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The Ubyssey Nov 8, 2010

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Array Flabbergasted by talent SINCE 1918
THE SEX
INDUSTRY:
HOW AND WHY
STUDENTS ARE
INVOLVED.
NOVEMBER 08,2010
• VOLUME 92, NUMBER X3X
• ROOM 24, STUDENT UN30N BUTLD3NG
• PUBL3SHED MONDAY AND THURSDAY
• FEEDBACK@UBYSSEY.CA
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EU
BYSS
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*£* 2/UBYSSEY.CA/E VENTS/2010.11.0 8
NOVEMBER 08, 2010
VOLUME XCII,  N°XIX
EDITORIAL
COORDINATING EDITOR
Justin McElroy: coordinating@ubysseyca
NEWS EDITOR
ArshyMann: news@ubyssey.ca
ASSOCIATE NEWS EDITOR
Sally Crampton : associate.news@ubyssey.ca
CULTURE EDITORS
Jonny Wakefield & Bryce Warnes:
culture@ubyssey ca
ASSOCIATE CULTURE EDITOR
Anna Zoria: associate.culture@ubysseyca
SPORTS EDITOR
Vacant
FEATURES EDITOR
Trevor Record :features@ubyssey ca
PHOTO EDITOR
Geoff Lister: photos@ubysseyca
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Virginie Menard: production@ubysseyca
COPY EDITOR
Kai Green: copy@ubysseyca
MULTIMEDIA EDITOR
Tara Martellaro: multimedia@ubysseyca
ASSOCIATE MULTIMEDIA EDITOR
StephanieWarren: associate.nulHmedia@ubyssey.ca
VIDEO EDITOR
David Marino: video@ubysseyca
WEBMASTER
Jeff Blake: webmaster@ubysseyca
Room 24, Student Union Building
6138 Student Union Boulevard
Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1
tel: 604.822.2301
web: www.ubyssey.ca
e-mail: feedback@ubysseyca
BUSINESS
Room 23, Student Union Building
print advertising: 604-822-1654
business office: 604.822.6681
web advertising: 604-822-1658
e-mail: advertising@ubysseyca
BUSINESS MANAGER
FerniePereira: business@ubysseyca
PRINT AD SALES
Kathy Yan Li: advertising@ubysseyca
WEB AD SALES
Paul Bucci: webads@ubysseyca
ACCOUNTS
AlexHoopes: accounts@ubysseyca
LEGAL
The Ubyssey is the official student newspaper ofthe University of British Columbia. It is published every Monday
and Thursday by The Ubyssey Publications Society. We are
an autonomous, democratically run student organization,
and all students are encouraged to participate.
Editorials are chosen and written by the Ubyssey staff
They are the expressed opinion of the staff, and do not
necessarily reflect the views of the UPS or the University of British Columbia. All editorial content appearing in
The Ubyssey is the property ofthe UPS. Stories, opinions,
photographs and artwork contained herein cannot be reproduced without the expressed, written permission ofthe
UPS. The Ubyssey is a founding member of Canadian University Press (CUP) and adheres to CUP's guiding principles
fetters to the editor must be under 300 words. Please
include your phone number, student number and signature
[not for publication) as well as your year and faculty with
all submissions. ID will be checked when submissions are
dropped off at the editorial office of The Ubyssey; otherwise verification will be done by phone. "Perspectives" are
opinion pieces over 300 words but under 750 words and
are run according to space. Opinion pieces will not be run
until the identity ofthe writer has been verified. The Ubyssey reserves the right to edit submissions for length and
clarity. All letters must be received by 12 noon the day before intended publication, fetters received afterthis point
will be published in the following issue unless there is an
urgent time restriction or other matter deemed relevant
by the Ubyssey staff.
It is agreed by all persons placing display or classified
advertising that if the Ubyssey Publications Society fails
to publish an advertisement or if an error in the ad occurs
the liability ofthe UPS will not be greater than the price
paid for the ad. The UPS shall not be responsible forslight
changes or typographical errors that do not lessen the value or the impact ofthe ad
EVENTS
ONGOING EVENTS
UBYSSEY PRODUCTION • Come
help us create this baby! Learn
about layout and editing. Expect
to be fed. • Every Sunday and
Wednesday, 2pm.
MULTIVERSITY GALLERIES CURATOR
TOURS* Learn about a different
aspect of the Multiversity Galleries from a different curator
every week. From the local to
the global and the mundane to
the arcane, let the experts introduce you to the objects that
intrigue them most. Along the
way, you'll gain fresh perspectives related to collecting, consulting, researching, interpreting and exhibiting in the Museum. • Tuesdays 1-2pm, Museum of Anthropology, $14/$12 included with admission.
MONDAY, NOV. 8
DUSK LANDSCAPE PAINTING* Robert Singley, a DMA student in
music composition, will present
a concert event of organ sounds
and sunset images. Singley will
create music to accompany several films he is creating, all based
on the concept of "dusk landscape painting." • 8-9pm, Coach
House, Green College, 6201 Cecil
Green Park Road, free event, contact gc.events@ubc.ca for more
information.
TERRY GLOBAL SPEAKER SERIES:
DAMBISA M0Y0 • Debunking the
current model of international aid promoted by both Hollywood celebrities and policy makers, Dr Moyo offers a bold new
road map for financing development of the world's poorest
countries that guarantees economic growth and a significant
decline in poverty—without reliance on foreign aid or aid-related assistance. A question and
answer period will follow. Copies of Dead Aid: Why aid is not
working and how there is a better way for Africa will be sold at
the event. • 12-1:30pm, Chan
Centre, ticket info afterry.ubc.ca.
INTRODUCTION TO ADOBE INDESIGN •
In this course, you get the opportunity to design a print project of your own, with hands-on
instruction in the use of this powerful layout program. At the completion of this course, you will
have gained an understanding
of the basics of colour management, font usage and print production, as well as a working
knowledge of the layout and design tools available in InDesign.
• Nov. 4-Dec. 9, 6:30pm, UBC
Robson Square, go to tech.ubc.
ca for more information.
TUESDAY, NOV. 9
EUROPEAN SUMMERPROGRAM INFORMATION SESSION • This five-week
summer program offered through
the Manchester Business School at
the University of Manchester provides the opportunity to study with
one of the top business schools
in Europe, while visiting England,
France, Spain and the Czech Republic. This program is open to students who have completed year
three. The program includes two
modules: European Business Environment and International Business Project. Participants earn six
credits for the program. • 12:30-
1:30pm, Room 33, Henry Angus,
go to students.ubc.ca/global for
more information.
PURPLE AND YELLOW WORK PARTY •
Volunteers help maintain the fleet
of community bikes. No experience is necessary and new volunteers will learn how to do repairs
by being paired with more experienced volunteers. Pizza is provided. Wear something that can get
dirty. • 6-9pm, Bike Kitchen, north
side of the SUB.
THURSDAY, NOV. 11
REMEMBRANCE DAY* This year's
UBC Remembrance Day ceremony will be held on Thursday,
November 11 in the War Memorial Gym. The event is open to all,
and doors open at 10am. It is an
opportunity to honour and remember all those who served in times
of war, military conflict and peace.
• 10:30-11:30am, War Memorial Gym, go to ceremonies.ubc.ca/
remembrance-day-ceremony for
more information.
THE MADONNA PAINTER • A play
written by Michel-Marc Bouchard, translated by Linda Gaboriau.
To avert the Spanish flu epidemic
of 1918, a young priest commissions an itinerant Italian artist to
paint a triptych of the Madonna,
an act he is convinced will ward
off the plague. The painter insists
on using local girls as models, and
four young women—all named
Mary—vie for the honour. The
artist requires a virgin, but does
everything in his power to render
his choice otherwise. The Madonna Painter is a dark and humorous fable which plays on our notions about sex, secrets and sacred ecstasies. • Runs until Nov.
20, 7:30-9:30pm, Telus Studio
Theatre, $22/$15/$10, buy tickets online at ubctheatre.univer-
sitytickets.com.
UBC FILM SOCIETY SCREENING: THE
OTHER GUYS • The UBC Film Society will be showing The Other
Guys, starring Will Ferrell and Mark
Wahlberg. Two mismatched New
York City detectives seize an opportunity to step up like the city's top
cops, whom they idolize —only
things don't quite go as planned.
• Runs until Nov. 14, 9:15-11pm,
Norm Theatre, SUB, $2.50 members, $5 non-members.
SUNDAY, NOV. 14
FALL TABLE TENNIS CHAMPIONSHIPS
• Show off your table tennis skills
at the UBC REC Fall Table Tennis Championships. One of our
most popular tournaments, both
singles and doubles options are
offered. Register by Nov. 8, roster
due Nov. 9, waiver and add/drop
deadline Nov. 12. • 9am-5pm, SRC
Gyms, $10.50-$28, limited paddles available.
BOREALIS STRING QUARTET* In honour of Remembrance Day, the
quartet will perform Shostakovich's String Quartet No. 8 and other works. Special guest includes
George Zukerman on the bassoon.
Please note for Recital Hall concerts with an admission charge,
only cash is accepted. • 3-5pm,
Recital Hall, UBC Music Building,
$15, call (604) 822-5574 or e-mail
concerts@interchange.ubc.ca for
more information.
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 17
JEREMY FISHER WITH EMILY BROWN •
Canadian folk-pop troubadour Jeremy Fisher first broke onto the scene
a decade ago, and since then his
career has been on a steady upward trajectory. A nomadic musician with a strong DIY ethic, his
artistry extends past making music and playing multiple instruments
to producing an accomplished, satirical web series, as well as creating and directing music videos for
himself and other artists. • 7pm, St
James Hall, 3214 W 10h Ave, $17
advance, buytickets afticketweb.ca.
UBC FILM SOCIETY SCREENING: MAO'S
LAST DANCER* The UBC Film Society will be showing Mao's Last Dancer, based on the autobiography of Li
Cunxin. It is the inspiring true story of
his extraordinary journey from a poor
upbringing in rural China to international stardom as a world-class ballet
dancer. Mao's Last Dancerweaves a
moving tale about the questforfree-
dom and the courage it takes to live
your own life. • Runs until Nov. 21,
9:15-11:15pm, Norm Theatre, SUB,
$2.50 members, $5 non-members.
