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The Ubyssey Oct 17, 1968

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Array REPORTER COMMENTS...
EX-MAG. SILENT-NOTHING MORE TO SAY
By PETER LADNER
Earlier this week, readers of Vancouver's bourgeois press were informed by a retiring 75-year-old
magistrate, Major Almond Marcus Grimmett, that
most of the unrest and attempted overthrows of
established rules on campuses are communist-
inspired.
Ignoring the fact that this is irrelevant to anyone
who is concerned with the issues, I decided to interview the esteemed war hero, former rugger star,
and ex-magistrate to find out just who these communists were.
I also wanted to find out who were the 10 or 12
UBC students he claims were sent to Chicago to
inspire revolt and spread their agitation at the U.S.
Democratic convention. And who sent them. (No
one here has heard of the sendees or the sender.)
And why "those 90 per cent of the students who
are level-headed" would elect to office communists
whose "entire objective is to create trouble and
disrupt society".
And why people whose sole objective is to create
trouble, etc. would bother spending hours and years
writing briefs, running for elections, writing articles,
and organizing committees.
I had also hoped the five-year magistrate could
tell me who were the people who had "professionally inspired" the revolts over the last two years.
And whether they had planned the crowded classrooms, autocratic structures, impersonal campuses.
And I wanted to know why ringleaders should
be "expelled forthwith" if their agitating creates
"serious troubles", and why people taking part in
"classroom sit-ins" should be "hauled off to jail".
But the only question asked was: "What's that
you've got there?" the blue-blazered former president of courts martial in the Pacific Command spoke
as he eyed my tape-recorder.
"A tape-recorder," I replied with all due respect.
"Well no one's recording my voice," he ordered
calmly.
And that's about the most communication we
had all afternoon.
"What I said is one thing; why I said it is another. I've nothing more to say than what is in the
Sun and Province. I won't go Into it any further,"
the double war veteran announced firmly.
He had agreed over the phone Tuesday to let me
interview him about his remarks, but said Wednesday he just wanted me to his house to hear his
decision face-to-face as it were.
Not being one to tangle with judicial double war
veterans, and a believer in rational discussion, I
suggested he look on this as a dialogue, not a cheap
source of irrelevant controversy, as it was treated
by other journalists.
"I'm not entering into any controversy," he emphasized.
Without worrying further about my other un
successful attempts to get him to talk, I would like
to point out a few sources of legitimate worry.
This guy's been throwing people in jail for five
years.
His statements are intuitive hunches at best, lies
at worst. The fact that he refused to talk further
about them only confirms his recognition of this.
To top it off, he is quoted as saying one of his
chief concerns is the confrontation between established authority and today's youth.
"The conclusions are just observations I've made
over my life," he explained. "I've said it and that's
that."
I realize that this man is not an elected representative and so is not technically obliged to explain
himself to the public. I realize that he is doing and
saying what he believes is right and best. He is
suspicious of The Ubyssey's motives.
But anyone who makes such blatantly untrue,
inaccurate, irresponsible and provocative statements
as he did should either back them up or admit he's
wrong.
Or else he's just as responsible as any communist-
inspired hippie-anarchist-revolutionary-outside-agita-
tor dope-smoking ringleader for causing the breakdown in communication that leads to unrest and violence in our society.
And the papers who print such unsubstantiated
nonsense are just as much to blame.
who can gauge
the effect
THS UBYSSEY
of a tight-
lipped dean?
Vol. L, No. 16
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1968
228-2305
— John frized photo
BEAUTY AND THE BRICKS. Homecoming queen candidates meet sunshine and granite in
Cecil Green Park.
Senators expel observers,
AMS demands open meets
- The Alma Mater Society repeated Tuesday its demands for
open negotiations with a senate
ad hoc committee investigating
the AMS "Fair Weather or
Foul" academic reform brief.
A council commitee meeting
with the senate committee was
instructed by council to refuse
to negotiate if senate does not
accept the principle of open
meetings by Oct. 30.
Senators decided to expel
observers, including reporters,
from a meeting of the two
committees  Friday.
"One of our main objects in
the brief was open communication between senators and students. The problems have to
be brought into the open to be
made clear," said AMS president Dave Zirnhelt.
The meeting was to plan a
joint conference between sen
ate and council, but failed to
reach a decision.
If the senate doesn't approve
the principle of open committee
meetings at its Oct. 30 meeting, the council committee will
break off negotiations.
At Tuesday's council meeting, student senator Mark
Waldman said although he does
Continued on Page 3
See: COUNCIL
Subcommittee
urges freeze
on enrolment
By ULF OTTHO
The Alma Mater Society political education subcommittee
wants an immediate freeze on the number enrolled at UBC.
The subcommittee is a group of about 12 students authorized
to formulate policies for the AMS.
It decided Wednesday that enrollment should not exceed
this year's level of 20,000 unless the administration can prove
finances can afford an increase.
The political education subcommittee will hold a public
meeting to discuss an enrolment freeze on the south steps outside SUB at noon today.
Even if the university can afford an increase, the subcommittee said enrolment should not exceed 25,000 students.
Committee chairman Les Horswill said "It is our feeling a
student population of over 25,000 would be a serious obstacle
to our aspiration of greater student and faculty participation and
scholarship.
"We don't want this institution swelling like a balloon,
therefore we must force the issue of enrolment now."
The subcommittee will present a brief stating these viewpoints to the AMS executive Tuesday.
If the executive supports this brief, it will be forwarded to
the university administration.
If the demands are ignored by the administration, Horswill
said, the committee plans to organize mass student rallies,
marches, picketing of board of governor meetings, meetings with
the faculty, and "direct confrontations with the public".
He said April would be the administration's deadline.
The brief also calls for establishment of an independent
grants commission for B.C.'s three public universities and establishment of regional colleges throughout the province.
A brief supporting regional colleges was presented by the
AMS and the B.C. Association of Students to the minister of
education last year.
The government showed NO response.
The student NDP club s<" •'.■•■ *. note to the meeting in favor
of the freeze on enrolment.
Subcommittee member Ian McEwen said, "according to the
UBC planning director, enrollment will swell to 34,000 in five
years. In five years the number of graduate students will double."
Student senator Don Munton said, "I think this committee
is making a serious mistake. The only advantage they can gain
for their cause is publicity. A good way to draw public attention
to the need for increased university facilities is to tell the people
that their children will be denied an education."
Munton also said that he wants to see an enrolment ceiling
of 25,000 put into effect. Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, October   17,   1968
— John frizr-fl photo
GREAT TREKKER for 1968, mineralogy prof Dr.   Harry  Warren   receives   award  from   Carley
Zitko.  Warren   participated   in   original  trek   in  1922 when students marched in protest of
government procrastination  on  construction  at UBC. Stones they carried from downtown went
to build commemorative cairn on main mall.
Queens, dinners, fishbakes
irrelevant/ charges Robbins
Homecoming is irrelevant to the goals of a
university, Alma Mater Society external affairs officer Tobin Robbins said Wednesday.
"There are probably numerous other activities that one can get involved in on campus
that will aid in creating a better university,
one where the educational experience would
be valued," Robbins said in an interview.
He was replying to statements made by
homecoming officials at a press conference in
Cecil Green Park announcing Homecoming 68,
which runs this year until Oct. 26.
Homecoming public relations officer Richard Reid said at the press conference that most
UBC students come to university for "an education and a good time, not to upset the applecart."
A press release written by Reid and distri
buted to reporters said in part: "We feel that
more students at UBC enjoy this type of activity (homecoming) as opposed to pub-ins and
protests and growing your hair long.
(Homecoming activities include student-
alumni sponsored social events including salmon bakes, teas, dinners and the climactic
selection of a beauty queen.)
Reid's release continued: "Homecoming is
really the way it is at UBC — a good school
with good fun to be had at any time."
Said Robbins: "Hell, I don't have to come
to university to have a jolly old time. Reid's
old American college spirit is dead and buried."
AMS internal affairs officer Ruth Dworkin
had only one comment when asked for comment on the homecoming queen contest: "It's
a bloody cattle show."
Grad students don't participate
Continued from Page 4
dowments to the university range all the way
from personal generosity, through 'conscience
money altruism', through tax-exemption bud-
getting, to fully-fledged capital investment programs: presumably the large scale endowments
such as those made by the Koerners or by the
MacMillan-Bloedel complex represent an uncertain mixture of these motives. We would indeed take the BoG seriously when they call
this range of endowments "creative giving",
and perhaps ask what the progney will be.
