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The Ubyssey Mar 27, 2014

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Array THE OIL FLOW?
VARSITY REPORT CARDS
We break down the performance of ten UBC Thunderbird
teams this semester to see who makes the grade
LOAN DATA LEAK
Government loses unencrypted hard drive,
exposing info of student loan recipients
ORIENTATION REPLACES TRAVEL GRANT P3 E BLOCK PARTY PREVIEWS P9
10 NEW SUB WILL BE THE AMS STUDENT NEST P3 CANNABIS CONVENTION F // Page 2
WHAT'S ON // THIS WEEK, MAYWE
THURSDAY  27
PREVENTION OF
VIOLENCE
AGAINST WOMEN
7 P.M.® 1KB RM192
This joint SASC-U.S. Consulate
General Vancouver lecture will
feature guest speaker Juley
Fulcher. Free
FRIDAY ' 28
BOOKSTORE
OPENING PARTY
9:30 A.M.-5 P.M. @ UBC BOOKSTORE
Rejoice, for Bookstore construction is no more! UBC is going all
out, celebrating with free coffee
and pastries until 11:30, dance
and music performances, spin
class, prizes and more. The opening party goes until Saturday. Free
SATURDAY ' 29
SHARING SCIENCE
CONFERENCE
10 A.M.-4 P.M. ©BEATY
BIODIVERSITY MUSEUM
This one-day interdisciplinary
science communications conference will feature lectures from
a variety of professors on topics
such as journalism, arts and more.
Come and shareyourscience!
Free
ON
THE
COVER
When molasses isn't being used as a replacement for crude oil for this
divestment metaphor, it's sitting in a carton, never being bought in the
baking aisle. Photo by Carter Brundage.
^
Want to help run this paper next year?
Run for an editorial position! For details,
visit ubyssey.ca/about.
^|THE UBYSSEY
MARCH 27, 2014 | VOLUME XCV| ISSUE L
EDITORIAL
Coordinating Editor
Geoff Lister
coordinating@ubyssey.cs
Managing Editor, Print
Ming Wong
orinteditor@ubyssey.es
Managing Editor, Web
CJ Pentland
webeditor@ubyssey.es
News Editors
Will McDonald +
Sarah Bigam
iews@ubyssey.es
Senior News Writer
Veronika Bondarenko
vbondarenko@ubyssey.es
Culture Editor
Rhys Edwards
eulture@ubyssey.es
Senior Culture Writer
Aurora Tejeida
atejeida@ubyssey.es
Sports + Rec Editor
Natalie Scadden
sports@ubyssey.es
Senior Lifestyle Writer
Reyhana Heatherington
"heatherington@ubyssey.es
Features Editor
Amo Rosenfeld
features@ubyssey.es
Video Producer
Lu Zhang
video@ubyssey.es
Copy Editor
Matt Meuse
eopy@ubyssey.es
Photo Editor
Carter Brundage
ehotos@ubyssey.es
Illustrator
Indiana Joel
joel@ubyssey.es
Webmaster
Tony Li
webmaster@ubyssey.es
Distribution Coordinator
Lily Cai
cai@ubyssey.es
STAFF
Catherine Guan, NickAdams
Kanta Dihal, Marlee Laval,
Angela Tien, Carly Sotas, Alex
Meisner, Luella Sun, Jenny
Tang.AdrienneHembree^
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Kosta Prodanovic, Olivia Law,
JethroAu, Bailey Ramsay,
Jenica Montgomery.Austen
Erhardt, Alice Fleerackers
Nikos Wright, Milica Palinic
Jovana Vranic, Mackenzie
Walker, Kaveh Sarhangpour
Steven Richards, Gabriel
Germaix, Jaime Hills, Jenny
Tan. Kaidie Williams, Rachel
Levy-McLaughlin, Maura
Forrest, Paul 5. Jon
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LEGAL
The Ubyssey is the official studentnews-
aaper of the University of Rrirish Cn-
umbia. Itispublished
anclThursclaybyTheUbyssey Publications Society. We are an autonomous,
democratically run student organization, and all students are encouragec
to participate.
Editorials are chosen and written bythe
Jbyssey staff. They are the expressec
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Publications Society or the University
of British Columbia. All editorial content
appearing in The Ubyssey is the property ofThe Ubyssey Publications Society. Stories, opinions, photographs anc
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OUR CAMPUS//
ONE ON ONE WITH THE PEOPLE WHO MAKE UBC
PHOTO STEVEN DURFEE/THE UBYSSEY
AMS executive chef Ryan Bissell says he's all about high-quality, fresh produce.
Good eats, best burgers
with chef Ryan Bissell
Jessica-Christin Hametner
StaffWriter
Foodies around campus are
certainly curious about what new
delicacies the New SUB will have
to offer when it opens in 2015.
While there will still be burgers,
noodles and cookies, Ryan Bissell,
the executive chef of the AMS, is
hoping to create a positive impact
by being a leader of sustainable
and organic food services on
campus.
Having grown up in the Okanagan Valley, and later moving
to Vancouver to attend culinary
school, Bissell has been a part
of Vancouver's culinary scene
since 2005. His talent for cooking
has led him to cook across the
world in the Caribbean, Toronto
and Germany.
Bissell is intrigued by the New
SUB. However, being able to
impact people's lives with good
food had proven to be his biggest
inspiration yet.
"I will have an influence in the
new food program for the AMS,
so the new restaurants, the new
Burger Bar, Pie R Squared and
all these kind of places," Bissell
said. "I am working with the store
operators to influence change for
the better."
While he does not have any
control in the current SUB just
yet, he is busy planning his
involvement for the new building
by creating student food that is
fun and high-quality. Focusing on
using fresh, local and handmade
produce inspired by Pacific Northwest cuisine, Bissell is a self-confessed advocate for sustainability
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THE COLLEGE OF HIGHER LEARNING
and someone who cares for his
community.
"The SUB feeds thousands of
people a day, and what an opportunity to have really high-quality
products that are accessible for
people," Bissell said. "You really
feel good about feeding thousands
of people quality food at a price
that they can afford every single
day."
Bissell has worked at such Vancouver establishments as C Restaurant, the Boathouse Restaurant
and Joe Fortes. What makes
Bissell different from other chefs
is his approachability and raw
passion for cooking. After having
completed his apprenticeship at
the Westin in Whistler, Bissell has
been learning the art of cooking
by craft ever since.
"[Cooking] is not something you
can stop learning — it's something
you have to continually grow on
and keep trying new things and
practicing. It's a never-ending
process," he said.
It is exactly this process he
now continues at UBC. Being
engaged in UBC's community by
interacting with a range of different students and clubs, Bissell
understands what students want
and need.
"To be able to have some
influence over what students eat
is phenomenal for me and a great
step for my career, and I am really
excited about it," he said. "I get
to do what I love doing, working
with local farmers and products
and bringing that to university in
such a high-level scale."
One particular thing UBC
students can expect food-wise
in the New SUB is a new burger
joint. It just so happened that one
of Bissell's creations was voted
Fraser Valley's best burger for
three years in a row by Surrey
Now while he was working at Uli's
Restaurant in White Rock. The
winning burger combination was
a ground steak patty with harrissa
— a Moroccan spice — alongwith
cheddar cheese, guacamole, corn
salsa and a secret house-made
barbecue sauce.
For those who fancy a bite to
eat, take note — UBC just might
become the future home of Vancouver's best burger. XI // News
ORS WILL MCDONALD + SARAH BIGAM
URSDAY, MARCH 2
GRANTS»
The Trek Home grant, previously given to out-of-province domestic students as an incentive to come to UBC , is being replaced with a new summer orientation program.
Orientation program to replace travel grant
Sarah Bigam
News Editor
Domestic students will no longer
receive the Trek Home grant, but
they will be able to attend an all-expenses-paid orientation event in the
summer.
Destination UBC, an orientation
event for Canadian and international high schools students living
in Canada, begins this summer,
expanding on a one-day event previously known as "UBC Welcomes
You."
The program runs from May
23 to 25 at UBC and May 9 to 11 at
UBCO. Students in Vancouver will
stay in Place Vanier or Gage residences and will have all their costs
covered.
"The idea is to give [students] a
little bit more time to get to know
some of their classmates and really
get to know the campus well," said
Leanne Isaak, manager of student
recruitment and advising at UBCO.