STUDYATLMU(GERMANY)* Ludwig-
Maximilians-Universitat Munich
is one of the leading research universities in Europe, with a more
than 500-year-long tradition and
over 44,000 students (15 per cent
of whom are from abroad). With
degree programs available in 150
subjects in numerous combinations, the array of courses they
offer is extremely wide. Founded in 1472 and originally located
in Ingolstadt, LMU is now located in Munchen (Munich) and it is
the second largest university in Germany. Facilitated by an LMU staff
member, come learn about international learning opportunities at LM U.
• 1-2pm, Room 260, IrvingK. Barber.
THURSDAY, NOV. 18
UBC SYMPHONIC WIND ENSEMBLE •
Featuring over 100 musicians from
the UBC band program, this concert is inspired by music of the
Medieval and Renaissance periods and pays homage to the
rich tradition of wind playing from
those earlier centuries. Several
of the works employ traditional consorts of woodwind, brass
and percussion instruments,
while others offer a fresh look
at the source music by borrowing colours, motifs and forms. •
8-10pm, Chan Centre, tickets for
free evening concerts are available
at the Chan Centre ticket office on
performance day starting at noon.
FRIDAY, NOV. 19
UBC FILM SOCIETY PRESENTS: THE
BIG LEBOWSKI BEVERAGE GARDEN
• The UBC Film Society will be
holding The Big Lebowski Beverage Garden! Come see the movie that defined a generation of
drunk bowlers with its humour.
There will be themed drinks and
cool pre-show prizes. • 19+,
7-11 pm, movie starts at 8pm,
Norm Theatre, SUB, $3 members, $6 non-members.
MONDAY, NOV. 22
THE AMS ANNUAL GIFT FAIR • One-
stop shopping for great gifts and
decorations from products imported around the world to locally
handcrafted items. There will be
new vendors each week. • Nov.
22-Dec. 3, 10:30am-5:30pm,
SUB Main Concourse.
TUESDAY, NOV. 23
NIGHT OF A THOUSAND DINNERS
(N1KD)• As one of I RSAs premier
events and the largest student organized fundraiser for land-mine
awareness, you will not want to
miss this! Featuring a silent auction, performance bythe Corpus
Christi College Chamber Choir,
a mouth-watering three-course
dinner and a stunning art installation by V. Tony Hauser. • 6:30-
9:30pm, 3250 Commercial Drive,
$40 students, $80 non-students,
tickets available online at irsa.rez-
go.com or in SUB 30-G.
Vancouver MBA Conference
Ready
for your
MBA?
Wednesday November 10, 2010, 3;30pm-9:30pm
Marriott Vancouver Pinnade Downtown, 1128 West Hastings Street
,, *.
MBA Panel Discussions, School Presentations
MBA Fair, GMAT Strategy Session
Register today! TheMBATour.com
theMBAtour
Your future begins fttrt
Cranfleld
JE
Simon Fraser
Univ ut Saskatchewan
CU Hong Kong
McGill
UNB Saint JDhfi
Univ ol Toronto
HEC Montreal
McMaster
Unlv of Alberta
Unlv ol Toronto, Mlaaissaugua
HKJUST
Queens
Unlv of British Columbia
Univ ol Victoria
Hurt International
Richard Ivey
Univ ot California, San Diego
Univ ot Windsor
York - SchutBh 2010.11.08/UBYSSEY.CA/NEWS/3
NEWS
EDITOR ARSHY MANN»news@ubyssey.ca
ASSOCIATE SALLY CRAMPTON»associate.news@ubyssey.ca
Quidditch sweeps into the muggle realm
MICKI COWAN
mcowan@ubyssey.ca
Quidditch, the popular flying
sport from JK Rowling's Harry
Potter series, has made it to the
'muggle' world and onto our very
own campus as of last week. "It
was just recently approved by
the AMS, which is really exciting. We have 112 people on our
Facebook group but paid members are about 30," said Verena
Facundo, founder and president
ofthe UBC Quidditch Club.
"It started off as a joke between Sebastian (executive) and
I; then we started researching
it. We figured out that it's an
actual sport and that over 200
colleges in the States have official 'quidditch' teams, and that
there's also the official International Quidditch Association
(IQA). So then we realized that
only three universities in Canada have teams, and we just started developing it," she said. "It
was quite easy to stir up interest
because everyone finds it such
a ridiculously amusing idea."
Hill explained that, similar to
Rowling's vision, there are three
types of balls—quaffles, bludgers
and the golden snitch. "The chasers put the quaffle, which is a
volleyball, past the goal keeper
while opposing teams, the beaters, attempt to hit them with the
bludgers, which are dodgeballs."
As in Harry Potter, the golden snitch is a magical ball that
rapidly zips around the quidditch field, but a few adjustments had to be made. "In the
muggle version ofthe game, the
snitch is carried by a non-partisan person dressed in gold—the
snitch runner. The snitch runner should be fast and have a
good attitude. In order to end the
game, the seeker has to pull the
sock (the snitch) hanging from
the back of the snitch runner's
Stop that pretend Quaffle! PHOTO COURTESY CARLETON QUIDDITCH
pants. Seekers can't physically touch the snitch runner but
the snitch runner is free to harass and irritate the seekers,
much to the amusement of the
spectators," said Andrea Hill,
coach and founder of the Carleton University Quidditch team
in Ottawa.
Another obstacle was the problem of flying: quidditch is played
on broomstick. "We don'thave the
technology to fly 50 feet in the
air, but we do run around with
broomsticks between our legs,"
Hill said.
Carleton University's team
is almost a year old and has
already grown a lot. "We have
about 40 players on our team
now and 19 will be travelling
to the Quidditch World Cup in
New York city [from] November
13-14," she said.
One issue seems to be finding
other teams to practice with. According to Hill, "The nearest team
to Carleton is St. Lawrence University in Canton, NY and next
is McGill University in Montreal. We played them in Montreal in March...The University of
Toronto and Ryerson University both have teams and are able
to scrimmage together regularly because they are both in the
same city." Far removed from the
eastern quidditch niche, the UBC
Quidditch team plans to practice against each other, as well
as againsthigh school teams that
have formed in the area.
"The UBC Quidditch Club is
going to arrange matches every
second Saturday. Captains are
in charge of their teams and
the team can decide how often
they want to practice, so some
teams might want to just show
up at games and just take it really recreationally and some
teams may want to go all out."
In terms of goals for the future, Facundo hopes to create a
varsity team that can be sent to
compete in international quidditch tournaments, including
the Quidditch World Cup, which,
according to its website, has over
60 teams currently registered
for this year's tournament.
Second-year math student Peter Salton, an avid reader ofthe
Harry Potter books and big fan of
the movies, was thrilled by the
idea of muggle quidditch. "They
can go around campus chasing
[the seeker]? Can I be a seeker? I
want to be a seeker! Two thumbs
way way up, I'd totally consider
joining the team," he said.
Aside from playing quidditch, both the UBC and Carleton teams have plans of hosting other Harry Porter-themed
events. For UBC, Harry Potter
movie nights and field trips to
the theatre for the upcoming
seventh installment of the series are being planned, while
Carleton University has already
hosted a Harry Pofier-themed
bake sale, complete with chocolate frogs, cauldron cakes and
licorice wands.
"Membership is $5, it's not
too late to sign up. We're going
to have another sign up day at
7pm on Tuesday at Vanier in
the Commonroom," said Facundo. "It's BYOB—bring your own
brooms." tl
Canadian university presidents on India mission
ARSHY MANN
news@ubyssey.ca
UBC President Stephen Toope,
along with 14 other Canadian
university presidents, is on a
seven-day excursion to India in
order to build ties with Indian
universities.
The delegation is travelling on
behalf of the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada
(AUCC). It is the largest group of
Canadian university leaders to
travel to India.
"Strong universities help
build strong societies. They
also strengthen regional economies while enhancing a country's capacity to contribute to the
world economy," Toope said in
a statement regarding the mission. "Canadian universities can
build beneficial partnerships
in India to create exceptional
learning opportunities for students and research collaborations that improve our societies
nationally and globally."
The group will be travelling
to Dehli and Pune and will be
meeting with Indian educators,
members of the business community and government officials.
They will also be participating in a summit on advanced
education organized by the Federation of Indian Chambers of
Commerce and Industry.
India is facing a shortage of
seats for university education. In
his spring convocation speech,
Toope said that India would need
to build around 800 new universities over the next decade,
with 60,000 students each, to
meet demand.
Tens of thousands of students
travel to Australia, the UK and
the United States for school.
However, because of stringent
visa requirements, only around
4000 come to Canada.
The trip comes at a time when
a bill is presently making its way
through the Indian Parliament
that would allow foreign universities to open satellite campuses in India. The Foreign Educational Institution (Regulation of
Entry and Operation) Bill would
mean that for the universities
that do setup in India, students
would pay domestic tuition, tl
Will more Indians be putting on their gowns here?
DAVID CHEN ILLUSTRATION/THE UBYSSEY
NEWS BRIEFS
GEOFF LISTER PH0T0/THE UBYSSEY
TOTEM PARK COMPETES TO
SAVE ENERGY
First-year residence Totem Park
will be working to reduce energy consumption in a three-week
competition this month. From
Nov. 1-19, residents will be participating in Do It in the Dark, UBC's
energy-saving contest, as part of
Campus Conservation Nationals (CCN), an annual US-based
competition. Students will be pitted against other students, residence houses and 39 other universities in North America.
UBC is the only Canadian university involved in the CCN this
year, and while Totem Park is
currently the only student residence on campus taking part,
competition coordinators will
be considering improvement
and extension of the contest to
Place Vanier next year.
WORKING AT NIGHT POSES
HEALTH RISKS, UBC STUDY
SHOWS
A recent UBC study exposes
night shift work may lead to unsafe working conditions, making
late-night Canadian employees
twice as likely to be injured on
the job than daytime workers.
Data for over 30,000 working Canadians between 1996
and 2006 was examined. While
work injuries had an overall decline, the injury rate for night
shift workers did not decrease.
Increased fatigue and reduced
alertness are cited as increasing the possibility of hazardous
late-night work environments.
The study was co-authored
by research associate Chris
McLeod from UBC's Centre
for Health Services and Policy Research, and clinical faculty member Paul Demers from
the UBC School of Population
and Public Health.