5—GRADUATE INERTIA
Graduate students have a lousy reputation
on the campus so far as participation in 'student affairs' goes. They are affluent and complacent; the extent of GSA activity seldom
moves beyond the confines of the centre and
it is perhaps significant that the major exception to this during the last year has been the
attempt by the tri-university committee to get
more bread. With this reputation hanging over
us it is hardly surprising that a serious attempt
by John Tilley to get the AMS to do some
radical thinking on the problems of housing on
this campus was met with disinterest by the
majority, and by & questioning of his motives
by a, minority, and the 'committee to look into
it' has not been heard of since. It is also to the
point that an attempt by Tilley to get the GSA
to take a stand against the encroachment of
major U.S. business complexes on campus was
was met by bland disbelief by several members
of the executive who asserted that it was no
concern of students to involve themselves in
the affairs of big business . . . (Half that meeting was spent discussing the comparative meat
prices of Safeway, Super-Valu and Lucky Dollar . . . while nobody questioned who was
paying for their research.)
Are graduates prepared to accept inertia as
the ruling principle of the GSA? Are undergraduates prepared to put up with being hassled for ID's, 'sponsors', etc., any time they
enter the sacrosanct threshold of Koerner
House? I have two simple lines of action to
suggest: first, that graduates with a few hours
to spare from their research go and see whether
they are happy with the direction that things
are going, and if they find they are not, that
they do something about it. (On the positive
side Andrew Quarry has some good ideas for
the GSA to take on a detailed research project
on the present performance of teaching assistantships; no doubt he could do with some
help.) Secondly, that undergrads feel free to
make use of the facilities of Koerner House,
remembering that they will be "responsible
for their deportment at all times in the centre."
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THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
Threat of lost
students' class
MONTREAL (CUP) — Students at four
Quebec Colleges d'Enseignment General et Pro-
fessionel gave up the battle and returned to
classes Wednesday, one day after education
minister Jean-Guy Cardinal threatened to invalidate the first semester if the schools did
not resume normal operations.
CEGEP de Hull cancelled their five day
occupation in the face of dwindling student
participation. Only 200 of the school's 1,016
students were at the school last night.
Three Montreal CEGEPs ended occupations
as well — Boise de Boulogne, Ahuntnic and
Rosemount.
College administrators, apparently taking
their cue from Cardinal, have tightened the
screws on the seven schools still occupied.
Though each administration is speaking individually, the message is clear. If classes are
not resumed by Monday, administrations will
cancel classes for the remainder of the term —
— powall hargravo photo
JANIS JOPLIN AND BIG BROTHER? ... No, ifs Peg Matheson and Mike Beddoes playin' the blues at the free arts
dance in SUB ballroom Wednesday.
d^W»Gli
Continued from Page 1
not support closed meetings, "I
can understand that some people will want to bring up extreme points in these meetings
and I don't think people want
to be quoted unfairly, for instance, in The Ubyssey."
Council also decided to present to senate for action the
question of student involvement in determining exam format. Other parts of the acad-
sented to senate later.
In other business, council:
*• Passed a motion condemn
ing the U.S. government for Its
actions in the Vietnam war;
• Urged all students to support the peace march to be
held downtown Oct. 26.
In her maiden speech to
council, fledgling secretary Isobel Semple told council: "Come
to me if you lack enthusiasm,
because I've still got lots of it."
Later in the meeting, Miss
Semple let out a huge sigh and
said, "Oh, we'll never get anything done!"
The statement was met by
applause and cheers from council.
SULLIVAN
his motion
CAMERON
shafted her
Sullivan shoots, scores;
petition recalls Jill
Council Tuesday accepted former Alma Mater Society president Shaun Sullivan's petition to recall coordinator Jill Cameron for "general incompetence in performance of her duties".
The petition, signed by 2455 students, was accepted by council in accordance with by-law 25 of the AMS constitution, which
reads in part "any elected officer . . . may be recalled by a
petition signed by no less than 10 per cent of the active members ..."
A by-election to fill the co-ordinator's position will be held
Oct. 30. Nominations open today and close Oct. 23.
Miss Cameron announced Wednesday she will contest the
by-election.
term ends
boycott
meaning that all students will lose the term.
Some, like St. Jean, will not wait for Monday. Students there have been told to return
today.
Despite the slow disintegration of the various strikes, more support poured in from
other educational institutions, including all
four Montreal universities.
Students slept in Tuesday night at Sir
George Williams university and l'Universite de
Montreal. Loyola College held a study session
and McGill staged a sympathy march in downtown Montreal.
At l'U de M nine of 30 faculties had normal
operations — the rest were either occupied or
on study session.
The Union General des Etudiantes de Quebec said Wednesday some secondary schools
may be taken by students before the weekend.
UGEQ meets tonight to evaluate further
action.
Two vie for SUS presidency,
stress media, co-operation
Sciencemen will elect an
undergraduate president today
and Friday.
The science undergraduate
society is holding a presidential
by-election to fill the gap left
when Ken Lott, elected president last spring, did not return
to UBC.
Candidates for the office are
Mike McPhee, sc. 4 and Peter
Kowalczyk, sc. 3.
Polling booths will be located in the major' science
buildings.
In an interview Tuesday,
McPhee, currently science representative on student council,
said he wants to improve the
SUS by "upgrading the quality
and sustaining the quantity of
programs that have been the
backbone of the SUS for years."
He said he wants to continue
the trends of social events,
liaison committees, academic
reform, and others.
"I also want to stress the
media as a means of communicating with the masses," he
said.
"The science newsletter
should reach a greater number
of students and should appeal
to a wider sphere of interest
than it does now."
McPhee proposed the estafo-
Large classes,
difficult texfs-
'chophist.WO'
History 100 is not satisfactory to students or faculty and
should be abolished next year
in favor of ten separate, specialized courses, UBC's acting
history department head said
Wednesday.
John Norris told 150 students
in the third of the arts faculty
lecture series, that history 100
was originally planned to give
an overall view of five or six
basic methods of examining
history.
"Dissatisfaction with this
approach is due to insufficient
background in high school
courses, difficulties in reading
texts, and, of course, oversized
classes," he said.
lishment of science academic
program with imported speakers and a series of exchange
lectures with other faculties.
Kowalczyk is campaigning
on a moderate-reform platform.
Kowalczyk feels that "tactics of open confrontation are
quite destructive" and wants
to stress coopertaion rather
than confrontation.
He said that the review of
profs   in   the   anticalendar   is
important because profs read
it and thus it is a valuable
tool for reform.
"Students must have more
confidence in SUS and this
means increasing communication between the students and
the undergraduate socity," he
said.
He called for an upgrading
of the society newsletter and
the establishment of greater
co-operation with academic
clubs.
Students have  no
voice  in choice
There's a new dean of arts at Simon Fraser University.
He is Professor Dale H. Sullivan, elected for a two-year term
by a committee of faculty members.
There were no student representatives on the committee.
Similarly at UBC no students are on the dean-choosing committee since Don Munton, the administration's student appointee,
resigned saying students should choose their own representatives.
Council later passer a resolution calling for a committee of
faculty and students on a 50-50 basis. This was rejected.
"It is now up to council to reassess its demands and to get
some student  representation,"   said  Munton.
— powall hargrava photo
THESE 48 PENNIES can buy  IVi  loaves of bread, enough
to feed 10 hungry people, but Cool-Aid needs much more.
Find them' near the information counter in SUB and GIVE I
(See story page 6.) Page 4
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, October  17,   1968
i
■--<■    <'i '     - ,  "*\-*■ <" *.'•** ,-*,-;*-*' ',    ,*;,.,;„(.- -^J&J
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university years
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press. The UbySsey subscribes to the press services
of Pacific Student Press, of which it is founding member, and Underground
Press Syndicate. Authorized second class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. The Ubyssey publishes Page
Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City editor, 228-2305. Other
calls, 228-2301 editor; Page Friday 228-2309; sports 228-2308; advertising
228-3977. Telex 04-5843.
OCTOBER 17,  1968
MWixjLr>, > a*fzfjs>vr&."-ty?d-d  »'*■-■
We get letters
It is highly amusing to see the reaction of UBC's
administration when it gets caught in the net sown by
its own arrogance and stupidity.
To wit, Tuesday's Vancouver Province contained
an article citing acting president Walter Gage's denial
of certain rumors on the reasons for President Hare's
current vacation, and a criticism of The Ubyssey for
refusing to print his letter of denial.
The Ubyssey refused to print Gage's letter for the
simple reason that we refuse to submit to the administration's authoritarian attitude that nothing ever happens
unless it decrees it has happened.
Let us examine our attitude towards Hare's current
illness.
Gage's letter states in part; "Dr. Hare overworked
himself during his first few months ... he suffered an
attack of influenza ... he has been instructed by his
medical advisers to get away from the campus and the
city for a period of recuperation."
Very well. A Ubyssey front-page story Sept 27 gave
these facts long before any speculation started.
But a lot of things remain unclear. In what way was
Dr. Hare overworking himself ? The administration won't
say, and since we poor plantation-dwellers aren't allowed
access to the inner sanctums of decision-making on the
campus, we must make our own investigation and draw
certain conclusions.