High school students who have
received an offer of admission from
UBC can also receive up to $1,000
of reimbursement for travel costs to
attend the three-day program.
This replaces the Trek Home
grant, which offered a similar
amount of money to all first-year
domestic students outside of B.C.
in order to cover the cost of a flight
home.
"[The grant was] part of encouraging students to accept their offer
at UBC and a lot of students didn't
really know that it existed," said
Isaak. "Formany of themitwasjust
money that was dumped into their
account and they used to go shopping or whatever."
Isaak said the Trek Home grant
was reviewed a couple of years ago.
"[It was] determined it would
be better if we could provide it for
the students up front because we
know that students are applying to
more and more institutions and...
particularly if they're coming from
a further distance, [applicants] can't
necessarily come and check out the
campus, so we thought this was a
good opportunity for students, before they come to UBC, to ensure it
was a good fit for them," Isaak said.
Transfer students and students
from the Lower Mainland or the
Okanagan region are not eligible for
travel reimbursement for Destination UBC, but unlike the Trek Home
grant, students from other areas of
B.C. are.
This year, there were 3,744 first
year domestic students at UBC,
including 3,113 from B.C. and 631
from the rest of Canada. Isaak said
that typically means about 1,200
people in attendance and that last
year, approximately 240 students at
UBC Vancouver's event from outside
of B.C. were reimbursed for their
flight.
Isaak said UBC should be able
to accommodate all students who
would like to attend the program.
Transfer students and students
from the Lower Mainland will still
be able to attend the main event
program on May 24.
Unlike the Trek Home grant,
which was paid in its entirety
when the student began courses at
UBC, 50 per cent ofthe maximum
reimbursement will be mailed to
the student as a cheque by the end
of July; the rest of it will be paid in
October 2014 if students pay their
tuition and register in full-time
studies.
Registration for Destination
UBC opens on April 1. XI
NEWS BRIEFS
New SUB name chosen
At last night's AMS Council meeting, Council narrowly approved a
motion to name the New SUB the
AMS Student Nest.
Council approved the decision
with 18 voting for, 16 against and
two abstentions.
The AMS had narrowed the
choices for the name of the new
building down to the AMS Student
Nest and the AMS Student Hub.
Some councillors expressed
concerns aboutthe naming
process, citing a lack of student
input. The AMS received feedback on the naming from around
1,000 students.
"I think that this process was
not done as best as it could have
been done," councillor Chris
Roach said at the meeting. "I personally can't support this motion
just because I don't think we've
done it right."
Other councillors argued the
AMS needed a name forthe building as soon as possible in order to
develop branding forthe building.
"I think most of us can agree
that how we got down to these
names was not ideal, but given
ourtimeline, I don'tthinkit
makes sense to go back to the
beginning," said councillor Paul
McDade.
Construction on the New SUB
is slated for completion in November, with the building opening on
Jan. 5,2015. a
SECURITY »
583,000 students'
data unsecured,
report finds
Will McDonald
News Editor
The government mishandled the
personal information of 583,000
student loan recipients, Canada's
privacy commissioner has found.
A report from interim privacy
commissioner Chantal Bernier
issued yesterday says a lost hard
drive containing the names,
social security numbers, phone
numbers, addresses or debt
amounts of more than 583,000
Canadians who took out student
loans from 2000 to 2006 was
left unencrypted and without
password protection.
"Our investigation identified a
measurable gap in [Employment
and Social Development Canada]'s
implementation of its privacy and
security policies in the day-today business operations ofthe
Department," the report read.
The investigation began in
January 2013 after the hard
drive was reported to have been
missing for two months.
According to Bernier's report,
the hard drive was kept in an
often unlocked filing cabinet in an
open cubicle, contrary to ESDC's
policy. The report also found the
hard drive was not inventoried,
nor were "readily available"
technological safeguards applied
to the hard drive.
FILE PHOTO JOSH CURRAN/THE UBYSSEY
The lost hard drive contained the social security numbers of 583,000 students.
"ESDC's failure to implement
the appropriate safeguards to protect the personal information in
question has created a significant
risk for unauthorized access, use
or disclosure — the very threats
that the Government of Canada is
entrusted to protect it from," read
the report.
There are currently three class
action lawsuits pending against
the federal government over
the breach.
The hard drive was never
located, but the report said there
is no evidence that any ofthe information was used for fraudulent
purposes. 31
CLIMATE CHANGE »
Students seek
alumni support
for divestment
=ILE PHOTO CARTER BRUNDAGE/THE UBYSSEY
The executives of UBCC350 hope alumni
will withhold donations until UBC stops
investing in fossil fuels.
Will McDonald
News Editor
A student group wants alumni to
stop donating to the university until
it divests from fossil fuels.
UBCC350, a student activist
group that pushed for a student
divestment referendum which
passed overwhelmingly this year,
also wants alumni to encourage the
university to divest from fossil fuels.
UBCC350 alumni coordinator
Alex Hemingway said around 100
people have signed their alumni
pledge so far, promising not to
donate to the university until the
school has divested from fossil fuels.
The group has had the pledge
on their website for more than two
weeks, but they plan to launch a
campaign to promote it soon.
"We're just in the word of mouth
stage right now... but there is gong
to be a lot happening around the
divestment issue," said Hemingway.
Hemingway said the group
doesn't have the same resources to
contact alumni as the university
does, but still hopes the pledge will
get circulated.
"What we want to do is keep the
number ticking up as we pursue
other avenues in building pressure
for UBC to do the right thing on
fossil fuels," said Hemingway.
"Many [alumni] feel they don't
want to be donating to the university while it's continuing to invest in
these companies that are contributing to global warning so severely,"
he said.
Hemingway is hopeful that the
pledge will encourage the university
to follow through on divestment.
"We're actually proud of what
UBC has done so far in trying to
earn a reputation for sustainability,"
said Hemingway. "[The university]
really needs to take the next step
and live up to ideals. If we're going
to be making improvements on
campus, we can't continue investing
in these fossil fuel companies."
Hemingway said he expects
UBC's Board of Governors will
discuss divestment at their
next meeting.
"From what we hear, it's on their
radar. So, we're being a bit cautious,"
he said. "We want to see what they
have to say.
"Ultimately, we're not going to
rest until they do the right thing
here." XI
Write
Shoot
Edit
Code
Drink
COME BYTHE UBYSSEY OFFICE
SUB 24, FOLLOW THE SIGNS NEWS    I   THURSDAY, MARCH 27,2014
MCGILL »
MARIJUANA »
Student leader no longer required
to apologize for Obama GIF
Lauria Galbraith
The McGill Daily
MONTREAL (NUW) - The Students' Society of McGill University
(SSMU) Legislative Council has
rescinded their decision to make a
public apology about a GIF showing
American president Barack Obama
kicking down a door with the caption "Honestly midterms get out of
here."
At a March 13 meeting, Council passed two motions regarding
the apology sent by VP Internal
Brian Farnan.
"The image in question was an
extension ofthe cultural, historical and living legacy surrounding
people of colour — particularly
young men — being portrayed as
violent in contemporary culture and
media," Farnan wrote in his apology,
sent in January to the university's
22,000 undergraduate students,
according to the National Post.
"By using this particular image
of President Obama, I unknowingly
perpetuated this living legacy and
subsequently allowed a medium of
SSMU's communication to become
the site of microaggression; for this I
am deeply sorry."
The first motion at the Council
meeting was put forward by services
representative Elie Lubendo, and
demanded a written explanation
from the equity complaints investigation committee regarding its
recommendation that Farnan make
a public apology for the GIF, sent out
over broadcast email in October.
"When the recommendation was
given to us on Dec. 5, we were never
given [an] explanation. What we
were told was that this is the recommendation that we have," Lubendo
said. "But they never actually
PHOTO COURTESY KHOADOAN3THE MCGILL DAILY
SSMU Council voted on March 13 to rescind their decision to apologize.
explained to anyone how they came
to that recommendation."
VP University Affairs Joey Shea
questioned the requirement of this
motion, saying, "Perhaps the report
itself was not thorough, but it is
stated in the policy that the equity
commissioner needs to present the
report and provide an explanation
and that is what he did."
President Katie Larson spoke
in favour ofthe motion. "I think
any way that we can encourage
transparency, especially when we
demand it so often ofthe University, is a good example to set among
ourselves," she said.
The motion passed.