FIRE RAVAGES QUEBEC COLLEGE RESIDENCE
SHERBROOKE, Que. (CUP) —
Nearly 50 students at Champlain
Regional College, in Sherbrooke,
Que., have been displaced after
a fire ripped through a residence
building on Monday.
No students were injured in
the blaze.
According to a press release
on the Champlain website, 50
firefighters were called to the
site when the three-alarm fire
broke out at around 7pm. The
firefighters were able to take
control of the situation, which
stopped the fire from spreading to the surrounding buildings.
La Tribune reported that the
fire was under control by 9pm.
The Red Cross and the Champlain Students' Association is currently accepting donations for the
affected students. The Red Cross
is also providing some temporary
lodging and is working to collect
students' belongings. 4/UBYSSEY.CA/NEWS/2010.11.08
UBC medical school diversifying admissions
Looking for students from various academic backgrounds
NICOLA GAILITS
Contributor
Medical schools across Canada,
including UBC, are re-vamping
their application process by adding new requirements and eliminating outdated criteria.
Three years ago, the multiple
mini interview (MMI) replaced
the panel interview. According
to Dr Joseph Finkler, the associate dean of admissions for the
UBC Medical School, "There was
evidence that the predictive value ofthe [panel] interview on the
performance in medical school
was about zero or even negative." MMIs give the applicants
a chance to showcase a variety
of skills, including their interpersonal skills and ethical and
moral judgment.
"Well-
roundedness
was definitely an
important factor
in the admissions
process and
contributed to my
acceptance."
JORDAN HAMILTON
FIRST-YEAR MEDICAL STUDENT
Previously, applicants were
asked to write autobiographical essays explaining their reasons for pursuing medicine. "Experts found that there was no
validity of the autobiographical essay," Finkler said. The essays "were hugely edited and almost Action."
He described a recent study
by The Times that reviewed medical school autobiographical essays. The study found a story in
which the applicant's pajamas
had caught on Are when he or
she was young, causing serious
injuries.
According to the applicant,
his or her desire to study medicine stemmed from the dedicated care he or she received from
burn unit doctors. The study
found this story had been used
over 233 times. The essay is no
longer a part of the application
at UBC.
To replace it, Finkler said,
"This year there will be a sample writing station during the interview. They will spontaneously respond to a question, a simple scenario." With this method,
reviewers know with certainty
who wrote the piece.
The reference requirement
has also changed. Finkler explained that having a personal
reference was of no use because
no one would "say anything
but superlatives." The personal reference has been replaced
with a professional or another
academic reference, along with
a community-related and academic reference.
These changes are designed
to recruit a better and more diverse cohort of doctors. Dr Graham Wong, staff at UBC and VGH
since 2003, has noticed that "the
UBC class is much more culturally diverse now than when [he]
graduated," 15 years ago.
First-year medical student Jordan Hamilton said, "Quite a few
[of my classmates] were varsity athletes, have extensive research experience or have traveled abroad." He believes that
"well-roundedness was definitely an important factor in the admissions process and contributed to my acceptance."
When asked about socioeconomic make-up, Finkler said
he's "working on enhancing socioeconomic diversity." Ideally,
admissions would like to "level
the playing field and make the
treating population mirror the
provider population."
Looking forward, Finkler
said he "would like us to not be
married to processes and procedures just because they looked
good and felt good." By incorporating studies that evaluate exactly what factors correlate with
later performance in medical
school, the process is refined.
"Medicine is changing, so
when something says 'this
doesn't work'...It's time to let
[it] go.- n
Artsies contemplate a medical career. JON CHIANG PHOTO /THE UBYSSEY
Report puts spotlight on academic fraud
New study calls for Canada-wide policy on research misconduct
ANDRACERNAVSKIS
The McGill Daily
MONTREAL (CUP) - Canada
needs a better way to monitor
and respond to research misconduct, according to a report published by the Canadian Council
of Academies.
The report, titled Honesty, Accountability and Trust: Fostering Research Integrity in Canada, was published on October
21 in response to federal government findings of 38 cases
of abuse that have occurred out
of 160 alleged cases of scientific
misconduct in the last decade.
Paul Davenport, former president of the University of Western Ontario, chaired the panel that produced the report. According to the CCA website, the
organization is dedicated to "science-based, expert assessments
to inform public policy development in Canada."
In an email, Davenport said
academic misconduct is hard
to track.
"Canada, the US and other
countries have no way of estimating what percentage of misconduct cases are actually reported," he wrote. "It is not possible to state how many cases
there are, what the trend in the
number of cases is and in what
disciplines the cases occur."
The CCA's report calls for the
creation of a Canadian Council for
Research Integrity, which would
be independent from the federally-funded Tri-Council—the body
currently mandated to supervise
issues of research integrity.
The CCRI would "function
as a much-needed educational
and advisory arm on issues of
research integrity. Its key role
would be to build and promote a
proactive approach to research
integrity in Canada," the report
reads.
Cathleen Meechan, CCA's
communications director, said
the report does not tackle specific cases of academic misconduct.
"There is not any set of clear
evidence that says one way or another about cases of misconduct
and if there is an overwhelming
amount of cases in one field or
another," she said. "There has
not been enough research done
on research misconduct itself."
The report is meant to provide the federal government
with information so they can
create policy around research
integrity.
"We provide a diagnosis of
sorts and then the government
determines what kind of prescription they want to pursue,"
said Meechan. "This report was
requested as part of a review
that the Tri-Council is undertaking on research integrity. It will
help to inform that review. We
think that this is a good report
to spur an important discussion
within the research community
about research integrity."
The report concludes that
there is a need to instill a culture of research integrity in Canada. But in order for this to happen, the report says there needs
to be a common way of approaching breaches of academic integrity across Canada.
"We need to have a much more
systematic approach taken at the
university level to research integrity," said Meechan.
Davenport stressed the importance of creating a better
system of dealing with academic misconduct.
"We live in a knowledge-based
society, where research is vital
to our future social and economic health, and research can only
be used for public policy if it is
viewed as trustworthy by citizens and their governments,"
he said.
"Failure to deal with the research integrity issue ultimately will mean that even outstanding research will not have the
impact on public policy that it
should. All Canadians have a
very large stake in this issue."
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■IdMMibWfAlMt.tf talMI 2010.11.08/UBYSSEY.CA/NATIONAL/5
NATIONAL
EDITOR ARSHY MANN»news@ubyssey.ca
ASSOCIATE SALLY CRAMPTON»associate.news@ubyssey.ca
Campbell leaves divided legacy on advanced education
ARSHY MANN
news@ubyssey.ca
Gordon Campbell is likely UBC's
best-known resident.
The soon-to-be ex-premier of
British Columbia represents
UBC and the surrounding area
in the BC legislature as MLA
for Vancouver-Point Grey. But
his connections to the university reach much further back.
Born and raised just outside
of campus in Shaughnessy,
Campbell's father, Charles Gordon Campbell, was the assistant dean of medicine at UBC.
He was also an alcoholic who
killed himself when Campbell
was 13 years old.
Like many teenagers associated with UBC, Campbell attended University Hill Secondary,
where he was the student body
president.
Though his degrees come
from Dartmouth and Simon Fraser University, Campbell did do
a brief stint in UBC's law program, deciding partway through
to take a job with the City of Vancouver instead.
He has been the MLA for Vancouver-Point Grey for 14 years.
And in many ways, Campbell
has played as much of a role in
what UBC is today as the university has played in what he
became.
On higher education, he has
been a boon for universities but
a bane for student finances.
Ending the NDP's six-year
freeze on tuition rates meant
universities have had the funding to invest heavily on capital
projects on campuses, especially
for research-intensive universities such as UBC and SFU.
"Ifyou tour any ofthe post-secondary institutions in the province, you'll see a significant new
capital infrastructure in the areas
of research and academic spaces," said Blair Littler, vice president ofthe Research Universities
Council of British Columbia. "Internationally and nationally, the
research institutions have been
recognized. Right now you have
three-UVic, SFU and UBC-all
in the top 200, according to the
Times Education Supplement.
"UNBC, on top of that, has
been recognized for its size as
one ofthe top research institutions in BC," he added.
Littler went on to say that
the creation of 25,000 seats for
undergraduates and 2500 for
graduates, as well as doubling
the number of doctors being
trained, are also positive contributions that Campbell has made
to post-secondary education.
Under the Liberals, six colleges became universities and two
new private universities, University Canada West and Quest University, opened.
These policies, however, have
done little to boost his reputation with students.
"I think ifyou talk to students
they're very unhappy about the
increase in student tuition," said
Dawn Black, the NDP's critic for
advanced education and labour
market development. "It's more
than doubled over the last ten
years under the leadership of
Premier Campbell and the BC
Liberal party. Student debt has
increased under his leadership,
as have the interest rates that are
charged on student loans, so I'm
not sure he would get a passing
grade on access to education."
When the Campbell government decided to end the tuition
freeze, students objected fiercely.
In March of 2002, over 400 UBC
students forced their way into
the Old Administration Building,
many spending the night, to protest tuition increases.
'"We the students of UBC have
taken the President's Office,' began a cry that was repeated by the
hundreds of students who filled the
entire first floor of the building,"
said a 2002 story in The Ubyssey.
"Students called on the university to conduct an inquiry into
the benefits of tuition increases
and demanded that the BoG and
UBC President Martha Piper lobby the provincial government for
increased education funding."
Campbell also cut student grant
programs in 2004 and again in
2009, and BC's interest rate on
studentloans remains one ofthe
highest in the country.
"The cuts to the BC Student
grants program and the cuts to
non-repayable financial aid [are]
what's put British Columbian students' level of borrowing much
higher than the Canadian average," said Black.
Campbell's parting gift for
post-secondary education was
to divide colleges and universities under different ministerial
portfolios. Colleges were placed under the Ministry of Regional Economic and Skills Development,
while universities now fall under the Ministry for Science and
Universities.
Ida Chong, the new minis
ter for science and univer
sities, justified the de
cision by saying that
"science and univer
sities are really going to be an im
portant part of    //t
our economic   v/,
future going forward." However,
Black said that few
people have understood the justification for the
decision.
