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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Feb 6, 1979

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Array withheld from members
BoG intimidation charged
UBC administration president Doug
Kenny is trying to intimidate newly-elected
student board of governors members Glenn
Wong and Bruce Armstrong, former student
board representative Paul Sandhu charged
Monday.
All board members except Wong and
Armstrong received a complete information
packet Thursday dealing with the agenda of
both the open and closed section of today's
board meeting.
The two student board members were not
supplied with any information on the closed
session of today's meeting until Monday at a
meeting with Kenny and board chairman Ian
Greenwood.
Wong and Armstrong said Monday that
although it was never officially stated at the
private meeting, it could be "speculated"
that the incident was a result of Sandhu's
expulsion from a board meeting in
December.
Sandhu was expelled from the closed
finance section of a board meeting after discussing allegedly confidential information
about the financing of UBC's Asian Centre
with The Ubyssey.
Sandhu said Monday that when he was
elected to the board last year, he was given
his complete packet along with everyone else.
"There was no difficulty in getting my
packet at all." Sandhu said that although
Kenny and former board chairman George
Morfitt called him to a meeting, they made
no attempt to withhold information when he
joined the board.
"No one tried to use intimidation on us,
which seems to be the case this time."
Sandhu added it was ridiculous to give the
packets out with so little time for
preparation.
"This is going to make it difficult to provide effective representation," Wong said.
"It will be hard to read all the information in
the packet in time."
Wong said he and Armstrong expressed
their "dismay and distress" over the incident
at Monday's meeting.
"I didn't feel it was necessary to understand exactly how the board worked before
receiving my packet," Armstrong said.
Wong said the incident was an inconvenience and Armstrong said it didn't make
them feel welcome on the board.
Armstrong added the incident could have
more far-reaching implications.
Up until this year, new student board representatives have received their complete
packets at the same time as other board
members, said Sandhu.
However there has been no indication that
the student members will receive their
See page 3: BoG
30 gov't jobs
lost in transit
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LX«, No. 48 VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1979   «*
228-2301
By KEVIN McGEE
What the Social Credit government giveth it just might taketh
away.
Unless the total funding for the
1979 Youth Employment Program
is increased, the recent announce-
ement of higher salaries for participants in the program will result
in fewer jobs available for students.
There will be at least 30 fewer
jobs for UBC students if the funds
available to UBC and the academic
distribution of the applicants
remain the same as last year, according to figures obtained from
Richard Spratley, campus coordinator of last year's program.
The pay rates for first- and
second-year students have been increased to $650 per month from
$550 and third-, fourth- and fifth-
year students rates rise to $700 per
month from $650. Graduate
students will get $775 per month,
up from $750 last year.
"I think it's a good move on the
government's part but the new
rates are still lower than they should
be," Spratley said Friday.
He said he could see no reason
why the government should pay
students in the program lower rates
than those paid students hired for
the summer by various ministries
such as the highways department.
Kate Andrew, Alma Mater
Society external affairs officer, said
Monday she is very hopeful the
labor department will increase
UBC's allocation of funds so that
no jobs will be sacrificed.
"There is obviously the
possibility that there will not be an
increase in funding for the program, but if that is the case it will be
a sad mistake on the government's
part."
Patrick O'Rourke, labor ministry
coordinator for the university,
college and institute programs, declined to comment specifically on
See page 3: PAY
CHECKING FOR EARLY signs of gangrene or dirty needle, Shena
Lambert, arts 1, happily discovers that giving blood is neither painful or
dangerous. Red Cross nurse Pat Tobin is one of many participants in
blood drive running through til Friday from 10 a.m
SUB. And to make bleeding even more enjoyable,
be held at the end of each day.
— peter menyasz photo
. to 4 p.m. upstairs in
three prize draws will
'English Canada losing political voice'
By TOM HAWTHORN
Growing regionalism in Canada
denies English Canadians the
opportunity to use political power
in   constitutional   debates,    UBC
political   science   professor   Alan
Cairns said Saturday in IRC 2.
Cairns told about 300 people in a
Vancouver Institute lecture that
while Quebec's political force has
Cash counts in Hong Kong
MONTREAL (CUP) — You think you have problems scraping up enough money to get back to school?
Visa students from Hong Kong have it much worse.
The Canadian High Commission in Hong Kong has
required all potential students from that area to pay
their tuition fees in full and set up a bank account of at
least $4,000 in the city in which they will be studying.
According to a document the Commission issues to
potential students, this must be done before the
embassy will issue them a visa.
Since visa students cannot usually work in Canada,
they are normally asked to bring at least $4,000 to
support themselves during their school year.
However, no other embassy is known to require
students to pay tuition and set up a bank account in
advance.
Employment and immigration officer Emmanuelle
Gattuso said "each embassy is allowed to fix its own
regulations. It's really a matter of interpretation of the
policy.
"The High Commission in Hong Kong is very
reasonable in specifying this amount."
Concordia University administrator Stanley French
suggested the policy would discriminate against less
wealthy visa students.
"It seems to me that we get wealthy students who
experience no hardships, but then we get another kind
of foreign student who is really quite poor, and this
policy seems to be discriminating against them."
expanded since the election of the
Parti Quebecois in 1976, English
Canada's is in a decline.
"English Canada lacks a political
outlet, a concentrated forcus of
political authority it can wield on its
own behalf. French Canadians have
acquired a state, and English
Canadians, to exaggerate somewhat, are in danger of being rendered stateless," he said.
Cairns, who is head of UBC's
political science department, said
there is no single provincial government which can represent the
majority of English Canadians, as
Quebec represents French
Canadians.
"It is surprising but true that although English Canadians control
nine provinces and have a majority
input into Ottawa, they are in a
sense disadvantaged by comparison
with the 80 per cent of French
Canadians who live in Quebec and
have  a  government   growing   in
power theit speaks in their name and
their behalf."
Cairns said English Canadians
will become bitter at the decrease in
their input to national affairs. They
are further frustrated because they
cannot give their loss a political
voice as that would be a restoration
of majority privilege, he said.
Ottawa will not provide this political leadership because it is no
longer the capital of English
Canada, Cairns said.
"Political leadership in Ottawa,
whether English or French, must
devote a large part of its energies to
the task of bargain, barter, and
compromise to prevent centrifugal
pressures destroying our limited
cohesiveness."
Cairns criticized the task force on
Canadian unity report for not
examining what effect the changes
in Quebec have had on English
Canada.
The report by the co-chairmen of
See page 2: FORCE Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  February 6,  1979
Force taken to task
From page 1
the commission also sides with
Quebec's opinion over that of the
national government, a surprising
development for a task force appointed by the cabinet, he said.
"In their discussion of duality
the commissioners hammer home
one brutal, fundamental note: not
only is the great divide between
French and English Canada a
crucial reality, but the French side
of the divide is represented by the
people, the province, and most importantly, by the government of
Quebec.
"The report therefore has declared a winner in the intense intergovernmental struggle between
Quebec and Ottawa which has gone
on for a decade and a half over the
loss of a homeland for the francophone community."
The report, titled A Future
Together and written by co-
chairmen Jean Luc Pepin, a former
federal cabinet minister and former
Ontario premier John Robarts, was
released Jan. 25. The Parti Quebecois, prime minister Pierre
Trudeau and Progressive Conservative leader Joe Clark have all
made favorable statements about
the report.