The second motion, jointly put
forth by Lubendo and the Black
Students' Network (BSN), asked
to reevaluate a previously failed
motion that had asked SSMU to rescind their decision to make a public
apology.
The old motion had asked SSMU
to rescind their decision based on its
effect on SSMU's reputation.
Lubendo argued to bring back
the motion on the grounds that,
"it has not only hurt the view of
SSMU ... it has even hurt the view
of equity itself."
"This has delegitimized our
organization because people feel
that we're lookpng] for something
to do, we're raising complaints for
the sake of doing it," said Delane
Efua Boakye, a representative of
the BSN.
Shea added an amendment to
the resolved clause that changed
the basis of why SSMU would
rescind their decision. The new
clause read that it was on "the
basis that the public apology trivializes the legitimacy of equity and
racism on campus." The motion
passed.
Councillor Courtney Ayukawa
voiced her concerns regarding the
original complainant, saying, "I
do want to reiterate that it is still
important to me to validate the
feelings ofthe people that filed
that complaint."
UBC's Transportation Plan
Public Open House - April 2 and 3,2014
Add your voice to the development of UBC's Transportation Plan!
In 2013, we reached out to and heard from the university community on issues related to on-campus
transportation, whether by foot, on wheels or by public transit. Your feedback has helped us identify
opportunities to better address how we get around on campus, and draft a Transportation Plan for the
Vancouver campus that will update and replace UBC's 2005 Strategic Transportation Plan.
Please join us at one of our upcoming public open houses to learn more and offer your thoughts
and ideas about the draft Transportation Plan, and the planning process to date.
April2, 20
, April 3, 2<
"0pm-7:0C
30am -1:
House, 3385 Wesbrook Mall
oyer, 6138 Student Union Boulevard
can't attend in person?
a quick online questionnaire will be available
from March 24 to April 4 at planning.ubc.ca.
For more information on UBC's Transportation Plan, please visit: planning.ubc.ca
For more information on the consultation process, contact: chris.fay@ubc.ca
This notice contains important information which may affect you. Please ask someone to translate it for you.
o| #*|^ SSI q|S 4= Si^ #s*rga.7|-#cH ai^qch
if£!S °|sW n a* B^sfe 4tfS S2|s|-A|7| h|-bh_|dK
Club hosts fourth
campus cannabis
convention
The Hempology 101 club organized the conference.
=ILE PHOTO CARTER BRUNDAGE3THE UBYSSEY
Julian D'Souza
Contributor
The UBC Hempology 101 club
hosted their fourth annual cannabis convention in the Student
Union Building on Sunday.
Four lecturers spoke about
various aspects of marijuana
legalization to an audience of
roughly 40 people. The event was
organized through a joint effort
with the International Hempology 101 Society.
Linda Balneaves, an associate professor at UBC's School of
Nursing, began the session by
presenting research on medicinal
cannabis patients' experiences
and difficulties obtaining their
medicine. "People said that the
social stigma around the recreational and legal status of cannabis
really overshadowed its medicinal
value," she said, citing unsupport-
ive doctors as one ofthe primary
examples. Despite the stigma,
she found that patients perceived
benefits of using marijuana outweighed the perceived harm.
Cherly Rose, whose daughter
uses medical marijuana, was the
second presenter.
"I don't believe that any parent
or any person should ever have
to fight for the right to be able to
have their medicine," said Rose,
the mother of Hayley Rose, who
suffers from a debilitating form of
epilepsy. "Hayley must have her
cannabis three times a day," Rose
said. "If she misses one dose, she
will seize." She was one ofthe
youngest Canadians to be given a
medical marijuana prescription at
15, and according to her mother,
has grown to be "one ofthe oldest,
highest functioning and healthiest children in the entire world
with this condition," now 21.
Next, cannabis activist and
author Chris Bennett discussed
modern religions which use marijuana ceremonially or spiritually.
"One thing I've really noticed
when I look at these different
cultures is how cool cannabis
smokers are," he said.
To conclude the presentations,
Jeremiah Vandermeer from POT
TV and Cannabis Culture said
2013 was "off the hook in a lot of
different ways," pointing to successes in Colorado, Washington
and Uruguay as examples.
"The Liberal leader Justin
Trudeau came out in a blaze this
year not only admitting to smoking pot but also completely supporting outright legalization for
all members of society, that's the
first time that a leader of a major
party in Canada has done something like that," said Vandermeer.
However, he said the campaign against the war on drugs is
far from over.
Activists Jordan Johner and
Krista Sidloski, both Arts students, agreed more work needs
to be done to educate the public
and reduce the social stigma
around pot. Corbin Manson, the
president of Hempology 101 UBC,
challenged stereotypes about
stoners, pointing to his club's
growth in just one year at UBC.
"I don't think people can say that
chronic or occasional pot users
are unproductive members of
society," Manson said.
Perhaps the best summary
ofthe optimistic feelings ofthe
convention around the rising tide
of legalization was given by Ted
Smith, author, prominent activist
and general manager ofthe
International Hempology 101 Society. "It doesn't matter anymore.
[Prime Minister Stephen Harper]
can't even stop it," said Smith.
"I wanted to educate the public
until they're ready to legalize it
— they're fuckin' ready." XI
a place of mind
THE   UNIVERSITYOF   BRITISH   COLUMBIA
campus+community planning
Write for News
news@ubyssey.ca // Sports + Rec
EDITOR  NATALIE SCADDEN
UBC VARSITY SPORTS REPORT CARD: TERM TWO
By Natalie Scadden, Sports + Rec Editor and CJ Pentland, Managing Editor, Web
WOMEN'S
VOLLEYBALL
(18-4)
CW standing: 1st
The six-time defending
CIS champions put
^ themselves in
I position to win a
' record seven straight
titles. Ultimately, they
tightened up and fell
flat in the final game at
nationals, losing to the
Manitoba Bisons, a
team they had crushed
a week earlier in the
Canada West Championship.
Best Player: Lisa Barclay kept the CIS Player
of the Year award in the UBC family for the
fifth consecutive season. The outside hitter
finished the regularseason averaging 4.26 kills
and 4.99 points per set — both the highest in
the country.
Needs Improvement: Don't let the loss in the
national final distract from the fact that UBC is
still one ofthe best teams in the country. Hopefully this team can refocus and get back on top.
WOMEN'S
BASKETBALL
(16-6)
CW standing: 2nd in
Pacfic Division
They finished well
enough in the regular
season to earn themselves home court
advantage in the first
round. They won the
first game of their best-
of-three playoff series
against Saskatchewan,
but couldn't get it done in
the next two, making an
early exit for the second
straightyear.
Best Player: Last year's CW MVP Kris Young
had anotherfantastic season, averaging 17.8
points, 7.0 rebounds, and 2.56 assists per
game. Harleen Sidhu was a huge addition,
averaging 15.5 points and 8.4 rebounds.
Needs Improvement: Consistency was
an issue, and the bench needs to contribute
more. Their entire roster will remain intact for
next season, so hopefully they can build more
chemistry and make a championship run.
P*
SWIMMING
The women's swim team took their
dominance to a whole new level this
season, setting a new CIS record with
a 397.5 point margin of victory over the
Montreal Carabins to win their third
straight national championship. The
men's squad again finished second
to the Toronto Varsity Blues, but were
slightly farther behind this year. UBC
men and women stood on top ofthe
podium in all six relays throughout nationals, a sign ofthe program's depth.
Best Player: Every swimmerscored
points, but Coleman Allen and Erika
Seltenreich-Hodgson took home
the male and female CIS Swimmer of
the Year honours with seven and five
medals at nationals, respectively.
Needs Improvement: Both teams
won at the Canada West Championships, but it would be nice to see the
guys match the girls' success and
bring home a UBC sweep at CIS.
BASEBALL
(18-5,
10-2 in conference)
NAIA conference standing: 1st
The T-Birds have looked
unstoppable lately,
winning 10 straight games
to sit in first place in the
conference. They've
done it on the backs of
outstanding pitching and
defence, giving upjust 15
runs overtheir past
eight conference
match
ups.
Best Player: Infielder Kevin Biro has been on
a tear at tine plate, hitting .444 on the year to go
along with a team-leading 19 RBIs and 44 total
bases. On the hill, Connor Lillis-White sports a
miniscule 0.59 ERAover30.2 innings pitched.
Needs Improvement:Strong regularseasons
have been the norm, but they have trouble
carrying that over to the playoffs. They need
to maintain this level of play to get back to the
NAIA World Series.