"I've met with
some ofthe faculty associations and
I've met with some of
the student associations
and nobody seems to be
able to figure out what
the rationale is. BC is
the only jurisdiction in
Canada that has done
this split," she said.
"Some people are
concerned that it's a
way of hiding off the
colleges and the applied programs and
perhaps increasing
tuition fees on the
university side."
Black said that
Campbell's legacy for
students is a negative
one.
"Education is restricted more and more [for] ordinary families," she said.
"[Students] fear going on
to university [and] coming
out with such a high debt
load." til
TIMELINE: GORDON CAMPBELL AND ADVANCED EDUCATION
2001
2002
JUNE 5
Gordon Campbell sworn in as
the 34th Premier of BC.
FEBRUARY 11
Tuition rates are unfrozen, leading to massive
increases.
MARCH 13
Students occupy Old
Administration Building at
UBC.
2005
2004
JUNE 5
Tuition increases tied
to inflation.
FEBRUARY 17
$30 million grant
program axed.
FEBRUARY 10
Campbell promises
25,000 new student space:
by 2010.
2007
2008
SEPTEMBER 1
Five BC colleges become
universities.
2010
2009
NOVEMBER 4
Campbell announces
resignation.
OCTOBER 26
Universities and colleges split
between two portfolios.
AUGUST
$15 million further cuts to grant programs
BC premier resigns
amid HST woes
DANIELLE POPE
Western Bureau Chief
VICTORIA (CUP) - BC Premier
Gordon Campbell stepped down
as leader ofthe provincial Liberal party this week, leaving many
around the province mystified—
and others celebrating.
Campbell announced his
resignation in Vancouver on
November 3, saying that "it's
time for a new person to lead,"
and that he would be making a
"smooth and orderly transition"
for the next leader and premier.
"After considerable soul
searching and discussion with
my family I have decided to ask
the BC Liberal Party executive to
hold a leadership convention at
the earliest possible date to select a new leader for our party,"
Campbell said in a statement released on November 4.
During his announcement,
Campbell noted the fallout from
the introduction of HST, which
has left him with a nine per cent
approval rating.
Now the BC Liberal party has
less than a month to meet and
must hold a leadership convention within six weeks. While the
party has denied the idea that
there was any internal push
to remove Campbell, pundits
are saying this "facelift" may
come too late to recapture voter's sympathy. 6/UBYSSEY.CA/ADVERTISEMENT/2010.11.08
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AND ECONOMY 2010.11.08/UBYSSEY.CA/CULTURE/7
CULTURE
EDITORS BRYCE WARNES & JONNY WAKEFIELD »culture@ubyssey.ca
ASSOCIATE ANNA ZORIA»associate.culture@ubyssey.ca
Bulk up with Sprouts bulk buying club
DIANA FOXALL
Contributor
When it comes to the age-old
dilemma of quality versus
quantity, the latter often
gets pushed aside for more
affordable options. This is
especially apparent at the
grocery store, where dinner
means either Kraft Dinner
(cheap) or something a tad
more gourmet (not so cheap).
But what to do when your
wallet doesn't match your
high standards? Head to
Sprouts and join their bulk
buying club.
The bulk buying club was created several years ago when a
group of 400 UBC students wanted to purchase alternative food
options. It continues to offer local
organic goods at reduced rates; everything from spinach to toilet
paper is available to order, and
can be bought at approximately
15-30 per centless than its cost
in a supermarket. Prices are low
because products are sourced
directly from Lower Mainland
distributors such as Pro Organics and Horizons, and buying
in large quantities reduces the
cost per unit.
"The bulk buying club simply
provides students with access
to the distributors we use for
all Sprouts-related programs,"
said club coordinator Mandy
Desautels. "We don't gain anything from the students who
use this service, we simply facilitate this program so that
students have access to food
products that we don't carry
in the store."
So how does one make a purchase? "First, check out the catalogues available online and in
Sprouts. Then place an order by
simply filling out an order form
which can be found in Sprouts,
and submit it, along with payment, to the store volunteers,"
explained Desautels. Bulk products range in quantity from 2
kilograms to 25 pounds, but if
even the smallest quantity is too
much for your liking, you are
able to split the order with other members ofthe community.
For cash-strapped foodies,
the bulk buying club is manna—or parsley, chard, or shallots—from heaven, va
WHAT'S ON OFFER AT SPROUTS' BULK BUY?
Eggs, large, 15 dozen - $75
Basmati brown rice, 11.34kg - $5
Unbleached white flour, 10kg-$30
■Oats, quick rolled, 2kg - $7.30
•Pinto beans, 11.34kg-$433
►Banana chips, 6.36kg - $36.50
►Organic concord grape Juice, 8/1.36L - $6.09
►Carbonated spring water, 8/2L - $1.20 each
Bulk buy boss Mandy Desautels.   GEOFF LISTER PH0T0/THE UBYSSEY
Sex, Catholicism and Italian fresco
JONNY WAKEFIELD
culture@ubyssey.ca
The UBC Theatre's latest production wraps up sex, Catholicism
and Italian fresco painting in a
sex-stained bedsheet and places it teetering on the brink of
apocalypse.
The Madonna Painter, by
famed Quebecois playwright Michel Marc Bouchard, takes place
at the end of the First World War
during the Spanish Flu scare.
When the flu reaches the small
Quebec village of St Coeur du
Marie, many suspect English-
Canadian soldiers of spreading the flu deliberately to sicken
French-Canadian deserters. The
town seems ready to implode.
Into this situation walks
a young Catholic priest (Eric
Freilich) who proposes a peaceful solution: he will hire a painter to create a triptych of the Virgin Mary.
Holzschuh assures
us that The
Madonna Painter
will raise eyebrows.
"He's under the impression
that if he commissions this fresco, then the flu hopefully will
avoid the town," said director
Craig Holzschuh, a UBC Theatre
grad and the head of Theatre La
Seizieme, Vancouver's French
theatre company.
The situation spirals out of
control when the hired artist
insists on using a local girl
as the model. The town's four
A scene from the Madonna Painter. DAVID MARINO PH0T0/THE UBYSSEY
Marys—Mary Francis (Barbara
Kozicki), Mary Anne (Christine
Quintana), Mary Louise (Claire
Hesselgrave) and Mary ofthe Secrets (Megs Chenosky)—are manipulated by the painter Ales-
sandro (Jameson Parker). Each
of the Marys has a haunting,
otherworldly quality.
"One of them can read people's
futures in their bedsheets," said
Freilich. "Another can release
people who are suffering in their
lives. She allows them to die."
The play deals with sexuality
and religion in a frank way, and
Holzschuh assures us that TheMa-
donnaPainterwillraise eyebrows.
"Some people think that the-
matically it's a little too risky for
maybe some more conventional
theatres in town," he said.
In the end, The Madonna Painter is interesting for Bouchard's
sometimes inflammatory take on
religion, said Holzschuh. "Bouchard obviously has some very strong
ideas about the Catholic religion
and the idea of faith generally.
There are many people who blindly put their faith into faith.
"You get to see some wonderful, risky work andyougetto see
a debate of ideas, which is what
university is about." tl
UBC Theatres The Madonna Painter runs November 11-20 at the Telus
Studio Theatre.
—With files from Tara Martellaro and David Marino.
Get ready for Flu Season
ANDREW MACISAAC
Contributor
Over the past few weeks, Brian
Cochrane, a second-year in the
UBC MFA directing program,
has worked with a diverse cast
Spreading the bug. JESS LANDING PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
consisting of first-year under-
grads doing theatre as a hobby,
recent BFA grads bent on pursing theatre as a career and every variety of theatre-lover in
between. The reason? To put together a production of The Flu
Season, a play by Will Eno centred around a love story set in
a mental health institution and
the creation of a play.
The vehicle thatbroughtthis culmination of amateurs and aspiring
professionals together, aside from
a love ofthe stage, is the UBC Players' Club. The club, created in 1915,
was the first constituted club at UBC
and has continued to put on amateur theatre productions to this day.
"When we announced this play
I think we saw at least 40 actors
[in auditions] and there's only 6 in
the cast," said Cochrane at one of
the show's rehearsals in the basement of the SUB. "We saw a lot of
talented people, and so for me it
was kinda nice, because I didn't
know what to expect."
Some members of the cast
andcrewpresent
at the rehearsal
had been with
the Players' Club
for other produc-
tions,yetremain
pleasanfly surprised by these
sorts of enthusiastic reactions.
Danielle Bour-
gon, veteran of
three shows,
mentioned how
the productions also meet
favourable responses from audiences. "I always
get surprised at how many people
come out for Players' Club shows.
There's at least 30 people a night
and they've been known to have a
couple sold out runs as well, including matinee performances, which
doesn't really happen all that often at UBC."
As for the play itself, Cochrane
billed it as "funny and tragic and
absurd." There seemed to be a consensus among the cast as to the
humour in the script. When asked
whather favourite part about the
play was, actor Rachel Johns simply said, "The lines. There are
some very entertaining lines, especially the doctors. I would recommend comingto the play just
for the doctors." vl 8/UBYSSEY.CA/CULTURE/2010.11.08
DAN "THE DUDE" MANGAN
DAN MANGAN
•w/The Burning
•November 11 a
•Vogue Theatre
•Sold Out
GINNY MONACO
gmonaco@ubyssey.ca
"Sometimes nostalgia grows in the image of
things that never actually existed," says Dan
Mangan. It's a lesson the singer-songwriter
has learned after spending the better part of
five years on the road and rediscovering his
hometown of Vancouver.
Mangan's 2009 record
Nice, Nice, Very Nice (tided
in reference to a Kurt Vonnegut calypso) earned him
rave reviews, loyal fans
and XM Satellite Radio's
$25, 000 Verge Award.
Earlier this month, Mangan took home three Western Canadian Music
Awards, including 'Songwriter ofthe Year.' He
had to text in his acceptance speech. "Wouldn't
youlaiowit? I've been to the WCMA thelastfour
years, been nominated and almost won, and the
year I win I'm not there. It's
ironic as a black fly in your
chardonnay!"
In August Mee.
Mee, Very Nice was
released in the US by
indie label Arts and
Crafts. Mangan's
current Peculiar
Travel Suggestions
Tour (again, named
in reference to Vonnegut) was launched
in support.
