate students seeking
employment in their own
country, and finally wriggled out
of discussion by suggesting that a
study be done of the problem.
The administrators, meeting in
an Association of Universities and
Colleges of Canada conference
commission on university
employment practices and job
opportunitues for graduate
students, gave little sympathy to
requests made in a 43-page brief
recommending immediate action
by the AUCC to help relieve a job
squeeze on aspiring Canadian
academics.
Prepared by Art Smolensky,
UBC graduate students'
association president the brief said
5,039 advanced degrees were
granted by Canadian universities
in 1967-but only 362 out of
2,611 academics hired by
Canadian universities the next
year were Canadian.
Smolensky recommended that
th.e Canadian government
discontinue a current two-year
waiver of taxes now granted to
foreign academics teaching at
Canadian universities, and that the
AUCC "Act so as to assure
maximum utilization and an
adequate supply of graduates."
But administrators thought
differently.
PhD students should become
less specialized if they want jobs,
said R. J. Rossiter, dean of
graduate studies at the University
of Western Ontario-PhD students
should become more specializaed
instead, said Robert Bell, dean of
graduate studies at McGill
University.
The commission's
r&commendations went before an
AUCC plenary Thursday, the final
day   of  the   conference. Page 4
THIWSSIY
KubliUfied Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial
opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian University Press.
The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services of Pacific Student
Press, of which it is a founding member. Ubyssey News Service
supports pne foreign correspondent in Pango-Pango. The Ubyssey
publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City
editor, 228-2305; editor, 228-2301; Page Friday, 228-2309;
sports 228-2308; advertising, 228-3977.
NOVEMBER 7, 1969
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, November 7, 1969
Bang, bang
When a human being is struck by one round fired
from an American M-16 rifle, he is left with a .22 calibre
sized hole at the point of entry and a crater the size of a
melon where the bullet exits.
If he is struck in the ankle, the force of impact is
so great that his entire skeletal frame is shattered.
If he is struck in the torso, his vital organs are
turned to jelly. A shot in the head obliterates everything
from the shoulders up.
Everyday, Vietnamese are being shot by Americans
with M-16 rifles and suffer at the hands of even more
terrible weapons.
As has been said before, war is no game.
But somehow, there are still those who fail to
comprehend this reality. There are still those who treat
war-which means extreme suffering, pain and death-as
they treat a game of chess.
And now they have organized themselves and hold
meetings on this campus. They are colled the
Wargamers, they are students and they play death games
with toy soldiers.
They stand around a table in a room in SUB and
manipulate tiny human replicas, eliminating them with
artillery or small arms fire or whatever happens to turn
up on the dice.
They sit there, absorbed in their labors, taking
their game very seriously.
We wonder how many of them will take the Nov.
15 Moratorium seriously. We wonder how many of
them will march, attend the teach-ins or ask questions.
Not very many, we're afraid. Like, compared to
the fun of war,   peace is really such a drag.
Confusion
It seems there has been some misunderstanding
regarding Tuesday's editorial which we will herewith
attempt to clear up.
In our quasi-rebuttal to Pat Moan's article in praise
of fraternities, we did not mean to imply any kind of
slur regarding the women who act as cooks for the
various fraternity houses on campus.
What we wished to say is that it is unfortunate that
fraternity members can sink to such depths as to
"gang-bang" their cooks, or anybody else.
In using that phrase, we assumed it would be taken
in its usual sense of gang-rape, and did not wish to
suggest that cooks in fraternity houses engage in any
kind of disreputable activity.
On the contrary, our experience with cooks in
fraternity houses, though limited, has always shown
' them to be very fine, hard-working and very tolerant
women. We praise them for their ability to work in what
sometimes become difficult surroundings, that of
cooking for 25 or 30 young men.
We apologize to the cooks at UBC's fraternity
houses for any embarrassement the editorial may have
caused them.
'^•f The.  Ulytsey
Reluctant to pull out.
LETTERS TO THE  EDITOR
Black out
Editor: Michael Finlay
News Paul Knox
City Nate Smith
Managing    Moshe Curtis'
Photo    Bruce Stout
Wire   Irene Wasilewski
Sports Jim Maddin
Senior John Twigg
Ass't News    Maurice Bridge
i Friday  Fred Cawsey
Norbert Ruebsaat
These worked, in varying degrees:
Robin Burgess, Dave Keillor, Murray
Kennedy, John Andersen, Lesley
Minot, Ginny Gait, Robert Bennett,
John Lingley, Shane McCune, Jim
Davies, Sandy Kass, Fran McGrath,
Colleen Hammond, Jan O'Brien, Brian
McWatters, Steve Lucas, Phil
Barkworth, Bernard Bischoff and Ber
Gelfond.
Dave Enns, Dirk visser and rank
amateur Bridge manned the darkroom.
Maddin forgot to turn in the names
of the sports staff.
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Is it not possible for something
to be done regarding the electrical
situation out in B and D parking
lots? Personally, I loathe walking
out to my car at night. It is so
damn poorly lit that there is no
way that you can avoid hitting or
falling into sidewalk curbs, the
puddles, potholes and mud-traps,
not to mention the real fear of
"walking-in-the-dark-alone-
at-night." By the time you get to
the lot, you are not sure which car
belongs to you-they all appear to
be shapeless blobs in the dark.
Twice I have put my key into the
wrong lock. Couldn't someone
please wire up a few night lights in
the far-out lots for the benefit of
the midnight trippers?
CATHY TERMUENDE
home ec 3
Marches
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Many fascinating things
happened at Monday night's
student council meeting, the firing
of Dermot Boyd being the star
attraction. But buried somewhere
beneath the railroading,
back-biting and general
politicking was a motion asking
AMS to support and organize
either a UBC march or a UBC
contingent to one of the existing
marches, on Nov. 15, the Vietnam
Moratorium Day for this month.
The motion was defeated.
The November Moratorium
covers a two-day period, Nov. 14
and 15, and in Vancouver two
marches, one silent and mournful,
the other open and vocal, have
been organized by the Vancouver
November 15 Vietnam Action
Committee. The silent march
leaves from the south end of the
Granville Street Bridge at 11:15
a.m. Nov. 15 and the other march
leaves from the CN station at the
same time. The marches will come
together at the courthouse for a
rally.
On Nov. 14 at teach-in has
been planned at UBC. Discussions
will go on in the common rooms
and lounges in the morning and,
starting at 12:30, a series of
presentations and discussions will
take place in the SUB auditorium.
Council's action Monday night
seems to stamp out any chance of
official UBC representation at
either march on Nov. 15. At the
council meeting a week before last
Monday's, however, council
passed a motion "supporting the
Vancouver November 15 Vietnam
Action Committee and the
'Cleveland Call' for a Nov. 15
International Day of Protest."
Council also asked "each
representative to gain the support
of his or her constituency and
formal organization for the
activities already mentioned on
Nov. Hand 15."
What the hell is going on? Has
council, still shivering from the
Great Trek Flop, sworn off
demonstrations altogether? Or
does council want to be named as
a sponsoring organization for the
downtown marches without
trying to turn out its membership,
the students? Qr perhaps council
didn't know what it was voting
on. Any way you look at it,
council has again revealed, with
no little skill, its singular ability to
govern (?) with wisdom, clarity
and a firm grasp on reality.
DAVE HILL
arts 2
TOM PERRY
science 2
RITA CHUD
arts 1
JENNIFER KLINE
arts 1
Humanity
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
In regard to the article in the
last issue of The Ubyssey about
the Animal Holding Unit, I am
appealing to you who really dig
animals to question what anti-life
things are happening on your own
campus.
It doesn't seem quite clear as
to what the AHU is all about. We
know, however, that they (you,
UBC) use cats and dogs for
experimental purposes. Dr.
Bankier says these animals would
die anyways, (as will we all) but
there were many healthy looking
animals there, and young ones,
and I think it should be made
public where they come from.
(Dr. Bankier told me on the
phone "we get all our animals
from the United States and Fraser
Valley"); from whom and for
what price? Proof also, Dr.
Bankier, of all these things.
Two years ago in Toronto one
laboratory was fined for buying
animals that had been catnapped
and dognapped in the city and
using them in an inhumane way
for experiments. It was suggested
at the time that many such labs
were in existence. Are the animals
at the AHU being anesthetized
before being experimented upon,
or must they suffer in a way
which they could not know wijj
end.
Could the AHU not use the
abudance of rats in the city for
their experiments, and therefore
allow these cats and dogs, if they
"are going to die anyway," to be
put to sleep humanely? will
apathy allow the senseless
slaughter of animals who trust us
to continue as long as it dragged
out the issue of baby seals
ELAINE P. IRELAND
White fear
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I would like to comment on
Jacques Khouri's Forum, which
appeared in October 31's
Ubyssey. Near the end of the
article, Khouri states:
"Who knows, if the black man
were given a chance, the white
race might end up as the black
man's burden at some point in the
future."
Perhaps this is exactly whal
most white recists are afraid of.
ROBERT HUNTER
science 3
Bloop, bloob
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I am appalled to see that the
performing arts committee lost
$3,800 of the students' money on
the Sandpiper Bloob. I salute
them for their gross misuse and
superb lack of foresight and hope
that this will lead to an inquiry
into the makeup of such a
committee and others on campus
which use our money for events.
Perhaps the treasurer should have
tighter controls on where these
committees spend their money.
Here's to the Bloop of the year.
KEN JOHNSON
science 4
Another
letter
on page 15 Friday, November 7, 1969
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
Campus
politics
taught
By MURRAY KENNEDY
Ubyssey Academic Reporter
Sheep dip courses getting you down?
If so, the place for you is the experimental college, which is
organized by the university's oldest activist, Karl Burau.
Interest in the idea of the experimental college arose a few years
ago when the Ford Foundation offered financial assistance for such
projects. A group of individuals, including Burau, started working to
set up the college.
However, interest and enthusiasm dropped when it was
discovered that the funds were not forthcoming
Only Burau continued to pursue the goal. He has continued to
operate the college on his own for the past five years.
He receives no financial aid from the university and his efforts
to obtain the post of teaching assistant have been repeatedly
thwarted. Burau says he has been refused a position on the faculty
because of prejudice against his German education.
"The purpose of the college is to provide a forum for
intellectual discussion," Burau said. "Usually we try to create a
situation of confrontation. This provides a greater stimulus for
discussion."
"The biggest problem in setting up the experimental college has
been the students," he said.
"The educational system of today has instilled such a set of
materialistic values in the minds of the young students that.it is
difficult to involve them in anything that does not result in visible
benefits such as credits."
The programs of the college are usually political in nature. The
politics range from the campus to federal level.
Wednesday's discussion centred around the Alma Mater Society.
The students, led by Burau, laced council for inadequacy in its
financial dealings.
The AMS was represented by assistant treasurer Stuart Bruce,
who admitted that council deserves to be criticized for its lackadasical
attitude towards the finance committee.
He said council often accepts recommendations of the finance
committee without even reading the minutes of its meetings.
He said the minutes once included a proposal to attempt to
purchase the Washington state highway patrol.
"Council accepted the minutes without question," Bruce said.
"A motion has since been made to retract this proposal since it was
made in jest and the committee did not expect it to be passed."
Burau also plans to get the Hodge brothers together for another
session on the AMS sometime in the near future.
Press exaggerates
alleged LSD deaths
By SANDY KASS
In the past three weeks Dennis Giroday and Kevin McClay have
died, allegedly from the use of drugs.
The commercial press has used the two deaths to begin an
all-out scare campaign against the use of illegal drugs. However, not
everyone is falling for it.
"The Province is picking out individual cases and blowing the
true situation way out of proportion. It's giving an emotional slant,
not an informational one," said Bob Cummings, managing editor of
the Georgia Straight.
"I feel the whole campaign is dishonest journalism, and in no
r* way can be morally justified."
Max Beck, director ofthe Vancouver Inner City Service Project,
called The Province scare stories "thoroughly disgusting."
"In fact, I'd like to see proper drug education begun, on
everything from pesticides to opium. There's really so little proper
information around," he said.
"I just hope that most people have more sense than to believe
everything they read in the newspapers."
A Cool Aid spokesman called the Province and Sun scare stories
"highly misleading."
"In fact, I feel that legalization of drugs like marijuana is
imminent in the future," he said.
"Major cigarette companies now own land down in Mexico
where the stuff could be grown, just in case."