One thing that is very clear, from Hare's speeches
during the summer, well-known events at other universities, and great amounts of space devoted to analysis
of student unrest in the administration newspaper, UBC
Reports, is that UBC's administration is very worried
about revolt on this campus.
So we naturally assume that much of Hare's overwork is in finding solutions in this area. A. W. Grapevine's speculation (backed up with certain facts) of Oct.
8, seems a reasonable analysis of one method Hare may
have advocated. But of course we'll never know for sure,
since the administration won't talk, and won't let us in
to see for ourselves.
Other things we find out confirm this speculation —
to wit, Hare at McGill had a history of getting ill under
pressure when things go wrong — ergo, threat of student
revolt (pressure) plus rejection of arts budget (things
going wrong) equals illness.
Gage: "I want to stress that the reasons for Dr.
Hare's absence are entirely medical. Any suggestion that
the reasons are political or budgetary are entirely unfounded."
To put it simply, Dean Gage, we don't believe you,
given evidence to the contrary, and given you don't
supply any further information on the subject.
Gage ends up: "Publication of unchecked, unverified
rumors over a pseudonym can only result in harm to
the entire university community."
We turn around and say that rumors and speculation
are the inevitable result of a situation where students
concerned about the direction of the university are autocratically denied access to or information from the
decision-making centres.
On Sept 10, Sept 13, and Oct. 8 students via The
Ubyssey ask some pertinent questions of Dr. Hare and
board chairman Walter Koerner. We have received no
replies ta these questions.
You would think that in this day and age the university power-brokers would at least want to cover over
their autocratic rule with some liberal attempts at 'creat-
a dialogue'.
But, if anything, they are moving even further away
from having anything to do with the student mass.
Both Gage and Koerner (and also some senior faculty
members) categorically refuse to talk to The Ubyssey,
barricading themselves behind information officer Arnie
Myers, whose office pours $4000 per issue into UBC
Reports to try to create a different image of the university than the free press does.
The Ubyssey believes that the administration, the
board of governors, and faculty have a supreme and unwarranted power at this university, and have no intention
of giving any significant part of it up.
And if they refuse to respect our requests for information and attempts at finding out the real reasons for
situations at the university, we are led to believe they are
not acting in good faith and refuse to print their statements unless we start getting some reasonable answers.
GSA binds grad students
in apathetic subservience
By JIM TWEEDIE
On Friday Leon Koerner is holding another
dinner party for the executive of the Graduate
Students Association. One aim of this party is
no doubt to forge the link of benevolence that
will help maintain the chain of subservience
that binds the present GSA to the altruistic
philanthropists who have so liberally endowed
this campus in recent years.
Since it is unlikely that any 'confrontation'
—of the nature represented by my appearance
at the last meeting of this sort—will occur
again, and since it is apparently only through
sensationalism that issues get raised in the
press, I would like to outline some of the problems that are facing the GSA at this time—
problems which are none the less serious for
being witheld from the general body of students
through the present policy of the GSA executive whereby any information that permeates
through to graduates is considered a 'breach of
loyalty to the executive'.
Since no-one else on the executive has taken
upon himself the duty of keeping people informed, and I find grads to be largely ignorant
of what is happening in the GSA (are we so
affluent now that we don't care what is done
with the $26 that we have just paid to this
association?), I think it is time that a dialogue
be opened. As acting secretary throughout this
last summer I have some limited knowledge of
what has been going on, at least at the surface
level of executive meetings; however, I would
stress that the on-going processes of the GSA
executive cabal have largely remained obscure
to me owing to my political difference with the
members, who seem to have been obsessed with
the fear of 'radicalism'; it is on these counts
that I suggest the futility of an open dialogue
since my present views are blatantly biased.
1—LIQUOR  LICENCE
The stated aim of the forthcoming dinner
meeting with Koerner is to discuss the procedures open to the GSA for obtaining a liquor
licence for the Centre—apparently with some
'useful contacts' of Koerner's. No harm in that.
When challenged regarding the means and tactics necessary for obtaining such a licence
(there are after all 'normal channels and procedures' which the less privileged amongst us
have to put up with) members of the executive
agreed that they were prepared to "stoop as
low as necessary" (even to the level of Koerner's
posterior, Tilley? Did we hear you right?).
I should note that the present executive is
well practised in such stooping; throughout the
discussions that have been carried on during
the summer regarding the plans for the expansion of the GSA, the executive never felt the
slightest scruple about making some fairly disparaging remarks about Koerner in the 'security' of the executive meetings; all discussions
of our financial planning for the building turned
upon whether the expansion committee could
screw some dollars from the old man upstairs,
and yet if you read the minutes of those meetings you will find only such nebulous phrases
as "the plans for expansion were discussed and
Tilley said he would be meeting with the Bursar shortly", etc. (If these present remarks are
seen to be a "breach of loyalty to the executive",
I can only suggest that Koerner is no fool, indeed he has been a very successful businessman,
and he hardly needs we to tell him what is
going on amongst the expansion committee.)
If my 'confrontation' with Koerner was regarded as an 'insult' to the man, I would ask
of the present executive whether they would
not regard their present action an even greater
insult? No doubt they will readily reply that
dissimulation, deceit and hypocrisy are justified on the grounds of 'political necessity' . . .
All for a beer-licence?
2.—EXPANSION
At present the future of the Grad Centre
in its expanded design is in the hands of the
clients committee—a self-elected body of the
executive including John Tilley, Gordon Alexander, Harold Davis, Gerry Rank: a group who,
while they have shown themselves to be fully
responsible, active and contributing members
of the GSA, are hardly outstanding for their
progressive thinking. While these people have
agreed that the GSA should take a firm stand
on running the GSC as a viable autonomous
body (starting with the control over hiring and
firing their own house manager and secretary),
they seem to have a vision of the new centre
as some comfortable social club through which
aspiring graduates may make their transition
from 'student' to 'business executive': a vision
with which I am sure Koerner would concur,
but which I confess I view with dismay. Meanwhile some straightforward decision regarding
the physical planning of the expansion have
got to be made; I see these simple spatial-design
decisions as having important repercussions for
the social tenor of the Centre. It is for this
reason that I would impress upon graduates the
importance of looking over the 'expansion' files
in the centre and of considering whether these
issues are to be left to the clients committee
as presently constituted; if, through the usual
principle of inertia, they are, I would impress
upon the committee the importance of presenting their decisions, at every step along the line,
to the GSA as a whole for review and ratification. (Perhaps the 'Newsletter', wherever it is
or isn't, could at last serve some useful purpose?)
3.—DISSOCIATION  OF  GSA  FROM AMS
At the last executive meeting a committee
was set up to look into the feasibility of breaking the GSA's ties with the AMS. This stems
from the fact that the AMS treasurer's office
has perenially screwed the GSA, in terms of
the pittance of a budget that is allocated to
the GSA relative to the extent of funds accruing to the AMS through GSA fees. At the
financial level, therefore, there is a clear case
for such a dissociation, given that the AMS
budget committee is unlikely to change its
ways. At the social level I see this as being the
first step towards institutionalising what is at
present only an unfortunate reputation . . . viz
that the GSA is an elitist social club aspiring to
an equality of privileges with the Faculty Club.
So long as this reputation persists I cannot
condemn the AMS for their reluctance to expand
the GSA budget—especially when AMS council
members find themselves being threatened with
the arrival of the campus fuzz while they are
watching TV in the GSC without being signed
in by a member. Unfortunately, I fear that this
reputation is not only persisting but actually
deteriorating — as witness the recent example
of regressive lunacy on the part of the excutive
in spending half a meeting pushing through a
motion amending the house rules of the GSA
in order to make members "responsible for
their deportment at all times in the centre" —
whatever that may mean. <Since it came up
immediately after the 'Koerner incident' I can
only assume that it refers to such personal details as whether one is wearing 'Old Spice' or
'Arid', how long your toe-nails are, and whether
you washed behind the ears before watching
TV; who is going to try and enforce any discrimination in the areas remains in doubt.) I
find it interesting that the faculty club are
sufficiently secure in their position not to have
to be worried by such pettiness. The only resolution of this hassle beween GSA and the
AMS that I can see as being at all congruent
with the idea of an academic community would
before the AMS to accept the GSA's demands
for autonomy, and for the GSA to recognize
that it can no longer afford to isolate itself
from general student activity. I fear that the
AMS may meet the first condition, but that the
GSA will not meet the second.