SAMANTHA BULLIS ILLUSTRATION/THEUBYSSEY
It's been an "exhausting and amazing" a flair, taking Mangan across North America and Europe. "It's really easy to burn out
on the road, when you just collapse, but we're
slowly learninghow to take care of ourselves."
Mangan joked about the collective peer pressure for band runs. "Like, nine or ten in the
morning, as soon as you wake up, you'd see
other people in the hotel
getting ready to go for a
run and all of a sudden,
Hell you feel bad. So you put
nd 13 I on your sneakers."
Following two sold out
shows at the Vogue Theatre, Mangan will finish
his lengthy tour with a
handful of shows in the western provinces.
For now, Mangan is home in Vancouver.
"It's kind of amazing how quickly this city
has changed," he says. "[The last record]
was just coming to terms with the changes going on in the city, becoming an adult
and slightly jaded towards my own nostalgia. You have that place inyour heart for
how the city was and it's not going to be
k that way now.
"The way that I pictured the city
I when I was a kid was simultaneously
the way that someone who's older than
me, for them that's the tarnished version. That's kind of what it is to grow
old and think 'Oh, that's not the way
it used to be.'"
For allhis talk ofthe way things
used to be, Mangan is looking
ahead. In December, he
will begin recording the
follow-up to Mee, Mee
Very Nice. "I'm really
excited to move on and
■ make this next album.
I'm so lucky. I've just
got the most incredible musicians playing
with me and I'm feeling really good about
the material. I think
it's some of my strongest writing yet." tu
W00DHANDS NO LAPTOP JOCKS
ASHLfIGH MURPHY
Contributor
While Dan Werb of Toronto's Woodhands may
looklike he works atanlThelp desk, don'tmis-
take liim for just another
electro-pop laptop jockey. He showed up to our
interview sportingjeans,
glasses andabrowncordu
royblazer—notexactlythe
wardrobe of arockstar. Yet
when he and bandmate
I^aul Banwatt take the stage, their performances are over the top, sweaty and raucous.
Unlike many of their contemporaries, Wood-
hands are vereatifointheirperformance: they're
free oflaptops, back-ups and pre-recorded samples. It's just live drums, synths,andakeytar.
"Everything we play even though it's electronic music, we make live on the stage," said
Banwatt in an interview at the Ottawa Blues
Festival 'Although we
mightloop things, eveiything we loop, we
play first." Looping
has the downside of
repkyingaflubbed
riff over and over
but Werb has said
that "he's gotten •;
really good at ft
covering up [jhis] "
mistakes."
Werb said he
craves this freedom
to improvise. "What I
love about being just
two people is thatyou
have the freedom to re-
actto the momentin a
way that bigger bands
sometimes don't"
Werb grew up in
Vancouver but relocated to Toronto at 18,
where he met Banwatt. At that time, he
said, Vancouver's music scene was much
WOODHANDS
•w/ Maylee Todd and Analog Bell
Service
•November 9, Pit Pub
less inclusive. "What got me at the time was
there was a lot of territorialism It didn't seem
like bands were really supporting each other." When he began making music in Toronto
in his early 20s, lie was struck by the community of musicians living
and working there. Since
comingbackto Vancouver,
however, Werb said this
has changed. "The things
Ilove aboutToronto are realty starting to take off in
Vancouver. There's a lot of
really awesome committedpeople, like greatvi-
sual artists and great musicians."
Asforwhatlypeofvenuetheyprefato rock out
at, Dan assured me that they "like good crowds,
so wherever the good crowds are, that's what we
like." And whenaskedifthere was anything else
he wanted to say to all the Woodhands fans
at UBC his message was clear and simple:
"Come out and party with us!" tl
INDIANA JOEL ILLUSTRATION/THE UBYSSEY
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Interested in sex, news
and rock and roll?
Ubyssey culture meetings are at lpm on Fridays, SUB 24. All are welcome.
BRYCEWARBES | culture@ubyssey.ca
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U THEUBYSSEYc 2010.11.08/UBYSSEY.CA/FEATURE/9
FEATURE
EDITOR TREVOR RECORD»features@ubyssey.ca
UK study: 16.5 per cent of students consider sex work
Money is the leading motivator for students who would think about entering the sex industry
JOANNA CHIU
Contributor
"After doing massage therapy for a while,
I am now working as an escort full-time.
I see two to three clients a day. Seventy-
five per cent of my clients are kinkier and
twenty-five per cent want vanilla sex or
massage with orgasms."
This is how a male student, who wishes to remain anonymous, described how
he started to consider sex work earlier
this year to raise funds to attend a midwifery school in New Zealand. As a massage therapist working in Kitsilano who
identifies as "sex positive" and sexually
experimental, he found the transition
to working as an escort "pretty natural."
"The work is whatyou make it," he said.
"I find it really rewarding to help clients
explore their sexuality."
He is part of a number of students who
have taken work in the sex industry as a
source of income. "Participation in sex
work: students' views," a UK study published in May 2010 by the journal Sex Education, found that 16.5 per cent of undergraduate students would consider
working in the sex industry and that 93
per cent identified money as one of their
main motivations. The same study found
that 11 per cent would consider taking a
job as an escort.
Janine Benedet, a UBC Law associate
professor who researches laws relating
to sexual violence against women, including laws on prostitution and pornography, said that a "more lax legal regime"
in the UK may mean that the number of
"I hope it is different now, but in 1998, the
average 'feminist' student in university was
very much anti-sex work."
TRINARICKETTS
students engaging in prostitution could
be greater than the number of those involved in sex work in Canada.
SFU prostitution researcher Tamara
O'Doherty said that it "remains difficult
for the public to understand" why adults
would choose to work in the sex industry
without coercion or financial stress, but
explains that attractive factors include a
flexible work schedule, high pay and anonymity. "Sex work" is a broad term that
can describe jobs such as erotic modeling,
web cam work, stripping and erotic massage—which may or may not involve physical contact with clients. Benedet said the
term "sex work" is a politically contested
one, because it "de-genders the practice
of prostitution, which is overwhelmingly about men buying and selling women
and girls," many of whom are poor and
using it as a last resort.
Benedet said that she believes that
students are misled into thinking non-
prostitution forms of sex work are safer.
"Many of [the types of sex work in the
study] involve no direct physical contact
and may appear to students who know
little about the abuses in such industries
to be relatively harmless ways of making
money," said Benedet. "I suspect that if
they sat down and talked to some women
who had left these sectors of the industry they might see it differently."
Trina Ricketts worked as a stripper to
fund her studies at SFU and Kwantlen
University. As the founder of the online
community nakedtruth.ca and as an organizer of events such as the annual Exotic Dancers for Cancer Strip-a-thon, she
is now one of Canada's most recognizable
sex worker advocates. But when Ricketts
was a student, she was not comfortable
telling her classmates about her work.
"I majored in English and women's
studies, and I felt very much like an outsider in my women's studies classes,"
said Ricketts. "I hope it is different now,
but in 1998, the average 'feminist' student in university was very much anti-
sex work. I never disclosed that I was a
dancer. I was still learning how to use
my voice back then."
"As more sex workers come out of the
closet," said Ricketts, "I hope that more
people will be forced to
face the fact that we are
not all degraded, violated victims."
O'Doherty agrees
that the public image
of prostitution is harmful and has said
to The Georgia Straight, "We need to take
a few steps back and look at how we are
structuring the experience of sex work
to be one of victimization."
The UK study came just before a September 28 Ontario judge decision to strike
down key provisions of the province's anti-prostitution laws. This may eventually
lead to the decriminalization of "brothels" nationwide if the decision is upheld
in the Supreme Court of Canada.
"There are certain advantages that people hope will occur by legalizing prostitution, which I think won't occur," said
UBC philosophy Assistant Professor Scott
Anderson. "...Unlessyou make sure there
are many other good options available to
people who need work, especially in less
privileged circumstances, merely legalizing prostitution does not mean that everyone that [is employed by it] believes
that it is a really good [job] to do."
However, the anonymous Kitsilano student escort said that safety is a top concern for him and that the most important way to stay safe is to work indoors.
"Even though I'm worried about being arrested for technically running
a brothel, in-calls are much safer because I have more control over my
work environment."
As additional safety precautions,
the student escort only agrees to
work with clients after a telephone
screening process, does not see
clients late at night and makes
sure his roommates are aware
of what he's doing—and would
recommend that other students
do the same. Ricketts said that
students who are considering
sex work need to be extremely
conscious of their safety. Besides the potential for sexual harassment or rape, top
student concerns regarding I
sex work include encounter- 1
ing social stigma and other re- I
percussions even after they are "
no longer engaged in sex work.
O'Doherty warns against stu
dents revealing their real identities if they choose to enter into
sex work.
"I know a few people who
have been very open about
their involvement in sex
work," said O'Doherty to The
Ubyssey. "The stuff they've
been through is  quite
hellish."
Not everyone who enters sex work "has made a
big mistake," Anderson explained, and noted that some
kinds of sexworkmay be better than many other forms of
employment for some. However, he is skeptical of whether anyone could ever make
an "informed decision" to enter sex work.
"There's certainly some aspects
ofthe industry that are worse than
almost anyone can imagine if they
haven't done it, so.... somepeoplewho
end up doing that as a way of making money are making pretty serf
ous mistakes." tl
—With files from Trevor Record
WHAT KINDS OF SEX WORK
WOULD UK STUDENTS _
CONSIDER?
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-*	 UBYSSEY.CA/ADVERTISEMENT/2010.11.08
ams Insider weekly
student society
a weekly look at what's new at your student society
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Helping students achieve
their academic goals
tftf H^SA   AMS Tutoring offers FREE and Appointment
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For more details visit:
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Kmm
v.7?
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t the UBC Whistler
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t See our website: www.ubcwhistlerlodge.com for new and improved
* ticket purchase details 604.822.5851 or 877.932.6604
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November 9th
Pit Pub, UBC, 8:00 p.m.
withMaylee
Todd
Tickets: TicketWeb, Zulu, Red Cat, Outpost (SUB)
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MMIE
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This week at the
Tuesday
Wood hands w/ Guests
$12 public $7 students
#♦♦••
Wednesday
Canadian Hero Pit night $1 poppy donation
Thursday
Closed to observe Remembrance Day
Friday
Association of Latin American Students Pub Night
Saturday
UBC Swim Team Baywatch Night
MYl
NEW
SUB
Check out the design for the New SUB at
, or come by the cube
11:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. Monday-Friday to have a
look at the plans in person and chat with the
design team.