MEN'S
VOLLEYBALL
(15-7)
CW standing: 2nd
They looked dominant
formuchoftheseason
and snagged second
in the ultra-competitive
Canada West, but fell
short when it counted
inthe first round ofthe
playoffs to Brandon. In
game one, UBC was up
two sets to none before
^ falling in five sets, and
1*    they could never quite
turn it around after that.
Best Player: Setter Milan Nikic and outside
hitter Ben Chow were a formidable offensive
duo thisyear, and both were rewarded with
All-Canadian honours. Chow finished fourth in
the CWwith 3.78 kills per set, while Nikic racked
up an average of 10.51 assists per frame.
Needs Improvement: This is two straight
seasons where UBC has been on the brink
of making nationals but came up short. Quite
simply, they need to step up at crunch time.
WOMEN'S
HOCKEY
(20-6-2)
CW standing: 3rd
For a lengthy stretch of the
year, UBC was leading the
Canada West regularseason standings for the first
time in team history and
their 20 season wins were
three higherthan the
program's all-time best.
They pushed Saskatch-
i   ewantoado-or-die
,,   gamethreeintheCW
•   semifinals, but lost
b that contest 3-2 on
the road.
Best Player: Tatiana Rafter broke UBC
records for most goals (20) and points (38) in
a season and won the first Canada West MVP
award in team history.
Needs Improvement: They were dominant
on home ice (13-0-1), but if they want to win a
national championship, they're going to have
to win big games on the road.
SOFTBALL
(13-13)
NAIA conference standing: 6th
It's been a season of
streaks so far for this
■ team(L5,W5,L3,W3,
. L5.W5), but they've
- scored more runs than
' they've let up, winning
their last five games by a
total of 48-4. Off the field,
they've had to deal with
some adversity after
being named the only
team sport that will lose
its varsity status in 2015.
Best Player: It's tough to say without updated
stats, but Yasmin Bains and Cass Dypchey
seem to be driving in the most runs, while
Alana Westerhof leads the pitching corps.
Needs Improvement: Nine games have
been decided by a single run, but they've
only won three of them. They need to finish
stronger and head into the postseason on a
high note.
MENS RUGBY
(20-2)
After many years of not creating much
competition againsttheirlongtime
rivals of Victoria and California, UBC
has brought it all together this year to
regain theirstatus as a rugby powerhouse. A convincing 29-16 win over
UVic brought the'Birds the Wight-
man's Boot forthe first time since 1997,
and a dominant 40-3 victory over Cal
saw them reclaim the World Cupforthe
first time since 2006.
Best Player: The team's coaches
stress how their success combines
from a whole team effort, and their
recent win over Cal really was a
strong showing on both offence and
defence.
Needs Improvement: It's hard to
pinpoint something the team has
done poorly as of late. The main thing
is probably just to stay healthy in the
run-up to provincials.
&
MEN'S
ft     \ HOCKEY
» (11-15-2)
CW standing: 1st
After a less-than-spectacular
first half of the season, the
'Birds used a second-half
surge and a little bit of help
to slip into the playoffs. They
carried that momentum into a
rst-round playoffvictory, but
fell short against Alberta. The
key to thei r success lay with
their goaltending, which finally
supported the high-flying
^    offence.
Best Player: Cole Wilson solidified his status as a
constant scoring threat, totalling 18 goals and 17
assists in 28 games. Second-year Neil Manning
also continued to show signs of becoming a top
two-way defenceman.
Needs Improvement: Winning a playoff series
was a significant accomplishment since they were
clear underdogs, but they never really had a chance
against Alberta, the eventual champion. They have
a long way to go to become legit contenders.
MEN'S
BASKETBALL
(11-11)
CW standing: 4th in
Pacific Division
After struggling with
injuries early on. they
were mostly healthy for
the stretch drive, they
couldn't quite pull it
together come playoffs.
They forced a game three
in the opening round
against top-ranked
Alberta, but the team's
youth and inexperience
playing together led to an
early playoff exit.
Best Player: Fourth-year Tommy Nixon
stepped up his game thisyear, leading the team
in scoring with an average 14.2 points per game
on 45.2 per cent shooting to go along with a
team-high 44 steals.
Needs Improvement: Most of their roster
returns nextyear, and B.C. high school provincial MVP Mindy Minhas also joins the team, so
the talent is there. It will come down to staying
healthy and locking down their defence, xi 6    I    FEATURES    I    THURSDAY, MARCH 27,2014
Divest me
Drama
The university, and much ofthe
world, is split between those who
think it is unethical — or financially
unwise — to keep investing in
energy companies, and those who
think such investments are the only
way to make such companies clean
up their act
By Jenny Tan
^^^^1 hen you enter the new
X " i" M online documentary
^l^^^ video game Fort Mc-
Money, created with
actual video footage from Fort
McMurray, Alta., scenes of doom
greet you. The sky is an immutable block of grey, save for immense columns of smoke forming
bridges from the factories to the
sky. As you speed along the highway, the dark prevents you from
seeing anything but the glare of
the headlights of incoming traffic.
Two pillars of light speed toward
you and suddenly the immense
bulk of an oil tanker truck is
illuminated by your headlights,
filling your entire field of vision
through the windshield. Just as
fast as it pounded towards you,
it disappears, and is quickly replaced by another one. You learn
later that Highway 63, the only
highway between Edmonton and
Alberta's massive northern oil
fields, suffers from harsh prairie
winter conditions, is only one
lane wide in either direction and
carries some ofthe heaviest and
most dangerous loads in Canada.
Locals call it the Highway of
Death.
^^f^^l hen I first meet Alex
^TiT J Hemingway, he looks
^^^^ me in the eye and gives
^^^^^ me a firm handshake. If
UBCC350, the student group of
which he is a member, wanted to
portray themselves as a professional group and shake loose
the granola image that so often
defines environmental activism,
they could not have sent a better
representative. With two master's
degrees from the London School
of Economics under his belt and a
PhD in the works, Hemingway is
a credible representative for the
group agitating for UBC to clean
up its investment portfolio.
UBCC350 wants UBC to divest
from oil companies — in other
words, to sell all of its shares in
oil companies and to desist from
buying any more such stocks in
the future. The idea behind the
campaign is this: as UBC moves
to become a sustainable institution, it should not profit from the
oil industry while striving for
sustainability in other areas of
its operations. UBCC350 successfully lobbied to have an advisory
question on divestment placed on
the recent AMS referendum, and
almost 7,000 students agreed it is
"unconscionable to fund our education with investments in fossil
fuels that threaten our future on
this planet and [that] UBC should
immediately forgo further investments in fossil fuel companies,
and divest from all existing fossil
fuel holdings."
The divestment movement
is not unique to UBC. The idea
of divesting from oil companies began in the U.S. and has
spread across campuses in North
America. The idea of divesting
from companies as an act of
protest also has roots beyond the
current climate change debate.
In the 1980s, students rallied
for divestment in protest ofthe
apartheid movement in South
Africa. Divestment has also been
used as a tactic more recently,
with activists boycotting Russian
vodka in protest ofthe country's
homophobic laws.
UBC has just over $2.5 billion
in its investment portfolio, and
12 per cent is invested in energy
companies, according to UBC's
Investment Management Trust's
2013 annual report. The two
largest funds in the portfolio are
the UBC endowment fund and
the staff pension plan, each of
which make up two fifths of the
portfolio. UBC owns only the endowment fund; the staff pension
plan is comprised of contributions
from employees and government
and is directed by a board of
faculty members and advisers.
Interest from the UBC endowment fund pays for scholarships,
professorships, teaching support
and other operating expenses.
Bveryone in the meeting room is dressed
to impress. The two
twenty-something men
standing by the refreshment
table are wearing suits and ties,
giving them an air of formality.
The juxtaposition is odd. We are
in a meeting room at a community centre downtown, hardly the
most formal venue in the city.
The seemingly incongruous
combination of venue and attire
makes sense given the context.
These people do, after all, spend
their time managing the trillions
of dollars ofthe one-percenters,
and ofthe rest of us. These are
chartered financial accountants,
bankers, fund managers and
investors, gathered to hear about
a United Nations program to encourage sustainable investment,
the UN Principles of Responsible
Investment (PRI) initiative.