4 ALTRUISTIC PHILANTHROPY
A final word regarding the munificence of
UBC's philanthropists would seem to be in
order since the GSA is faced with it so directly by Leon Koerner's past generosity and current 'presence', and it seems to be ham-stringing all independent action by the GSA on their
own terms. I am sure the Koerners are OK
people, taken in the appropriate temporal and
spatial frames of reference. My father was an
OK person when he used to give me pocket-
monye; he ceased to be an OK person in this
respect when he attempted to manipulate
pocket-money in order to impose upon my individuality; the only way to shift from the
assymetrical father-son relationship to the sy-
metrical individual-individual relationship was
to reject his generosity for the sake of my own
autonomy. So long as grad students accept unthinkingly the hand-outs that are so readily
available to them — they are committing themselves to, and thus perpetuating, a gerontocra-
tic society.
However, the Koerners' munificence cannot
even  be  seen  in  this  paternalistic  light.  We
have to face the facts that the motives for en-
Continued page 2:  GRAD Thursday,  October  17,   1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
LETTERS  TO  THE  EDITOR
Insult'
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
OPEN LETTER TO
LEON KOERNER:
In response to the dinner invitation you have extended to
the executive of the Graduate
Student Association for the
18th of October, I regret that I
must decline. It is necessary
that I do so because of your unfortunate reaction to the
appearance of one of your
guests — Mr. James Tweedie,
then acting secretary — at
a previous dinner. I strongly
object to your behavior of publicly insulting and arbitrarily
dismissing an individual from
your presence because you did
not deem his appearance acceptable. Furthermore I will
not submit myself to your
judgment regarding whether I
am properly dressed or not.
Certainly it is obvious that
if effective, meaningful communication is to take place between graduate students within
the university, graduate students cannot speak from a position of subordination. Your
actions reveal that you consider them to be in that position.
I decline your invitation also
because Mr. John Tilley, president of the G.S.A. has stated
that if such an incident occurred again, he would apologize
to you as he did at that time.
It appears that the executive
is willing to suffer any degradation you may care to impose
so that the power and influence you have obtained will
be exerted benevolently.
Sincerely,
ANNE ROBERTS
Secretary, G.S.A.
Unbleeding
Editor,  The  Ubyssey,  Sir:
As one of the many freshmen at our university this
year, I would like to express
my dissatisfaction with the student body, particularly with
regard to the Red Cross clinic
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of last week. With a population of our size, it is deplorable
to think that we could not
meet the desired quota of 2,500
donations. One pint of blood is
such a little gift to give, yet
it is one of the most important.
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Readership
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I am writing to you as the
Protestant chaplain of a medi-
.um security reform institution,
on behalf of the inmates here.
Quite simply, there is always
a shortage of good reading
material as the prison buys
only a limited number of general interest magazines.
Would you then, assist me in
filling this gap by donating a
subscription of The Ubyssey.
REV. R. NASH
Collins Bay Penitentiary
Kingston, Ontario.
Kits and have a beef against
unjust restrictions on your per-
sonnal liberty, or increased
rents suddenly sprung on you,
or if you would simply like to
see the tenant secure some
legal rights to protect him
from the all-powerful property
owner, come out to the meeting. It will be held at 8 p.m.
in the Henry Hudson School
Auditorium (Cypress and Cornwall). Speakers will include
Bruce Yorke and. Alderman
Harry Rankin. Mr. Yorke can
also be reached at 733-4953.
JANICE ELGAR
Renting
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Tired of being at the mercy
of your landlord ? So are a lot
of people in Vancouver, and
finally getting together under
the lead of the Vancouver Tenants Organizing Committee. As
Secretary Bruce Yorke says,
"They can't evict 150,000 of
us."
Mr. Yorke spoke at Hebb
Theatre last week to a rather
sorry turnout of about 15. We
think a lot more people would
have come if they had known
about it, but unfortunately Mr.
Yorke was given very inadequate advertising.
Another meeting is coming
up today to organize the Kitsilano tenants.  If you live in
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THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, October   17,   1968
Cool-Aid helps,
and needs help
By ALEX VOLKOFF
Only young people can help
other young people.
That's the premise on which
Cool-Aid is run, and for the
past year the society has
helped an average of 1,000 kids
per month.
Officially known as the
Greater Vancouver Youth
Communications Society, Cool-
Aid is a registered association
trying to provide guidance services, health care, shelter and
food to young persons who are
in desperate need of such assistance.
The society is not attempting to duplicate the services of
existing social agencies such
as the Children's Aid Society,
but is trying to reach young
people who are unwilling to
seek help from such groups.
The workers at Cool-Aid find
that the kids they handle —
most of them runaways —
don't trust the established organizations.
But due to the lack of a great
gap in attitudes and experiences  between  them  and  the
This is the stairway just inside the front door of the
Cool-Aid house up to the
office and the medical clinic.
Many children get medical
aid Kere that they wouldn't
get other places without a
lot of hassle.
Cool-Aiders,   they   are  willing
to talk to the Cool-Aid staff.
It was started in October
1967 when Ray Chouinard and
Elmore Smalley met in the
Georgia  Straight office.
They had both been working
for a free store that the
Georgia Straight people had
started, but found that after a
few days, the place ended up
as a giant crash pad, and the
kids that crashed weren't getting the help they needed.
Through their connection
with the free store, Elmore and
Ray tried to get support from
the Salvation Army and various church organizations, but
as soon as they mentioned the
Georgia Straight, people
"shrivelled up like prunes" and
wouldn't give the needed food,
medical and financial assistance.
During the next few weeks,
while they exhausted themselves and all their personal
savings, a few interested individuals started to come in and
form the beginnings of a resource group.
This group, made up of psychiatrists, doctors, lawyers and
others that can help straighten
out the kids, has now grown to
15 lawyers and about 45 regular resource people, with a
great many more helping out
when they are needed.
Then with the fabulous gift
of Wellwind House from for-
photos by Fred Cawsey
mer Vancouver dancer Irish
O'Brian, work really got
under way.
Soon after moving in on
Nov. 1, 1967, Cool-Aid was
feeding 30 to 40 kids per day
on whatever money the kids
pooled together plus some from
the Georgia Straight.
They weren't pestered by
bills, but had to spend money
on making the place livable.
There was no furnace and the
floors were pocked with holes.
In March of this year the
society got a grant from the
Rotary Club and bought their
present house at 1822 West
Seventh.
This is the Cool-Aid house on seventh avenue. It is bright blue, bright crimson and very bright
yellow. Superman colors . . . great Scott!!! The little house behind on the left is the staff house
where the staff members eat, sleep and live.
Cool-Aid doesn't try to give
the young people any answers,
although their practical experience — and, in Ray's case,
psychology courses — provide
This is writer Alex Volkoff.
'Nuff said.
them with the basic knowledge.
Their function is to reach
kids that would otherwise not
be helped, and to get them to
agree to seek help.
After this, staffers refer them
This is the place where one of the kids sleeps at night when he tires of his daily activities. The
rectangular object in the corner is his bed.
to resource people or to one of
the existing social agencies.
It is only because of their
trust in Cool-Aid that the
young people place their trust
in other useful organizations.
In May, medical students
from UBC offered their services and expanded the rudimentary treatment clinic to a
daily service.
Every Wednesday night a
number of doctors from a pool
of eight and often a psychiatrist are present.
The equipment and drugs
used are all donated by doctors and various institutions.
The usefulness of the clinic
is shown by the fact that during ten weeks in the summer,
it handled 252 patients, and
gave 328 treatments and/or
interviews.
Thus the clinic was instrumental in keeping Vancouver
relatively free of hepatitis
which plagued Toronto this
summer.
Since the beginning, the
Cool-Aid staff has counselled
an average of 30 runaway kids
per month, and in every case
has managed to establish contact between them and approved social agencies.
Another function of the staff
has been to provide employment, which is helping to cut
down begging among runaways.
Other Cool-Aid societies have
been started in North Vancouver, Victoria and Calgary. All
stem originally from Wellwind
House.
Cool-Aid acts in close contact with Youth Resources, a
treatment society for disturbed
adolescents, which provides intensive care to the kids the society refers.
And now that winter is coming, the limited resources won't
take care of all the young
people that need them. The
society must find people who'll
be willing to put up kids for
several nights in the cold
weather.
Most of the staff goes to
school at least part of the time,
and Ray manages to follow six
courses at Vancouver City College as well as being one of
the central figures in the society.
The problem is, they're
starving. Whereas the Children's Aid Society receives $4
million per year, Cool-Aid gets
nothing from the government,
and lives day to day on donations.
That's why students are being asked to give whatever
support they can at the booth
located by the information
desk in SUB.
Ray and Elmore will be on
campus    today,    speaking    in
This is Elmore, one of the co-
founders of Cool-Aid. Elmore
sometimes wears sunglasses,
sometimes not.
Angus 110 on the services of
the society.
Cool-Aid will also sponsor a
dance Saturday, Oct. 19 in the
SUB cafeteria.
All donations above $1500
collected at the Teacup game
Oct. 31 will go to Cool-Aid.
But if they don't get enough
support they won't be able to
exist.