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HYPNOTIST
MASTER SINCLAIR
"Learn Self Hypnosis"
FOR
To Improve School Marks, and Studies
Also to Stop Smoking, Dieting, Etc.
See Your Friends Hypnotized On Stage.
Don't Miss This Big Three-Hour Show.
November 11, 12, 13
SUB  AUDITORIUM
Admission: $1.50 Page 6
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, November 7, 1969
SIR GEORGE: 9 MONTHS LATER
MONTREAL (CUP)—The long wait by defendants charged in
connection with the computer burning at Sir George Williams
University last February will continue for at least another 66 days.
The names of 70 defendants appeared on the rolls before Mr.
Justice Ignace J. Deslauriers in Montreal court Monday, only to be put
over to the next term of the court of Queen's Bench which will start
January 7, 1960, and run through January and February.
The 70 defendants form the major bloc of the 89 students
arrested February 11 and charged with 363 crimes ranging from
conspiracy to commit arson to property damage.
Their history since then has been one of waits: preliminary
hearings into the incident did not begin for 76 accused until April 14;
eight others did not face preliminary hearing until March 5.
And in the interim, the majority of the defendants were refused
bail twice before it was finally granted Feb. 18; seven others were not
granted bail until March 5.
'Racism is a Canadian dish'
TORONTO (CUP) - Forty
members of York University's
black community demonstrated in
front of Toronto's federal
building Monday in solidarity
with 70 defendants in the Sir
George- Williams affair who were
brought to court in Montreal that
day.
The York students picketted
the building for an hour, carrying
placards and chanting "racism is a
Canadian dish," and Trudeau, get
off your ass."
Spokesman Horace Campbell
said Sir George students, charged
in connection with the
destruction of the university
computer  last   February   ll,  are
political prisoners, "held to a large
degree for their political beliefs,
and their refusal to acquiesce to
the subtle forms of Canadian
racism.
"This Sir George incident has
only brought out the latent racism
of   Canadian   society,"   he   said.
Campbell said the real
issue —accusations of racism
brought against SGWU biology
professor Perry Anderson—has
been buried.
Complaints of racism against
Anderson were ignored for nearly
a year before the Sir George
administration convened a
commission to examine the
charges. Black students challenged
the makeup and proceedings of the
commission, and occupied the
computer centre to demand a new
commission, approved by both
themselves and the
administration.
Police ended the two-week
occupation and provoked the
wrecking of the computer.
Cartoon was 'offensive'
MONTREAL (CUP) The issue of racism at Sir George
Williams University, buried in the uproar surrounding the notorious
computer-burning here last February, erupted again Monday—the
same day defendants in last year's affair appeared in provincial courts.
A group of Sir George students and faculty have laid libel and
racism charges against Wayne Gray, editor and publisher of "The
Paper," a joint weekly publication of the Sir George and Loyola
evening students' associations, for a cartoon published in Monday's
edition.
The charges created a furore which ended with the paper's
removal from news-stands, and the burning of the edition. The paper
was later re-issued without the cartoon.
The SGWU students' association has denounced the drawing as
"the most offensive example of racism ever published at Sir
George ... a shocking example of bad taste."
The cartoon shows a black pondering the page of a newspaper,
as his companion polishes a machine gun in a setting strewn with
"visit beautiful Biafra" posters, shrunken heads, skulls, and pennants
labelled "Mau Mau Tech" and "Nigeria U."
The caption reads: "Pack your kit bag, Alfred, they are about to
start a Black Studies Program in Sir George."
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SUNDAY, Nov. 9-2:45 p.m. — UBC Thunderbirds vs  Williams  Lake
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SATURDAY, Nov. 22 — 8 p.m. — UBC Braves vs Grandview Steelers
FRIDAY, Nov. 28-8 p.m. - UBC Braves vs SFU Clansmen
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j>*e.LseN
So I said to cohort Rubes,
er...
A contest, a contest, said
I. That's what we need to
incite apathy in our readers.
Nevertheless, he added that
we have to think of some
ploy to gain their disinterest.
On the other hand, we
thought togetherly, we
should make a contest up.
So.
Flag-burning was thrown
out because it is too political.
Baby kissing spreads grems.
Girl kissing can be fattening
(for the girl). Anything
athletic is bourgeois
adventures. Pie throwing is an
expensive extravagance.
Pornography is... good.
That's it we leched Yuk.
We'll have a pomo, that's
photo contest.
Therefore it is with great
pleasure that PF announces
itst first ever, first annual
photo contest, open to any
student who wants to get into
the picture-
Prizes. There will be prizes
for winners of the various
categories. The best prize of
course will be in the nude,
NUDE, category (that's
naked GIRLS you guys). We
realize this is bourgeois male
chauvinistic hedonism etc.,
but e'est la vie, or vive les
filles.
Now, the contest deadline
is two weeks from today and
here is a chance for all you
aspiring photogs to get some
of your work in print. A limit
of two pix per entrant is to
be set.
There will be prizes, and
you will receive credit for all
photos printed. Nudes will be
droolingly accepted.
We're serious. About the
contest.
Now, this week. Cover
artist, Bruce Dolsen is pissed
off, hence the little vignette
in the upper right corner of
this page. Inside Miss Alex
Volkoff, who is travelling
around the world on a
scholarship, gives us a bird's
eye view of Japan. Also after
a too long absence, Valerie
Hennell once again graces our
pages with her thoughts.
Those young maniacs,
Sinclair and Dickin, have
produced another humor
column for your pleasure and
Quigley is up to his usual on
the music beat.
Well, that's the message
for this week brothers and
sisters, so keep those letters
and postcards coming cuz we
loves ya. Take pictures you
creeps.
-F.C.
L.
at86X3Q6ss3«a>aaiaai**^^
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"Staged Stuff"
to come
i   to
tossc
Many dramatic events this
week.
A REMINDER (and we
enjoy keeping people
generally informed as to
what's going on) that the
Gallimaufry Theatre
Company is still playing
Michael McClure's The Beard
at the Riverqueen on Davie
Street. The Beard is a very
earthy (very good) American
play which was the subject of
much controversy concerning
censorship last summer. It
was extremely implemental in
ridding us of Herr Licence
Inspector.
Michael McClure is a Hell's
Angel.
The Gallimaufry is a
bunch of fine people trying
to do something meaningful
and very necessary about the
Vancouver Theater Situation.
The Gallimaufry is having
trouble financially. Which is
partly why they are now
restaging The Beard . This
show might make or break
them.
So go out and give them
your support. For Gawd
sakes!
FURTHERMORE: a play,
highly relevant to "our day
and age" starts Friday at the
Freddy W. It is Arthur
Miller's The Crucible, a
dramatization of witchcraft
trials in Salem, Mass. in 1692.
Witchcraft, dark rituals in
forests, drugs . . . Miller
examines the paranoia and
hysteria of a community
thrown into disorder, and the
fate of the individual, who's
activities make him a deviant,
a direct threat to the existing
norm.
Written during the dark
era of "McCarthyism" in the
U.S., The play's present
topicalness speaks for itself.
This : production stars
Lee Taylor as John Proctor.
It runs to November 15, and
tickets (students $1.00) are
available in Freddy Wood
207.
AND FINALLY: The
Playhouse Theatre's second
production of the season also
opens Friday night: George
Kelly's The Show-Off,billed
as a "classic of American life"
(from the twenties), and
featuring guest director Eric
House at the wheel. The play
runs to November 28 and
student night is on the 11th.
-N.R.
ANGELA SLATER and Wayne
Robson as Jean Harlow and
Billy the Kid in the
Gallimaufry's production of
McClure's "TheBeard".
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"' THE ROYAL HUNT OF THE SUN'
is a very entertaining movie."
-Vincent Canby, N. Y. Times
"MAGNIFICENT ACTING. Makes
for good theatre, on stage and on screen."
— Saturday Review
"SAVAGE ELEGANCE. LAVISH AND
BEAUTIFUL. ROBERT SHAW IS SUPERB. CHRISTOPHER PLUMMER
MAGISTERIAL AND PRIMITIVE."
—Newsweek
Robert Shaw Christopher Plummer
"The Royal Hunt of the Sun"
cottarTing
Nigel Davenport Michael Craig Andrew Keir William Marlowe
James Donald and Leonard Whiting
Screenplay by Philip Yordan   Based Upon the Play The Royal Hum of ihe Sun "Written by Peter ShaHer
Produced by Eugene Frenke and Philip Yordan  Directed by Irving Lemer   Technicolor"
A Cinema Center Film* Presentation   A National General Pictures Release
Starts FRIDAY
DENMAN PLACE
1737 COMOX STREET - 6S34647
A FAMOUS PLAYERS THEATRE
EVENINGS
7:00  &  9:00  p.m.
MATINEE
SAT. & SUN. 2:00 p.m.
Sinclair-Dicken Report
On the Status of the AMS
Not only is the AMS illegal, it is also
non-existent, and has been for some time.
Recent investigations by a team of experts,
(the authors of this report), have failed to
produce a single student who is capable of giving
a credible description of the Alma Mater Society.
The 17-inch footprints found in the concrete
outside the Student Union Building which were
advanced by some as evidence of the AMS, have
been refuted by an Anthropology professor as a
hoax prepetrated by the Engineering
Undergraduate Society.
Not only does he claim that the cranial
capacity attributed to the mythical animal is
certainly not large enough to sustain life, but he
adds that the creature would have to eat twice its
weight in food each day, and have special shoes
made.
What has been acclaimed as its natural
habitat—the 2nd floor of SUB—has been searched
thoroughly. Although numerous droppings have
been found in certain rooms on that floor, these
have been analyzed and attributed to a rather
large and healthy bull.
We first began to suspect the AMS was
non-existent when the supposed minutes of the
AMS were examined and found to be cleverly
worded doubletalk; "Full of sound and fury,
signifying nothing."
We interviewed thirty or more persons who
claimed to have caught a glimpse of the AMS.
Their descriptions of it were wild and disjointed.
Said one Mark Jansen, Science II: "At first I
thought it was a monster—like Godzilla—you
know, like in the movie, Godzilla Meets Tammy
Wynette. But as it came closer—it seemed to be
after my wallet—I saw it was more of an octopus.
It had about twelve hundred arms and they were
all entangled in one another. It was eating
everything it came to. I ran, scared out of my
tree!"
Another, Sylvia Vorst, Arts 1, said: "Well, it
moved like an elephant-slow and ponderous,
trumpeting. Ah-ooh-ouh! I was afraid that if it
were to get excited it might stampede, but I was
wrong. I went up and kicked it in the leg and it
didn't do a damn thing!"
Still another, Bill Drinkhorse, said: "It was
like a great machine-wheels spinning, lights
flashing, smoke spewing-I couldn't believe it! I
looked for the switch to turn it off, but
everything I did just increased its activity—wheels
spinning, lights flashing, smoke spewing!"
A hunting party gave us what they claimed
was a piece from an AMS hide. It was
exceedingly thick, and frankly, it stunk.
The leader of the hunting party said, "The
main difficulty in hunting the AMS is its ability
to camouflage itself to fit any background and
the fact that it apparently has the ability to rise
from its ashes."
Further he said: "I wouldn't want to meet
one of those babies alone on a dark night. One
near kissed me to death last week."
Although we are still collecting and
analyzing eyewitness reports of the AMS, we can
safely say now that the Alma Mater Society only
exists as a manifestation of a deep disorder of the
student subconcious.
Comediens Communicate
Special Events brings Les
Jeunes Comediens from
Montreal to UBC for a free
performance today at 12:30
in the Sub Ballroom.
Anyone who has seen
them before will rave about
this group of seven young
players—former students of
the National Theater
School—who have a unique
ability to communicate with
their audiences, be they
French or English. The
intensity of the group's
involvement with their work
and their audiences is more
than enough to overcome
language barriers.
Les Jeunes Comediens
have been on tour in
Vancouver before, presenting
drama, music and poetry
from Quebec and France to
university and high school
audiences. This year, under
new director Jean-Pierre
Ronford, the troup has a kind
of living-theater format,
involving creative stage
experimentation and dialogue
with the public. Their play,
"Le Voyage", was written
this fall by the actors
themselves and its themes are
taken from contemporary
problems of individuals, and
society.
——*----— pfi 2WO —
The 1969-70 Canadian
tour of Les Jeunes
Comediens, a production of
Montreal's Theatre du
Nouveau Monde is organized
by the National Arts Center
in Ottawa. It should be a
good experiment in theater
... Noon in the Ballroom.