UBCC350 and UN PRI both
want to achieve sustainability,
but their methods are markedly
different. In an interview with
The Ubyssey, Fiona Reynolds, UN
PRI's managing director, said
divestment is the last step they
advise shareholders consider —
only to be taken when all else has
been tried and has failed.
Two key groups make the
decisions in every major publicly
traded company like Enbridge,
the Alberta energy giant: shareholders and the management
team.
By purchasing shares, shareholders own a portion ofthe
company, and therefore have a
say in how the company runs.
The more shares you hold, the
more votes you get at the annual
meeting where the company
makes important decisions.
Shareholders are essentially the
employers ofthe chief executive
officer (CEO), chief financial
officer (CFO) and other members
ofthe management team. The
stick waved by shareholders in
front ofthe management team is
this: make money for us and do
as you're told, or we'll fire you.
The carrot to the management
team for maximizing the profits
of a company come in the form of
payment and bonuses.
"UBC should
immediately
forgo further
investments
in fossil fuel
companies,
and divest from
all existing fossil
fuel holdings."
—Partial text of the
AMS referendum divestment question, on
which more than 7,000
students voted yes THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 2014    |    FEATURES
In most cases, however, the
management makes all the decisions itself, and only comes under
fire if it fails to make the company
money or becomes embroiled in
major scandal.
The UN group essentially encourages shareholders — like UBC
— to engage with the management
teams of companies in which they
invest, encouraging them to act
more responsibly and sustainably.
The threat if management refuses
to play ball is implicit rather than
explicit, but still hangs over any
negotiations: if you're really not
listening to us, we'll fire you.
However, like most organizations, the theory of who has
control over the operations of a
company doesn't always play out
in real life as predicted on paper.
Apple CEO Tim Cook demonstrated this earlier this month. During
a board meeting, shareholders
told Cook they did not want him
investing their money in activities promoting sustainability.
Cook balked and effectively told
shareholders to sell their shares
in Apple if they disagreed with
his vision of corporate responsibility to the environment. Shareholder engagement, in this case,
failed, and divestment became the
only option.
But while trying to change corporate behaviour as a shareholder
may not always work, critics say
divesting from oil companies
altogether, as UBCC350 advocates, seems to be throw the baby
out with the bathwater. Without
any shares, anyone advocating for
change in corporate behaviour
might as well be a fly in a tent:
the buzzing ofthe fly may be
annoying, but its presence is of no
real consequence.
If divestment loses former
investors their clout
with a company, is it still
worth doing not just to
inflict financial pain on the corporation or industry, but because
it's a wise financial move for institutions? Hemingway brought up
the concept ofa "carbon bubble."
To understand this concept, we
can think of Wile E. Coyote. During my childhood, I watched Wile
E. Coyote try to chase and trap
Roadrunner, his efforts always in
vain. Many episodes ended with
the iconic cliff scene: Roadrunner
speeds along in front of Wile E.
Coyote and, defying gravity, races
straight across an immense gulf
between the faces of two cliffs.
Wile E. Coyote is in hot pursuit.
He runs straight at the gap. He
races past the edge.
And then, of course, the fantasy
ends. Wile E. Coyote inevitably
pauses, looks down, and realizes
that, unlike Roadrunner, he cannot defy gravity. He looks at the
camera, blinks twice and waves.
He plummets downward, and all
viewers see ofthe aftermath is
the dust cloud ballooning across
the bottom ofthe canyon when
gravity is done pulling Wile E.
Coyote toward his doom.
Advocates ofthe carbon bubble
theory suggest that the stock
prices and returns of oil companies are analogous to the run and
fall of Wile E. Coyote. Look at
the amount of carbon reserves oil
companies count as assets that
scientists agree cannot actually be used, they say. According
to two papers published in the
scientific journal Nature, three
quarters of all known fossil fuel
reserves must stay in the ground
to avoid crossing the threshold
to catastrophic climate change.
Once the stock market becomes
fully cognizant of this inconsistency, investors will rush to sell
the overvalued stocks. At that
"The university
consulted widely
with leaders in
the responsible
investment field.
These leaders
did not favour
divestment."
—UBC Investment
Management Trust
press release
point, share prices plunge. The
lucky ones will sell their shares at
a loss as prices fall. The unlucky
ones will remain unable to find
buyers for their shares at decent
prices and the weight of their
immense loss will add to the
cloud of dust that rises from their
collective fall.
If this were to come true, it
would be the obvious financial
move for UBC to divest sooner
rather than later. But assuming that continuing to invest in
energy companies is in a fact a
smart financial stance for the
university to take — the prevailing view among many on both
sides ofthe divestment debate —
what should the folks in charge
of UBC's money do? Is it even
possible that the divestment of
public institutions will lead to
concrete change in the behaviour
of companies?
Suppose divestment campaigns
successfully persuade UBC and
other public institutions to divest
from oil companies. This divestment will not directly harm the
companies very much, given the
size of investments from private
individuals and corporations.
However, suppose other investors
are persuaded that oil companies
are undesirable investments for financial and environmental reasons.
More investors sell their shares.
Auch a large amount of shares of oil
companies would become available
on the market that share prices
would fall significantly. Remaining shareholders, alarmed by the
falling value of their shares, might
then put fierce pressure on company management teams to develop
more sustainable practices and appease the market. If they continue
placing pressure on management
until the public is satisfied with the
degree of sustainability ofthe company and purchase the company's
shares again, that could result in
real change.
"The financial divestment is
important in the sense that that's
the mechanism through which
people can take joint action and
through which the stigmatization
can happen," Hemingway said.
I, however, am skeptical.
In 1972, Stephen Ross, an associate professor of economics at the
University of Pennsylvania, laid
out his economic theory of agency
that has since, with great fecundity,
become the foundation on which
many analyses of social and market
issues have been conducted. He
termed it the "principal-agent
problem." The mathematical proofs
in his paper reinforce a point that
one can intuitively grasp: having
someone else do work for you is
difficult if they do not have the
same incentives as you. Ross
attempted to prove in his paper
that given a very specific type of
personal preference and a complex
compensation scheme, one might
be able to convince someone else to
do a task with as much earnestness
and effort as you would. However,
the corollary of Ross's theory
naturally holds as well: most ofthe
time, you can't.
Imagine you have been hired
by College Pro Painters. You are
assigned to paint the garage of
someone you don't know. All
your supervisor is concerned
about is that you finish the job
by 4 o'clock, and all you know
is that you are paid by the hour
and that you are meeting friends
at the Norm afterward. Are you
going to finish the job as efficiently as possible? Probably not.
If you can extend your work all
the way until 4, you'll maximize
your profits.
Similarly, the primary objective of any corporate team is to
maximize profit. When profits
are high, shareholders receive
large cheques in the mail and
their bonus is correlated with the
size of their cheques. Unfortunately, sustainability and profits
are often orthogonal goals.
For UBC's part, Roger Polishak,
director of manager relations and
investment operations for UBC
Investment Management Trust
Inc., declined to be interviewed
for this article. He simply provided a link to a statement from the
summer announcing a "responsible investment strategy."
"In adopting its new responsible investment strategy, the
university consulted widely
with leaders in the responsible
investment field," the divestment
portion ofthe press release read.
"These leaders did not favour
divestment."
sit down with Hugh
Neary, a UBC economics
professor who has always
reminded me of Santa
Claus. I wanted to hear Neary's
opinion not just as an academic,
but also as a father with dependents and a pension that would be
directly affected by university
divestment — and unlike Santa
Claus, he has a very real mortgage.
His response surprised me. His
primary concern with the divestment movement was not the risk
of a drop in his pension, as I had
expected. I had probed Hemingway on the topic in great detail in
preparation. But only about 10 per
cent of UBC's portfolio is invested
in energy companies. Divestment
would protect UBC and its employees from the popping ofthe
carbon bubble, and some studies
have shown minimal to no impact
on return given divestment.
He sat in his chair and looked
at me, holding his glasses in
one hand and shaking his head
slightly as I repeat Hemingway's
assurances. No, the potential drop
in his return wasn't his primary
concern. Instead, he gave an
example that illustrated his fundamental doubt ofthe divestment
movement. Look at Walmart, he
said — so successful it opened 37
new Supercentres in Canada in
2013. Despite its reputation for
poor treatment of workers, among
other accusations, people still
shop at Walmart because of its
cheap prices. If knowledge ofa
problem did lead to people taking
action at their own expense to
mitigate the problem, Walmart
would have much quieter aisles
than it does now.