This is Ray the other co-
founder of Cool-Aid. He
sometimes shaves, sometimes he does not. Thursday, October  17,   1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 7
ZAP: SUB's bugged
Who started that rumor that all the rooms
in SUB are bugged? Of course, when you think
of it, that all-prevailing sound system has all
sorts of possibilities . . .
I'm sure you all recall A. W. Grapevine's
letter to The Ubyssey speculating on the whereabouts of our runaway president? And the cross
letter from Dean Gage, explaining it was all
lies? And weren't you impressed by the evidence of careful reporting shown by the Sun,
in its mention of Gage's letter — stating in
cautious parentheses that no student named A.
W. Grapevine is registered at the university?
(And what's this about plans to sell the
Sun to the Thomson newspaper chain?)
Underground papers have speculated on
what will happen when those half million GIs
come back from Vietnam, where marijuana
grows wild and more inmates at the Long Binh
jail are in for pot than for any other offense.
Similarly, they're wondering what will happen when the law students  of the next few
graduating classes become judges .  . .
Or what will happen when today's crop of
reporters become editors . . .
Meanwhile, back on the campus, the Varsity Outdoor Club reports that Ladner's Last
Erection is easy to climb . . .
Well up in the running for the recently
announced Master Teacher award is an associate prof, whose disciples — er, students —
rushed to nominate him, mindful of the tremendous party that will happen if the man
wins ...
We find it interesting that most of the
names suggested for the prize are those of quite
young men. With the exception of the Walter
Gages and the Malcom McGregors, old teachers
tend to lose their fizz, it seems. They give the
same lectures every year, and half the time
they were boring to start with.
Anyone contemplating nominating a professor should first glance through Gilbert Highet's
The Art of Teaching. It's in the library.
UBC and SFU
unite in
number game
A widely-known mathematics
author and researcher will address a mathematics education
colloquium at Simon Fraser
University Oct. 10.
Dr. Zolton Dienes of the
University of Sherbrooke will
speak to the colloquium which
is the first joint venture of its
type between the SFU and
UBC.
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The Varsity Outdoor Club and
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A HIKE TO HOLLYBURN
Sunday, Oct. 20
Bring Lunch and $1
Sign Up At The I.H. Office
Before Saturday
I
TODAY
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The Poppy Family
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SUB BALLROOM
ONLY 50c
Notice to Graduating Students in
SCIENCE
A meeting will be held in Chem. 250
Friday, October 18, at 12:30 p.m.
to hear a representative from the Placement Office
(Office of Student Services)
on the subject
GRADUATE EMPLOYMENT
NOTICE TO '69 GRADS
Last Chance For
Your FREE Grad Photos
To Be Taken
Mobile Studio Location
OCT. 17f 18 & 22 BEHIND BROCK (South)
Arts Students Anytime — Hours: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Don't Delay — No Appointment Needed — No Cost
(This Service is Covered by Your GRAD FEE)
CAMPBELL  STUDIO
10th & Burrard 736-0261
OFFICIAL NOTICES
Alma  Mater  Society
Election for the Office of A.M.S. Co-Ordinator
In accordance with By-Law 25 of the A.M.S. Constitution, an election will be held for the position of A.M.S.
Co-ordinator.
To be eligible for the position, a student must have
completed his or her first year or its equivalent and have
achieved, in the previous sessional examinations, an
average of not less than 60% for 15 units or more and
not less than 65% for less than 15 units.
Nominations will open at 9:00 a.m., Wednesday, October
16th and close at 12:00 noon on Wednesday, October
23rd. Voting will take place on Wednesday, October 30,
1968.
The duties of the Co-ordinator as outlined in By-Law
4 (4) (g) are as follows:—
"The Co-ordinator of Activities shall be responsible for
the co-ordination and booking of all Alma Mater Society
functions and events. He shall work in close co-operation
with the Treasurer to ensure the financial success of
the various activities of the Society. He shall act as
Brock Management Committee Chairman."
Nomination forms to be returned to the AMS Secretary,
Box 55, Brock.
Communications Commission
Campus communications are poor. People are needed to
do various exciting jobs such as on-campus coordination,
SUB publicity coordination, archive collecting and just
general jobs that are not demanding, but are a necessary
part of any bureaucratic Society such as the AMS.
Come around to SUB if you are interested and either
leave a note in the AMS executive offices or talk to
Ruth Dworkin, Internal Affairs, Rm. 254 any time this
week.
tom BERGER
M.L.A. for Vancouver-Burrard
Bu. 106
12:30
October 18,1968
UBC/NDP
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"The Handiest Book on Campus"
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THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, October  17,  1968
H UAC not in humorous mood,
YIP, movement mock house
By TOM MILLER
Collegiate Press Service
WASHINGTON (CUP-CPS)
— Several weeks ago, vice-
presidential candidate Spiro
Agnew called for a "greater
national sense of humor."
The House Committee on Un-
American Activities (HUAC)
and its subpoenaed witnesses
have responded to the call,
HUAC by taking itself seriously, and the witnesses by refusing.
The committee wanted evidence of "subversive activities"
at the Democratic convention
in Chicago.
It brought to Washington
leaders and anti-leaders of the
political and cultural peace
movement — most prominently Dave Dellinger, Tom Hayden and Rennie Davis of the
National Mobilization and Jerry Rubin and Abbie Hoffman
of the Youth International
Party (Yippies).
The first witness, Bob Green-
blatt of the National Mobilization, spoke at length on his
anti-war  work.
Dr. Quentin Young, of the
Medical Committee for Human
Rights, then used his time on
the stand to outline the medical needs of demonstrators
everywhere.
Periodically, other witnesses
would interrupt with comic relief.
After Jerry Rubin made an
ann ouncement, committee
chairman Richard Ichord proclaimed, "The chair is not conducting a  circus here today".
Earlier, "while one police infiltrator was testifying, Abbie
Hoffman asked to be excused to
go to the bathroom. His request
was granted.
Plagued by interruption and
witnesses who didn't see things
his way, Ichord constantly repeated the intent of the hearings: "We want to find out if
Communists in this country inspired and took part in the
riots in Chicago . . . and if
certain organizations in the
United States have connections
with foreign Communist
powers."
Ichord found his main
troubles with Dr. Young. The
Committee was trying to establish that Young loaned Ronnie
Davis $1,000 to lease office
space for the mobilization in
Chicago.
Davis went to Hanoi last
spring and this linked him in
the committee's minds with all
sorts of anti-U.S. activities.
Young quietly said he does
not ask for travel dossiers from
people    to    whom    he    loans
money.
The Committee hearings
were most noteworthy for what
didn't occur, rather than what
did. The most articulate and
colorful anti-war leaders were
not called to testify; the questions of free speech and suppression were not raised.
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
Maritimers continue strike
protest enters third week
FREDERICTON    (CUP)    —
A sit-in  at  the  University  of
New Brunswick  dragged  into
its third week Friday.
More than 70 students have
participated in the lengthy sit-
in protesting the suspension of
nuclear physicist Dr. Norman
Strax.
On Tuesday, members of the
UNB board of governors had
to be carried over the outstretched bodies of twelve protestors sitting in at the board
session.
The sit-in took a brief but
ugly   turn   Wednesday   when
Learning study worth
money to psych student
John Jamieson, a UBC psychology student has been
awarded a $3,000 graduate fellowship by the alumni association.
Jamieson is studying the
physiological mechanisms of
memory, more specifically the
transfer of learning from one
animal to another by chemical
means.
After finishing his doctorate
by September he plans to do
some post - doctorate training
and then begin teaching and
research at a university.
eleven counter-demonstrators
dragged three protestors out of
Liberation 130, the room they
occupy.
The eleven walked into the
office, surprising a skeleton
occupation staff maintaining
the physics building outpost
while the others were out demonstrating at the university's
convocation ceremonies.
After brief scuffles, the demonstrators once again liberated
Liberation 130 and at last report wert determined to sit
there "forever" unless Strax
was reinstated.
The physics professor is still
obeying a court injunction restraining him from entering
university property.
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mmsH SCENHS15
TALK STRAIGHT WITH
Thinking of returning to the U.K. ? Get in touch with
the team of ICI scientists visiting your campus
shortly. They will tell you about jobs available now,
where these are, how much they pay and what the
housing situation is. If you've only just arrived, drop
in just the same for a chat about your future
prospects.
ICI's recruiting team
will visit your campus on Oct. 22, 23 — A.M.
Contact them through   Mr.  J.   C.   Craik
Office of Student Services
.
MAX DEXALL
OFFERS
^110% Discount
to UBC Students
2609 Granville at 10th
A complete stock of all the popular makes
of shoes for the college student, as well as
hosiery, handbags, slippers, rubbers.
Whatever your need in footwear you'll find it at
Dexall's. Pay them a visit — see the exciting new
styles — and ask for the 10% discount.
