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The Ubyssey Feb 3, 1987

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THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXIX, No. 34
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, February 3,1987
®..<ig!gx*
228-2301
Athletic fee increase deferred
By SVETOZAR KONTIC
The UBC administration's proposal to raise the student athletic
fee levy has been put on hold indefinitely, said the vice-president of
student and academic services.
K. D. Srivastava"said the athletic
fee, which was to increase by $5.50
per student this fall, is presently
under review. He said a newly-
formed committee which will report
to president David Strangway will
conduct an investigation of UBC's
athletic department and submit a
report by March 31.
Martin Cocking, Alma Mater
Society director of administration,
welcomed Strangway's decision to
form the committee, saying it is an
"extremely positive step forward
and long overdue."
"After two years of bungling and
goofing around with the University
Athletic Council, it finally looks
like we'll get some action," he said.
Cocking said the Athletic Department should have been putting
money into the facility development
reserve for the purpose of building
new student use facilities, but instead has used the money for covering over expenditures.
"It's hard to support increases in
fees when there is no increase in services," he said. "In fact, there has
been a decrease in services."
The President's Review Committee On Athletics will consist of five
or six members selected from the
student body, alumni, and faculty
members not directly linked with
the athletics department. It will
establish what the priorities of the
athletic department are and will
look for suggestions on how those
priorities will work.
Four areas will be examined:
• The administrative and management structure of Athletics
• The relationship between Athletics and the School of Physical
Education and Recreation
• The interelationship between the
various athletic and sports programs, including procedures for
establishing priorities
• The operation and role of the
Athletics Council and the Men's
and Women's Athletic Committees
Srivastava said the role of the
athletic department will be examined closely by the president's committee. He said the UAC was set up
as an advisory committee, and that
"management must rest with the
people whose full time job it is to
manage."
"The UAC does not have a
management role," he said.
The committee is not expected to
outline in full the priorities of the
athletics department in the short
space of two months, according to
Srivastava, but it will review iu
structure.
Canada's refugee laws must change
By ALLISON FELKER
Canada must change its
repressive refugee laws if it wants to
retain its international
humanitarian status, the Refugee
Co-ordinator for Amnesty International said Thursday.
"There is a continuing media
campaign promoting prejudice
towards refugees," Francis McQueen told a small group of UBC
students in SUB 211.
She   said   some   refugees   are
chosen for their ability to assimilate
into Canadian culture rather than
the threat of persecution they face
at home.
Entrepreneurs who can invest at
least $100,000 into the Canadian
economy stand a better chance of
gaining refugee status than applicants without cash.
"Canada is trying to bring in the
economic cream of the crop; meanwhile, 200 Afghans are waiting for
refugee status," McQueen said.
Students defeat proposal
By EVELYN JACOB
UBC students defeated a proposal to ban the sale of South-
African linked products in SUB in
last week's Alma Mater Society
elections.
Only 12.2 per cent of UBC's
27,000 students turned out to vote
on the referendum last Wednesday,
Thursday and Friday, which would
have affected the sale of Carling
O'Keefe and Rothmans products.
Official results Monday showed
1,951 votes opposed the ban, while
1,366 supported it. The required 10
per cent quorum was not reached.
Student senator Kirk Hancock,
who has worked against the ban
since 1979, said the results indicate
that students realize the connection
between Carling O'Keefe products
and South Africa is tenuous.
"Somewhere along the line there
may be a South-African
shareholder, but attacking him or
her would not be effective," said
Hancock.
He said the federal government
should be lobbied to fight apartheid, which he says he condemns.
John Dafoe, a member of
Students for a Free Southern
Africa, said Monday the referendum was confusing because it relied
too heavily on the question of Carling O'Keefe and its ties with South
Africa than with apartheid in
general.
"It (the referendum) turned out
to be counting corporation directors on the head of a pin," he said.
Although disappointed with the
results, Dafoe said it doesn't mean
that students wouldn't support
divestment.
About 83 ballots were disqualified from a polling station in
the civil and chemical engineering
building, the AMS elections commissioner reported Monday.
Michael Skene said Wednesday's
votes were discounted after a group
of engineers moved ballot boxes
from an official polling station to
the Frank Howard building.