This is the crucial puzzle we
must solve in order to succeed in
responding to climate change.
How do we persuade ourselves to
resist the siren song of short-term
personal gains and long-term
detriment? The success ofthe divestment movement hinges on our
ability to translate knowledge into
action. If we know more about
the consequences of our actions,
will we really give up some of
our personal gains for the sake of
future good? Will we accept lower
profits? Drive less? Buy fewer
clothes? Eat less meat? Or will we
only change the way we act if we
personally benefit from it now?
Hemingway pointed out that
the ultimate goal ofthe divestment movement is increasing
public awareness; divestment
itself is only a means to that end.
The crucial assumption ofthe
divestment movement is that lack
of knowledge is the largest barrier
preventing action on climate
change. I don't think that's true.
Climate change is known to the
vast majority of people. The w
example shows us that the largest
barrier is not lack of knowledge,
but our unwillingness to change
our behaviour despite knowing
the consequences of our current
lifestyle. Increasing public awareness is only the first step that
has already been done well; the
challenge now is to convince ourselves to accept the uncomfortable
knowledge we have and act on it.
The sun is just beginning to
set as Hemingway and I finish
our conversation. For close to an
hour, I had grilled him on the
ambiguity ofthe actual impact
divestment would have on climate
change, the amount of risk to its
return the university would face
and technicalities ofthe finance
industry. Hemingway answered
my questions with clarity and
precision and, at some points,
frank acknowledgement when he
had no answer. At one of those
points, he looked at me and said
that, eventually, we have to make
a choice between questioning and
researching, and actually choosing a course of action.
And at some point, we do. For
to not make a choice is to have
made one as well. XI
OPEN HOUSE
Early Public Input Opportunity
Proposed Redevelopment on the
LUTHERAN CAMPUS CENTRE SITE
The B.C. Synod ofthe Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada is proposing a new
development on the existing Lutheran Campus Centre site to serve the entire UEL Community.
Prior to making a formal application for an amendment to the OCP and the Land Use, Building
and Community Administration Bylaw, we invite you to an      OPEN HOUSE
for an early opportunity to view the proposal and offer comments.
Proposed Development:
A two story community assembly space on the east portion of the site with a generous public
open plaza to the southeast corner. To the west, a five storey mixed use compcnent with
retail / cafe on the ground floor and market rental housing above. All parking wi I be
underground with access from Wesbrook Mall.
DATE: Thursday, April 3, 2014
TIME: 4:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
LOCATION:   STE 300-5755 Dalhousie Road
(UEL community space in the Village)
Representatives ofthe Lutheran
community and the architects will
be available to answer questions
and provide information.
Please direct questions to Rev.
Cliff Reinhardt at 604-874-2213
or visit our website at
lutherancampus.centre.com.
wautMBw*.
mmm&'gvjm§mimnmm&. 8    I    SPORTS + REC    I    THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 2014
T-BIRDS 5-ON-5
MOST COMMON UBC NAMES
1. If you had been born the opposite sex,
what would your parents have named you?
Matty. They're unoriginal.        Shaquille.
Nadine. Its a beautiful
name. Nadine Cheong
fits so nicely and has a
nice ring to it.
He-Who-Must-Not-Be-
Named.
Karolina.
2. What TV show character are you most like?
Harvey Spectre from
Suits. Neverwrong,
sarcasticallyfunnyand
drop-dead gorgeous.
Guy Fierri from Diners,
Drive-ins and Dives,
because food is my
best friend.
Johnny Bravo. He knows
how to talk to women,
wish I had his confidence, muscles and hair
— in that order.
Kim Possible, because
fight crimein my spare
time. If you want to page
me, it's OK.
Mike Ross from Suits. \
like to think I have almost
asgoodofa memory as
him.
3. What's your guilty pleasure?
Playing MLB: The Show
every night before bed,
usually naked.
Buying a dozen donuts
and taking a single bite
out of everyone.
Anything with Meryl
Streep. Osage County is
iustso beautiful.
Creeping you on Face-
book.
Candy I could live off of
Skittles.
4. What would be your porn star name?
Mattastrophe.
BonerGarage.
Jim Deal. "Do the ladies
want the real deal?"
would be my tagline. POV
only
Diamond, because
shine bright like a
diamond.
Hard to say An online
quiz gave me "Sheila S-e-
x-y," though.
5. What does UBC really stand for?
The University of British
Columbia is all I've
known it to be — or more
notably "the U".
Unnecessary Budget
Cuts...
Universal BrunkClub.
# UBC Bad Boys
Ultimate Beer Challenge.
University of Beautiful
Cars. Gotta love all the
luxury sports cars with
Ns on them.
71 4,009 people have done it
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AIRPLANE DESIGN »
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The Province     THE VANCOUVER SUN
Nick Adams
StaffWriter
A group of UBC engineers are
taking off to Fort Worth, Texas,
for a competition in which they
will fly a remote control wooden
airplane at maximum capacity
— probably until it crashes to
the ground.
This competition, officially
known as the SAE Aero Design
West but commonly referred to
as the Heavy Lift Competition,
is one that hard-working UBC
students pour an absurd amount
of their already few minutes of
spare time into. According to
one club member, his uncounted
hours amass to over five hundred
since this September.
"At the beginning, every Saturday I'd show up to the meetings
and do some work," said Antonio
Peralta, the chief design officer.
"But once you start building
planes and getting everything
integrated, it gets pretty hectic. I
remember during reading break
we were pretty much in the lab
every single day for 12 hours."
Not all clubs at UBC require this amount of work
and devotion. But then, not all
clubs make lightweight planes
fly through the air holding
more than the average textbook-jammed backpack.
"The hardest part is integrating the size constraints,"
Peralta said. SAE International
sets strict regulations for their
competitions, and for good
reason — limiting the size of the
planes forces engineers to design
more efficiently and effectively, a
real-life translation to the world
of aircraft design.
The planes weigh in at about
seven pounds; in the past, the
UBC Aero Design team has
loaded theirs to about 30 pounds.
"It's a heavy lift competition, so
whoever can lift the most wins,"
Peralta said.
The beauty of such a competition must certainly lie in its
juxtaposition of complexity and
simplicity: complexity in the
delicate, tedious task of creating
an object that can lift over three
times its weight and the simplicity of a spot on the podium.
They're taking elementary school
Popsicle stick bridges to a whole
new level.
But the team doesn't get
caught up in the complexity of
the competition, and they have a
track record to prove it. They've
finished in the top 10 for the
past seven years. It doesn't seem,
however, that they've gotten
there only through long hours
in the lab and forsaking their
spring breaks.
"We've conducted ground
schools where we fly trainer
airplanes," Peralta said. This is
all part ofthe effort to help teach
anyone interested in joining
about airplanes. The team is very
inclusive of other departments,
and their current group reflects
that. "We've got Arts, Sauder,
Forestry, Science and Engineering," Peralta said happily.
If the club piques your interest, take a look for them at
Imagine Day next September.
It could be the f lyest decision
you've ever made. XI II Culture
RHYS EDWARDS
URSDAY, MARCH 27,20
MUSIC »
Dan Mangan + Blacksmith
ready to go back to school
MAGECOURTESYJONATHANTAGGART
Singer-songwriter Dan Mangan likes to ponder the big questions in life, like whether it's a good idea to put a plant
on a radiator.
Lauren Dixon
Contributor
It has been almost nine years since Dan
Mangan donned his cap and gown, smiled,
and tried not to blink while cameras
captured the graduating class of'05. Now,
he's back for Block Party next month under
the moniker Dan Mangan + Blacksmith.
Although he has returned to UBC since he
graduated with a degree in English, this
particular visit is different — the Juno
award-winner's college dreams are about to
come true.
Each calendar year, Mangan attended the
Arts County Fair at Thunderbird Stadium.
The yearly last-day-of-classes event was
cancelled in 2007 due to financial concerns.
Block Party was its successor.
I attribute a lot of any kind
of lyrical prowess that I
have to all of those all-nighters that I pulled at UBC
writing essays, and half the
time completely bullshitting
everything.
Dan Mangan
"I remember always begging Shea Dahl,
who used to book it, to let me play, and I
never did. Now I have my redemption — to
come back and play at Block Party," he said.
UBC was never part of Mangan's plans.