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S.U.S. SPEAKERS PROGRAM ANNOUNCES:
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Room 119, S.U.B. - 12:30 - 2:30 p.m.
Thursday, February 8-Use of Credit
E Y
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Sponsored by the Awards Office and the Women-Students' Office
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
1979 SPRING LECTURES
BY VISITING PROFESSORS
Andrew Ian Malcolm
The dangers of soft drugs and the effects of group encounter techniques have been
brought to public attention by Canadian psychiatrist Dr Andrew Malcolm. His books
The Pursuit of Intoxication, The Case Against the Drugged Mind, The Tyranny of the
Croup and The Craving for the High, all published in the 1970s, detail his concerns
about the North American desire to suspend rational thinking and release emotions
His years of clinical experience in Ontario give his work a practical basis, and he is well
regarded as an informative and provocative speaker
TRAGIC CULTS
Wednesday, February 7      In Lecture Hall A, School of Social Work, at 8:00 p.m
THE HAZARDS OF LIVING ,'N A CHEMOPHILIC SOCIETY
Thursday, February 8 In Lecture Hall 2, Woodward Instructional Resources Centre,
at 12:30 p.m
THE USE AND ABUSE OF THE FORENSIC PSYCHIATRIST IN OUR COURTS
Saturday, February 10 In Lecture Hall 2, Woodward Instructional Resources Centre,
at 8:15 p.m.
(A Vancouver Institute Lecture)
MAGIC HUMANISM IN MODERN WESTERN CULTURE:
A CRITIQUE OF THE HUMAN POTENTIAL MOVEMENT
Thursday, February 15        In Lecture Hall 2, Woodward Instructional Resources Centre,
at 8:00 p m
(A Centre for Continuing Lducation Lecture)
ALL LECTURES ARE FREE
PLEASE POST AND ANNOUNCE
sponsored by
■m       The Cecil H. and Ida Green Visiting Professorship Fund
STRATHCONA
A magnificent year 'round wilderness centre
offering apprenticeship programmes in outdoor and environmental education. Enjoy the
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INTRODUCTION    TO    STRESS   MANAGEMENT,  CHINESE MEDICINE AND  TOUCH
HEALING
with Effie Chow, R.N., Ph.D.
Date: FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 1979
Time: FRIDAY, 2:00 p.m.-5:30 p.m.
Place: HOLIDAY INN
711 West Broadway, Vancouver, B.C. 879-0511
Presentor: DR. EFFIE CHOW
President East West Academy of Healing Arts, San Francisco
Subject: Emphasis will be placed on dealing with stress
related to study and examinations, work and economic
pressures, and other debilitating conditions.
Cost: $20.00.
INTRODUCTION TO HOLISTIC HEALTH
February 9, 1979
Name	
Pre-register: Louise Collins 327-8341
Address	
Work Phone	
Agency	
$20.00 Cheque of Money Order to: B.C. Chapter, C.G.C.A., c/o John Oliver Secondary
School, 530 East 41st Avenue, Vancouver, B.C. V5W 1P3
Information phone Louise Collins 327-8341.
No refunds, but substitutions allowed.
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We're
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Are you?
There are two kinds of people in this world.
Some want to feel they are part of a giant — even at the risk of getting lost in the corporate maze.
But others want the more personal, more exciting challenge. They
want to be in on the ground floor of a very big future.
If that describes you, think about Wendy's Restaurants of Canada
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We're a Canadian company and part of the fast-growing hamburger
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We've made a definite commitment to match Wendy's phenomenal
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If that's your kind of challenge, we may be your kind of company offering your kind of growth.
Tell us why your academic background qualifies you for a key role
on a dynamic, fast-growing mamagement team.
We'll tell you why Wendy's commitment to qualify will help  us
achieve our commitment to growth.
We will be conducting interviews on Campus on
FEBRUARY 26 and 27, 1979
For appointments and more information, please
contact:
Canada Employment Centre on Campus
^ University of British Columbia Tuesday, February 6,  1979
THE      UBYSSEY
Pago 3
Hatch blasts American applicants
English c'tee to discuss hiring
By TOM HAWTHORN
The English department's executive committee will discuss
today complaints within the department about the imminent
hiring of a non-Canadian professor.
The decision to take the matter to the executive committee,
the senior committee in the department, follows criticism of
the English appointments committee by associate professor
Ronald Hatch.
The appointments committee decided recently to narrow down its
choice of candidates for a position
as a senior Shakespearean professor
to three Americans, who will be
brought to UBC for further consideration.
Hatch has sent a letter to all
members of the executive committee scheduled to meet at 1:30 p.m.
today, urging them to draft guidelines so that the appointments com
mittee will be directed to hire
primarily Canadians to fill
vacancies at UBC.
"It is time to lift our heads up
from the underbrush, to realize that
we are now in a similar position to
that of the U.S.A. and the U.K.,
where we no longer need to advertise abroad," Hatch says in the
letter.
Hatch said Monday it is not
known if the executive committee
would accept his recommendations
or decide to search for a Canadian
candidate.
English department head Robert
Jordan has now sent the curriculum
vitae of a Canadian appointee from
Toronto to department experts,
Hatch said.
"The appointments committee is
a little unsure or unclear about who
they are hiring and why they're
hiring. That's my impression."
Hatch says the department
should only advertise in Canada
and hire Canadians almost exclusively.
Jordan, who is a member of both
the appointments and executive
committees, said Monday the
dispute was not a major concern of
the department.
"It's his (Hatch's) business, not
mine. You can't confuse personal
views with department policy," he
said. "Our department is based on
providing the best quality of
education possible."
Hatch says it is important to hire
Canadian graduates to improve
Canadian graduate schools.
"It is easy to maintain, I know,
that the English department's main
function is not to supply jobs, but
to profess our discipline. This is undoubtedly true, but if we are to
maintain strong graduate schools,
then we must be willing to hire from
those graduate schools," he says in
his letter to executive committee
members.
Hatch also said a majority of the
people in the department do not see
a need for hiring a senior Shakespearean professor.
"The head has informed me that
the executive committee of last year
suggested that we hire a senior
Shakespearean. I have asked
several members of last year's
executive committee about this;
they have no recollection of the
committee's suggesting a 'senior'
Shakespearean," the letter states.
Most department members
would prefer to see a recent
graduate hired at the assistant professor level, Hatch said.
JNo reactors to
Third World'
MORE THAN JUST puck in net nets UBC Thunderbirds a goal against
University of Calgary Dinos in hockey action Friday. Dinos went on to win
game 6-3 however, en route to splitting two weekend games with UBC.
—peter menyasz photo
'Birds were luckier Saturday when they put Dinosaurs back into ice age
with 6-4 win. Series left 'Birds in third place in west. (See story page 7).
Pay raises slash 30 UBC student jobs
Trom page 1
what plans had been made for
funding of the program.
"The funding for the university
program should remain about the
same as last year, but any guess
now would be speculation. We
won't know for certain until the
budget speech at the end of the
month," he said Thursday.
O'Rourke said a "rough study"
has been done showing that any decrease in jobs would be slight, as 70
to 80 per cent of students involved
in the program were in the pay
brackets which increased the least.
"We wanted to make improvements in the areas in which we were
getting the maximum criticisms,"
O'Rourke said, referring to the
$100 per month increase in the
wages paid to first- and second-year
students.
A major complaint against the
program had been that students
making the minimum rate were not
able to save enough to qualify for
student aid, he said.