He said SFSA alleged a pollster at
the same station advised students to
vote against the referendum. But
Skene said evidence did not support
the charge.
Under the 1951 United Nations
Convention for the Status of
Refugees, which Canada ratified in
1967, individuals are eligible for
refugee status if they have a well-
founded fear of persecution based
on their race, religion, or social
status.
To claim refugee status, an individual must apply to a Canadian
embassy outside of the country of
their nationality, through the sponsorship of a relative or organization
or from within Canada.
Despite these options, McQueen
says, becoming a refugee is not so
simple. She says it is often impossible for someone to leave his or her
native country.
"Whether or not a person
receives refugee status is largely up
to the discretion of the immigration
officer," McQueen said.
She cited the example of a
12-year-old boy with two broken
arms who was refused refugee
status because the immigration
judges did not believe he could be
subject to torture.
"There is a certain amount of incredulity in the system."
The general public as well as the
immigration officials must change
their view on refugees, because
unlike immigrants, they do not
want to be in Canada, said McQueen.
"Refugees are people who want
to be home because they have
strong patriotic ties with their country. These are people who have put
their lives on the line," she said.
Nevraumont voted new AMS president
By SCOT MacDONALD
Students voted in former Alma
Mater Society vice president Rebecca Nevraumont to serve as AMS
president for 1987-88.
Nevraumont defeated her only
other competitor, Blair T. Longley
by more than 500 votes in last
week's elections. Nevraumont
garnered 1,737 votes while Longley
got 1,234.
Of the five council positions up
for grabs, the vice presidency was
the closest race. It was won by Jody
Woodland with 1,080 votes over
Don Mustard's 948 and Carol
Pedlar's 744.
Tim Bird with 1,515 votes,
defeated Nindy Duggal with 1,121
votes for the position of director of
administration. Coordinator of external affairs was a four way race
with Caroline Rigg coming out on
top with 1,063 votes. Michael Moeti
came next with 803 votes while
Craig Lindsay got 574 votes and
Brett Clippingdale 511 votes.
Don Isaak will be the new director of finance after he received
1,288 votes to defeat Garth Miller's
1,014 votes, and Brad Craig's 344
votes.
Nevraumont said she "encourages anyone and everyone with
a bitch or a complaint to come see
her during the first three weeks of
her term to express their complaints
and annoyances so she knows what
they want.
Nevraument said students should
have more influence on how their
athletic fee levy is spent.
"Students fund the program to a
considerable degree," she said. "I
want to know what students want
out of athletics, varsity, Rec UBC
and intramurals. I'll take the information to the UBC athletics council
and have them adjust their
priorities."
Nevraumont wants to "assess"
AMS business practices and funnel
money out of the businesses and into students clubs and organizations.
She urges students to knock on
her door with their gripes.
"If students do not see me, I will
not know what they want. Students
should get involved at some level
beyond scholastics."
-•-i ■**-* ***** "~ Malcolm Pearson photo
THREE SAILING SWEETHEARTS, Charmine C, Skeena A, and Skidgate, snuggle up closely as they break for tea for three. The cuties trade barnacles and clams during aquatic interlude. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 3, 1987
Canada can cancel cruise
By JAMES YOUNG
Canadian University Press
Canada should cancel cruise
missile testing in response to the
U.S. violation of the 1979 strategic
arms treaty, says a political scientist
at UBC.
"Our attitude should be to suspend cruise missile testing, at the
very least as long as the policy of
SALT II break-out continues,"
professor Michael Wallace told
students at UBC recently.
The U.S. violated the strategic
arms limitations treaty Nov. 29,
when the 131st B-52 bomber,
modifed to carry air-launched
cruise missiles was deployed in
Texas. Canada has tested the cruise
each spring since 1984, and the
government is expected to announce this year's first test in the
near future.
Noting the missile's part in the
treaty breakdown, Wallace said
SALT II was "the one thing which
maintains offensive strategic stability .. . and therefore we cannot be
seen to be involved in its dissolution."