Better Shoes for less
DEXALL'S - GRANVILLE AT 10th - 738-9833
ROTP.
Regular Officer Training Plan
IN THE
Canadian Armed Forces
Do you have the qualifications to receive
a Government sponsored education ?
IF YOU ARE . . .
— a Canadian citizen
— Single
-Physically fit
— Between 16 and 21 years of age
AND IF YOU HAVE . . .
— A junior or senior matriculation
— A desire to serve your country
You are eligible to apply for enrolment as an OFFICER
CADET. The standards required of Officers are high, the
work is hard — but the satisfaction is great. Not only do
you have the opportunity to serve Canada but the financial
rewards range to $18,000 per year.
Full Details of the R.O.T.P. may be obtained from:—
THE CANADIAN FORCES RECRUITING CENTRE
545 Seymour St., Vancouver Phone 684-7341
DROP  IN  AT
WE NOW HAVE CHILDREN'S WEAR . . .
as well as Men's and Women's
2140 Western Parkway  - 224-0915
VILLAGE  SHOPPING  PLAZA
GIGANTIC POST GAME DANCE
Featuring ...
Rosalind Keene & the
APOLLOS
MONDAY, OCTOBER 21,
10:30 p.m.
Sub
Ballroom Page  10
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 17,  1968
EDITOR:
Al Birnie
City	
News 	
  John Twigg
Photo	
.... Powell Hargrave
Wire 	
  Peter Ladner
Page Friday 	
  Andrew Horvat
Sport* 	
  Jim Maddin
For Action !
Personalized Service
Come to
Joseph for
HAIRCUTTING
and STYLING
BARBERS
8144 WESTERN  PARKWAY
In the Village Shopping Plaza
(behind University Boulevard)
Someday
I'll be an actress
or a writer
or a musician
11
or an
international spy
Before you take Broadway
by storm, you'll have to
learn to be an actress. That's
common sense. It also stands
to reason that becoming
a mature and graceful woman
will be easier if you learn
certain things now, like proper
posture, speech and manners.
There are some other things,
too, that'll make femininity
easier. Like Tampax tampons.
The sanitary protection that
was developed by a doctor
to be worn internally. Tampax   *
tampons are made of pure
surgical cotton. The silken-
smooth container-applicator
assures hygienic insertion
and easy disposal. Your
hands need never touch the
tampon. And there'll be no
more pins, pads and belts to
limit what you can wear. Try
Tampax tampons. They "re
one of the little things that
just might make it easier
to become a famous woman.
TAMPAX
tamponi
SANITARY PROTECTION WORN INTERNALLY
MADE ONLY BY CANADIAN TAMPAX CORPORATION
LIMITED. BARRIE. ONTARIO.
U.B.C. THUNDERBIRD
WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
SKATING SCHEDULE 1968-69
Effective September 28, 1968 to April 13, 1969
TUESDAYS —
WEDNESDAYS
12:45 to 2:45 p.m.
2:00 to 3:30 p.m.
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
FRIDAYS — 3:00 to 5:00 p.m.
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.*
SATURDAYS — 3:00 to 5:00 p.m.*
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
SUNDAYS — 12:45 to 2:45 p.m.
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
* Except when Hockey Games scheduled:
November 1, 2, 15, 16, 29, 30
January 10, 11, 24, 25
February 14, 15
Admission: Afternoons—Students 35c. Adults 60c
Evenings—Students 50c. Adults 75c.
Skate Rental - 35c a pair. - Skate Sharpening - 35c a pair
For further information call 228-3197 or 224-3205
FILM SOCIETY PRESENTS
51
INT
0FTO
NIGHT
THURSDAY & FRIDAY
Showtimes: 12:30, 3:30, 6:00, 8.30
Admission: 50c — In Old Aud.
BASKETBALL...
Which ones to cut?
DEREK A. SWAIN
Ubyssey Basketball Writer
Thunderbird basketball coach Peter Mullins has faced
problems before, but for the first time he has the perplexing
problem of picking a starting lineup.
In previous years, the first string has been decided long before official training began.
Training began on Tuesday, and Coach Mullins is no closer
to his decision than he was in September.
His basic problem is too many good players.
The remnants of last year's team, led by fourth year veteran
Neil Murray, is bolstered by the addition of Neil Williscroft and
Ed Suderman — both of whom spent two years with I.G.A.
Grocers.
Along with them comes the formidable Bob Barazzuol, who
presently holds the all-time high scoring record of 20.2 points
per game average in one season.
Third year veterans Dave Rice, Bob Molinski and Phil
Langley, along with Ken Shields and Derek Sankey (both in
their second year with the Birds' are struggling for positions,
not only with the above "old timers", but with two rookies —
Terry McKay and Ron Thorsen; both of whom graduated from
the JVs along with Bruce Jagger — the Bird's new senior manager.
The Birds' first game is scheduled for Nov. 1 against the
Grads, but the first real contest will be in the Totem Tournament
(Nov. 30 & Dec. 1) when they meet their latest rival — the SFU
Clansmen.
The Second Buchanan Classic, a two-game, total point series
between UBC and SFU is scheduled for Feb. 7 at SFU and the
Birds' home game, Feb. 8, has been booked and scheduled for
the Coliseum.
Skaters practise at
Winter Sports Centre
One varsity sport at UBC
which rarely receives mention
is figure skating.
UBC is well represented in
this sport with skating gold
medal holders Marilyn Thompson, Pam Wiles, and triple gold
CUSO WORKSHOP
INDIA & S. E. ASIA
medalist Shirra Kenworthy.
These girls and many others
are trying out for the team
which will represent UBC in
the Western Canadian Intercollegiate Athletic Association
Figure Skating championships
at Edmonton this year.
They are coached by Mrs.
Bonnie Gordon who will choose
the official team after
Christmas exams.
The team works out regularly at Thunderbird Arena and
it should be noted any figure
skaters may skate during the
practises.
Also attending UBC are Canadian and American dance gold
medalists L-ouise Lind and
Barry iSoper, who will be rep*-
resenting British Columbia for
the third time in the Canadian
Nationals at Toronto in January.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
SAT. OCT. 19th
10:00 - 2:00
SPEAKERS - FILM - DISCUSSION
FREE COFFEE
BRING  YOUR  LUNCH
Flowers & Gifts
• A COMPLETE FLORAL SERVICE
• WEDDINGSI & CORSAGES A
SPECIALTY
• GREETING CARDS & GIFTS
tcufwra
"Filters By Wlr*"
10%  STUDENT DISCOUNT ON
PRESENTATION  OF A.M.S. CARD
Three  Short   Blocks  From   UBC  Gates
4427 W. 1 Oth Ave.   224-1341
Under  New  Management Thursday, October  17,  1968
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 11
CHECKPOINT HELP waiting for the next car to attack.
SCC   sponsors   novice   rally
Sunday, Oct. 20 will mark
this year's running of the UBC
sports car club's annual fall
Totem Rally.
This rally is designed primarily for the novice rallyist.
The event is a straight "time
against distance" rally.
Speeds are at least 10 per
cent below the posted legal
limits.
The length of the route is
200 miles through the Fraser
Valley and northwest Washington state.
Over 100 cars entered last
years Totem which like this
year involved about eight hours
total driving time.
First car starts from Eaton's
Brentwood, in Burnaby, at 8
a.m., Sunday, Oct. 20.
In the matters of equipment,
it is strongly urged by the
organizers that each crew arrive at the start with a motor
car. Other equipment should
include: paper and pencil (lots
of both), erasers, trip mileage
counter (usually found in the
centre of the speedometer),
and a slide rule (for them that
know how to use 'em.)
Cost for this event is $3.50
per car. Any three crews wishing  to   form  a   team  will  be
Intramural results
SOFTBALL
Union College, winner of
Div. 1, A league plays off
against winner of PE and
Commerce Div. 2, B league
on Monday.
Beta Theta Pi, winner of
Div. 2, plays off against Phi
Delta Theta on Monday.
PE 2 plays off against
PE 3 winners of Div. 2
leagues A and B. All games
on Memorial gym fields.
Touch football starts Oct.
21.
BUY YOUR TICKETS NOW
1968
HOUi DANCE
with 2 Big Bands
SOUL UNLIMITED with CARL GRAVES
ERIC SAMDQUIST'S BIG BAND
Dance:
Saturday, Oct. 26, 1968
SUB Cafeteria
$4 per couple
Ticket  Sales
AMS Ticket Office, Brock
SUB Information Desk (Noons)
DISTINCTIVELY
NOW
FASHIONS
224-5352
4409 WEST 10th AVENUE "Just off Campus'
Open   Fri.   till   9   p.m.
charged an additional 50c per
car.
Prize classes will be for both
novice and veteran crews.