DAN MANGAN
THE BURNING HELL
AND THE CRACKLING
November II B 13. 2DID
Vogue Theatre
mm
mninnugt   cum
The AMS has installed two new Waterfillz water
bottle refilling stations as part of a year-long
campaign to help students develop sustainable
water consumption habits.
These stations are located on the SUB main
concourse next to Bernoulli's^agels and in
the basement next to the Honour Roll.
Each Waterfillz unit rapidly serves cold, clean
water that has been filtered for chlorine and
other off-flavors to provide the best tasting
water at UBC.
To make accessibility to this water even
better, the AMS has started selling the
highest quality water bottles on campus
at the Outpost for $7,50
STAY  UP TO DATE WITH THE AMS
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AMSExecutive 2010.11.08/UBYSSEY.CA/SPORTS/ll
SPORTS
EDITOR VACANT
Soccer T-Birds flying to nationals
JUSTIN MCELROY
coordinating@ubyssey.ca
It was a November weekend to
remember in Edmonton for both
UBC soccer teams, as both the
men's and women's squads did
well enough in the Canada West
playoffs to advance to the CIS
National Championships next
weekend.
The women, who eked into
the playoffs on the final weekend ofthe regular season, were
ranked fourth in the conference
with a 8-5-1 record and needed
a victory over top-ranked Alberta in the semi-finals to continue.
And they did just that, with a
2-1 overtime victory over the
Pandas, thanks to a goal by all-
star Lisa Furutani in the 12th
minute of the bonus session.
Though they followed the win
with a 2-0 loss to the Fraser Valley Cascades Sunday, the second place finish gives them a
quarterfinal match against the
Ontario champions, the Wilfrid Laurier Golden Hawk's,
on Thursday afternoon at the
nationals.
UBC posesaftertheirconferencechampionship.MATTHIRJIPHOTO/THEGATEWAY
Meanwhile, the men (8-3-3
going into the playoffs) defeated
the Calgary Dinos in the semfi-
nals and the Saskatchewan Huskies in the finals by identical 1-0
scores to gain their spot in the
men's national championships.
Gagandeep Dosanjh scored in
the first minute to give the Thunderbirds a lead they would never give up.
"I was really happy with the
performance this weekend. The
result tells a lot, but I thought the
performances across the board
were excellent," said head coach
Mike Mosher after the victory.
"It's the first step. It's always
good to win trophies," said
Dosanjh, a Canada West All-Star,
after the game, "but we've got a
long ways to go." tl
Women's field hockey team
finishes second at nationals
MARIE VONDRACEK
Contributor
Entering as the reigning national champs, UBC women's field
hockey captured the silver medal this weekend in Guelph, Ontario, losing 2-1 to the University of Toronto Varsity Blues yesterday afternoon and ending
UBC's quest for a record 13th
CIS championship.
Led by western conference
leading scorer Victoria Pearson the T-Birds opened the
tournament with a huge upset
against the top ranked Guelph
Gryphons 2-1 in round-robin play.
This hard-fought win handed
the Gryphons their first loss of
the year at home, and only their
second of the year overall. Later that day, UBC beat Waterloo
handily 6-2.
The 'Birds took this momentum into their game on Saturday.
They beat season rivals UVic TO
in the semifinals to earn chance
to play for national gold.
In preparation for Sunday's
final, UBC head coach Hash
Kanjee said, "We'll try and get
our heads around what tomorrow brings. I think Toronto is
a well-balanced side, they have
strength all over the pitch and
I think we're going to be hard
pressed so we'll just have to go
and regroup now and make sure
we're ready for tomorrow and
do the best that we can."
However, it was not to be for
UBC on this given Sunday. Toronto opened the scoring 15 minutes
in, to which the Thunderbirds'
All-Canadian forward Victoria
Pearson responded 13 minutes
later. Toronto's Katherine McNeill
notched what ended up being the
winning goal at the 66th minute.
Although UBC had a goal called
back, they had many chances.
However, in the end their efforts
were not enough. But with five
tournament all-stars and Natalie Sourisseau named CIS rookie of the year, the future is just
as bright as the present for the
women's field hockey team, va
ROOKIES ALREADY MAKING THEIR MARK ON THE COURT
NATASHA EGAN
Contributor
Thisyear's rookies on the women's basketball team, Alyssa
Binns, Kristyana (Kris) Young,
and Zana Williams are ready to
make a difference in the 2010-
11 season. Head coach Deb Huband is confident and realistic
about this year's recruits.
"They all come from high-
performance, competitive programs. . .they have a strong understanding ofthe game," she said.
KRIS YOUNG
Young made her presence felt
when she played on her senior
team for four years at Hand-
sworth Secondary in North Vancouver. She was named MVP for
all five of the tournaments her
high school competed in during the 2009-10 season.
Young has already made an impact this season, scoring a team-
high 23 points Saturday night
against the Alberta Pandas, and
averaging 17.5 minutes of action
per game.
Coach Huband described
Young as well-rounded and
tough, with a knack for scoring. Expected to play shooting
guard, she has no idea what she
wants to study at UBC, but she's
beginning in general Arts. She
chose UBC in part because of the
T-Birds' good coaches.
ZANA WILLIAMS
"I've known Deb and Carrie
for a pretty long time now and
they've known me as a player
and the issues I've had with my
knees," said Zana Williams. "So
that just made UBC an even a
better place for me to start playing basketball again."
Huband tried to recruit Williams, a 5-foot-8 guard, straight
out of high school. Instead,
the Kitsilano grad wenttoUtah
State University. However, after battling recurring problems with her knees throughout the 2008-2009 season,
which forced her to sit out
many games, Williams took a
year off from basketball and
came to UBC.
Williams said the year off
has allowed her knees to feel
better and is determined to
make good her comeback this
season.
ALYSSA BINNS
Huband described Binns as "a
strong student and hard worker."
Binns who has just turned 17,
is fresh off a summer playing
on the U17 Provincial team who
plays guard or forward. She is
also a member of a basketball-
playing family with her sister
also played for the Gleneagles
team. Currently studying Human Kinetics at UBC, she's considering going into therapy.
If early results are any indication, Huband's hope that the
three recruits would bring depth
to the team has come true.
"Their commitment to themselves as athletes will support them
in taking the next step. They bring
lots to the game and the school,
both as people and as players." tl
Standout rookie Kris Young.
JON CHIANG/THE UBYSSEY
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The Ubyssey will not be publishing this Thursday, due
to the Remembrance Day holiday. We'll be back with
a new issue on Monday, November 13.
Justin mcelroy | coordinating@ubyssey.ca
U THEUBYSSEYc 12/UBYSSEY.CA/SPORTS/2010.11.08
Men s hockey team saves
face with 5-0 victory
DAVID ELOP PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
MARIE VONDRACEK
Contributor
Matches of pride were played
this weekend at the Doug Mitchell Arena, as last place holders
Lethbridge came to take on the
second-to-last place Thunderbirds. Separated by only two
points, UBC was in danger of
ending the weekend at the bottom of the heap.
Friday's game was a back-
and-forth battle, which was
drawn out into an overtime
that ended 49 seconds in when
Lethbridge's Winston Day Chief
scored the winning goal. That
loss tied the two teams in last
place, which made Saturday's match a fight to regain
position.
"There is pressure entering
every game," said Coach Milan
Dragicevic. "We need to be prepared and in a league as tight
as ours every game counts, so
absolutely we felt pressure entering today's game."
The motivation to not be last
seemed to propel the Thunderbirds through the first period,
out-shooting their opponents
17-7. But the 'Birds could not
get past Lethbridge keeper Reese St. Goddard until 5:50 into
the second period.
"We had a great week of
practice, the team was battling
and scoring goals," said Coach
Dragicevic.
And scoring was just what
UBC did on Saturday night. Even
without injured team points
leader Justin McRae, the T-Birds
knocked in four more to win 5-0.
"I heard the guys on the
bench halfway through the third
period saying, 'Let's do this for
Whitey'" said Dragicevic, referring to 'Birds goalkeeper Jordan
White. "When players are saying that, you know it's a team
thing. And it was also a great
job on Jordan's part."
This teamwork displayed
by the T-Birds to help White
complete his first shutout of
the season will be essential as
they move further into the season. Saturday's win was crucial
for UBC in order to stay in playoff contention. Only six points
separate first-place Alberta and
UBC, now in fifth place, making
every single game count. The
Thunderbirds showed they can
control a game. They outshot
their opponent 36-26 and controlled the majority ofthe play.
They will now work to continue and build on this with each
subsequent game.
"Only because we won one
game does not make us content,"
Dragicevic reiterated. %&
Bright future for UBC
women's rugby program
COLIN CHIA
Contributor
The UBC Thunderbirds women's
rugby team wrapped up its season last weekend with a 26-10
win against University of Victoria to take the Canada West
bronze medal, a repeat of last
year.
"I'm not disappointed," said
head coach Lesley McKenzie,
although she felt the team
could have done better in the
regular season to earn an easier semi-final matchup. "They
did quite well in making sure
they took care of a physical team
like UVic in the bronze medal
final. All of that factors into a
strong team one season, definitely two seasons down the
road, and that's the important
thing to look at."
dimk MILK
wnagramntptrip
For 2 to the 53rd Annual GRAMMY® Awards
JON CHIANG FILE PH0T0/THE UBYSSEY
UBC had a 1-3 regular season
record, with a 19-0 win over the
University of Calgary and losses
against Lethbridge, Alberta and
Victoria. They were beaten once
more 36-7 by defending national champions Lethbridge in the
Canada West semi-final.
Full-back Darcy Patterson was
named to the conference all-star
team and described it as a "great
honour."
"There is such an abundance
of talent in the west it was quite
amazing to be included among
the top," she said.
Commenting on the team's
season, Patterson said, "I think
everyone felt good about placing third. You have to look at
the bright spots.
"The competition in the west
is very fierce, the teams in this
conference are closer in talent than any other conference
across Canada, so placing third
was an achievement. It was especially sweet because we were
victorious against UVic who had
beaten us a week before."
Joining Patterson on the all-
star team was Megan Hamm,
who was also named Canada
West rookie of the year. It gives
Patterson optimism.