Free.
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, November 7, 1969 Yes, It's Definitely All Happening!
At the latest meeting of the Committee on the Contemporary
Arts Festival last week it was conclusively agreed upon that the
festival this year should be structured in terms of a series of festive
svents, running throughout the spring term. (See article in last week's
Pf.) A committee, representing virtually all areas of interest, has been
set up, which will initiate and/or receive submissions for events,
allocate funds, and retain ultimate responsibility for the festival.
Individual events, however, will have to be arranged and managed by
the respective participants themselves.
At the meeting, Ian Wallace suggested the committee meet at
regular intervals to discuss in more detail what kind of thing they
wanted to see and would financially support. Furthermore, he
thought the committee itself should make at least some effort to
solicit events—possibly also from out of town.
Essentially, however, the festival is fairly open to a wide variety
of events—and any proposal, idea or submission is gladly desired and
will be considered. Some events (see below) are already starting to get
off the ground.
Any proposals of submissions should be made (if possible in
writing) before November 24—to any member of the committee—or at
the next committee meeting on November 27. (At 4 p.m. in Buchanan
Penthouse.)
Remember:
• present an accurate cost estimate for equipment, materials,
rentals, professional fees, etc.
• you are responsible yourself for arranging time and place of
the event or whatever.
• be prepared to help publicize your event.
• the Festival budget is limited. It's almost a first-come
first-serve situation. The selection committee, however, does not plan
to allocate more than one-third of the budget before Xmas.
Additional submissions will therefore be considered in the new year.
The number to call for any further information is 228-2462 —
henceforth to be known as The Festival Fone.
-N.R.
A4ore nutritious objects heralding an expanded artistic
repast in this year's Contemporary Arts Festival.
ARTS
FEST
TAKES
OFF
CONTEMPORARY ARTS
FESTIVAL 1969!
The ACT is ON.
The Countdown has started.
The lines are getting hot. Some
ignitions have already been made;
"F*R*E*E* P*L*A*Y" - the
Festival opener at the Fine Arts
Gallery January 7 to 24. A series
of funky sculptured space
experiences. Bob Arnold, Herb
Gilbert, Gary Lee-Nova.
"4 VANCOUVER ARTISTS"
- January 30 to February 14.
Tom Burrows, Duane Lunden,
Jeff Wall, Ian Wallace.
"THE PHYSICAL PLANT" -
a macrobiotic assemblage. Dates to
be announced.
"CAMPUS AIR SPACE" - a
line in the sky during Open
House, March 6 and 7.
"THE THEATRE OF
POLLUTION" - guerilla street
events during Open House.
"STARK" - a tunnel of
sensory experiences. Dates
forthcoming. Admission:
Nakedness.
"THE DEATH OF WINTER
AND THE RITES OF SPRING"
- a procession. March 20. Friday.
Sunrise. Sun at culmination. Sun
Set.
"POMP AND CIRCUMSTANCES" — a happening on the
last day of lectures.
"EARTH" "AIR" "FIRE"
"WATER" — a series of events
and non-events celebrating one or
more of the four elements.
'THE CITY" - a festival
occasion in downtown Van.
"MORE PROPOSALS" - are
wanted. Maybe the above plans
will give some kind of inspiration
for more ideas.
p£ 3hree
J
November 14 - December 14
The Vancouver Art Gallery 1145 West Georgia St. 684-2488
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Most car illnesses don't
heal themselves . . . they
need professional help.
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Join  Forces to   Fight  Fragmentation
— in  our  Education  System
— in our Society
COMMUNITY DAY
NOVEMBER 17
EDUCATION BLDG.
8:30 - 4:30
Friday, November 7, 1969
THE      UBYSSEY U.B.C.
Home Service
Larry  Brownlee,  Prop.
COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE ON THE CAMPUS
Let Us
Reverse Flush
Your
Cooling System
224-3939
2180 ALLISON
Should I skip
Phys. Ed.
this week?
Girls who rely on externally
worn sanitary protection frequently use their monthly
period as an excuse to cut gym
classes. They find it uncomfortable to be active while
wearing a bulky belt-pin-pad
contraption.
For these girls there's an
easy answer: Tampax tampons.
Because they're worn internally, you can't even feel them
when they're properly
in place. There's no
possibility of chafing.
Odor can't form. And
after strenuous exercise you can tub or shower-
even swim —and be your own
cool, clean, fresh self again.
If your school has compulsory Phys. Ed., it pays to be
compulsive about Tampax tampons. They're available in 3
absorbency-sizes — Regular,
Super and Junior— wherever
such products are sold. Easy
to get, easy to use, easy to
dispose of.
° DI7711
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Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
TYPEWRITERS
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_  LOW  STUDENT  RATES  —
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2 blocks East of UBC Gates
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TUXEDO RENTALS
10%  UBC  Discount
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TAMPAX  TAMPONS ARE   MADE ONLY   BY
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USED
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'69 Triumph TR6    $2895
Only   14,000   miles
'68 Sunbeam Alpine
Good   condition $1895
'67 Volvo 144       $2295
4-speed, one  owner  and
21,000  miles
'66 Triumph Vitesse
6  cyl.   high  performance     *t*|*9*QC
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mechanically   excellent
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CLARKE
SIMPKINS
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7th Ave. and Burrard
736-4282
JAPAN
dispar
This being a come-on for a summer exchange program to the jewel ot the Pacific
free you japan
you the all t me temple
a come ercial
The pagoda is aged and earthworn, but it is
also diminutive, fragile, and feminine. Appearing
in such a quiet, wooded place it commands one's
attention as you draw near and begin circling
around it, but not for long, for as you get to the
other side you are suddenly aware of something
else in the background, as if a giant had just
materialized to protect this delicate thing. It is
the cliff, and Kiyomizu.
Next summer you can go to Japan for two
months as an exchange student at one of three
universities. Last summer I went and
To what shall I compare
This world?
To the white wake behind
A ship that has rowed away
A t Dawn!
One day I came to Kiyomizu at dusk. The
crowds were gone, and the temple was empty, as
it is only near the end of the day. The sun had
been down for some, and behind Kyoto a dull
red sky was flickering out and taking with it all
detail in the shadowy city below; Soom Kyoto
and a little later Kiyomizu, would be shrouded in
darkness. But at this moment Kiyomizu was
silhouetted sharply in the afterglow, waiting
patiently for the city to take the first taste of
nite.
I walked up to the Hon-do to look from the
dancing paltform. I stepped out into the false
light of the white sky from among the heavy,
close-standing pillars and looked out over a black
and white world. A sound attracted my gaze to
the sacred waterfall below, and I looked down
through the cool evening air.
There was a man standing in the waterfall.
The water fell on the back ofhis neck. He wore,
for all I could see, a shapeless white garment
which could have been the cotton
kimono of a pilgrim. The cold water poured
steadily on the back of his neck and with head
bowed he danced about under it-not moving
away, just slowly dancing where be stood, right
in the center of the fall.
There was no one else about. I stood on the
dancing platform looking down, and the dancing
pilgrim moved yet stood still in the cold falling
water below me. He made strange howling noises
and they floated up into the empty, cool night
air. They were not loud noises, but they spread
easily through the emptiness surrounding us
both.
You-meeting Nov. 10 BU 221.
Application Forms Available.
,jf
•V
pf 4our
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, November 7, 1969 e views
JAPAN
This being an objective first hand view of the oriental industrial conglomerate.
By ALEX VOLKOFF
Ah soooo.
There was a young girl in Japan
Who went to a restaurant can
But when she arrived there
It really surprised her
To be doing it next to a man.
And that's when her troubles began
Yes, that's when her troubles began.
For then she decided to eat
Thought Japanese food can't be beat
But she wasn 't inticed
By raw fish and rice
When what she desired was meat.
But still my sad tale's incomplete
Yes, still my sad tale's incomplete.
For then this young miss went to bed
Her pillow was harder than lead
And, what is more
She slept on the floor
And that isn 't how she 'd been bred.
CUM
was busted again at a Miami concert last night
But they'll be back.
Watch Page Friday for details
of their upcoming Vancouver appearance.
•l    TAPES   RECORDS   ^
\ Open Nights 'til 10 %
INCLUDING SUNDAYS '
¥ ON GRANVILLE 3
fe. NEXT  TO
x     L     ORPHEUM THEATRE
685-0405 3
Japan in a nutshell, almost. Especially the
title. Japanese people really say that, all the time.
And remember when they tried to integrate the
washrooms in SUB? Japan's been doing it for
years. In fact, only recently have they started
separating sexes in the public baths.
Japan's great really. After about a week you
can start telling the Orientals apart. And some
people even learn to enjoy having fish for
breakfast, lunch and dinner.
It's the subway that takes a little longer
getting used to. Oh, it's fine for getting
somewhere—far better than B.C. Hydro buses.
But I'm surprised at the low death rate by
suffocation suffered by commuters. There is a
little man in uniform at each station to push you
into the already overflowing cars. Once you're in,
you're totally pinned between people. When the
train stops and starts, you just fall with the
crowd and try to disregard the screams of those
flattened against the wall.
Everything in Japan is built for someone less
than five feet tall. But you get used to it. The
first week you have a permanent welt across the
middle of your forehead. By the second week,
that's beginning to heal, but there's a large bump
on the top of your head. In about a month, you
remember to duck enough, but you're becoming
-* a permanent hunchback.
One of the most telling things in a Japanese
household is the kami shelf. This is where the
family puts those things it values most as well as
memories of their ancestors and of the past.
The first evening when I arrived in Tokyo, I
presented the family I was staying with a bottle
of scotch from the airport. 'Mien I woke up the
next morning, guess what was on the kami
shelf—the empty bottle.
The Japanese are even more scared of the
word Communism than the Americans are.
Yesterday the group of students I'm travelling
with was invited to visit the Communist
headquarters. We didn't know it, but once we
left the building, each one of us was closely
followed.
By evening, half the group was arrested for
not carrying their passports and questioned for
an hour. One of the favorite questions was "How
much land do you own?" I guess they figured if
we were bourgeois enough to own land, we
couldn't possibly be Communists. When they
discovered they had carelessly arrested two with
their passports, the best they could do was
accuse one of having kidnapped the other. Three
cheers for the five-foot Japanese police.
P.S. Did you know Tokyo has five times as
much smog as Los Angeles. It's a fact.
p£ sivei
'I'm sick of all that Electric Music . . . get me
a ticket to
Carlos Montoya
ii
The world's foremost flamenco guitar player will make
his only Vancouver appearance this year at U.B.C. on
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 18
— 8 p.m. —
SUB BALLROOM
General admission: $3.00
Students: Half price, $1.50
TICKETS AT AMS OFFICE and the VANCOUVER
TICKET CENTRE
MONTOYA MONTQYA MONTOYA
Friday, November 7, 1969
THE      UBYSSEY DUTHIE BOOKS
UNIVERSITY BRANCH
4560 W. 10th Ave. - 224-7012
OTHER STORES
919 ROBSON 684-4496
PAPERBACK CELLAR 861-8713
670 SEYMOUR 685-3627
1032 W. HASTINGS 688-7434
GRADUATION
Special rates on Grad Portraits now in
effect at Campbell Studio's where
we've been taking Grad Portraits for
the past 20 years.
Campbell Studios — traditionally up-
to-date with all the skills and techniques of modern photography.
Send someone your Grad Portrait for
Christmas.
For an appointment call 736-0261.
THE BEST OF TIMES'
Picture Perfect from
2580 BURRARD STREET VANCOUVER 9. B.C.
Contact   $AQ.50
Lenses       ^ ^
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to Us... AND REALLY SAVE!
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Complete from $9.95 Includes Lenses, Frame & Case
SPECIAL DISCOUNT TO STUDENTS & FACULTY ON GLASSES
NOW! - 6 LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU!
Downtown
677 GRANVILLE          °PP- *he   Bay
681-6174
South   Granville
2987  GRANVILLE     At  14th
736-7347
Oakridge
5618 CAMBIE          at 41st
327.9451
North   Van.
1825  LONSDALE
9874264
675 COLUMBIA ST.
Opp.  Army  &  Navy,   New West.
521-0751
763 FORT ST.
VICTORIA,    B.C.
286-7578
Musical Crap
By MICHAEL QUIGLEY
If anyone from The Province showed up at
the Little Richard concert two weeks ago
demanding eight tickets for himself and his
friends, then it wasn't anyone officially from that
paper.