For futher information contact: Lyle Acton (registrar),
2049 Renfrew Street, Vancouver; or drop into the outdoors
club's area in SUB to pick-up
an entry form containing further information.
Sailors travel
UBC sailors, skipper Hunt
Gordon and his crew, Jane Fulton, finished a close third in the
Canadian Collegiate Sailing
championships last weekend.
The UBC boat was a mere
1% points behind the second
place boat from Lakehead University, skipped by Bruce Bry-
mer. The winner was Bob Pollock of McMaster.
The UBC team will travel to
Lon Angeles for Douglas Cup
competition on Oct. 25.
INTERNATIONAL
F0LKDANCE FESTIVAL
Saturday, 19th October, 1968
Women's Gym, U.B.C.
Workshop 1-4 p.m. - $1.50
Festival 8-12 p.m. - $2.00
Juniors and audience - 50 cents
Sponsored   by  Vancouver   International
Dancers and School of Phys. Ed., UBC
SPECIAL BUS
TO
UBC
CONNECTING WITH  NORTH SHORE  BUSES
T45
#        A.M.
Monday to Friday
From Burrard and Georgia
(Bus stop by Christ Church)
This bus picks up from the following North Vancouver buses:
J4 — 3rd St. leaving Boulevard and 15th at 7:04 a.m.
$6 — Lonsdale, leaving Rockland and Prospect at 7:05 a.m.
$40 — Mt. Royal Highland, leaving Mt. Royal and Skyline
at 7:14 a.m.
Regular interzone fares apply from North Vancouver to
University.
For information call 261-4211.
Also connects with West Vancouver municipal buses leaving
Horseshoe Bay at 7:00 a.m., West Bay at 7:00 a.m., 25th
and Mathers at 7:10 a.m.
B.C. HYDRO
INTERCOLLEGIATE   FOOTBALL
2ND ANNUAL SHRUM BOWL GAME
UBC  THUNDERBIRDS''
vs
'rr
S.F.U. "CLANSMEN
MONDAY-OCTOBER 21st AT EMPIRE STADIUM
at 8:00 p.m.
SPECIAL STUDENT PRICE
$1.00 for a $2.50 or $2.00 Reserved Seat
(Advance Sale Only) on presentation of A.M.S, Card
Organized student groups may purchase blocks of tickets
from Athletic Office
STUDENT TICKETS AVAILABLE ONLY AT MEMORIAL
GYMNASIUM AND STUDENT UNION BUILDING
UP TO AND INCLUDING NOON FRIDAY, OCTOBER 18th Page 12
THE     UBYSSEY
'TWEEN CLASSES ..
Poppy Family
performs in SUB
The Poppy Family, in concert, SUB ballroom today
noon, only 50 cents.
FILM SOC
In the Heat of the Night,
with Steiger and Portier, today and Friday: 12:30, 2:30,
6, 8:30; 50c.
UCC
Elections for Pres. and P. R.
man noon Tues., Oct. 22, Bu.
204. All clubs must send a
rep.
FU
Grad students will provide
free tutorials for Eng. 100
students and others. Phone
738-8432.
HISTORY UNION
Students wishing nomination
for union exec, put name,
address, phone, and history
courses on paper and deposit
in history office before 4:30
p.m. Friday.
SUS
Meeting for Sc. 1 students
noon, Tues., Oct. 22, Hennings 200. Council being
formed.
SAN FRANCISCO
MIME TROUPE
Special Events presents
theatre group Tues., Oct. 22,
noon and 8 p.m. Old Aud.
75c noon, $1.25 students —
$1.75 others in evening.
VOF
Bentley-Taylor to speak on
authority of the Bible, Friday noon in SUB party room.
KARATE CLUB
General meeting and elections Oct. 22 at 7 p.m. in SUB
200. New members welcome.
CUSO
Workshop on India and S.E.
Asia at International House,
Oct. 19, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Speakers, film, discussion, coffee.
SUB GALLERY
COMMITTEE
Interested members meet
Friday noon, SUB gallery.
COMPUTER CLUB
AMS chapter members may
hear Dr. Whitney speak on
Constructivist Cinema - Design and Motion, Friday
3:30 p.m. Room M in SUB.
Three films.
SPEAKERS COMMITTEE
Ex-U.S. Marine, an active re-
sister, speaks on 'Canada: It
couldn't happen here,' etc.
Noon today, Bu. 100.
CONSERVATIVE CLUB
General meet Monday noon,
SUB Council Chambers.
Guest speaker.
St. Anselm's Annual
THRIFT SALE
Better Used Clothing
and Household Articles
Sat., Oct. 19, 11 a.m. - 1 p.m.
University Hill United
Church Hall
5375 University Blvd.
PRE-DENTAL
Meeting noon today, SUB
205. Speaker from Dental
Hygiene dept.
SKY DIVING CLUB
Meeting noon today, Bu. 219.
PARLIAMENTARY COUNCIL
Meeting noon today, SUB
211
MAMOOKS
Potential artists, poster-painters etc. meet noon today in
SUB office.
SUS
Elections Thursday and Friday, more votes mean more
reps on AMS Council.
CONSERVATIVE CLUB
General meet Monday noon
to elect vacant executive,
SUB council chambers.
CAMPUS CRUSADE
Teach-in, hear Ross Carey in
Ed. 201, today noon.
GRAPE  BOYCOTT
Meeting noon today, SUB
courtyard, to organize for
weekend.
AQUA SOC
Underwater film World
Without Sun today noon,
Ang. 104. Free.
VARSITY ROD AND GUN
Meeting noon today, SUB A.
UBC LIBERALS
McCarthy worker speaks on
Chicago riot noon today,
SUB F.
SQUARE DANCE CLUB
■Dancing   today,   noon   2:30,
SUB L and M.
YOUTH RESOURCES SOC
Organizations meeting noon
today, SUB 105 B.
SUB
Meeting today 8 p.m., SUB
lounge.
PRE-DENTAL SOC
Meeting today, SUB 205.
UBC FLYING  CLUB
Meeting Friday noon, Bu.
322. Flying arrangements
have been made.
NETHERLANDS
STUDENT ASSOC.
Meeting at International
House Friday noon.
PHOTOSOC
AH welcome. Brock ext. 163
any noon hour this week.
CIRCLE K
General Meet Friday noon,
SUB 206.
Thursday, October   17,   1968
Films and
a Dance at
International
House
Friday, Oct. 18
8:00 p.m.
25c Admission
ALL FOREIGN STUDENTS
WELCOME
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students, Faculty & Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 75*. 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00, 3 days $2.50.
Rales for larger ads on request.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and
are payable in advance.
Closing Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publication Office: 241  STUDENT UNION BLDG., UNIVERSITY OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
VANCOUVER'S TOP BANDS ARE
managed exclusively by MCM &
Associates.  731-4741.
Greetings
12
WHO  IS  THE INVISIBLE  RABBIT?
Lost & Found
13
LOST: GLASSES IN RED PLASTIC
case, lost Friday, Oct. 4 on way to
C lot. Phone Lynne 738-3559.
LOST — DISSECTING   KIT.    PHONE
879-7205 after  6 p.m.
FOUND—WALLET IN VICINITY OF
Picketts Pharmacy, 3750 Oak St.
Contact   738-2322.
LOST: WHITE WALLET. MUST
have rings back. Reward. No questions asked.  Ph.  224-0962.
LOST: BLACK SWEATER, GREEN
skirt in brown shopping bag. Fri.
Oct.   11.   Phone   Leslie   224-7929.
LOST LIBRARY BOOKS VICINITY
Empire Pool, Monday morning. Fin-
.der please call or contact Colin Godwin. 4540 W. 11. Phone 224-1741.
Reward.
PICKED UP BY MISTAKE IN YOUR
Green VW — Birdcalls. Sorry!
Phone:  Carol 266-4316.
FOUND:   LADIES'   2   STRAP   SLING
9-2A   shoe.   Navy.    Parking   lot   D.
228-8254.
LOHE ANYTHING AT UNDERCUT?
Contact Forestry Club Office, McM
Bldg.,   228-3125.
Rides & Car Pools
14
Special Notices
15
THE GRIN BIN HAS POSTERS,
Jokes, Cards, Gifts and a Post
Office. You'll find it across from
the Liquor Store at 3209 West
Broadway.
REDUCE THE COST OF YOUR IN-
surance by as much as 20%. All
risks insured and no cancellations.
Motor bikes also. Phone Ted Elliott
299-9422.
THE NEW YORK LIFE AGENT ON
your campus is a good man to know.
SMILE YOU '69 GRADS! YOUR
Grad pictures are being taken behind (South) Brock in the Mobile
Unit until October 22nd. You've already paid for this service in your
Grad fee so hurry before it's too
late! This is the only time pictures
will  be  taken  this  year.      	