Fresh out of high school, he just wanted to
get out and create music. His parents were
supportive, but were clear that he had to
go to university before jumping into the
music scene headfirst. "I kind of begrudged
them for it but quickly realized when I was
in school that that was where I should be,"
he said.
Spending most of his university days in
the Buchanan buildings, Mangan said he
learned how to question things, and not to
take them for granted. He left UBC having
read a small library's worth of books and
believes his background in literature has
been crucial to his songwriting.
"I think I attribute a lot of any kind of
lyrical prowess that I have to all of those
all-nighters that I pulled at UBC writing essays, and half the time completely bullshitting everything. It's all process."
While in the studio recording the
much-anticipated followup to their second
album, Nice, Nice, Very Nice, the band
made the decision to add "+ Blacksmith" to
Mangan's former singer-songwriter title. "I
feel as though the band deserved some kind
of formal recognition for all ofthe work
they have put in over the years, and it kind
of stuck with me for a long time," Mangan
said.
He looks back and sees an
important part of his past
rooted in the singer-songwriter genre
— "introspective
nerdy folk rock
music," as he
calls it. Looking forward,
he believes
change is
important.
"It feels
like there
has been an
evolution
in terms of
the sound
in my head
and what I
want to hear,
and I guess Dan
Mangan + Blacksmith is a nice way
of saying, OK, this
is a new era and a new
thing."
There is a chance Block
Party-goers will get to hear a teaser
from Dan Mangan + Blacksmith's new album. "I have a feeling we will probably play
one or two new songs. I would be surprised
if we didn't. At the same time, we recorded
these songs a while ago and now we have to
figure out how to actually play them again,"
he said.
Block Party will be the first show Dan
Mangan + Blacksmith have played in over
seven months. "You spend too much time on
the road, you start to itch to be home. And
when you spend all that time at home, you
do tend to itch to be on stage again," he said.
Indeed, Dan Mangan is looking forward
to coming "home" to UBC for the seventh
annual Block Party. Vt
Kenton Loewen, centre, and his band the Crackling aren't too fond of warm and fuzzy things.
The Crackling
burns with post-
apocalyptic flame
Rebekah Ho
Contributor
With a name drawn from the sounds of
burning fire, the Crackling is bringing its
flame to the stage for this year's Block Party
on April 8.
Kenton Loewen, the folk-rock five-piece
band's frontman, compares their music to
reading a Cormac McCarthy book — dark,
haunting and beautiful.
"It's post-apocalyptic," said Loewen.
"There's this dark essence to the human
soul, and there's this odd hope
inside of these terrifically
horrible things happening, and that sort of
describes away of
what this music
does and how
this music
works."
The
Crackling's
first album
is called
Keep Full
Ambitious,
was named
after a
phrase used
by Loewen's
grandfather
throughout
his childhood,
and as a gesture
of constant love.
Mary Magdalene, the
Crackling's most recent
album, comes out on April
23. The album cover features
Jesus pouring wine at Mary's feet.
"I think Mary Magdalene was a deeply
misunderstood character, a deeply respected character [and] a deeply hated character.
She was enigmatic and confusing for several
reasons," said Loewen.
The premise ofthe album is to flip Christianity on its head and also to place women
in a central position of power.
"Once again we have created a thing
where people are comforted by the fact that
that's an option rather than dealing with
our own lives, and I'm really inspired with
dealing with my own life and dealing with
the people in my life and being entirely
hands on about that experience in a way
that's real," said Loewen. "The whole Jesus
figure and the disciples — I find that whole
picture quite ridiculous, questionable,
hilarious and wonderful to destroy and take
apart."
There's this dark essence to
the human soul, and there's
this odd hope inside of these
terrifically horrible things
happening, and that sort of
describes a way of what this
music does.
Kenton Loewen
The Crackling frontman
Loewen's writing process is far from conventional. It is chaotic, which comes through
in the honest music the Crackling produces.
"I'm a terrible writer. I'm a mess. I'm all
over the place and up all night and drinking
and breaking things and acting fucking mental," said Loewen. "It's a cathartic experience,
but at the end of it the day, it's usually these
bits and pieces and morsels of music [that
makes it feel] like a worthwhile process.
"Experiencingthe world is goingto affect
you. You either do something with it or you
don't do something with it, and I choose to do
something, because I can't just leave it in my
head."
The Crackling came to UBC earlier last
January to perform as part ofthe Gallery
Lounge's live music series. The Crackling is
only one of Loewen's projects; he has also
played drums for Dan Mangan, Mother
Mother and the Gordon Grdina Trio. For
Block Party, Loewen will be drumming with
Blacksmith, Dan Mangan's band. He sees
music as an open invitation, and even more so,
a challenge to question our experiences.
"You know when you're watching a Hollywood movie, and the music comes in at the
right time, and the lighting comes in at the
right time, and everything comes in at the
right time, and you feel manipulated, and it's
supposed to be this powerful moment, and
you're supposed to feel this shit.... Fuck all
that," said Loewen. "I like [that] the idea ofthe
music allows you to have your own question
and your own experience.
"The music's an invitation. It always has
been." Vt 10    I    CULTURE    I    THURSDAY, MARCH 27,2014
THEATRE»
Voyaging to stranger shores
Theatre and creative writing unite for Brave New Play Rites
=HOTOCOURTESYJUSTINNEAL/BRAVENEWPLAYRITES/
Simon Maclntyre and Taylor Scott star in Drifted, one of a dozen new plays in the festival.
Hilary Leung
Contributor
Imagine bringing a play to life.
Now imagine bringing a play to life
with people you have never met in
a few short months. Daunting? Yes.
Impossible? UBC creative writing
and theatre students beg to differ.
Brave New Play Rites is a
collaborative festival that unites
creative writing and theatre students together in order to script,
stage and perform a variety of
plays. Playwrights submit their
work to the festival's organizers
for a chance to meet with directors
and actors and begin the creative
process of breathing life into their
plays. For some students, Brave
New Play Rites is the first place
their work has ever been staged;
some of it goes on to be performed
across the world by other compan
ies. Now in its 28th year, this year's
festival includes 12 new plays about
a variety of subjects, including alcohol-induced revelations, a couple
stranded on a boat in the Georgia
Strait, a murderous Mexican vigilante and a global epidemic.
Sarah Ens, a creative writing
major participating in the program, found writing the play a
refreshing experience. "I've never
written plays before," she said. "So
that was kind of nerve-wracking,
but also really exciting."
Ens' play, Little Light, is a twisted modern-day parable about the
legend of Peter Pan. While it was
scary for Ens to hand her manuscript over to the directors, she
recognized that she had done her
part. "It was their turn to make it
their own thing," she said.
Seeing her play acted out in
front of her aroused many emo-
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tions for Ens. "I've grown attached
to these characters and to these
lines," she said. "It was really
cool to see these actors take these
characters really seriously. And
when they read the lines ... it was
really lovely. It was someone taking
my work seriously and caring a lot
about my characters."
Directors and actors play a
significant role in the plays' creative processes. Ndola Hutton, the
festival's stage manager and director of Travel Weight, and Angie
Lopez, who acts in three plays, are
as connected to the plays as the
playwrights themselves.
"The most exciting part of
directing was when you first get
the script and you read through
it," Hutton said. "You get all of
these images and possibilities and
what you can do and see it unfold.
From there, it gets more and more
exciting."
For the theatre students, collaborating with the playwrights
has been a wonderful experience.
"It was really great seeing all of
the plays progress and taking the
feedback from [the playwrights]
and moving it forward," Hutton
said. "Everyone had a really good
time."
"As an actor, having the playwright in the room — you know,
you're asked to play all sorts of
characters and make up these
stories about their past that aren't
in the scripts," Lopez said. "So to
have that person that you can turn
to ask is really nice. And sometimes they say, 'It's up to you as an
artist.'"
Despite the stress and difficulties that accompany a work of art
being produced in a short period
of time, it has been an extremely
rewarding experience for Hutton
and Lopez.
"The most gratifying experience
for me was when every single one
of my directors said '...and we have
a show.'" Lopez said, laughing. V
Brave New Play Rites takes place
in the Dorothy Somerset Studio on
campus from March 26 to 30.
Post-coital conflict cultivates
candid conversation
Love and sex a hot topic in AFTER
The play features the stories of two couples -
relationships after having just done the nasty.
Mariam Barry
Contributor
Let's talk about sex.