O'Rourke said a decision had
been made to place a greater emphasis on creating jobs in the
private sector for the upcoming
summer.
"It is recognized by the ministry
that projects at the university level
have a far greater potential to be
career oriented, but there is an even
greater need for jobs among young
people who don't have any post-
secondary education."
O'Rourke said it cost the
ministry $1,000 for every job
created in the private sector versus
$2,700 for those jobs created at the
university level.
"Last year we had a total budget
of $21.4 million to create summer
employment, of which 15 per cent
went to post-secondary institutions.
We created 1,450 jobs for
university and college students last
year, and our target for this year is
a total of 13,000 jobs, including the
private sector."
O'Rourke said he feels projects
at the university level are worth the
extra money it cost to create them.
BoG 'welcome' hit
From page 1
packets later than other members
for future meetings.
Wong   and   Armstrong   said
Monday they called the board clerk
Friday to find out where the rest of
their information packets were, and
were told they would not receive the
complete packet until Monday at
noon. At this time, they were told
they   would   be   meeting   with
university administration president
Doug Kenny and board chairman
Ian Greenwood.
Wong and Armstrong said
Greenwood explained to them at
Monday's meeting the board's
function and then gave them the
rest of their packets which contained information on the closed
part of their first board meeting.
Kenny could not be reached for
comment by press time.
By VICKI BOOTH
Canada should not supply underdeveloped nations with nuclear
technology or fuel, Fraser Valley
West Progressive Conservative MP
Bob Wenman said Friday.
"We should not at this time export technology or supplies because
we can't be sure it won't be used for
nuclear proliferation," Wenman
told 30 people in SUB 215. "For
example, India is using Canadian
technology and fuel for purposes
other than energy use," he said.
India developed its first nuclear
weapon with Canadian-supplied
technology a few years ago.
Wenman said Canada should
have a moral obligation to have an
international concern about any
nuclear supplies it releases.
"We have a tendency to cover
our eyes and ears after we supply
(nuclear) reactors and fuel and say
it's gone, we don't have to worry
about it anymore."
Wenman said he thought it deplorable that previous ministers of
the environment and of external
affairs have said that Canada has
no responsibility for nuclear
supplies after they leave the
country. Canada is not concerned
enough with control of nuclear proliferation, he said.
There is a great need and demand
for energy in the world today, and
Canada should perhaps be willing
to supply nations who want nuclear
energy, Wenman said. But some
kind of control should be
established, he added.
Wenman said return of spent fuel
was an obvious answer to control,
but Canada doesn't want it back
because no safe method of disposal
has yet been developed.
"One answer to disposal is
regional repositories, but would
you want such a repository in
Canada?"
Canada should not continue to
expand its nuclear program until a
permanent safe method of nuclear
waste disposal has been found,
Wenman said.
Wenman said he was in favor of
the current method of sealing
nuclear wastes and dropping them
into the Precambrian Shield, but
added this method may well prove
unsatisfactory in the future.
"We once thought it was all right
to drop sealed wastes into oceans
and rivers, but have since found
after 50 or 60 years, there is
leakage."
Wenman said he would like to see
more research into alternate
methods of energy such as solar,
wind, tidal and organic decomposition.
"Nuclear power may well be the
energy of the future, but is it the
energy of today?"
He also spoke briefly on religious
cults, another area which he said
needs   government   investigation. Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 6,   1979
Oh, Canada
Time is running out for prime minister Pierre Trudeau as the first
ministers gather this week to discuss constitutional change.
Trudeau is desperately searching for an issue, any issue other than
the economy, upon which to base the Liberals' election campaign
for the upcoming federal election.
But it is highly unlikely the premiers, dominated by a majority of
Progressive Conservatives, will allow Trudeau that opportunity
with the federal Conservatives so close behing the Liberals.
Even assuming the premiers could put aside partisan politics,
their past record at these conferences of putting their province's interests ahead of the nation's, bodes ill for any hope of substantive
agreements.
It may be for the best. On Saturday, political science professor
Alan Cairns told the Vancouver Institute that the federal government is increasingly under attack as the provinces grasp for more
powers from the central government. For example, even the task
force on Canadian unity, a group of federally appointed commissioners, recommend sweeping changes to the constitution which
would greatly strengthen the provincial governments at the expense of Ottawa.
It is highly dangerous to draft a new constitution with the prevailing parochial attitudes. If the task force has its way, the country
will lose much of its national decision-making ability, including
some levers of economic control, to the provinces. Such a course
of action could be disastrous for a country like Canada which must
live with the world's largest economic power as its southern
neighbor.
The survival of a Canadian economic identity is difficult enough
at present. And the balkanization of the country into little decisionmaking units would leave Canadians incapable of resisting the
enormous pressures of the American economy.
The move to spread economic decision-making power to the
periphery also goes against the trend of many other countries
which are joining together into larger economic units, such as the
European Economic Community. If Canada is to compete successfully with other countries it must have a single government
which can speak and act for it.
£rJWrtVo-"K>
THE UBYSSEY
FEBRUARY 6, 1979
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year by the Alma
Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the
AMS or the university administration. Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey
publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial office is in
room 241K of the Student Union Building. Editorial departments, 228-2301; Advertising,
228-3377. Editor: Mike Bocking
Heather Conn sat in her elegant bachelor's apartment on her leopard skin bedspread listening to Henry Mancini with the lights turned low. She flipped idly
through her glossy magazine of Mike Bocking nudes, then, her breath quickening, reached for her little black book and her candy-apple red telephone. She
passed over Verne McDonald and Kevin McGee. "Blond beards give me a rash," she thought. "I wish Bill Tieleman would shave his off again." She could call
Tom Hawthorn, but he had to be in bed by nine and would never make it over in time. She flipped the pages faster and faster. Mike Mong had only two stars,
he would never do. Ross Burnett, alas, was too much bent on marriage and never put out. She hesitated a long time over Kevin Finnegan's number, which had
foui stars. "Tail, dark, and handsome with curly hair," she thought. "But women don't make passes at men who wear glasses." Then she saw Peter Menyasz'
five stars. She dialed, trembling with desire. "Hello, Peter? I. . ." "Hey, do you call here often?" "Never mind, Peter, I want to . . ." "What's your sign? Wanna
get lucky?" She slammed the phone down and sighed, then dialed again. "Hello, Vicki Booth? Have you got a kid brother?"
Letters
Please don't teach my 'animals'
In response to your Friday, Feb.
2 article titled "Thrust alone into
the jungle," by Mary-Ann Bru-
noro, I am somewhat shocked!
Miss Brunoro has virtually
nothing good to say about school
students. With more than 500,000
registered school students in British
Columbia (B.C. Teachers' Federation, October, 1978) I find it difficult to agree with Miss Brunoro
that all students are, "wild and undisciplined animals." Miss Brunoro
also suggests that student teachers
are left defenceless in the
classroom.
Do all student teachers have
difficulty arousing their classes'
interest, Miss Brunoro? I think not;
in fact, the problems you experienced were due to your lack of
respect for education. I believe you
Skiers club AMS
The purpose of this letter is to let
everyone know (particularly AMS-
affiliated clubs) of the problems we
have encountered with the AMS on
a matter that, if not corrected,
could have far reaching repercussions.
During the past 60 years, the
Varsity Outdoor Club has built a
number of cabins for the use of its
members.