"Each and every one of the
girls has a tremendous amount
of potential and improved so
much throughout the short
season. The team will be head
and shoulders ahead of where
we were this year," Patterson
predicted.
Their head coach shares the
same view. "The bulk of players
are first and second-year, which
bodes incredibly well for the
next few seasons. This is a program that's going to do more in
the next couple of seasons and
I'm looking for them to develop as players and students of
the game."
Armed with all this potential,
to challenge conference and national titles in the next fewyears
is "realistic," McKenzie said.
McKenzie was also bullish
about the general state of women's rugby in the province, despite the stranglehold ofthe Al-
bertan universities in Canada
West. Although the BC provincial team is very strong, Alberta hasn't been able to translate
their university-level success to
the senior representative levels.
Many players from BC are also
lured over the mountains by better recruiting efforts and scholarships, McKenzie said.
"Lethbridge is doing a really good job of recruiting. They
actually have a lot of BC players
and they do have an advantage
in being able to offer a bit more
in scholarships. It's tough when
you're limited by your players either being able to get into UBC or
not, and that's a factor that some
ofthe other schools in CIS competition don't have to deal with." tl
BIRD DROPPINGS
WOMEN'S VOLLEYBALL TEAM ENDS
TWO-GAME LOSING STREAK WITH
SWEEP AGAINST ALBERTA
UBC's women's volleyball team
has gotten back into its groove.
Still missing two of their top players, the Thunderbirds swept the
University of Alberta Pandas this
weekend at War Memorial Gym.
Led by Shanice Marcell, the T-
Birds set themselves straight
and back on track for a successful championship defence.
"It was a really good team
effort, and it's easier when you
start well," said UBC head coach
Doug Reimer. "You don't even
have to look at the stats to know
how well Shanice played. It was
a tremendous response from
last week by the whole team,
led by Shanice, and I am very
encouraged by that result."
On Saturday, a well-rounded
effort with contributions from
all parts of the floor allowed the
Thunderbirds to come out of
the close and difficult match
victorious.
"One of the best signs for
our team was the balance we
showed tonight," said Reimer.
LETHBRIDGE KEEPER TOO MUCH
FORUBC
UBC women's ice hockey
dropped their wo games to Lethbridge this weekend by scores of
4-2 and 5-3. Pronghorns keeper
Crystal Patterson was forced to
stand on her head stopping 33
of 35 UBC shots. Although out-
shooting their opponents 35 to
18, the Thunderbirds struggled
with their usually outstanding
penalty kill.
"It was a pretty disappointing loss in that we gave up three
power play goals. Our penalty
kill has been so good during the
year but tonight it was just not
sharp," said UBC head coach
Nancy Wilson.
Veteran leader Tamara Pickford was the first to crack the
wall built by Patterson, but was
equalled a minute later by Lethbridge. Playing without power-
forward Lisa Bonang, whose
speed and tenacity helped propel them in the past, the Thunderbirds allowed three more
goals. Tatiana Rafter responded with a feeble screech late in
the game but could not bring it
any closer.
The Birds lost 5-3 on Sunday afternoon. Kaitlin Imai gave
UBC a lead late in the first period. It was soon topped with
two goals by Lethbridge forward Shelby Ballendine. Rafter
added her second goal of the
weekend to even it up. Rookie
Sarah Casorso scored her first
CIS goal putting UBC back in
the lead. This lead was once
again given up., something the
team has shown to do often
this season. The defeat puts
the Thunderbirds in sixth place,
two points behind a two-way
tie for fourth place.
UBC CROSS-COUNTRY CAPTURES
SILVER AND BRONZE AT
CONFERENCE CHAMPIONSHIPS
On Saturday in San Marcos,
California the T-Birds were not
soaking in solar rays lying on the
beach, but instead were gutting
it out on a Cross-country running
course at the A.I.I, conference
championships.
Teammates Luc Bruchet and
Jordan Smith took fourth and
fifth leading the 8th ranked male
Thunderbirds to finish 2nd, while
the number 10th ranked UBC
women lead by fifth placing
Nelly Amenyogbe finished 3rc
as a team. Both teams qualified—and are preparing—for
the N.A.I.A National Championships on November 20th. tl GAMES & COMICS
2010.11.08/UBYSSEY.CA/G AMES/13
COMICMASTER, BY MARIA CIRSTEA
bip^CM FAU. FROM
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PHILOSPHRENIC, BY RACHAEL FREEDMAN
_^. FRFFDOM FROM THF DFSIRF FOR AN ANSWER IS ESSENTIAL
jgZZ^-Si^L TO THE UNDERSTANDING OF A PROBLEM
SE*
We're listening.
At campus and community planning, we ensure any
choices made about land, buildings, infrastructure and
transportation support UBC's core academic mission and
commitment to sustainability. We invite your input on
key projects and policies through a wide range of events
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We will keep you informed and provide
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IUBC       a place of mind
OF   BRITISH COLUMBIA
CAMPUS AND COMMUNITY PLANNING
CROSSWORD
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VIRGINIE MENARD
production@ubyssey.ca
tlT lEUBYSSEYc 14/UBYSSEY.CA/LETTERS/2010.11.08
LETTERS
THE PIT'S INAPPROPRIATE ATTITUDE
In the November 4th issue of The
Ubyssey there was a letter written by Melle Nikkels regarding
the line ups and an arrogant
attitude.
We do not intentionally create a line up to give the appearance that we are busy. We want
you in the bar, we want you to
be having a good time, we want
you to enjoy yourself responsibly and we want you to be
spending your money, which
in turn is giving money back
to the AMS.
We are no different than any
other bar or club in Vancouver,
or British Columbia for that matter; we have very strict rules and
regulations that must be followed
and adhered to. The Pit has an
operation capacity of 406 people.
On a Wednesday evening there
are generally 16 staff, along with
myself and the assistant manager, which would leave space
for 388 patrons.
While that may seem like a
large amount of people to fit into
the Pit, there is another catch.
When the dance floor is not in
use the number of guests is
lowered to 360 people allowed
in the space, bringing the actual number of people permitted into the pit down to 342—
not including the number of
employees that are working
in The Burger Bar.
Our priority is to ensure that
you are safe while having fun
and enjoying yourselves. We
must remain diligent in adhering to the laws, regulations and
our operational capacity so that
we can, if need be, evacuate you
as soon as possible and keep
you safe. As was the case on
the October 27th when the fire
alarm was set off and everyone
was immediately required to
leave the building. We have
worked very hard to form great
relationships with the RCMP,
liquor inspectors, fire department and both AMS security
and campus security.
Having been to numerous
bars and clubs over the years, I
have been on the other side of
the "velvet rope", and I have felt
your frustration, Melle. Here are
a few suggestions for you and
your crew of friends:
1. Come early, have a bite to eat at
the Burger Bar andyou will most
likely score a place to sit.
2. Take the opportunity to actually meet some new people in line-
time flies when you are making
new friends.
3. We also have the Gallery; you
can hangout up there, have a few
beverages and then come down
for the last part ofthe night.
Melle, I hope that this gives
you a little more insight as to
why the Pit has line ups and I
hope it dismisses your idea that
the Pit has a "wannabe Fancy
club attitude." Have you seen
the place? I believe we are as
laid back and normal as we can
get. After all, we are named the
Pit, not Le Pit.
—Andrew Wailing
AMS Beverage Manager
List of contributors in this issue
Colin Chia
Karina Palmitesta
Indiana Joel
Micki Cowan
Nicola Gailits
Diana Foxall
Andrew Maclsaac
Brian Piatt
Marie Vondracek
Kalyeena Makortoff
David Elop
David Chen
Samantha Bullis
•QTHEUBYSSEYca
Agenda for Staff
Meeting
1. Introductions
2. New Members
3. NASH Campaigning
4. Retreat Plannering
5. New Business
•Q THEUBYSSEYca
AMS RESOURCE GROUPS FIGHTING
FOR STUDENTS
The Ubyssey's recent article
"AMS resource groups off to slow
start" brought up specific concerns about the organization of
the resource groups and about
the availability of contact information. Although each resource
group operates largely autonomously and with its own organizational structure, we would
also like to offer a joint response.
The resource groups continue to work to make our contact
information available. Information about individual group
meeting times has been widely
distributed in pamphlets, posters, alternative media, at Clubs
Days, in the SUB concourse and
outside our offices. A website
designer was hired over the
summer and a Resource Groups
website will be launched shortly, along with websites for those
groups currently lacking one.
We have adopted a different
organizational structure this
year by rotating the coordinator position and by making it an
un-paid position. This way, we
are able to cut administrative
costs and provide more services for students. By sharing the
job of coordinator, we are building the capacities of our members and encouraging cooperation between groups.
Fundamentally, our priorities lie in providing resources for students and in challenging oppression. Our goal
is not to educate our members
about the technicalities of our
constitution, but to provide safe
spaces for them to discuss, explore and mobilize. We have
already had many successful
speakers, get-togethers, film
screenings and discussions
this year. We are also excited
about fighting the record-high
tuition fees, working towards a
sustainable world, and addressing recent sexual assaults on
campus - to name a few initiatives. We hope that The Ubyssey
will focus more on these important issues in the future, and
we encourage students to come
to our open house to meet us,
learn more and get involved.
The open house is taking place
on November 10th from 5-8pm,
in SUB 245.
—The AMS Resource Groups
PRIDE UBC: ALL RESOURCE GROUPS
ARE NOT THE SAME
The Ubyssey's recent article
"AMS resource groups off to
slow start" paints an inaccurate
picture of the resource groups
in general, and Pride UBC in
particular.
This article attempts to paint
the resource groups as a unified collective, which is hardly
the case. Each resource group is
almost completely autonomous
from the others, though efforts
are made to work together whenever possible. Rather than making the blanket statement that
"AMS resource groups off to a
slow start" The Ubyssey might
have investigated what the respective groups have done, as
there have been varied levels of
activity. To insinuate otherwise
is unfortunate and misleading.