The Province pop critic apparently showed up
with two other people, one of them was a
photographer, and all were refused admission by
the promoters even after producing a letter of
invitation. The promoter then changed the number
of people from three to eight and related the story
of the incident at the press party held after the
concert.
Whatever the rationale behind this move, it
says little for the promoters of the concert, Candi
Promotions, who were responsible for the abortive
Vancouver-Squamish Pop Festival last August. It
was rumoured this earlier effort would destroy
Vancouver's reputation in the pop scene.
Fortunately, this appears now to be unjustified.
It seems peucliar—in light of the "nice"
treatment other press people receive and the fact
that Candi seemed to be trying to make amends
for their earlier faults—that they wouldn't look to
The Province for just as much support as from the
Georgia Straight or The Peak.
Local singer Tom ("1941", "The
Rainmaker") Northcott is making a reappearance
on the local scene next Tuesday night, when he
appears with the Vancouver Symphony. He'll be
performing his own composition".. . God Created
Woman"   which  has  been  orchestrated by   Bob
Buckley, musical wunderking of Spring. As well,
there is a chance that Northcott will do a few solo
selections.
This concert was originally supposed to be
part of conductor Meredith Davies' avant-garde
Sounds of the Century concert series, but due to
complications, such as rumoured pressure from the
Symphony Board of Directors, contemporary
music has all but been eliminated from this year's
symphony concerts.
Nevertheless, the concert appears like it could
be a good one. Also on the program are
Beethoven's Leonora Overture Number 3 and
Dvorak's New World Symphony plus works by
Vaughan Williams and Faure. As well, ticket prices
are abysmally cheap—$1, $2, and $3.
*  *  *
Gordon Lightfoot's latest album, Sunday
Concert (United Artists UAS 6714), is a rather
antiseptic production. It says on the cover it was
recorded live last March in Toronto's Massey Hall.
You'd hardly believe it.
There's applause after each song and also the
usual amount of clapping after the introduction or
the first line of each piece. ("Gee, Martha, they're
playing our tune!") But there's no patter on the
album aside from a bit at the beginning of
Canadian Railroad Trilogy, which makes little
sense thanks to an editor's scissors.
As well, the sound of the album is a bit hazy,
quite unlike other live-performance recordings.
The result is, both in presentation and
production,    a    record    which    doesn't    really
QM DOES IT AGAIN
represent Lightfoot in any way. Lightfoot live may
be a nice legitimate experience, but even this
album doesn't come up to that.
HOT POOP: Concerts West is bringing in
Canned Heat and The Moody Blues this Sunday at
the Coliseum. (Advance comment from a friend:
"Hey, we can sit on the floor there instead of their
crappy chairs!")... a letter from CKLG program
director (a personally Xeroxed letter, mind you)
tells about "a specail 48-hour weekend
program ... called THE HISTORY OF ROCK
AND ROLL" which happens this weekend. (In
case you haven't heard the plugs every two
minutes on LG-AM). It sounds like it might be
interesting, so tune in an' groove, kiddies. It starts
at 6 p.m. this evening and continues to 6 p.m. on
Sunday.
(P.S. A late flash just before press time revealed
that the above-mentioned History of Rock
program was pre-recorded in Los Angeles and
syndicated out to various radio stations across the
continent.)
f -
'X%i(\-il i'-:
. *<xx*x f-* x. ,    v ,**-   -    *
UxikT
fWt
L%^.i*;   ,, ^v. vi*.
# - •  i«,    "*
®F *      ***    . ^
''£.*)
11" ♦*>
m
QUIGLEY DEMONSTRATES his far-out
writing technique for the expressed benefit of
aspiring future musical journalists. See the
colorful results ofhis latest output on this page.
record record reconl record record
One of the best things about pop music
today is that anything goes. People aren't afraid
to try new ideas and new combinations of
instruments, and pop groups aren't afraid to steal
rhythms and harmony from other forms such as
jazz.
At the same time, the better ones manage to
keep some sort of discipline. They refuse to let
their tracks ramble, to degenerate into
unintelligible morasses of electronic technology.
THE   FOURTH   WAY   (Capitol   ST-317)
manages to keep on the tight side of the line,
building cool, soaring piano and violin lines on a
precise bass and drum rhythm. Unfortunately
they suffer from a common disadvantage among
instrumental groups: the tracks are all about 60
seconds too long and the group runs out of
variation on its themes.
But despite this, and notwithstanding the
incredibly  pretentious  liner  notes  (when will
flacks ever learn?), it's not a bad album ifyou dig
what's happening between pop and jazz these
days. I particularly liked Clouds on side one and       _,
Openings on side two.
It's a breezy and happy music, like you play
at 7 a.m. oh a bright and sunny morning.
It's too bad some groups never learn to
control themselves. They become obsessed with
one or two themes and work them to death.
In such a category I'd place ON TIME by a
group calling itself Grand Funk Railroad (Capitol
ST-307).
I listened to this record once and didn't like
it.
Not wanting to be unfair, I listened to it
a second time. I still didn't like it.
I'm not going to listen to it any more.
-P.K.
pf 6ix
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, November 7, 1969 Meditations
in the Wilderness
A passing phenomenon; people helping people
By VALERIE HENNELL
Back from Anderson Lake, last week's land
of vanishing bears and log cabin comfort...
To discover that the PGE railway doesn't
end in Squamish, gully of unpolluted Pop
Festivals, but carries on over the mountains,
serpentining towards (and past) mail throw off
mile 133.8, wilderness home of Luap and Maid
Marion. Woodstove spews forth home-made
bread, the now naked vineyard rustles as you
climb the hill in a little yellow jeep towards
dinner and homegrown wine. You can almost
paint the silence. Stand on the porch and get
high on the smogless air; trip out on the
complete and utter absence of sound ... but
for the waves on the lake, the wind in the trees,
the chipmunks in the leaves, and the
train—maybe six times a day it passes-with the
waving engineer, the smiling men who toss off
the mail and shout a greeting as the little parade
of cars clatters off around the bend and echoes
down the lakeshore into stillness.
The PGE is the chief link between the lives
of the people who live in handfuls some
nebulous where between here and the north. It
brings news, by word or by letter, and friends
who come to visit, and on shopping day it takes
you into town—Lillooet— some twenty miles
away. For me, the railroad has a story.
There is a man who lives along the tracks in
a little log villa he built for himself and his wife.
Not long ago the man's brother was killed in a
plane crash, and when he heard the news, he
knew he had to get to Vancouver to his
brother's family. Only thing was that the same
storm that swallowed the plane washed out
both the highway and railroad routes to the
south, leaving as the only possible access to
Vancouver the much longer land route to the
north through Lillooet. So he set out for the
nearest settlement, Seton Portage, by boat. His
nearest neighbour who lives a mile and a half
away across the lake intercepted him and took
him to Seton, where he was met by an
impromptu committee of people who had
heard news of the accident, and knowing he
would have to take the northern route to
Vancouver, had provided a human chain to get
him there. His trip was all mapped out. Lists of
people planning to travel that day to Lillooet
and those planning to go on to Vancouver were
put at his disposal. People he had never met
offered to pass messages, provide cars and
accommodation. When it was learned that his
niece's husband was on business in the area,
word of his exact whereabouts was passed by a
human telephone system until the two men met
and were able to continue the trip together.
When the first train South, on which his wife
was travelling to join him, was delayed
overnight in Squamish, she was put up
overnight in the home of one of the PGE
personnel.
In a time when we city folks might live for
ten years not ten feet from our nearest
neighbours and still not know their names it is
wonderful to discover that, in an area where
habitations are few and miles between, such a
whole-hearted concern still exists between
people.
Standing in the dark on a little bluff
peopled only by pine trees, watching the lights
of the night's last train jog steadily past, I
couldn't help thinking that the missing link is,
in fact, human. You just have to be far enough
away from the next human to realize it. The
silhouette of the railway man waves in ritual at
the little log cabin, and the women in the
window returns the gesture. Satisfied that all is
well there, the man turns back to his work, and
the little train rattles on, disappearing into the
night.
p£ 7even
SUB FILMS PRESENTS:
\\
HOUR OF THE
WOLF
ff
directed by INGMAR BERGMAN
starring MAX VON  SYDOW
LIV ULLMAN
Nov. 6, 7, 8, 9,
Thurs.-12:30 Fri.-7:00, 9:30 Sat.-8:00, Sun -7:00
mumauMMum&fifammmmm
(jjmple ok/^^Jmed:
Which will you choose for your wedding set? For three-
quarters of a century, the solitaire, or single diamond,
has been traditional for engagements. Then came more
elaborate settings with decorative small stones. Since
each is equally effective, it is a matter of choice.
DIAMOND ENGAGEMENT RINGS from 75.00
Special Discount to Students and Faculty
566 Seymour
685-2271
Victoria Store-1209 Douglas, Tel. 385-4431
Authorized bottler of Coca-Cola under contract with Coca-Cola Ltd
WOMETCO (B.C.) LIMITED
1818 CORNWALL, VANCOUVER
Friday, November 7, 1969
THE      UBYSSEY oHot fioOp
Heaven and Hell opened with a splash last Friday. Besides
sporting one of the best looking waitresses in town, the club also
serves good food at reasonable prices and a nice atmosphere.
Tomorrow's Eyes, playing their first gig in town since
returning from a cross-country tour, impressed with their usual
onstage charm and showmanship. On top of this, their vocals and
instrumentals seem to be tighter and much more precise than
before. They attribute much of this to the fact they were playing
a lot of small clubs on the tour where the volume had to be kept
low and consequently every little sound mistake or otherwise was
picked up.
Heaven and Hell will be free every Thursday night from now
on for every beautiful single chick who wants to make the scene
there. You can apply in The Ubyssey office; just ask for the
Roon.
This week Seeds of Time entertain at Heaven and Hell. It's a
club mainly for UBC students so if you've got nothing to do and
want to go somewhere get up off your asses and make the scene
at Tenth and Alma.
Seeds of Time
The Burnaby Art Gallery has a Print Show, which started
yesterday and runs to Dec. 7. This (according to the blurb we
got) is the major show of its kind in Canada and Canadian artists
working in the field of prints are most anxious to enter work.
This includes etchings, wood cuts, lithography, silk screen, etc.
Gallery hours are Tues. through Sun.: 1-5 and Wed. and Fri.
evenings, 6450 Gilpin.
* * *
SUB Art Gallery has signs. Lots of old metal and wood
advertising signs from yesteryear. Featured, of course, are those
good old soft drink boards for Stubby, and Orange Crush. —F. C.
If stepping out for din-din gets you down because you've
been everywhere in town that you can afford and found that even
your favorite restaurants are a little thin on atmosphere, try
Granny's, Vancouver's newest and probably only restaurant and
ice cream parlor. It's boop-boop-a-doop differdrent. Grab your
favorite flapper and catch a trolley down to Denman Street.
Granny's is Roaring 20's from decor right through waitresses and
music. Despite their entertaining antics, the staff provides the
fastest and most cheerful service I've ever seen. They'll fare you
well with your choice of over thirty varieties of hamburgers, the
menu descriptions of which are enough to entertain you for a
good 15 minutes.
"The Moscowburger: The hamburger robed in a magnificent
Russian stroganoff—a Troika of sour cream—fresh mushrooms
and capitalistic spices. From Rasputin's own recipe."
"A Mexican Fiesta: The hamburger steak featuring our
special Mexican hot sauce with chili and pepper. Warm enough to
maybe take off your serapes or reliozos—you can't help but say
Ole."
Prices range from 75c to $2.75, and at Granny's a burger is
really a meal. Choose from a dozen different flavors of "Bootleg"
malts and milkshakes, or a "Prohibition Soda", and if you still
have room, get yourself on of Granny's mammoth 60c sundaes or
some banana fritters. The old gal certainly doesn't underestimate
the modern appetite.
I stumbled into Granny's quite by chance the other day and
I'll never regret it. It would take months to sample all the
outrageous concoctions the menu proposes. And the whole
atmosphere of the place is in itself well worth a visit. Drag out
your coonskin coat or just go as your are, and tell 'em Big Al sent
you. _V. H.
—i^— pS Sight .i——^-^—
BUSY "B"
BOOKS
Used  University Texts
Bought and Sold
146 W.  HASTINGS
Opposite Woodwards
681-4931
Dave Barratt, MLA
B.C.'s interim leader N.D.P. party
INTEGRATION IN EDUCATION
the relevancy of our education system in B.C.