These cabins — located successively on Hollyburn mountain,
Grouse mountain, Mount Seymour
and a Whistler mountain — have
served as focal points for the many
and varied activities of the club. As
well, they have helped to bind the
club together with the strength and
companionship which major
projects bring to clubs.
As the. clubs expanded over the
years, and as circumstances
changed, one cabin was replaced by
another. All of the cabins were built
and/or renovated by the club with
members, both present and past,
contributing and acquiring the
necessary money, labor and
materials. Always, the proceeds
from the sale of one cabin were
used to help finance construction of
the next.
The Whistler cabin's present day
value is at least a quarter of a
million dollars. Over the years the
general   area   has   become   more
recreational with an emphasis upon
downhill skiing.
As -a result, the UBC Ski Club
eventually expressed an interest in
acquiring the Whistler cabin from
the Varsity Outdoor Club. This
interest subsequently culminated in
an offer to buy the Whistler cabin
from the Varsity Outdoor Club in
which we would reinvest into
another cabin more remotely
located.
At this point the AMS intervened
and advised that the Varsity
Outdoor Club could not sell the
building because it did not own it
despite the decision by a student
court after many hours of review on
April 1, 1977 to the effect that the
Varsity Outdoor Club was entitled
to compensation of $30,000 for the
Whistler cabin.
To add insult to injury the AMS
is now demanding that the Varsity
Outdoor Club pays a weekend rate
of $300 for the use of the Varsity
Outdoor Club-built Whistler cabin
even during off season times.
Some action needs to be
promptly taken to reverse this improper extension of AMS
jurisdiction and interference.
Otherwise, it could possibly be
expanded to include every club
affiliated with the society. We
require your support.
Varsity Outdoor Club executive
have done one practicum. Does that
constitute valid research and such
an in-depth article?
I have done four practicums;
three in the regular secondary
school division and one in an alternate education centre.
In each school I learned much
about the students through experiencing their needs, their problems and their frustrations. Despite
the basic discipline problems, I
never lost faith in these students. It
didn't matter to me whether or not
the students were on probation or
were top honor role students in the
school. I respected them for what
they were — people, not
"animals." I love the kids, and
they are the reason why I'm going
into teaching.
There are countless problems
teachers must face every day, either
in the school or in the community,
and many problems that teachers
must   endure   regarding   political
opinions. But that doesn't mean we
sit still and complain about the
kids. If we don't have any respect
for the students, then we should not
be teaching.
I hope the faculty of arts accepts
your graduate school application,
Miss Brunoro, because I sure as hell
would not want you teaching my
kids. Steve Ferguson
vice-president
education students' association
In   addition   to   Steve's   valid
comments, I also feel that if any
student teacher has discipline problems, he/she should take stock of
himself/herself rather than put the
blame on the students.
Miss Brunoro, if you feel so
strongly against students, perhaps
you should consider another profession — you are there to educate,
not hinder. Most important —
students are people, too!
Heather W. Lacelle
president
education students' association
AMS falls short
In response to Dave Coulson's
letter of Feb. 14 (Armstrong head
strong) and the editorial One for
All condemning the lack of time
spent on tuition fee increases, all I
can say is bravo. Once again the
forces for democracy have tried to
interfere with an honest attempt at
improving the AMS.
Go for girl germs
I would like to make a response
to the letter of Mr. Chiang. First of
all, why is he in arts. I am an oil
painter not attached to the
university. He is in Letters.
I agree with some of what he
says, although not for the same
reasons. I care not for Eve. Suppose one were really in love with
Jezebel or Delilah the Temptress.
Whenever I read Christian
apologetics, it sticks in my craw.
Nevertheless, I like his rebel stand.
He mentions girl germs. Germs
also have a useful aspect. There is
wheat germ, and the germ of an
idea. Besides, syphilis is a very
beautiful disease, and those who
have it can easily solve the most
difficult problems of logic and
expression, especially in the tertiary
phase. Why am I so clever? Because
I cannot spell Nisho.
For those who are insecure, I
suggest the following therapy. Two
minutes of hazing, three bottles of
stout, and a trip to the Stratford
hotel. Once there, burst into tears
and confess your problems to Mary
Magdalene.
I think homosexuality leads to a
false sensitivity of manners, art and
writing, corrupts the home and
leads to a bitter old age. Women are
not scarce. In France, pedestrians
do not have the right of way. I
think Zorba the Greek was right in
his great solicitude towards lonely
widows. I was sitting in a cafe in
Piraeus. . . .
Christian Henricksen
Spanish philosophy 2000
As a member of the constitution
and code committee I take great
offence to the inference that I am
wasting your time. I personally feel
that, under the present structure,
the AMS couldn't rally an attack
against a killer mink let alone the
provincial government. However, if
The Ubyssey, DVB and Coulson
want to organize a lobby far be it
from me to interfere.
More than likely they will sit on
their butts and do nothing until
such times as the Point Grey cliffs
erode and they all fall in the ocean.
Perhaps this is what Mr. Coulson
meant by the 'lemming-like attitude
of student government.'
One of our proposals calls for an
executive to be elected at large;
something that doesn't happen
now. Perhaps with such an election,
Armstrong, Coulson, DVB and
Hedstrom could run on their respective platforms and views and
from the results we could really find
out what the students want. Right
now we can only guess as to what
the real issues are.
I think the constitution is important and you think tuition fees
are important. I'm working on the
constitution; what are you doing?
Brian Short
EUS president Tuesday,  February 6,   1979
THE      UBYSSEY
Letters
Page 5
Services cuts won't fill residences
An open letter to Michael Davis:
I note in your housing budget for
1979-80,   several  cuts  in  services
which  total  $112,797   (maid   services, toilet paper,  linen service).
You claim that it would require a
nine per cent increase to prevent
these cuts. Here are my calculations: assuming there are 3,150
students in residence, the $112,797
works out to approximately $36 per
resident. This is only 3.7 per cent of
Gage residence fees.
If we now take into account the
asset replacement fund of $98,225,
this percentage is only increased to
6.8 per cent of Gage fees, again far
short of nine per cent.
Residences are usually considered
as a whole, but I think that it might
be worthwhile to look at Gage
residence alone. Assuming that
Gage residents pay for 40 per cent
of the above services, and just over
60 per cent of the asset replacement
fund, then the fee raise to Gage
residents will be the nine per cent
you have proposed.
This seems to imply that you are
saying you will eliminate the asset
replacement fund, whereas your
actual intention is to retain it under
the guise of raising fees to cover the
other services. I am quite sure that
Gage residents would be willing to
spend an extra 3.7 per cent and
keep the three current services.
Since the office of student
housing is for students, and paid
for entirely by students (as you have
told us many times), would you
please issue a non-confidential
report giving the residents access to
the actual details of the budget,
such as the fate of $25,000 in interest that the current asset replacement fund makes per year.
Yes, this budget does keep the
fees the same, but is it really what
students want, and are you willing
to change your mind to the wish of
the majority of the students? I
would also like to know if you will
even look at the current survey
form being circulated and read the
comments on it, or do you feel that
you know more about what
students want than students?
You state that you desire to keep
the costs down so that more
students will move into residence
and lower the unacceptable vacancy
rate of 10 per cent at Totem Park.