Not the courting, the foreplay
or the action, but what happens
after it. Romantic relationships can
change after a couple's first experience of sex, and sometimes for the
worse. Sex, rather than bringing
down barriers, can reinforce them.
What often ensues are trials of
miscommunication, dishonesty and
frustration, all of which stem from
the struggle to reconcile emotional
and sexual needs.
It is exactly the presence of these
underlying issues playwright and
UBC master's graduate Martha
Herrera-Lasso examines in AFTER
— a play centered on the complex
conversations that unfold after
sex. A joint production between Excavation Theatre and the dream of
passion theatre company, AFTER
episodically follows the evolution
of two couples' romantic relationships. The action always takes
place in ambiguous settings only
identifiable with their compatibility as a place for sex, ranging from
the bedroom and the bathroom to
the kitchen.
All in different stages in their
lives, the four principal characters
— all in their 20s and 30s — face the
same challenge of defining the line
between love and lust.
"Everyone can identify with the
characters onstage, as the topic of
romantic relationships is univer-
PHOTO COURTESY AFTER PLAY
- in their 20s and 30s — discussing their
sal," said Jessica Anne Nelson, the
production's director.
As Nelson points out, it's all too
easy to be swept away in the desire
for a relationship. "[We forget to
ask ourselves,] am I happy? Am I
okay with being treated this way?
Am I letting myself be used?"
Observed through a female
perspective and in her 20s herself,
Nelson, the founder of Excavation
Theatre and a UBC theatre alumna,
sees the internal conflicts ofthe
female characters as the result of a
bigger cultural debate about what is
acceptable for a woman's sexuality.
Nelson says females in the media
are either hailed as perfect virgins
or smeared as sluts, and these
outdated dichotomies often lead to
self-loathing or doubt concerning a
woman's role in the bedroom.
Empowered by a woman in
creative control, all members of
AFTER's production team are
female, with the exception ofthe
lighting designer. They are joined
by a cast that features Stefania
Indelicato, Al Miro, Jane Hancock
and Matthew McLellan.
"More than simply to expecting
to laugh, the audience should be
prepared for the script's layers of
intensity," said Nelson. "I hope
this production will generate more
conversation about how we treat
each other." V
AFTER will play at the Havana
Theatre (1212 Commercial Dr.) until
April 5.
na
bit.ly/UBCBike
twitter.com/UBCBike II Opinions
EDITORIAL CARTOON »
LLUSTRATION CJ PENTLAND3THE UBYSSEY
Alternative methods of getting over the wall: ladders, hang-gliders and moon boots.
The outdoor pool has closed permanently, one of a number of athletics services from which Carla Turner feels she is not getting her money's worth.
Just what athletics do I get for my $200.94?
LETTER
Is anyone else sick of seeing this in
their tuition fee summary:
Athletics and Recreation fee:
$200.94.
What is this fee for, and why is it
so high?
I am not on a sports team, so I
figured this fee was for the use of
the aquatic centre swimming pools,
sauna and other amenities.
Maybe I am mistaken, because
every time I go to use the pool
between classes it is being rented
out for some sort of training. As an
alternative to swimming, I thought
I should use the sauna to recover my
costs, but the sauna has been broken
for months. All there is available is
a tiny steam room crammed with
people. I don't like to lift weights or
use treadmills because I get plenty
of exercise riding my bike to school
every day. If you ask me, these services are not worth the price.
My other thought was that
maybe this fee pays the cost of being
represented by sports teams, but
lately I have been reading plenty of
news about how many teams are
being dropped from varsity status
because of lack of funding. I was also
disappointed to hear that the outdoor pool is being permanently shut
down because there is no money to
fix it.
I can only say that I do not
understand why I am paying this
fee, or where my money is going,
because I am certainly not gaining
any benefit from athletics and
recreation at UBC. Perhaps this
is an outdated fee that should be
re-evaluated. Maybe students who
don't use the amenities should be
exempt from paying? It certainly would be interesting to know
where the money I pay is being
used, as I am seeing no direct
improvements to my educational
experience by continuing to pay
this large fee.
Carla Turner
Fourth-year, Faculty of Land and
Food systems
Why we interrupted the
announcement of UBC s
new president
LETTER
On Wednesday, March 12,2014,
five animal liberation activists and
students disrupted the formal announcement of UBC's new president
to raise consciousness about lab
animal violence.
We see violence towards animals
as an issue of justice sharing similar
patterns with other ongoing and
past injustices. Learning from other
social justice movements (e.g. LGBT,
women, civil rights and liberation,
decolonization and eco-justice
movements), we practice nonviolent direct action to demand that
oppressive social structures and institutions end their domination and
exploitation of nonhuman animals.
UBC is one such structure, sys-
temically justifying and normalizing violence against animals in
scientific research. Under pressure
from activists and university faculty
and students, UBC began publishing its annual animal use statistics
in 2011. These statistics reveal that
the number of animals used at
UBC has steadily increased in the
past years. From 2010 to 2012, an
average of 75,520 animals were used
annually in "experiments which
cause moderate to severe distress
or discomfort," while the number of
animals used in experiments involving "procedures which cause severe
pain near, at, or above the pain tolerance threshold of unanesthetized
conscious animals" increased from
31 to 85.
If researchers inflicted the pain
or suffering these categories define
to animals outside of university labs,
they could be charged as criminals under Canada's animal cruelty
laws. The arbitrary legal subjection
of some animals to violence, while
others are protected, demonstrates
how our legal system fails when
it considers and treats animals as
human property. Animals deserve
legal protection of their right to
life as persons and must have their
property status removed.
UBC's statistics are also consistent with the overall increase of
animal use for science in Canada.
From these trends, it seems the
animal research community is not
seriously trying to implement its
guiding ethical principles of replacement and reduction in animal use.
Stephen Toope's administration did nothing to end animal
suffering at UBC. Masked in the
rhetoric of "transparency," "humane care" and "necessity," UBC
defends the enslavement and abuse
of animals through propaganda.
For example, UBC extols only
the virtues of animal research,
vaguely mentioning Nobel prizes
and claiming animal research is
necessary to develop new medicines, when even mainstream
media outlets concede rodents are
far from ideal models.
Furthermore, UBC excludes
rodents from the category of "small
mammals," exploiting the fact that
humans are less likely to empathize with them and more willing
to accept the high numbers of
rodents used and killed. Designating a specific category for rodents,
against all established cladistics, and
excluding them from the category
of mammals serves to reproduce
and normalize the animosity and
violence toward rodents that exists
in society at large.
We hope that in the next five
years President Gupta will sincerely engage with these issues and
consider ending unjustifiable violence against animals at UBC. We
encourage all members ofthe UBC
faculty, staff and student body who
care about the sentient, conscious,
nonhuman animals in our community to take actions and uphold our
responsibility and accountability to
their lives. We encourage students
to think critically about the scientific norm, and whether it truly aligns
with their values.
Sincerely,
Caroline Lemieux, Mavaddat Javid,
Darren Chang, Jackie Mac
UBC Activists for Animals
Pro-Palestinian student group
condemns anti-Semitic graffiti
concerns with the anti-Semitic
act that took place at the Nootka
House in Totem Park.
SPHR-UBC condemns, without ambiguity, all acts of anti-Semitism and rejects all forms
of racism. Furthermore, SPHR-
UBC calls upon the university
to take all measures to find the
perpetrators and ensure a safe
environment for Jewish students,
as well as all students vulnerable
to all forms of racism.
SPHR-UBC calls upon student
groups on campus to actively
work with the university administration and the AMS to ensure
that all students, regardless of
origin, culture, religion or race,
can conduct their activities,
academic or otherwise, without
fear of being intimidated or discriminated against.
FILE PHOTO GEOFF LISTER/THE UBYSSEY
Anti-Semitic graffiti was discovered in
Totem Park on March 16.
Solidarity for Palestinian Human
Rights UBC (SPHR-UBC) sent
the following statement to The
Ubyssey on Sunday night following our publication of an article
about anti-Semitic graffiti in a
Totem Park house lounge.
Solidarity for Palestinian Human
Rights at UBC expresses its deep
Have an opinion about UBC? Come to our opinion meetings Mondays at 12:30 p.m. and Thursday at 1 p.m.,
or email us at feedback@ubyssey.ca.
COME BY THE UBYSSEY OFFICE: SUB 24, FOLLOW THE SIGNS 12    I    GAMES    I    THURSDAY, MARCH 27,2014
CROSSWORD
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