Wed., Nov. 12 — 12:30, Ang. 110
SPONSORED  BY  EDUCATION  U.S.
SUB FILMS PRESENTS:
ff
RACHEL.
RACHEL"
Starring JOANNE WOODWARD
Directed by PAUL NEWMAN
Nov. 13, 14, 15, 16
Thurs.-12:30 Fri.-7:00,9:30 Sat.-8:00\ Sun.-7:00
SUB THEATRE—75c
STUDENTS...
SAVE
50%
and be
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INFORMED!
♦dbelHottbem flBincr*
Canada's National Mining Newspaper
77 River Street — Toronto 247, Ontario
Canada's mining industry continues to grow at a hectic
rate and outpaces all other industrial groups. The future
calls for accelerated expansion.
By knowing the facts, and they appear each Thursday in
The Northern Miner, you can keep abreast of the mining
industry and what it means to Canada. Read all the. news
of all the mines — all the metals.
A special $5.00 per year subscription rate (regular price
$10.00 per year) is offered only to University students.
Take advantage of this special student offer by completing
and mailing the coupon below with your $5.00 remittance.
Name —
Address
University   _	
Year of Graduation  __  Faculty
if
ATTENTION — Students of English 100
U.B.C. FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE PRESENTS
THE  CRUCIBLE
by Arthur Miller
(Gripping Drama of Salem Witchcraft Trials)
NOVEMBER 7-15
DIRECTED BY STANLEY WEESE
STUDENT TICKETS - $1.00 (available for all performances)
SPECIAL STUDENT PERFORMANCES
^
Monday, Nov. 10, 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 13, 12:30 p.m. Matinee
Tickets:      The Frederic Wood Theatre      Room 207
SUPPORT YOUR CAMPUS THEATRE
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, November 7, 1969 Friday, November 7, 1969
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  15
Loyola profs split over physics prof firing
MONTREAL (CUP)-The
faculty association of Loyola
college voted non-confidence in
its executive Wednesday night
following a statement the same
evening by the college's academic
senate threatening punishment of
faculty and students who "use
disruptive   tactics   to   achieve   a
reversal of the senate's decision"
to fire physics professor S. A.
Santhanam.
Association president Don
Savage and vice-president Jim
Moore, who lost their mandate by
a 106 to 96 vote, have both
supported action in Santhanam's
case.
Interaction is goal
Interaction between professional faculties is the goal of a
campus group known as Interprofessional Education Association.
It is quite common for a doctor to refrain from recommending a
patient to a social worker because he doesn't recognize that
profession," said Andrea Moen, social work 2.
The IPE sponsors programs such as a sex education course,
symposia, joint seminars and community projects.
"Our group invites members of all faculties to attend the
symposia and one representative from each to aid in education
decision making," said Miss Moen.
Interested persons can attend the meetings held every second
Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. in SUB or can contact Moen at the school of
social work office.
LETTER
Complaint
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Several articles of opinion have
appeared on this page in the last
few issues, and since they all in
some way concerned The
Ubyssey, I feel some comment is
necessary.
Namely your editorials and
particularly your latest.
I have nothing against
editorials generally. And what I
do have against them is not their
function, which is presumably to
express an opinion. When one
expresses an opinion, one doesn't
expect worldwide agreement, nor
do I believe that an editorial will,
or should, meet with universal
approval. However, in an editorial
spirit of my own, I feel bound to
express some views on your views.
I consider your editorials to be
unquestionably brilliant. Who else
could capture so clearly what is
indubitably the thought and
feeling of today's campus? In a
spirit of daring and good will, you
productively criticize our foibles.
Deftly you probe to expose our
subconscious guilt and paranoia.
How admirable your assault on
everyone's ethical and moral
weakness.
How does one dare to criticize
your melifluous prose with its
barb-like social and political
commentary?
I would ask you: 1) since when
did incompetence become such an
integral part of The Ubyssey; and
2) what is inherently good about
sloppy thought?
As regards your latest, even if
as you say, the converse is not
true, the reader should imagine a
writership worth hearing.
However, if he did that, he might
Just ignore what is being
published. And that would really
be the beginning of the end, Sir.
Apparently the reader trusts
you more than he trusts himself.
If he didn't, The Ubyssey would
never get off the ground, let alone
onto the street. And that is an
unfortunate fact, too.
ROGER SATCO
law 2.
SCIENTIFIC GRAPHICS
Professional Production of all kinds of
GRAPHS, CHARTS, MAPS
ILLUSTRATIONS & FORMULATIONS
MOLECULAR MODEL DESIGNING & BUILDING
SCIENTIFIC DISPLAYS & ADVERTISING
Phone 733-4506
Tickets
$1.50
from
I.H.
^I6--V [ 1 ( •
MON
)
NOV. 10
8:30
i *™^'"^ iff
M   %  1  La
• ^
P
SUB
Ballroom
'V—
DANCE
Featuring
"SONNY JOHNSON and the SUNGLOS"
Direct  from   Nassau  to   You
FLOORSHOW - FOOD
The nuclear physicist was not
rehired by the college for the
1969-70 academic year, and
Loyola trustees gave no reason for
his dismissal. Conflict has been
growing on the campus ever since,
as students and faculty brought
forward increasingly stiff
denunciations of the
administration's action as
authorization and unfair.
The two were among 100
faculty who backed a boycott of
classes Oct. 27-29 by half of
Loyola's 4,600 students,
demanding the administration
accept binding arbitration by the
Canadian association of university
teachers in Santhanam's case.
The executive committee in its
ruling Wednesday said, violations
of their order "to cease and
desist" will be considered in
contempt of senate and "may
incur academic penalties as are
deemed appropriate."
A sit-in by 250 students
Monday trapped administration
president Patrick Malone in his
office and brought an
administration attempt to buy off
Santhanam.
But Santhanam refused the
offer of a cash settlement of
$ 10,000 and the remainder of his
$16,000 Canada council grant and
a letter of recommendation.
"I want justice to be bought
off," Santhanam told students
Wednesday, after refusing the
administration offer. His contract
with Loyola was not as important
as clearing his name, he added.
The administration responded
by returning to their 'no
negotiation' stance, and the offer
was unconditionly withdrawn-
Following the vote in faculty
association, Savage said Dr.
Santhanam would continue his
appeal to the CAUT whether or
not a new executive supports
binding arbitration.
Loyola students vote Monday
to decide whether to continue
support action for Santhanam's
appeal.
DON'T  FORGET   THAT   TUESDAY  IS   A   HOLIDAY!
am 17.
was not born until after the war.
am able to go to school.
have a buzz-bike.
have parents.
have never gone hungry.
don't know what war is!
What is hunger?
What is a concentration camp?
What is a razzia?
What is a bomb?
What is fear?
I know we are free!
I know who liberated us!
I know what they sacrificed!
The Men and Women of the Canadian Armed Forces,
Dedicated to the cause of Peace,
Hope that everyone will
REMEMBER THEM! Page  16
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, November 7, 1969
Down unders
against war
Australians and New
Zealanders have organized at UBC
to protest the war in Vietnam.
The group, Australians and
New Zealanders Against the
Vietnam War, held its inaugural
meeting Thursday and is open to
anyone on or off campus.
"We want to put pressure on
our own governments,"
Vancouver organizer Alastair
Campbell said.
The group originated in
Toronto last year, but the goal is
now for a national organization.
They will give full support to
all anti-war campaigning next
week, and will hold a further
organizational meeting Wednesday
noon in Bu. 205.
TODAY
SUB  FILMS
See "Hour of the Wolf" at 7 p.m.,
9:30 p.m., tomorrow at 8 p.m., and
Sunday at 7 p.m. in the SUB theatre.
FRENCH   DEPARTMENT,   PERFORMING
ARTS  &  ALLIANCE  FRANCAISE
Songs   and   poetry   reading   by   LES
JEUNES COMEDIENS in SUB ballroom at noon,  free.
CLASSICS   DEPARTMENT
Hear Miss Mary E. White on "The
Relevance of Thucydides" at noon,
Bu.   100.
LEGAL  AID   SOCIETY
Legal advisory panels every Monday,
Wednesday, Friday noon, 237 and
237A  SUB.
CAMPUS   CAVALIERS
Dance meeting 7:45-11 p.m., SUB 125.
'tween
classes
RADICAL   FORUM
Faculty-student group will meet tonight, 8 p.m., SUB clubs lounge, to
discuss the democratization of a university and to compare SFU and UBC.
VARSITY   CHRISTIAN   FELLOWSHIP
"Get-together and talk", noon, SUB
125.
NEO  FASCIST  CLUB
Hear Kevin Crowe on "The Social Les-
sions to be learned from South
Africa", noon, SUB 113.
VANCOUVER STUDENT MOVEMENT
Anti-repression conference begins 8
p.m. tonight and continues until Sunday in Bu. 202.
STUDENT  SKI   CLUB
Anyone interested in a ski bus at
reasonable rates, phone Ted at 731-
3706.
LIFE SCIENCE  CLUB
Hear Dr. Robin Harger on "Pollution
and Community Education" at noon
in Bu. 102.
CIASP
Noon meeting, SUB 119, recruiting
meeting for anyone interested in volunteer work in Mexico  or Canada.
WOMAN'S BIG BLOCK CLUB
General meeting, SUB 119 at 12:30.
SATURDAY
CHINESE   VARSITY
Talent Nite -****. Sat., Nov. 8 in SUB
clubs lounge from 8 to 12 p.m.
SUNDAY
UBC SPORTS CAR CLUB
Gymkhana on Nov. 9 at 10 a.m. in
B lot.
MONDAY
YOUNG  SOCIALISTS
Dick Fiddler speaks on Quebec, Nov.
10 at 12:30 in SUB auditorium.
HISPANIC   &   ITALIAN  STUDIES
Professor L. Woodward will lecture
on Nov. 10 at 12:30 in Bu. 2238.
UKRANIAN   VARSITY   CLUB
General meeting, Nov. 10 at 12:30 in
SUB 211.
ALPHA  OMEGA
General meeting on Nov. 10 at 12:30
in SUB 211.
POLITICAL  SCIENCE
Dr. Anthony Parel will lecture in BU.
100 on Nov.  10 at 12:30.
THURSDAY
THUNDERBIRD  SKI  TEAM
Ski and sports films on Nov. 13 at
12:30 in Hebb  Theatre.
FRIDAY
AIESEC
Luncheon on Nov. 14 in International
House.
PANGO-PANGO
(UNS)-Hordes of screaming
female electic blorgs ran through
this island capital Monday,
defecating.
CLASSIFIED
Rate:s Students. Faculty & Club—3 lines, 1 day 75* 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional lines 25-t;
4 days price of 3.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and
are payable in advance.
Closing Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Office, STUDENT UNION BLDG., Univ. of B.C.,
Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
SKIER'S   BALL
(S.U.B.)
Nov.   X  —   0:00-1:00
Dross Optional — $6.00 a couple
—hor   d'oeuvres   &   liar   service
—tickets   Athletic   Office
<"*; at door.
Greetings
12
TO DTKCUSS A PERSONAL PROB-
lem to share your latest inspira-
ation call MU 5-9181 during the
Sunday Line program, Sundays
9:30-10 a.m., and 11:30-1:00 p.m.,
Radio C.IOR 000. Or call and see
me at tho Chaplain's Office, (SUI!
237A). For an appointment phone
2G6-!)27.r*.
Wanted Information
13
Lost & Found
14
LOST: BLACK PURSE — WAS
hitchhiking from 41st. Return to
Ida.   266-0847.	
LOST: 200 M.M. NTKKOR LENS
Sat. nite on U.B.C. bus in. Canvass shoulder bag. Reward.
738-5257.	
FOUND: TN STIB BALLROOM
tho Gas Company from Seattle,
Friday Novomher 14th, 9:00 p.m.
to   1:00   a.m.	
LOST: ONE NAVY BLUE
leather purse with silver studs.
One strap. Con tains wallet and
1! >. Contact Sydney Price at 224-
9098. 	
PERSON* WHO BORROWED OFF-
white raincoat from Biology Nov.
4 please return to same. No questions.
MORROW' G R E K N RAINCOAT
from Bio. 30011 Nov. 4th. Return
keys and AMS card to Box 100
Place   Vanier.	