Following from this, the treatment of Pride UBC in this article speaks only to a complete
lack of preparation and proper investigation. Reference is
made to "repeated attempts" to
reach us for comment. My fellow
co-chair and I received a single
e-mail on the Thursday before a
Sunday deadline, the Pride UBC
email received no such notice,
and no Ubyssey representative
made any effort to attend any of
our five weekly meetings, including our Monday executive meeting, where both co-chairs are
available for comment. Excepting a single, unannounced visit to the Pride office, there were
no other attempts to contact us.
It's no wonder then how many
errors this article makes. Contrary to the insinuations made
by this article, the contact information for all Pride executives is available on our website, along with our constitution
and executivemeeting minutes.
Excepting three one-hour slots,
Pride UBC's office is open Monday through Friday from 10am
to 3pm.
Pride's AGM is held every
April, where the executive for
the upcoming year is selected.
As a result of this, Pride is able
to participate in events over the
summer and hit the ground running in September. We held our
executive retreat before classes began and from the first full
week of classes all of our five
weekly groups were held, as
they've been held since. We've
also hosted two beer gardens
and all ages events, with more
events planned for the term.
None of the above is reflected by the article in question. Instead, the less active of the resource groups are put forward
as reflective ofthe whole. By attempting to reflect the state of
some resource groups in the
state of them all, this article
misinforms the public and simplifies a complicated situation,
much to its detriment, and to
the detriment of Pride UBC's
reputation.
—Daniel McGraw
Pride UBC Co-Chair
Editor's Note: The Ubyssey sent
emails to both Pride co-chairs and
left a phone and in-person messages with volunteers in their office. The article in question also
specifically credited Pride UBC
for having an up-to date website.
Achieve.
At Athabasca University, our transferable
courses can help you expand your academic
options. Whether it's a scheduling conflict or
a necessary prerequisite, we have over 700
courses delivered online and at a distance,
many with the flexibility of monthly start
dates, to help you complete your degree.
Learn more at
www.athabascau.ca
Athabasca University^ 2010.11.08/UBYSSEY.CA/OPINIONS/15
OPINIONS
DO YOU CARE? WRITE US A LETTER»feedback@ubyssey.ca
EDITORIAL
IF YOU WANT TO CALL YOURSELF A RESOURCE,
ACT LIKE ONE
Imagine the following scenario:
You are a visible minority attending this school
who feels discriminated against by a TA in one of
your classes. You hear of an organization, paid for
by your AMS fees, meant to provide support and
information in this sort of situation. But when
you attempt to contact that group, you find out that
their website is not updated. Your phone calls are
never answered or returned. Finally frustrated,
suppose you go to their office only to find no one
there. In the end, the only way to get in contact with
the group is to put your name on a pen-and-paper
'email' list—and pray.
This isn't a hypothetical situation. It's exactly
what happens when you try to contact Colour Connected Against Racism, one of the AMS Resource
groups. In fact, it's much like what happens when
you try to contact the majority ofthe groups. We covered this problem in a story titled "AMS resource
groups off to slow start" in our last issue. The resource groups have already responded to the article by sending us an angry letter. Good, so you
can respond to student comments. Now it's time
to act like a group that is paid by student fees and
start responding to student inquiries.
The resource groups claim that their priorities lie in providing support for students and
challenging oppression. It's almost impossible
to measure what degree of success they've had
with the latter. However, for the former the ways
in which they are lagging are clear to anyone. It
is completely inappropriate for student-funded
groups to be submitting their budgets and executive lists in the middle of the semester. Having visible email addresses and phones thatyou
answer during peak hours is a completely reasonable request. Launching a group-wide web
site to help students get in contact is a great initiative; launching a website in November is too
little too late. And staffing an office space with
even semi-experienced volunteers, let alone executives, should be a higher priority than is evidenced at the moment.
To be fair, some ofthe resource groups are much
better than others, and are able to hold events we
are aware of and respond within reasonable time
frames—Pride UBC specifically has a strong campus presence and is a recognizable support group.
But face the facts: one effective group can't salvage
the reputation of all. Resource groups aren't supposed to be insular clubs, they are supposed to
be resources for students. Instead of responding
with anger, we'd like to see the resource groups
take well-intended criticism as a push to move
forward and improve their important services, va
UBC OUTREACH TO INDIA LONG OVERDUE
President Obama is in currently in India arranging business deals, engaging in diplomacy and
pushing America's interests on the subcontinent.
And although their paths are unlikely to cross,
Obama isn't the only president visiting at the moment. In fact, there are fifteen others.
UBC President Stephen Toope and fourteen
other Canadian university presidents recently
departed for a seven day trip to Dehli and Pune
to discuss increasing ties with Indian post-secondary institutions.
It's an important step that is long overdue. It's
the next frontier for higher education. Already,
hundreds of thousands of Indians leave for educational opportunities abroad, but only 4000
come to Canada, with 40,000 choosing Australia, 50,000 the UK and 80,000 the US.
With one ofthe top Asian studies departments
in North America and a large number of people
of Indian ancestry in Vancouver, one would expect UBC would have well-established connections with our Commonwealth brethren.
However, UBC has only two exchange opportunities to India, one of which is restricted to engineers. And the number of courses taught about
India pales in comparison to those about Japan
or China. Considering that UBC sees itself as a
'global' university it needs to push for a stronger relationship with places like India.
In more ways than one, UBC can't look at India
as just an international cash cow. tl
OPINIONS
,    • '. ■"'■■■■:
BRIAN PLATT PH0T0/THE UBYSSEY
Back from Kabul: what Ive learned
BRIAN PLATT
bplatt@ubyssey.ca
At some point during my trip through
Afghanistan, it fully dawned on me
what a unique opportunity this was.
Unlike most Canadian journalists, diplomats, aid workers and soldiers who
go over, I had absolutely no restrictions on my movement. I could, and
often did, just hang out in the streets
of Kabul. Alongside my many planned
meetings with local residents, I also
had plenty of random encounters. One
day I spent an hour just window shopping on Chicken Street, a collection of
shops and bazaars that was a must-
see for travelling hippies in the 60s.
Yet I also had dinner in the soldiers'
mess hall on a NATO base, a night that
ended with me shaking hands with the
commanding officer, Brigadier-General Dave Neasmith (a Canadian). The
Governor of Kandahar, who lived in
Vancouver until two years ago, offered
me a meeting. I received an unsolicited invitation to a function at the Canadian Embassy which I couldn't attend
because itwas the day after my plane
left Kabul. And then, of course, there
are all the incredible Afghans I met
with: lawyers, teachers, school principals, news editors, female MPs, museum curators and the guy who runs
the only contemporary arts centre in
the country. This trip was the perfect
mix of freedom and access.
Much of this was because I was travelling with Lauryn Oates, an indefatigable activist for education and women's rights who first visited the country in 2003 (as a 21-year-old blonde
girl in ravaged Kabul, she turned a few
heads.) She's been going back three
times a year ever since, and her connections made everything easy. Some
of it was also simply due to me being Canadian; Afghans like Canadians, and foreigners in the city look
out for each other. However, most of
credit goes to the amazingly hospitable culture of Afghanistan, despite 30
years of war. The hardest thing I had
to do was turn down offers to stay for
a meal when I had to be moving on.
You could spend weeks in Kabul and
never know there was a foreign military presence in the country. The only
giveaway is the constant pace of helicopter flyovers. It's the other things
that catch your notice: the police and
security guards on practically every
block in the city the ubiquitous construction crews, the giant wedding
halls, the stray dogs and most of all,
the insane traffic.
But the reminders of the war, when
you get them, are bracing. I was invited to an Afghan wedding and one of
the men at my table had his hand covered with a cloth. He's a police officer,
and on a recent prisoner transfer operation down the Kabul-Kandahar highway he was ambushed by the Taliban
and shot in the hand and the head. The
only reason he's still alive is because of
swift medical attention at the Canadian
military hospital in Kandahar.
Ah, Kandahar. The original capital region of Afghanistan in 1747,
the place where Taliban militias first
seizedholdin 1994, and the last place
they hung on to before scampering
off through the hills to Pakistan in
2001. The Taliban have never denied
the symbolic importance of Kandahar City and have been making a concerted campaign to retake the city
since 2006. Today the heaviest fighting in Afghanistan is taking place in
the districts around the city and you
can tell from the moment you leave
the airport. I spent barely 24 hours in
the province and saw more armoured
convoys, fighter jets, helicopters and
drones than I could keep track of.
Though again, the foreign presence
was dwarfed by the number of Afghan
military and police units patrolling
the streets.
The day I arrived, a small bomb
went off in Kandahar City. Large suicide bombs have been mostly eliminated since the police began enforcing a
multi-layer checkpoint system around
the city but less deadly explosions
still occur almost daily. More worrying are the targeted assassinations of
government officials and secular Afghan educators; the evil persistence
of Taliban hit teams has successfully instilled a constant fear across the
civil society of the city.
Afghanistan is a complicated place.
Always has been and always will be. A
so-called "peace council" is aiming to
achieve peace in Afghanistan's time
by—what, exactly? "What are we seriously going to give them to stop fighting? A ministry?" I asked a researcher from the respected Afghanistan Research and Evaluation Unit. He told
me he wasn't sure either.
Shagul Rezai had just finished running for parliament when we talked to her (no results are confirmed,
but early indications look good for
her). You should have seen the fire in
her eyes when asked what she thinks
about negotiating a power-sharing
deal with the Taliban. And, well, can
you blame her?
When you speak to Afghans, you
quickly realize how little Canadians
actually know about the country. I understand why our media leads with
explosions and dead bodies, but this
makes it so easy to forget that Afghanistan is, like anywhere else in the
world, filled with mostly good people
who are just trying to get by. They understand exactly what democratic and
accountable governance is, and I'd argue they care more passionately about
it than us complacent Canadians do.
"The biggest danger," Farida Nekzad
told me, "is that the international community will just get bored or tired
and go home and ignore us again."
Nekzad is the news director of Wakht
News Agency and a pioneering force
for female journalism in Afghanistan.
For her, there is nothing rhetorical
about this. Her apartment has been
bombed twice by Taliban members
trying to kill her, and she has a newborn daughter.
Most Afghans I met felt very pessimistic about the current state of affairs, but they agree about two things.
First: the way forward for Afghanistan
is democracy. Second: they need our
help, and will need it for a long time,
to build it up in defiance of their tormentors and murderers, tl 16/UBYSSEY.CA/ADVERTISEMENT/2010.11.08
*■
I
1
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