This is an obvious first-year
economics move, where the analyst
has drawn a supply/demand curve,
B.Comm. a la USA
The English department isn't the
only one looking only for Americans as new professors. In the
faculty of commerce there are
several instances this year. In one
department in commerce they only
interviewed one person, an American. There is a Canadian who is a
visiting prof here now who wasn't
even considered even though he's
the best teacher I've ever had and
one of the best in the whole faculty.
I hope you will investigate this
since I can't because the other profs
in the department (all American)
might try to get even with me and I
need good grades to get into grad
school.
a Canadian commerce student
MUSSOC PRESENTS
4NYTHIN&
JAN. 31-FEB. 10
8:30 p.m.
OLD AUDITORIUM
TICKETS: Concert Box Offices,
Outlets & AMS Business Office
STUDENTS: $2.00 Tues.Thurs.
THESE ARE THE ARMIES
OF THE NIGHT.
They are 100.000 strong. They outnumber the cops
five to one. They could run New York City.
Tonight they're all out to get the Warriors.
Paramount Pictures Presents A Lawrence Gordon Production
"THE WARRIORS" Executive Producer Frank Marshall Based
Upon the Novel by Sol Yurick Screenplay by David Shaber
and Walter Hill Produced by Lawrence Gordon Directed by
Walter Hill
NOW AT A THEATRE NEAR YOU
and decides that, to fill his
residences up, he must keep the
prices the same, or even lower
them. However, you haven't
adequately considered the
'quality/demand' curve as the cuts
that you propose will surely
severely lower the quality of
residence living — a trend that I feel
has caused the decrease in residence
students in the first place.
When you first visited us in the
last full week of January, you said
that you could only stay for 30
minutes, although you did extend
this to 40 minutes. This made me
wonder how much you cared about
students' concern for the budget.
Furthermore, the session had
only a 10-minute question period;
not much time to question your
initial decisions! Could you not
have made sure that this initial
meeting was scheduled so that you
had much more time to discuss the
matter? After all, your primary
responsibility is supposedly to
students.
It was only after a definite
consensus of students at the first
meeting that you decided you
would come back the next week and
talk to us again, something that I
would like to thank you for.
My understanding of the
university financial system is that
budgets, fee increases, etc. must be
in the administration's hands by the
last week of January in preparation
for the February board of
governors meeting( week of Feb. 5).
I feel that this is now a 'rush'
proposal that you have put forward, hoping that the GCC and the
other residence associations would
'rubber stamp' it, hailing the
budget as a 'great thing' since it
proposed no direct fee increase
(although students might end up
paying more physically and
mentally).
I would like your assurance that
future budget reports will be given
earlier in the year and all relevant
facts and figures will be included
for students, and not just the bare
essentials that you seem to be
willing to give us.
I look forward to hearing your
response and the possibility of
seeing, in writing, what your department does with all my money. I
hope to see residences become a
student service where students have
more say, and not another semi-
closed university department that
covers up inept management with
the 'confidential' stamp.
Craig Brooks
science SRA representative
Gage resident
OPTIC
ZONE
Student Discounts
ARBUTUS VILLAGE
733-1722
There'll never be
anotherVice President
like Richard.
Never.
The President made that
promise to himself last
Thursday afternoon, after
Richard blew an important
new-business presentation.
Richard isn't incompetent.
The villain is his lunches, or
rather the too-many drinks he
often has at lunch. Come
afternoon, he's just not as
sharp as he was in the
morning.
Richard is playing dice
with his health. His old-
fashioned business style is
also sabotaging his career.
Today, with competition so
rough and stakes so high, even
the most generous coimpany
can't be patient for long with
an employee whose effectiveness ends at noon.
If you're a friend, do
Richard a favour by reminding
him of the good sense of
moderation.
You can bet the man
eyeing his job won't help
him.
Seagram Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 6,  1979
'Tween classes
TODAY
CHARISMATIC CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Prayer and sharing, noon, SUB 213.
HILLEL HOUSE
Fallafel lunch and Israel film, noon, Hillel House.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Supper,  Jim  Martin  speaks on  Revelation  as
Apocalyptic Literature, 6 p.m., Lutheran Campus Centre.
PRE-MED SOCIETY
Dr. Jack Blanchard lectures on general practice,
noon, IRC 4.
SCIENCE FICTION CLUB
Policy meeting, noon, SUB 216.
BAHA'I CLUB
Informal discussion on the Baha'i Faith, noon,
SUB 113.
AQUASOC
First of two lectures on Marine Life of B.C., 7
p.m., SUB 125.
UBC HUMANITIES ASSOCIATION
Dr. Peter Petro, department of Slavonic studies,
speaks on The Apocalyptic Vision in  Russian
Literature, noon, Buchanan 2238.
CSA
Choir practice, 7:30 p.m.. International House.
Sports  night,   7:30  p.m.,   Thunderbird  Sports
Complex gym B.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
General meeting, noon, SUB 130.
PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVE CLUB OF UBC
General meeting, noon, SUB 119.
WEDNESDAY
UBC SAILING CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 205.
SUS
Dr.   Gary  Clarke  speaks  on   Glacier  Dammed
Lakes in the Yukon, noon, Hennings 201.
ART OF LIVING CLUB
Carl Feagan speaks on biorythms and cycles,
noon, Buchanan 319.
PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Dr. Pinel speaks on New Directions in Animal
Learning, noon, Angus 110.
VARSITY OUTDOOR CLUB
Slide show, noon. Chemistry 250.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Lesbian drop-in, noon, SUB 130.
CENTRE FOR HUMAN SETTLEMENTS
Nova explores mining on the ocean floor,  12
a.m., IRC audio visual library B80.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Girls' floor hockey game, 8:30 p.m., Thunderbird
Winter Sports Complex, gym E.
THURSDAY
AWARDS OFFICE
An awards office representative will be available
to discuss student financial aid, noon, SUB
Speakeasv desk.
AWARDS OFFICE AND
THE WOMEN STUDENTS' OFFICE
Pat Mugridge wil] present a seminar on Making
the Most of Credit, noon, SUB 119,
PRE VET CLUB
Dr. Cooper gives lecture and slide show on
W.C.V.M., noon. McMillan 160.
AQUA-SOC
Last of two lectures on Marine Life of B.C.
Waters, 7 p.m., SUB 125.
CCF
Film: What's Up Josh? noon, SUB 207.
EAST INDIAN STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
General meeting, noon, SUB 117.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Women's drop-in, noon. SUB 130.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Disco dance lesson, 12:45 p.m., SUB 126.
GAV PEOPLE OF UBC
Dr. Jaimie Smith reviews the latest Kinsey report
on homosexualities, noon, SUB 212.
UBC LIBERTARIAN SOCIETY
General meeting on censorship, noon, SUB 224.
UBC NDP CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 215.
FRIDAY
UBC HANG GLIDING CLUB
Meeting and slide show, noon, SUB 111.
ATA
General meeting, noon. Graduate Centre committee room.
GAY PEOPLE OF UBC
Gay valentine disco, 8:30 p.m., Graduate Centre
ballroom.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Women's drop-in, noon, SUB 130.
SAILING CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 205.
SUNDAY
UBC/VRC ROWING TEAMS
UBC/VRC row-a-thon to raise money for equipment and expenses not covered in budget, 7
a!m., start at Vancouver Rowing Club.
PUULIC
228-6121
skaHnc
FRI. & SAT.
7:30 p.m. - 9:45   p.m.
SUNDAY
1:00 — 3:00 p.m.