WOMAN'S NAVY BLUE DOUBLE
breasted coat. Cecil Green Park
Nov. .11,-1969. Call 7:18-5772. I have
yours. 	
LOST: BROCK: WHITE BAG
with Bauer rugby boots. Chris
261-S083.	
FOITND: LETTER FOR ED
Maier, Black Creek, rh. 324-2752
Nites.
ANYONE FINDING A BEIGE
suitcase and foamie at VOC parking lot at Whistler Nov. 2. Please
phone 684-4030.
15
Rides 8c Car Pools
MOBILITY FREEDOM
$18.00   per   month,   including   insurance. See tbe volume dealer in "Two
Wheel    Freedom"    for   details.     Hi
Performance    Honda,   3712   W.    10th
al   Alma.   Phone   228-9077	
RIDE WANTED TO THE GAS
company SUH ballroom Nov. 14,
11:00-1:00.   Inquire   SUI*   Room   101.
WANTED: A RIDE TO GRAND
Forks, B.C. on Friday Nov. 7.
Phone    Peter   874-3274.	
NEED RIDE DAILY FOR 8:30-5:30.
Live right at Jen. Ladner Trunk
Rd. (10) and Hwy. 17. Ph. Glen
946-4794.
Special Notices
16
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rate if you are 20 years or
over and have good driving record you may qualify. Phone Ted
Elliott,   299-9422.
SAVE ON BLANK CASETTE
tape C-90, Ampex lifetime guarantee, $2.95 each: C-60 B.A.S.F.,
$1.95 each. Plastic box included.
Call or see Peter Tim, 224-9062
or   320   Okanagan.	
BOB DYLANS PREVIOUSLY* UN-
published Tarantula now avail-
able    I'BC    Bookstore.	
TRIALS OF JASON HOOVER,
Northwest Company, Winter's
Green. Fridav P.N.E. Gardens.
9:00-1:00.	
DYLAN CAN'T MAKE IT. COME
anyway — Barn coffeehouse. Fri.
Nov.  14,  8-12.
HEAVEN AND HELL NEEDS
customers for weekends. Thurs.
thru Sun. 7:30 to 1 p.m. This
week Seeds of Time, next week
Spring.   3730   West   10th.   224-1415.
SKI AND SPORT FILMS. FIVE
flicks including documentary on
IX Winter Olympics at Innsbruck
in 1964. Watch skiing, skating,
hockey etc. Other films on skiing
in A*ail & Snowmass and on racing technique. 50c Thursday Nov.
13.   12:30,   Hebb   Theatre.
TH10 TIME HAS COME FOR THE
■■Hour of the Wolf* Nov. 7 7:00,
9:30 Nov. S 8:00: Nov. 9, 7:00. SUB
Aud.   75c  growl.
Special   Notices—Cont'd
16
WHAT WORLD FAMOUS FLA-
menco -Guitarist is coming to
campus  Nov.   18.	
A.I.E.S.E.C. MEETING IN I.H.
next Friday noon. Talk on International Management and travel
opportunities.
Semiahmoo Homecoming
Basketball   Game
Homecoming  Queen
Ex- Students /Teacher   Gab
DANCE Fri. Nov. 14-7 p.m.
Semiahmoo Sr.  Secondary
SCUBA CLASS
:—Taught by experienced world travelled professional instructors. Both
N.A.U.I. (internationally recognized) and P. A. D. I. certificates
awarded.
—All   equipment   supplied.
—Classes   starting   now,   limited
enrolment.
—Transportation   from   UBC   arranged on  request.
For Information
GRAY AQUATIC
685-6017 (24 hrs.)
Travel Opportunities
17
OVERLAND TOUR TO KATMAN-
du. May to August 1970. E. Wilks,
No. 45, 2560 Whiteley Crt. N. Van.
EUROPE, $275 RETURN. VAGA-
bonda International,  922-2761
Wanted-Miscellaneous
18
OLD     LEATHER     JACKET     SIZE
medium   or   large.   Phone   733-b017.
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
1966 AUSTIN 850 VAN, EXCEL,
cond. 738-1911, 4:30-6:30 p.m.
Mon.-Fri.
'62 VW, MECHANICALLY O.K.,
$350.00 or best offer. Phone 228-
2673,   between   11  a.m.   -   5   p.m.
'67 HONDA CONV'T SPORTS
car. Great shape, low insurance
rates.    20,000   mi.    Phone    AM    3-
7321.
1965 PONTIAC PARISIENNE. EXC.
cond., executive driven, 8 cyl., 4
dr. sedan. Jet black, 6 near new
WW (2 studed). P.S., P.B. auto.,
38,500 miles. $1,500. Phone Harry
at 266-0703 between 6 & 7.
'68 MUSTANG. V8. AUTOMATIC.
Radio. Phone 732-7555 after 6 p.m.
CLASSIC M.G. MAGNETTE ZA
newly rebuilt trans and motor,
radio, W.W.s, 4 door. Excellent
mech. condition. Driving lights.
$330  or offers.   224-6113.
1965 VW DELUXE "WITH GAS
heater, H.D. battery, W.W.'s, new
paint. Excellent condition. 731-
0096.
'64 CHEV. GOOD CONDITION, V8,
standard, radio. Phone 732-6779
after Saturday.
'62 STUDEBAKER S.W., V8, R & H,
spotless condition. $425 or near
offer.   224-5194.	
'59 METROPOLITAN, $235 OR OF-
fer. Good condition, through MV
test Nov.   3.  Phone 736-4802.	
•64 AUSTIN CAMBRIDGE, 31,000
miles, new tires, automatic. One
women owner. Garage kept. Phone
266-4656.
Automobiles—Wanted
22
Automobiles—Parts
23
Automobiles—Repairs
24
Motorcycles
25
BUSINESS SERVICES
Dance Bands
31
Duplicating &  Copying 32
Miscellaneous 33
Photography
Repairing—All Kinds
Rentals—Miscellaneous
34
~35
"36
Scandals
37
CO-OPERATION OR DEATH —
join forces to fight fragmentation
—Education Building November
17.	
HAVE YOU HEARD THE GAS
Company from Seattle? If not Friday, Nov. 14, 9:00-1:00. SUB
Ballroom.	
TESTS HAVE SHOWN THAT Todays rock music can cause deafness. Give your ears a rest. Hear
Montoya.
Sewing & Alterations
38
Typewriters & Repairs 39
Typing 40
EXPERT   ELECTRIC   TYPING,   35c
page   (10  copy)   call   Mrs.   Duncan
228-9587.	
TYPIST  — ELECTRIC
224-6129
 Dunbar Area	
EXPERIENCED    AND    RELIABLE
typist   available   for   home   typing.
Please phone 277-5640.	
EXPERT   TYPING   —   THESIS   35c
page.    Essays    30c   page—5c    per
copy. Fast, efficient service. Phone
325-0545.	
EXPERIENCED ELECTRIC HOME
typing.   Essays,   theses,   etc.  Neat
accurate   work,   reasonable   rates.
Phone 321-2102.	
ESSAYS TYPED
 Please   phone   683-2859	
HOME   TYPING   —   ELECTRIC   *—
Experience.     Reas.    rates.     Phone
738-7881.	
TYPING   OF   ESSAY   ETC.,    DONE
neatly,    efficiently,    and    quickly.
30c   a   page.   Phone   224-0385   after
5 p.m.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female
51
GIRLS: EARN EXTRA SKI
money in pleasant part-time work.
Remuneration   open  for  ambitious
—987-1772	
JON'S PIZZARAMA RESTAUR-
ants requires part and full-time
wairesses. Attractive girls, 18-25.
Apply in person only, 2676 West
Broadway. Shifts available at all
four   restaurants.	
HEAVEN AND HELL NEEDS AT-
tractive girls 18-25 for part time
and full time waitresses. 3730
West 10th.	
GIRLS: GUARANTEE YOURSELF
a job for this summer. Phone Mr.
Stevens at 526-7821 from 10-5
soon!
Help Wanted—Male
52
JON'S PIZZARAMA RESTAUR-
ants require young men with
cars for part-time general kitchen work. Apply in person only,
2676   West    Broadway.	
HELP WANTED, NEEDED, DE-
sired: 200 men by 200 girls (at
least) SUB Ballroom Friday, Nov.
14 9:00-1:00.
Help Wanted-
Male or Female
53
NEED MONEY? WE'LL TRAIN
you to sell and earn money?
526-6325.	
SUB-SIDIZE YOUR INCOME BY
earning money in your spare
time, retailing Holiday Magic
Cosmetics on campus. No. 6 —
1557   W.   Broadway.   733-6316.
PART TIME JOBS. PHONE
George at 224-3498, 5-7 p.m., Mon.
to  Fri.	
TIRED OF HEARING THE SAME*
loud twangy rock music. Carlos
Montoya is a calm melodic relaxing  guitarist.   Coming   Nov.   18.
Work Wanted
54
INSTRUCTION
Instruction Wanted
61
1ST YEAR MATH TUDOR WANT-
ed in New West., Surrey area.
584-6832.
Language Instruction 61A
QUALITY  LANGUAGE  TUTORING
and
CERTIFIED   TRANSLATIONS
CONVERSA-SCHOOL    OF
LANGUAGES
1603   W.   4th   at  Fir  — 736-5401
Chargex Cards Accepted
Music
62
Special Classes
63
LEARN THE POPCORN, SUB
Ballroom, Friday, November 14.
9:00-1:00.  Everyone's doing it!
Tutoring
TUTORING IN MATH-PHYS. FOR
undergrad by instructor. (Ph.D.)
$5.00   hr.   Ph.   733-6037   eves.
FLAMENCO GUITAR TUITION.
Michael   Kocial,   tel.   224-7762.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
SKI EQUIPMENT FOR SALE. 205
CM. Gold Star Epoxy Skis, Tyrol
size 11 boots, good condition $70.00.
Phone Harry at 266-0703 between 6
& 7.
BIRD CALLS
Your  Student  Telephone
Directory
NOW AVAILABLE — $1.00
al the Bookstore,
AMS Publication! Office
and Thunderbird Shop
100% "DOWN" SKI JACKETS AND
Terinit (Heienca) track suits.
Variety of colours and sizes. Lowest prices in town. Interested?
Come have a look in Room No. 305
War Memorial Gym. Mondays and
Thursdays 12:30-2:00 p.m. Contact Hank Lyth in gym or phone
683-3442  eves.	
KNEISSL WHITE STAR SKIS 200
CM. Harness included. Good shape
985-1896 after 6 p.m.
SKI BOOTS, LARGE COMPETI-
tion, 8, $145, never used, Dave
Pugh,   224-1678.	
15 TRANSISTOR - AM-FM-SW-MB
portable radio. AC-DC. See Dennis,    443    Salish,    Totem    Park    or
224-9001.	
KNEISSL WHITE STAR RACER
RSE skis, 210 cm. Unused (no
bindings). Call 3750 (UBC) or 987-
0232.	
GREAT BOOKS OF WESTERN
World, 54 Volumes. Homer to
Freud, slightly used 526-3072 after
5:15  p.m.	
AMPEX TAPE DECK, 80W SOLID
state AMP and Tuner, speakers.
All near new.  224-5194.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
•1
GIRL WANTED TO SHARE FUR-
nished room, $30 per person, TV.
3913 W. 19th Ave. Good company
■wanted. No dull type. Phone 224-
6696.	
ACCOMMODATION AVAILABLE
for two male students. Close to
U.B.C.   Tel.   224-4294.
"NEWLY COMPLETED L. H. K.
room with private bath and entrance, close to bus and shopping,
25th and Macdonald. Phone 738-
5603."	
ROOM $50 WITH KITCHEN PRIV-
ilges for male students on campus.
Large study room and lounge.
Weekly linen. Board $45 if desired.
5760 Toronto Rd. or phone Ron at
224-0327.	
LARGE, QUIET ROOM (UP-
stairs), available immediately or
Jan. 1. Board may be arranged.
Phone 224-0394  (after  4).  Suitable
mature woman student.	
AVAILABLE NOV. 15, 2 LIGHT
warm sleeping rooms. Share washroom, limited cooking. Prof. grad.
male   students  738-4892.	
ROOM FOR RENT $50.00 MONTH.
Use of kitchen for breakfast if
needed.   Call   aft.   5  p.m.   733-9762.
STUDENTS ONLY — FURNISHED
light housekeeping rooms. Shared
facilities. Close to U.B.C, transportation available immediately.