PLAYHOUSE THEATRE HAS A
few student tickets for Tuesday
nights available. Special price, 7
plays  $10.  560  Cambie,   684-5361.
LIFE INSURANCE
Students, age 23 — $20,000 (commuted amount). Reducing Term.
Includes 3 options. Premium $42.50.
Also New Fidelity Inflation Fighter
policy; first in Canada. Call George
Kaiway, Fidelity Life Assurance
Co. — 681-7496.
NEEDED DRUMMER AND GIRL
Singer for Blues Band. Call Bryan
after  6:00  p.m.   RE  8-4736.
TODAY ONLY! THE POPPY FAM-
ily in concert. SUB Ballroom at
noon. And  only 50c cheap.
68 - INVITATION - 69
A student-oriented booklet of 33
different entertainment passes
valued at over $50.00. Available
at the Bookstore, He & She
Clothing (the Village). Canteens
in the Residences and the Information   Desk  at   SUB.   $2.50.
Travel Opportunities
16
Wanted Information
17
INSURANCE STALL. ANYONE
witnessing accident Monday, Sept.
16, 2:15 p.m. at 10th & Alma. '60
Olds, '68 Chevy II. Please call 261-
7065.
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
ONE OWNER '55 BUICK, WHITE
4-door hardtop. Immaculate condition. Only $495. Call Bil] Wyman.
681-6553   days   or   985-5141   evenings.
'64 M.G. MIDGET EXC. COND.
Mech. sound. And extras. $850. See
on campus call M.W.  224-9769.
1960 PONTIAC, GOOD CONDITION,
new battery, generator, tires. Must
sell.   Best   offer   from   $400.00.   926-
4003.
'62 GALAXIE 4-DR. V8 AUTO. P.B.
& P.S. New brakes & trans. $850.
Phone   after   6.   732-8346.
'57 VOLKS, GOOD COND. $500. Cash,
685-2775 between 6-8. Ask for
Denny.
Auto. For Sale (Cont.)
21
'57 METEOR EXCELLENT TRANS.
6 Std. Good radio, brakes, tires.
$275  or  best  offer.  Call  224-0311.
1966 PONTIAC 6 CYL. AUTOMATIC.
Phone   434-6785.
Automobile—Parts
23
Automobile—Repairs
24
Motorcycles
26
BUSINESS  SERVICES
Dance Bands
31
Miscellaneous
33
NOW WITH APPOINTMENT SER-
vice, Upper Tenth Barber Hair
Stylists, 4574 West 10th Avenue,
224-6622.
Home  Entertainment
35
Guaranteed Expert & Efficient Repairs
Color TV — Black and White TV
Record Players — Radios
Stereo Equipment — Tape Recorders
ALEXANDER  AND AXELSON  LTD.
4512 W. 10th — 228-9088
Complete   Record   Department
Scandals
37
DEKES! DEKES!!!! ACTIVES ZERO
pledges one. Brian P. keep your
Gravol  pills  handy, US.	
THE ACID IN OUR BATTERIES
will really turn you on. Call University Cab Company, 224-5025 for
battery boosts.	
GET   HOT    WITH    "IN    THE   HEAT
of The Night", today and tomorrow
in the Old Aud. Adm. 50c, 12:30.
3:30, 6:00, 8:30.	
"BEYOND THE CLOUDS" IS IN
the top ten. Hear the Poppy Family
today,  noon,  SUB.	
IT IS AUTUMN!
Typing
40
GOOD EXPERIENCED TYPIST
available for home typing. Please
call 277-5640.	
EXP. TYPING ESSAYS & THESES,
reas. rates; legible work; phone
738-6829 after 10 a.m., Mon.-Thurs.,
and  Sundays.	
GOOD EXPERIENCED HOME TYP-
ist available for essays, etc. Please
call  435-0882.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female
51
WANTED GIRLS TO WORK PART-
time in an expanding business. We
offer an opportunity for rapid advancement plus choice of own working hours. Phone Heather, 321-3603
between 5-7 p.m.
Help Wanted—Male
52
APPLICATIONS ARE NOW BEING
taken for the Pizza Patio Pizza
tossing program. Training course
will be held at the Milano Pizza
Training Institute — Italy. For further information contact:
Personnel Director — Pizza Patio
The Home of Perfect Pizza, 688-2381
Male or Female
53
Work Wanted
54
RESPONSIBLE MARRIED COUPLE
would like babysitting or odd jobs
for weekends. Reasonable rates.
Phone  733-1375.
INSTRUCTION
Tutoring
64
ENGLISH, FRENCH, HISTORY,
Russian lessons given privately by
B.A., M.A., B.L.S. (McGill). Phone
736-6923.
FIRST YEAR MATHEMATICS, PHY -
sics, Chemistry lessons given by
excellent tutors. Phone 736-6923.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BUSY "B" BOOKS — USED UNI-
versity texts bought and sold. 146
W. Hastings, opposite Woodwards.
681-4931.
NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY
at the UBC Barber Shop & Beauty
Salon. "It pays to look your best."
5736 University Blvd. 228-8942.
2 SNOW TIRES,  6.50x13 WITH RIMS
$34.  Phone  688-4073.
GIBSON ELECTRIC BASS EB-2
two pick-up. Good condition, cherry
finish.   Phone  Bruce 224-9888.
1 PR. 210 HEAD G.S. 1 PR. 210 HEAD
Standards. 1 pr. 195 Head 360's. 1
pr. size 12 Seal-skin after ski boots.
1 pr. size 12 Headerer ski boots.
224-6279.
Misc. For Sale (Cont.)
"Ti
BUNK BEDS, SET, $29.50. 2'x4' TOP,
unpainted double pedestal desks,
each $29.50. New 252 coil single
Hollywood beds, complete, from
$49.50. Unpainted book cases, from
$8.95.
KLASSEN'S
3207  West  Broadway RE  6-0712
(Beer bottle drive-in at rear of store)
BIRD CALLS
NOW AVAILABLE
at Bookshop & Publications
Office in SUB
On Campus, only 75c
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
FURNISHED ROOM FOR MALE
students near 16th and Arbutus.
Phone   after   6   p.m.   733-5255.	
SLEEPING ROOMS, AVAILABLE
Nov. 1, male. Well furnished, priv.
bath, entrance, 4546 W. 8th. $45.
Ph.  224-9340.
NICE HOUSE-KEEPING ROOM FOR
male student. Prefer non-smoker.
Phone  325-9503.
FURNISHED   ROOM,    MALE,   ONLY
$45.  Phone  736-5745 after  six.
SLEEPING ROOM, MALE STUDENT
$45 per month. 1750 Allison, phone
224-1545.
2 MEN, LARGE HOUSEKEEPING
room, house privileges, $40.00 each.
733-8285.
MALE    ONLY.    SHARE   SELF-CON-
tained   ste.   $35.00.   733-8285.	
ROOMS ON CAMPUS $40.00 (M.) 2250
Wesbrook. Kit. priv., TV lounge, on
campus   parking.   224-0439;   224-9662.
BSMT. ROOM, PRIV. ENTRANCE
and bathroom, shower, male or female.  3005 W.  20th, 738-7984.	
LARGE WARM ROOMS. TWO STU-
dents. Private entrance, bathroom.
Lots of hot water, bedding, etc. $35
per month.  Call  325-4505.
Room & Board
82
LIVE ON CAMPUS AT THE DELTA
Upsilon Fraternity House, good food,
short walk to classes, quiet hours
enforced for study. Phone 228-9389
or 224-9841.
ROOM AND BOARD, EXCELLENT
meals: breakfast, lunch and dinner.
736-5030.
ROOM AVAILABLE (BOARD Optional) for senior professional married couple, in clean, quiet home, in
South Granville district. 224-3617 or
733-7181.
FURNISHED ROOM, MALE. AVAIL-
able Nov. 3. Private entrance, kitchen privileges, bath. $60 per month.
Phone 733-8702.
WISH GIRL TO SHARE WITH
same, semi-furnished, one bedroom
apartment in West End. 683-3678;
alternate  685-2640.
Furn. Houses & Apts.
83
MATURE MALE STUDENT WANT-
ed to share house with two businessmen,   Kerrisdale  area.  Ph.  261-
9491   eves.
FEMALE STUDENT WANTED.
Share large semi-furnished suite
with two others. Own room. 733-
9339.
FURNISHED BASEMENT SUITE.
One or two male students. Private
entrance. Kits area. Phone 731-1629.
BASEMENT SUITE, FURNISHED,
private entrance, washroom, shower,
light cooking. 1 or 2 quiet older students. 4615 W. 9th. Ph. 228-9448 —
5:00-7:00 p.m.
BUY — SELL — RENT
USE
UBYSSEY CLASSIFIED
UBYSSEY ADVERTISING
OFFICE
Now Located In
ROOM 241 — S.U.B. ^

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