STUDENTS
& CHILDREN     .75
ADULTS $12S
THUNDERBIRD
WINTER
SPORTS CENTRE
Playing this week—8:30 p.m.:
Tuesday
JAM NIGHT with DON OGILVIE
Wednesday
KANSAS CITY FIVE
Thursday
WESTSIDE FEETWARMERS
FRIDAY
MOM AND POPS
Saturday
PHOENIX JAZZERS
TUES/WED/THURS — FREE for Members
LIVE-NEW ORLEANS JAZZ
36 E. Broadway — 873-4131
_   YEARLY MEMBERSHIPS — $3.00   m
What is Outward Boand?
Outward Bound is a real life adventure. It is ordinary people doing extraordinary things, things that others
only dream about. It's an experience in
concentrated living which lasts three or
four weeks, but can affect you for the rest
of your life.
Outward Bound is the accomplishment you feel relaxing on top of your first
mountain after working so hard to get
there. It's the wonder of nosing your
canoe into a shimmering lake after the
longest portage you've ever imagined, or
bringing your kayak to rest at the end of
the wildest stretch of white water you've
ever seen.
Outward Bound is the joy of sharing
and helping, and of receiving help
yourself. It's experiencing the silence of
wild places and sleeping under the stars.
It's learning to rely on your own mind
and body, muscles and wits, learning to
trust and respect others, and accepting
responsibility yourself. It is a unique
educational experience which leads to*a
new understanding of yourself, your
strengths and limitations. You discover
that most of your limits are self-imposed.
Outward Bound is the simplicity of living with the minimum of equipment in
wild country. It is the discovery of inner
strengths achieved by extending personal limits. It is the joy of finding new
levels of communication with others.
Outward Bound is the chance to find out
who YOU really are.
Outward Bound ... an international
educational movement with over 30
schools on 5 continents. The program
includes mountaineering, kayaking,
mountain rescue and extended mountain
expeditions. 1979 Summer Courses
begin April 30th.
OUTWARD BOUND. 1616 West 7th Ave.,
Vancouver. B.C. V6J 1S5 (604) 733-9104
or 11 Yorkville Ave., 200 Toronto, Ontario M4W 1L3 (416) 9Z2-3321
Please send details of 1979 courses at Outdoor
Bound to.
NAME	
ADDRESS 	
PHONE AGE	
UBC AQUA SOC. and the A.M.S.
PRESENT
NEIL McDANIEL
ON
"THE MARINE LIFE OF
B.C. WATERS"
Feb. 6 and 8, 7:00 p.m.
S.U.B. 125 (N/E Corner of Cafeteria)
ALL WELCOME
No Biology or Scuba exp. necessary
Important Notice to
Graduate Students or
Prospective Graduate
Students for 1979-80
The Awards Office at U.B.C. offers
a number of graduate fellowships for
Master's and Ph.D. students attending U.B.C. Further information can
be obtained from the Department in
which you are or will be studying.
The deadline for receipt of applications is:
FEBRUARY 15, 1979
MON.-WED. FEB. 12-14
"GIRL FRIENDS"
7:30 p.m. and 9:15 p.m.
THURSDAY ONLY - FEB. 15
Gary Guthman Orchestra
in Concert
8:00 p.m.-$6.50
Box office opens 7:00
16th & ARBUTUS, VANCOUVER
738-6311
*
¥i
H
<2
I VALENTINES DAY
*3^» c~>ai)  C7ja.f2.f2.ij     vctLz-ntlnz i.   -L^clu  cuitn
A^kv uou.% fiEXionaL mziiagz
^r  i. Cf/r* ^n oax i-f1£-CLCL'-     vaLzntins.
^fxzztinai. xzction of
tkz   \Ju£.i.aatj  CLaiiifizaA
*WW* FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL
UBYSSEY CLASSIFIED
£ 228-3977
228-
«&€«»*
3977 x
H
Ht»Hc»W«»HC»K«»H«»
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: Student - 3 linns, 1 day $1.50: additional lines 35c.
Commercial - 3 lines, 1 day $2.75; additional lines 50c. Additional days $2.50 and 45c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in advance.
Deadline is 11:30 a m., the day before publication.
Publications Office. Room 241. S.U.B., UBC. Van., B.C. V6T 1W5.
9 — Coming Events
Commedia dell'Arte anyone?
Vancouver Little Theatre Association
presents the comedy
A COMPANY OF WAYWARD SAINTS
By George Herman
Feb. 7-24. Wed.-Sat., 8:30
METRO THEATRE. 1370 S.W. Marine Drive
Students $2.50. Info: 266-7191. 731-1516
Preview: Wed. Feb. 7—Pay as you can.
10 — For Solo — Commercial
Save On
STEREO REPAIRS
20% off labour. Cost + 5% on parts
with this ad. For simple repairs or
cleaning try our popular self-service
$3-$5 hour (by appointment).
Counter hours: Mon.-Thurs. 4
p.m.-8 p.m.
APCO
3-2414 Main St. (2nd floor)
872-3150
35-Lost
ATTENTION Fit Patrons. Have a heartl
Whoever found or "borrowed" a
brown Irish tweed hart size 7 on Thursday night at the Pit, PLEASE return
it. It has great sentimental value.
Jackie  224^0346.
AGGIE Sweater. Lost in FIT Jan. 29.
Rewarl offered. No questions asked.
Knut  224-1739.
40 — Message*
11 — For Sale — Private
FOR SALE: 1 pr. Sarmer "Vision" skis,
190 cm; Look bindings, 1 pr. Kasting-
er boots, size 11; 11 mos. old. Phone
Ted at 433-0352 after 6.
1*M "BUG". Well cared for, $1,150.
Mark,  683-6911.
COMMUNITY SPORTS — Excellent
prices for ice skates, hockey, soccer,
jogging and racquet sports equipment. 7331612. 3615 West Broadway,
Vancouver, B.C.
20 — Housing
AVAILABLE Immediately. Single and
double rooms. S125 mt. and 150 mt.
Kitchen facilities. Priority to 1st
and 2nd yr. students. After 5 ask
for Greg  or  Mike.   224-9679.
w
f
v
31.
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THIS •
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Tuesday, Feb. 13th JW
SPECIAL RATES ;£
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Deadline ^^
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FEB. 13th ■■
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70 — Services
REWRITING SERVICES
Professors and Students: Improve the
Quality of Your Prose, the Structure
of Your Paper and the Soundness of
your Reasoning,
My editing and rewriting services will do all of
these things for you. I will corret your spelling,
punctuation and grammar, suggest ways to
reorganize your paper, to re-structure your
paragraphs and to rewrite your sentences, and I
will evaluate the clarity and validity of your
arguments.
My qualifications include a Ph.D. in philosophy
and extensive writing, rewriting and editing experience.
Technical Work Welcome.
733-5294
LEARN French in France. Get sure results with total immersion method.
Native instructors. For complete information meet Thursday, Feb. 8, Bu.
230,  12:30.
ART HARTVIK happy belated birthday
Dec.5, '78. As you cross each truss,
take care, love Penelope.