$50 month. Lloyd or Tom 732-7827.
Room & Board
82
LIVE ON CAMPUS PHI KAPPA
Sigma. Colour T.V., Sauna, 5785
Agronomy  Road.   224-9684.	
EXCELLENT ROOM AND BOARD
for senior male student. Near
gates. Phone 224-4866, 4595 W. 6th
Avenue.	
SIGMA CHI HOUSE — LARGEST
room on campus; two lounges, and
dining hall. Free room cleaning
service, laundry, color TV, good
food. Come out and see us, 5725
Agronomy,  224-5530.  Evenings.
ROOM AND BOARD AVAILABLE
at   Psi   Upsilon,   $95   month.   Call
228-9439   for   Jamie.
Furn. Houses & Aprs.
83
WE NEED THIRD PERSON, MALE
or female, to share roomy house.
$60.   736-7574.
Unfurn. Houses fc Apts.        84
IT PAYS TO ADVERTISE IN THE UBYSSEY CLASSIFIED SECTION Friday, November 7, 1969
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 17
Student unrest backlash laws
pending in U.S. senate
WASHINGTON, D.C. (CUP-CPS) - At least 15
pieces of legislation - the official response to
student unrest on American campuses - are still
percolating in various committees of the U.S. senate
and house of representatives. They include:
• a bill providing that institutions of higher
education that have failed to take necessary steps to
maintain "a reasonable degree of discipline" will not
receive federal contracts;
Public schools
not for worship
The practice of reading the Bible and reciting
the lord's prayer in public schools does a great
disservice to religion, a United Church minister said
Thursday noon.
Rev. Rod Booth said schools are not places of
worship and that forcing students to pray in them
does more harm than good.
He was speaking on a panel discussion in
Education 100 about the relevance of Bible reading
in schools.
Another panel member, electrical engineering
prof Fritz Bowers, said, "The present system is the
worst possible compromise between those who
think religious issues should be part of the
curriculum and those who don't."
Courses should be introduced which would
teach a person how to make religious and moral
judgments, he said.
Vancouver school trustee Mrs. Eva New
defended the Lord's prayer, saying it would at least
help teach students what others believe.
"The power of the Lord's Prayer will rub off
through its daily repetition," she said.
About 150 students attended the Education
Undergraduate Society-sponsored discussion.
• a bill "to encourage institutions of higher
education to adopt rules to govern the conduct of
students and faculty, to assure the right of free
expression and to assist such institutions in their
efforts to prevent and control campus
disturbances";
• a senate measure which would amend the
U.S. Higher Education Act of 1965 "to provide a
means of preventing civil disturbances from
disrupting federal assistance programs and activities
at institutions of higher education";
• a house bill requiring the suspension of
federal financial assistance to colleges and
universities which experience campus disorders and
"fail to take appropriate corrective measures within
a reasonable time." The bill would also require the
termination of federal assistance to "teachers,
instructors and lecturers guilty of violation of any
law in connection with such disorders."
So far, none of the bills have emerged from
committee for approval as law.
Exec to run things
after Gibson leaves
There will be no Alma Mater Society internal
affairs officer for the rest of the year.
Council decided Monday night that most of the
internal affairs duties will be handled by the
executive following the resignation of Dave Gibson.
"The appointment of a public relations officer
would take care of the dispensing of information,"
said AMS president Fraser Hodge.
"The PRO would not become part of the
executive as such but would handle such things as
council meetings and information services."
Hodge said a constitutional revision abolishing
the position of internal affairs officer may be
presented at the next AMS general meeting.
HONG KONG
CHINESE FOODS
Just   One   Block  from   Campus
In The Village
(Next   to   U.B.C.   Barber  Shop)
WE   SERVE   GOOD   CHINESE  FOOD
AT    REASONABLE    PRICES
For  Take-Out  Service  Ph. 224-6121
OPEN   TUES.  -  TO   -  SAT.
11:30  A.M.  TO  10  P.M.
SUNDAY & MONDAY 5 TO 10 P.M.
THUNDERBIRD SKI TEAM presents
INNSBRUCK 1964
-documentary on IX WINTER OLYMPICS
(skating, skiing, bobsled, etc.).
—on racing technique and skiing in U.S.A.
and 4 SKI FILMS
THURSDAY, NOV. 13      12:30
HEBB THEATER
50c
Career opportunities with
AA
MacMillan Bloedel Limited
Engineering Graduates
MECHANICAL
(Bachelors)
CHEMICAL
(Bachelors)
(Bachelors or
Masters)
We invite graduates to discuss opportunities for:
Production Trainees: Responsibilities in production planning,
control., budgeting, cost analysis, production supervision,
engineering, and special studies.
Design and Project Engineers: Responsibilities in plant and
equipment modification, new equipment specification and
design, and installation.
Process Engineers: Responsibilities in process and quality
studies and inspection, for recommending changes in operations,   raw  materials,   equipment  or  control   procedures.
Research Engineers: Projects in process and product development in pulping and bleaching.
Interviews will be held on Campus November 13 and 14, 1969.
For information and appointments, please contact your Student
Placement Office.
BOOKSTORE
NEW ARRIVALS
NOVEMBER 3, 1969
PAPERBACKS
Anouilh.Thody. Oliver & Boyd. (Literature)     $ 1.50
Artof the West: Part One—Romanesque. Focillon. Phaidon. (Art)   ..     5.00
Artof the West: Part Two-Gothic. Focillon. Phaidon. (Art)      5.75
Bookof the Hopi. Waters. Ballantine. (Sociology-Anthropology) .. 1.25
C. Wright Mills and the Power Elite.
Domhoff & Ballard. Beacon. (Sociology)      3.80
Civil Rights and Civil Liberties. Ludwig.
Washington Square. (Sociology)     75
Crime and Juvenile Delinquency. Leinwand.
Washington Square. (Sociology)     75
Frail Ocean. Marx. Ballantine. (Biology)     95
I Ching: The Chinese Book of Changes. Waltham.
Ace Books. (Table Display)     95
Italian Baroque Painting. Waterhouse. Phaidon. (Art)          4.95
Lie Algebras and Lie Groups. Serre. Benjamin. (Benjamin Section) . . 4.25
Molecular Thermodynamics. Dickerson. Benjamin. (Benjamin Section)   5.35
Moment in TheSun. Rienow. Ballantine. (Biology)      95
Negro in the City. Leinwand,   Washington Square. (Sociology)     75
New Music 1900-1960. Copland. Norton, (Music)          2.50
On the Nature of the Psyche. Jung. Princeton. (Psychology)         3.25
Peyote Cult. La Barre. Schocken. (Sociology-Anthropology)          2.95
Politics and Government of Urban Canada.
Feldman &Goldrick. Methuen. (Canadian History)         4.95
Practical Yoga. Wood. Wilshire. (Miscellaneous)      2.50
Progress of Management Research. Farrow. Penguin. (Economics)    ..    .85
Psychology and Education. Jung. Princeton. (Psychology)      3.25
Psychology of the Transference. Jung. Princeton. (Psychology) .... 3.25
Psychotherapy and Existentialism.
Frankl. Simon &Shuster. (Psychology)      2.95
Quantum Mechanics in Chemistry.
Hanna. Benjamin. (Benjamin Section)      5.35
Rates and Mechanisms of Chemical Reactions.
Gardiner. Benjamin. (Benjamin Section)         5.35
Red and the Black. Stendhal. Collier. (Translations)    95
Statistical Mechanics. Ruelle. Benjamin. (Benjamin Section)          8.60
Studies in Cognitive Development: Essays in Honor of Jean Piaget.
Elkindetal. (Psychology)          4.95
Time's Arrowand Evolution. Blum. Princeton. (Biology)      3.25
Unbound Prometheus. Landes. Cambridge.
(History—Continental Europe)      2.95
HARDCOVERS
African Tribal Images. Fagg.
Cleveland Museum of Art. (Miscellaneous)  18.00
Architectural Models. Janke. Praeger. (Miscellaneous)  10.75
Artof Enameling. Seeler. Van Nostrand. (Miscellanous)      17.95
Bayeux Tapestry. Stenton etal. Phaidon. (Miscellaneous)      13.50
Content of Watercolor. Reep. Van Nostrand. (Miscellaneous)     18.00
HowSummer Came to Canada. Cleaver. Oxford. (Canadiana)     3.95
Lawren Harris. MacMillan of Canada. (Canadiana)      20.00
Miller, the Boy and the Donkey. Wildsmith. Oxford. (Miscellaneous) 3.50
Mountain Goats of Temlaham. Cleaver. Oxford. (Canadiana)      3.95
Olympia: The Sculptures of the Temple of Zeus.
Ashmole & Yalouris. Phaidon. (Miscellaneous)  14.75
Shanghai Journal Hunter. Praeger. (Miscellaneous)      9.50
Sylvia Sidney Needlepoint Book. Reinhold. (Miscellaneous)  10.75
Thailand: Land of Color. Sieben. Taplinger. (Miscellaneous)  17.95
Whistler. Sutton. Phaidon. (Miscellaneous)  14.75
rrmjHs um$. tm^R iHmftri£A\esoFFi
BLACK  SUN
A NOVEL BY BILL T. O'BRIEN
PRISM INTERNATIONAL PRESS AND NOVEMBER HOUSE
AH Above Available at
UBC BOOKSTORE Page  18
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, November 7, 1969
SPOR TS
Seeyer says foot ball
to be Birds big game
Hockey team looks for
more easy victories
By GDICK
Frank Gnup, head optimist of
the UBC football scene predicts a
tight game this weekend with
the University of Alberta Golden
Bears, and is furthermore, laying
his prophets union card on the
line by predicting a win for the
Birds.
The Birds finish off their
second worst season of the last
two years this Saturday at
Thunderbird Stadium at 2:00
p.m. Since this is the last game of
the season, the Birds plan to make
use of a large number of surprise
plays, including one which will
use 12 men to take advantage of
an alleged loophole in Canadian
football rules.
Coach Gnup is more worried
actually about how he will stop
Edmonton's twelfth man than
how he will utilize his own.
It is rumored that Thunderbird
coaches are unusually optimistic
about this game and are betting on
the outcome with reckless
abandon.
The winner (?) of the game will
be presented with the Rain Bowl
trophy by the Vancouver branch
of the University of Alberta
Alumni Association.
Birds will be trying to extend
their winning streak to 2 games
Saturday, and trying to beat a
Canadian university for the first
time in 2 years. As a result of the
drought which has befallen the
football team in the last few
years, the players became
unaccoustomed to winning. Now
that they have had a taste of it,
they would like to try a little
more.
The game will be a good
indication of how the Birds would
have   done   in   the   WCIAA   this
year, as Alberta was one of the
powers in the league this year.
The Birds will be playing in the
conference next year, and are
hoping to be rated as one of the
teams to beat.
This will be the last game for
several of the big stars of the
Birds, notably Dave Corcoran who
set a rushing record for UBC
football last weekend, and
lineman Don Lumb and Dick
Stein, who also doubles as place
kicker.
The UBC hockey Thunderbirds
take on the Williams Lake
stampeders this week but are still
recovering from the hard hitting
doubleheader last weekend against
the Vanderhoof Bears.
In Saturday's opener, the Birds
edged the Bears 4-3 in a vicious
contest which featured aggressive
hockey to the extreme as
Vanderhoof resorted to overt
savagery. Their main culprit was
Ray Hamilton, who went out of
his way to charge at UBC players
on more than one instance and
left his opponent groaning on the
ice.
The winning goal was fired by
smooth UBC centre Wayne
Schaab shortly after Roy Sakaki
had tied the score at three-all with
five minutes left in the final
period.
In   Sunday's   encounter   the
Grads coming
for  Birds first
home
game
By TONY GALLAGHER
The  1969-70 varsity basketball season opens tonight at War
and the opposition will come from some extremely
SMILING OPTIMISTICALLY
Frank Gnup ponders what is
coming from the east to upset
his one game winning streak.
Memorial Gym
familiar faces.
Former Bird Stars Phil
Langley, Ken Shields and Ian
Dixon will all be in the line-up for
the Grads when they take on
coach Peter Mullins' UBC
Thunderbirds.
Also returning for the Grads
will be Gene Rizak, javee coach at
SFU, Dave Way a former member
of the Canadian National Team
and last year's starting centre Neil
Williscroft.
Mullins, on the strength of the
Grads, "They have a very strong
club and will be a good test for
us."
The outlook for this year's
Birds depends on their breaking
offense led by junior guard Ron
Thorsen and on 6'8" centre Terry
. Mackay. Thorsen, who averaged
11 points per game last year,
should prove to be the leader in
the running offense.
However, Thorsen's arm, which
caused   him   to   miss   two   full
months of the season last year is
still a question mark.
MacKay is the only genuine big
man on the club and will be called
upon to do the majority of the
rebounding.
Veterans Derek Sankey and
Bob Molinski will start at the
forward positions flanking
MacKay and Alex Brayden will
join Thorsen to complete the
line-up in the backcourt.
Following the Grad game
tonight the Birds have a two week
layoff until they open the WCIAA
season at home against the
University of Manitoba Nov. 21.
Game time tonight is 8 p.m.
Birds completely dominated play
only to be held to a two all tie.
The main stumbling block for the
Birds was Vanderhoof goalie
Lome Hudson who came up with
key saves on numerous occasions.
Tom Williamson and Barry
Wilcox scored the Bird goals while
Dave Finnie replied twice for the
Bears.
Action resumes at the Winter
Sport Centre this weekend as the
Thunderbirds take on the Williams
Lake Stampeders.
These two teams met two
weeks ago and on this occasion
the Birds won 9-1 and 4-3. The
second game was much closer and
the Stampeders will be trying to
win in this meeting.
Doug Buchanan will be
rejoining the Birds for this series
after missing two weeks due to an
injury. He will be teamed up with
John Marshall and Jeff Wilson as
coach Bob Hindmarch shuffles the
personnel to get some more
scoring punch.
Game times are 8 p.m. on
Saturday and Sunday at 2:45 p.m.
at the Winter Sport Centre.
Student admission is free with the
presentation of your AMS card.
INNSBRUCK 1964, a color
documentary on the IX Winter
Olympics will be featured at the
second of the UBC ski team's
series of Ski Flicks. A 50c
admission charge for the Thursday
noon performances in Hebb
Theatre will help send the team to
their winter competitions.
1968 TRIUMPH
MOTORCYCLE
500 cc. TROPHY
$750.00
from
VARSITY CYCIES
4357 W.   10th        224-1034
ill
NORTH WESTERN SPORTING GOODS LTD.
- JIMMY COUSE and GERRY MILLER -
"Your Headquarters For All Sports Equipment'
Hunting & Fishing Supplies
Camping Goods
Guns and Gun Repairs
Golf and Tennis
A COMPLETE LINE OF ALL WINTER SPORTS EQUIPMENT
Skis - Poles - Boots and Harness - Slacks & Sweaters
Skates and Hockey Equipment
USE YOUR CHARGEX PLAN
10th Ave. at Alma Road
224-5040
UBC Sports Events
for the Week-end of Nov 7-8-9
BASKETBALL
FRI. NOV. 7
UBC T'BIRDS vs GRADS
War Memorial Gym
8:15—Old Grads Inter-Squad Game
9:15—Young Grads vs. "Thunderbirds"
FOOTBALL
SAT. NOV. 8
T'BIRDS vs U. of ALTA.
2:00 p.m.   -   T'Bird  Stadium
HOCKEY
SAT NOV. 8, 8:00 P.M. - SUN. NOV. 9, 2:45 P.M.
T'BIRDS vs WILLIAMS LAKE
Winter Sports Centre Friday, November 7, 1969
THE     UBYSSEY
Pago 19
UBC dropouts practise
sky diving for fun
By JIM STEVENSON
Things are really jumping with
the UBC sky-diving club and the
largest jump has been in
membership.
- Last year's enrolment was a
scant 10 members but has risen
this year to well over 100, about
15 per cent of them girls.
Such an enormous growth in
numbers has caused a bottleneck
in training as only about 60
members have been trained and
experienced their first jump.
The training is handled by Bill
Hardman, a member of the
Canadian National team and once
holder of a world record 150
jumps in one day. This instruction
consists of a five hour session
where the student learns how a
. parachute operates, steering, body
position for freefall, exits and
landing.
The first jump is made at an
altitude of 2,800 feet from a tiny
Cessna 180 with three fellow
students and a jump master.
On their first six jumps all
students are rigged with a static
Une or a "dope rope" which
insures a perfect opening.
Jumpers are aided by a ground
instructor who directs them to the
target by telling them the
appropriate parachute toggles to
pull to manipulate their descent.
To qualify for free fall
jumping, a student must have
completed his first six jumps, on
which he is required to pull a
dummy rip cord and to stay stable
in the air.
The first free fall delays are
only three seconds but the
student gradually extends delays
from three to five and eventually
all the way up to 75 seconds. An
average student can do a
20-second delay on about his
twentieth jump.
The delays enable the jumper
to perform flips, rolls and relative
worK, which consists of meeting
one or more persons in the air.
Most relative work is done from
an altitude of 7,200 feet which is
a delay of at least thirty seconds.
Slacks Narrowed
Suits Altered and
Remodelled
I UNITED TAILORS I
549 Granville St.
PAT
SAVE UP TO $125 FOR $1.75!
GO PLACES 2 FOR 1
INVITATION
THE STUDENT ENTERTAINMENT BOOK
ON  SALE  NOW:  SUB  INFORMATION
BOOK STORE
EAT IN •TAKEOUT. DELIVERY.
3261 W. Broadway   736-7788
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
DEAN'S
RESTAURANTS
Full
Dining
Facilities
Take-Home
Service
PIZZAS - CHICKEN
HAMBURGERS
4544 W. 10th 224-1351
5688 Yew at 41st    266-7188
Hour*: WaaJnays 7 <ua. to 11 M*.
t—duyi  10 a.m. to 11  pJB.
DEBATING TOURNAMENT
UBC vs. U. Vic.
"Resolved that Canada recognize
The People's Republic of China."
8:30 p.m.        Fri. Nov. 7        SUB Party Room
Tickets
$1.50
From
tx2ii
I1
MON. NOV. 10
\                   8:30
I.H.
F                              in
or             A
SUB       M
■*^-^   Iff
.III
• ^
ft            SUB
^---fl     Ballroom
DANCE
Featuring
"SONNY JOHNSON  and the SUNGLOS"
Direct   from   Nassau   to   You
FLOORSHOW - FOOD
DON'T   FORGET   THAT   TUESDAY   IS   A   HOLIDAY!
On these jumps or any jump of 10
or more seconds, the diver is
required to carry a stop watch and
an altimeter to know exactly
when to open his chute.
The minimum safe altitude is
2,200 feet, which still leaves 10
seconds for the diver to pull his
reserve chute if the main one fails.
The chances of such a failure are
about one in ten thousand, still an
adequate reason to carry a second
chute.
The club is now in the process
of planning events which will
include an accuracy competition,
Inter Collegiate meets between
Vancouver City College and
Simon Fraser, and a Para Ski meet
in Kamloops.
A Para Ski meet consists of a
jump onto the top of a mountain
whereupon the jumper dons his
skiis and descends the mountain.
The club is now hoping to
purchase two full sets of
equipment including a main
chute, reserve, jump suit, boots,
brain bucket and instruments.
Parachute packing lessons are
now   being   held   on   Thursday
nights,   a  duty  which  generally
takes   a   few   hours   to   learn.
Student  packers pass their first
test when they jump the rig they
have packed which, hopefully, is
the first time.
Anyone who wishes to join the
club can contact president Val
Predico at 738-2305.
RUGBY ACTION
By SCOTT McCLOY
What does it take for UBC to
win a rugby game?
This is what Thunderbird
coach Donn Spence is asking
himself lately.
Going into the second half last
Saturday they enjoyed a
comfortable 10-3 lead over
Georgians.
In the first half UBC displayed
its finest all-round play to date as
tackling was sure and passing
crisp.
In the second half, however,
the momentum changed sides
owing to a few poor calls by the
referrees.
Final score: Georgians 17,
Thunderbirds 15.
This weekend they play the
Vancouver Kats and then the
following Wednesday take on the
Vancouver Reps. The Kats haven't
lost on league play yet and the
Reps consist of the best players
from the city.
UBC beat the Kats in
pre-season play but the Kats since
have encouraged veteran Ted
Hunt out of retirement.
FOOTBALL FINALS—TODAY (Nov. 7)
at 12:30. The top two teams in Division
I will be playing on the field just behind SUB. Everbody is invited to watch
Beta I take on Phi Delta. Division II is
playing its final game up at John Owen
Field 2-B, 12:30, Nov. 7. Beta m vs.
Beta II.  All players change at Gym.
BADMINTON — Semi-finals — Nov. 7,
12:30 in War Memorial Gym. Check the
schedule   outside  Intramural  office.
BASKETBALL—Schedule now posted
outside the Intramural office. First
round gafnes start on Nov.  12.
CURLING—Nov. 10, 5:00: Beta I vs.
For I (rk. 1); For n vs. Eng 11 (rk. 25;
Com vs. Dekes (rk. 3); Beta II vs. Eng
IV (rk. 4); Eng VII vs. Eng V (rk. 5);
Eng Vni vs. Eng VI (rk. 6).
CROSS COUNTRY RESULTS—1) WoTr
Schamberger, Med. 2;2) Jan Atlung,
Eng.; 3) Paul Dooper, SAM; 4) Rolf
Lueck, SAM; 5) Lorn Sheppard, SAM;
6) fe. Naesgaard, Eng.; 7) A. Maclean,
Law.
She will
be proud
to know
her
diamond
came from
O. B. Allan's
'rXXMM      $275
You Must See It!
LIMITED
REGISTERED JEWELLER, AMERICAN GEM SOCIETY
Granvill« crt Pm-Jar Sit**-* 1904 Page 20
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, November 7, 1969
'TIS THE TIME of the year to 'groove on the scenery'. This shot was taken 5,000 feet
up on Cloudburst Mountain. The Tantalus Range rises out of the snow-covered rocks
and newly formed lakes in the valley, and is an excellent place to escape from the
smog, and artificial scenery of the city scene. —John frizell photo
BoG goes in hiding: yet to act on enrolment cut
The UBC board of governors
will continue to operate in
secrecy.
At its meeting Tuesday night,
the board rejected the idea of
opening further meetings to the
public.
Board members were either
unavailable or refused comment
Thursday.
Meanwhile, the board has not
yet    acted    on    the    senate's
recommendation to reduce first
year enrolment from 4,000 to
3,400.
The new enrolment policy,
which also includes early
admission to grade 12 students
and faculty recommendations of
standards for second year
admission, first went to the board
Oct. 7.
"It was deferred to the next
meeting so all the implications of
such a policy could be examined," It was deferred again Tuesday were in Ottawa for the convention
said information director Arnie because registrar Jack Parnall and of the Association of Universities
Myers. academic   planner  Robert  Clark     and Colleges in Canada.
UCLA students accredited
for Angela Davis course
LOS ANGELES (CUP-CPS)-At least for the time being, UCLA
students enrolled in a philosophy course taught by avowed
Communist instructor Angela Davis will receive academic credit.
UCLA chancellor Charles Young ordered the school's registrar
to accept credit for Davis' course, Philosophy 99. At the same time,
he warned class members to check with the appropriate department
head to make sure their academic status will be protected in case UC
regents de-credit the course.
Early this fall, the regents decided to fire Davis because of her
affiliation with the Communist Party. On October 20 a Superior
Court judge in Los Angeles ruled the firing illegal. The regents,
. however, are expected to seek reversal of the court decision.
Admin defied
at St. Mary's
HALIFAX (CUP) - Students in residence at St. Mary's
University defied their administration Monday by voting to
abolish residence curfews and regulations prohibiting visits
between male and female dwellings.
Instead, the students intend to substitute rules prohibiting
property damage and inconvenience to other students, and
determine curfews and visiting hours on their own.
The residence students approved the action, voting 499 to
14 after petitions to the administration failed to bring any
response.
Female students particularly objected to a midnight
curfew on their activities, but their complaints didn't bother
associate dean of women Irene Hayes who said she was
instrumental in creating the curfew and didn't intend to change
her position.
After making their decision, students held a symbolic
"rule-breaking", criss-crossing between the sexually-segregated
residences.
The St. Mary's administration has not responded to the
student action, although administration president Henry Labelle
told the local commercial press he "didn't think boys and girls
should be able to move from one building to another without
regulations."
An administration committee on student life urged
Labelle to follow the wishes of the students.

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