60-Rides
WANTEDI Side to Tsawwassen ferry
terminal on Fridays, in time to catch
the 5:00 p.m. ferry to Victoria. I'll
pay for gas, plus. Call Janert 736-1838
evenings.
mane rmz
COSMETIOUE
TREAT YOURSELF
MID-WINTER SPECIAL
20% off on Facials
3820 OAK ST
733-1911
85 — Typing
65 — Scandals
25 — Instruction
PIANO and Theory tuition for Grades
1-10 and A.RC.T. by Graduate of
Musikhochschule Frankfurt, Germany.  Westend. 6 2-4141   or 682-7991.
CAR ACCIDENT Monday, Ian. 90, 12:45.
Yellow V.W. Conv. / brown Olds."?
Meter parking at Armouries, would
lady involved please call me or notify
I.C.B.C. I need your I.D. to claim
against my insurance. Anyone with
any info,  call B.  McDonald, 738-3301.
EVER WONDERED what lurks in our
Oceans? If so come see Neil McDamiel
Feb. 6 & 8, 7:00 p.m. in Sub 125. No
Biology or scuba experience needed.
Sponsored by Aqua-Soc & AMS.
FAST accurate essays, theses. Campus
pickup / delivery. 263-8506, evenings,
weekends.
TYPING—Fast and accurate. IBM Selectric. Please caH Susan after 6,-00 p.m
736-1544.
TYPINO — 75c per pace. Fast aad accurate by experienced typist. Gordon,
685-4863.
TYPING: Essays, theses, manuscripts,
reports, etc. Fast and accurate atr-
viae. Bilingual. Clemy 324-9414.
FAST     efficient     typing.     Reasonable
rates.  266-5053.
FOR  ACCURATE   TYPING  on   an   IBM
Selectric Correcting Typewriter, call
936-2577 after 2:00 p.m. Rush wit
accepted.
90 - Wanted
99 — Miscellaneous
SKI   WHISTLER
Rent   cabin   day/week   732-0174 Tuesday,  February 6,   1979
Ice 'Birds rally,
split with Dinos
The Thunderbird ice hockey
team won and lost on the weekend
in a rough series against University
of Calgary at Thunderbird Winter
Sports Centre.
Friday night UBC lost 6-3 but
they rebounded Saturday to take a
6-4 decision in overtime. The win
left the 'Birds alone in third place in
the Canada West standings.
Friday night UBC failed to take
advantage of numerous Calgary
penalties, especially in the third
period. Calgary had 65 minutes in
penalties to UBC's 23, but had little
Pleez rite
norts spews
Maybe it's the relief of knowing
that at last a written submission of
yours at this university won't come
back with a low second-class mark
and the cryptic command, "Quote
my book more often."
Possibly the attraction is the
thrill of competition, the agony of
defeat, the greatness of victory, the
fleeting rewards of fame, the fickle
finger of fate, and the satisfaction
of knowing you have just written an
article with more cliches than the
last one by Tom Hawthorn.
For some, it will be the closeness
that develops between themselves
and the players. For others, it will
be the distance that emerges between themselves and their books.
One or two will just want to get
close to the nerve centre of
Canada's finest student newspaper.
Another will just want to get close
to the beer fridge.
Somebody out there sees a bright
future in journalism. Another sees
a free ticket to next year's Shrum
Bowl.
Whatever the reason, at least 10
of you are going to walk into SUB
24 IK at noon some day this week
and announce that you have come
to write sports.
Uncle Kevin wants you.  Now.
HOLLYWOOD
3123 W.Broadway 738-3211
George Segal Richard Widmark
Henry Fonda in
"ROLLER COASTER" 9:30
plus
Richard Burton, Lee Remick in
"MEDUSA TOUCH" 7:30
difficulty holding off the 'Birds
power play. Twice in the third
period Calgary was two men short,
but UBC was unable to mount any
attack.
UBC opened up a 2-0 lead in the
first period on goals by Frank
Gorringe and Gilles Grenier, but
Calgary had tied it before the
period was over. Two Dinosaur
goals in the second period put the
game out of reach, and Calgary
goals bracketed Jim McLaughlin's
marker in the third to round out the
scoring.
Saturday's game was less
physical and more pleasing to UBC
fans as Gorringe scored with less
than two minutes left in overtime to
give the 'Birds the win.
CANADA WEST
UNIVERSITY
ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION
Men's Hockey Standings
GP W       L
Alberta 'Bears   16   15      1
Calgary D'saurs 18   10     8
UBC T'Birds      16     5    11
Sask. Huskies     18     4   14
Pts.
30
20
10
8
A power play goal by Rob Jones
gave UBC a 1-0 lead after one
period, but the Dinosaurs notched
two in the second to take the lead.
Terry Shykora tied it 25 seconds
into the third period, and Paul
Carson restored UBC's lead three
minutes later. Calgary tied it, McLaughlin put the 'Birds ahead, and
Calgary tied it again to set the stage
for Gorringe's heroics in overtime.
Jones added his second goal of the
night into an empty net with two
seconds left.
The Thunderbirds will play the
B.C. winter games team Thursday
night at 7:30 before leaving for Edmonton for a weekend series with
league-leading University of
Alberta.
Feb. 11-18
Al Pacino in
"DOG DAY AFTERNOON" 9:15
Mature: coarse language
plus
Mick Jagger in
"PERFORMANCE" 7:30
Restricted
Adults and Students $2.00
In response to the
January 30th "Letter
to the Editor" of
Jeremy Thornburg:
... oh?!?
... (burp)
The Zeta Zeta Chapter
of PSI UPSILON.
[\Col. Sandus had absolutely nothing to do with
THIS MOVIE IS TOTALLY
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THE      UBYSSEY
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THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  February  6,   1979
Hockey 'Birdettes burn Burnaby 'B's
By TOM HAWTHORN
The Thunderette hockey team
demolished Burnaby "B" 11-1 in
action Sunday at the Thunderbird
Winter Sports Centre.
UBC's Diane Abbott led the
way for the inspired Thunderettes, pumping four goals past bewildered Burnaby goaltender
Lorraine Dickey.
The Thunderettes jumped to an
early 2-1 lead after one period,
and matched their goals in the
second period to make the score 4-
1.
But it was in the third period
that the door fell in for Burnaby,
as wave upon wave of UBC attackers    marched    unscathed
toward the Burnaby net. If not for
the agile acrobatics of goalie
Dickey, the Thunderettes may
well have doubled their own
totals.
The victory leaves UBC in
seventh place in the Lower Mainland Girls' Ice Hockey League,
but a home and away series with
Killarney could notch them one
spot higher in the standings.
UBC coach Jim McMillan says
the Thunderettes have an excellent
chance of becoming the best team
in the second tier, and added that
he expects the team will be able to
come off Sunday's victory to beat
Killarney twice.
They are currently three points
behind Killarney, while their only
other regular season game is
scheduled against Newton.
The Thunderettes are out of the
playoffs, as only the top four
teams of the 10-member league
are eligible, but the remaining six
teams battle to determine the best
team in the second group.
The Thunderettes outhustled
and outskated a clearly inferior
Burnaby team in the mismatched
outing. Burnaby's defence played
hide and seek with UBC's rushing
forwards as they skated through,
around and behind a defence
which was clearly out to lunch.
Despite having to fish 11 pucks
out from the net behind her,
Burnaby's Dickey came up with a
number of spectacular saves.
Louise Tenisci and Anne
Stevens notched two goals apiece,
while Darce Lazzarin, Brenda
Donas and Kim Hudson scored
single markers to round out
UBC's scoring.
Danyele Leroux scored Bur-
naby's lone tally midway through
the first period.
The 14 spectators were treated
by an amazing performance by
UBC's Abbott, as each of her
four goals surpassed her other
attempts in excitement. Her final
goal was the result of a quick
break down the right sideboards
with an incredible deke around
Dickey.
Abbott   was   near   the   puck
throughout the game, and almost
scored five as she nicked the post
in a wild third-period scramble in
front of the Burnaby net.
The Thunderettes also showed a
remarkable ability to rush the
puck out of their own end. Time
after time, the Burnaby defence
faced three on two and three or
one breaks.
Thunderette goalkeeper Kathleen Corbett was hardly tested,
but the single Burnaby tally kept
UBC's goals against total down to
two in their last two home games.
Saturday UBC lost to second-
place Burnaby "A" 3-1 at Burnaby Lake Arena. Stephens had the
lone UBC goal. j
SPORTS
— ross burnett photo
GOING OFF DEEP end in fine style, Thunderette diver Sue Goad managed first place in one-metre diving Saturday in exhibition met with University of Victoria at new Aquatic Centre. Things will be tougher at Canada West
meet at UBC over midterm break, when she won't be only competitor.
»¥■»•
Bird Droppings
The Thunderbird rugby team had
to travel to Victoria to find a field
in playable condition for their
international match against Sydney
University of Australia last Thursday, which they won 21-7.
UBC played well despite the
weather-imposed layoff, and
dominated the game in the second
half. Sydney scored first but UBC
got tries from Dave Whyte and Rob
Greig, as well as a Preston Wiley
penalty goal and a Whyte convert,
to lead 13-7 at the half. Greig and
John Olesen had tries in the second
half to round out the scoring.
Bill Collins played well in his first
game in four months. He replaced
flanker Ken Harder who was
seriously injured in a car accident
during Christmas. Harder, a
medical student, is back at classes
with the help of a back brace.
If the mild weather holds the
'Birds will play Ex-Brittania at
Clinton Park Saturday at 2:30 p.m.
Three UBC wrestlers won titles at
the B.C. wrestling championships
held at the Osborne Centre last
weekend. Wayne Yeasting won the
114 lb. division, while Martin
Gleave took the 136 lb. class and
Lee Blanchard the 163 lb. section.
UBC's basketball teams lost
three of four games in Edmonton
last weekend in their continuing
quest for last place. The 'Birds split
with University of Alberta, losing
88-67 Friday and winning 79-75
Saturday. The Thunderettes
dropped both games, 80-48 and 95-
61. This weekend both teams play
in Saskatchewan.
*      *      *
The soccer Thunderbirds will
finally start their Pacific Northwest
Soccer League home schedule this
weekend if the weather co-operates.
They are hoping to meet Pegasus at
Thunderbird Stadium Saturday at
2:00 p.m.
This week's televised sports
special in the Pit wil! feature Saturday night's men's ice hockey victory
over Calgary. Next week selected
matches from last weekend's
volleyball tournament will be
shown, including the Thunderettes'
five-game match against Victoria.
Game time is 7:30 p.m. each
Thursday.
University of Puget Sound swim
coach Don Duncan was overwhelmed with the new UBC
Aquatic Centre but not with the
UBC swim team as UPS blasted the
Thunderbirds 78-34 in a men's dual
meet last weekend. Duncan, in his
25th year as coach of the perennial
NCAA Division II powerhouse,
said the facility was the finest he
had ever seen. Paul Hughes in the
200-metre individual medley and
Don Lieberman in the one- and
three-metre diving were the only
UBC winners.
Thunderette
volley fails
By KEVIN FINNEGAN
Defending national volleyball
champions UBC Thunderettes find
they must win the final Canada
West tournament in Saskatoon
Feb.23-24 after losing a marathon
two and one-half hour match to
University of Saskatchewan in the
UBC tourney last weekend.
The Huskiettes lead UBC by one-
quarter of a point following two
tournaments in the series that will
decide the western representative in
the national championships. UBC
has won the national university
tournament for the past two years.
Both UBC and U of S had won
all their matches before meeting
each other in the last round of the
tournament before 200 fans in
War Memorial Gym. The Thunderettes won the first game 15-8 before
dropping two in a row, 11-15 and
15-17, setting the stage for the
cliffhanger fourth game. Down 12-
14 and facing match point, UBC
rallied to tie the game 14-14. The
teams exchanged serves 10 times
before UBC was able to score and
eventually win 17-15.
Saskatchewan, which substituted
freely during the match, finished
strongly in the fifth game to win 15-
12 and finish first in the tournament.  UBC's   six  starters  played
most of the match and were visibly
tiring as 11 p.m. came closer.
The Thunderettes had difficulty
throughout the match handling
spikes from the taller Saskatchewan
women, and only Chris Trainor and
Liz Vidoni had success spiking
through the imposing blocks of the
Huskiettes. UBC will have to overcome this disadvantage if they are
to win in Saskatoon.
The men's tournament, which
ran concurrently, supplied no such
excitement as Saskatchewan rolled
to its ninth straight tournament win
and virtually clinched the national
berth. The rebuilding Thunderbirds
won only one game in four matches
and are last in Canada West
standings.
Fortunately it won't be necessary
to travel to Saskatchewan to see
volleyball as exciting as the meagre
but enthusiastic crowd witnessed
Saturday night.
Friday and Saturday the
Thunderettes host an invitational
tournament at Memorial Gym and
one of the guests will be the Old
Time Ladies, who have recently defeated the Thunderettes twice in
tournament finals. The competition
will be round-robin, with the final
game Saturday at 7 p.m.
Curses, foil again
If a sabre is a hockey player in
Buffalo, what is an epee or a foil?
For the answer to this and other
exciting questions, attend the
Stephen Lazar memorial fencing
tournament this weekend at the
Osborne Centre, where the UBC
fencing club is sponsoring their
seventh annual tourney.
Men's and women's foil competitions will be held Saturday, with
men's epee and sabre on Sunday.
This is considered a major tournament, with fencers from B.C.,
Washington and Oregon in attendance.
The tournament is named after
former UBC fencing coach Stephen
Lazar, who was killed in a car accident in 1972. Lazar had been a
fencer in the elite Hungarian army
corps before fleeing his home country in 1956.
UBC fencing club president
Marianne Mortensen said about 40
members train under coach Bac
Tau-Hi, although not all of them
participate in competitions. Since
the demise of intercollegiate fencing
three years ago, the team has been
restricted to local and American
meets.
Foil,    the   traditional   fencing
weapon, has a target area of the torso and crotch and is scored electrically. Complicated right-of-way
rules make it a mental as well as
physical challenge.
The epee, a heavier weapon
which uses the entire body as a
target, is also scored electrically
while the sabre, a calvary sword
that is aimed above the waist, is still
scored manually, because the edges
as well as the point of the blade are
used.
Mortensen said it was "only prejudice" that kept women from fencing all three events, and that sabre
was considered "too vicious" for
ladies.
She said that due to the mental
aspect of the sport, fencers did not
reach their peak until their mid-
thirties. Fencing strategy is so complicated it has often been compared
to chess.
Five UBC fencers will be representing B.C. in the Canada Winter
Games in Brandon, Manitoba
February 17-24. Jane Milton,
Frances Sloan and Mortensen will
comprise the women's foil team
while Rob Margolis is entered in
men's sabre and Craig Bowlsby is
men's foil.

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