SALT II, signed by U.S. president Jimmy Carter and Soviet
leader Leonid Brezhnev, but left
unratified by the American senate,
was commonly regarded as one of
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agreements to date. But Wallace
assessed the initial significance of
the breakdown as symbolic.
"It was done to appease the
radical American right, rather than
as a substantive military gesture,"
he said.
He later explained that a Pentagon decision to refit aging
Poseidon I submarines, instead of
dismantling them also contributed
to the treaty breakdown.
Wallace criticized Canada's will
ingness to comply with Reagan administration strategies, but said a
more independent Canadian
foreign policy was unlikely, given
the Mulroney government's overwhelming desire for a free trade
agreement.
Quoting an unidentified official
in external affairs, Wallace said:
"The Canadian government wants
to play ball with the Americans all
the time. But we learned a long time
ago that if you play ball with the
Americans, all you get is a bat up
the ass."
Show your support for UBC's very own
RICK HANSEN.
Man in MotionWorldTour Bfe
mi^-y
Friday
February
6th
12
: 35 pm
S.U.B. Plaza
)
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All donations collected go to the
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Hours: Mon.-Fri.
8:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m.
Sat. 10 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
Telephone 224-1911
Visa & Mastercharge
Accepted
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wes starting to take «s effect. Vet another Doobie Brothers special flooded Into the room. The Wicked
Witch of the West was threatening die lives of the cteeins of the dark. The damp mapper of electrical
rooms was having arguments with himself. In snort my apologies: remember what die Dormouse said.
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Administration intimidates staff
WATERLOO (CUP) —
Custodial staff at the University of
Waterloo claim they are intimidated
and punished by university
management if they complain about
unfair promotions and hiring practices.
Custodian Toncka Bestic filed a
complaint with the Ontario Human
Rights Commission after supervisor
Denis Mustin told her she should
not apply for a higher paying "CI"
custodian job. If she did, she was
told, then "all the women would try
to apply".
Mustin denies he discouraged
anyone from applying.
Although afraid of retaliation if
she complained, Bestic finally
decided to take action after being
passed up twice for the job.
"I have eight years seniority.
How come they  promote people
who have been here for only a few
months when I have an excellent
work record?" she -said. "It's
because I'm a woman, and they
don't want to give the women who
work at the custodian jobs the CI
jobs. It's considered a man's job."
According to Director of Personnel Lloyd Brown, "It's just simple
statistics. The men are bigger and
stronger than the women so the
women take the lighter jobs."
The CI job entails polishing
floors with a machine, lifting bags
of garbage, and occasionally climbing ladders. Otherwise, the job is
identical to any other. CI custodians Gordon Klein and Hernan
Crespo say they don't believe their
job is harder than C2 jobs.
Although university custodians
belong to the Canadian Union of
Public  Employees  (CUPE)  Local
793, many find the union is ineffective and "married to
management". About 385 custodians, groundskeepers and food
services employees belong to Local
793.
The average age of university
custodians is 59. "It is a long six
years to retirement. At their age,
where would they get a job if they
try to stand up for their rights, but
get terminated instead?" said Klein,
a former union president.
Many custodians claim that
employees who speak out against
management are likely to find
themselves moved to a "punishment floor", or a floor which is
much harder to keep clean than
others.
Management vehemently denied
that assigning people to certain
floors is used as a punitive measure.
Mustin said workloads are supposed to be balanced, but "in practice
we're aware that they're not. I've
heard this expressed before, but
these are no punishment floors."
But Elke Schummer, a CI custodian who claims she was discouraged from applying by management,
was moved to a harder floor after
her promotion.
"They're trying to break me,"
she said. "They're hoping it will do
me in and then they'll say to me,
'See? A woman can't handle this
job', but I'm going to stick it out."
Klein said promotions are given
not on the basis of competence, but
by either seniority or "whether oi
not the employee is a friend of the
foreman.''
Tax removal sought
Editors fired over caption
WINNIPEG (CUP) — Two editors
of the University of Manitoba student newspaper were fired after 100
angry students stormed its office to
protest a controversial front-page
photo caption.
A caption underneath a
photograph of Rick Hansen on the
Jan. 22 edition of The Manitoban
read: "Hansen, fuck, again on the
cover."
"It's like putting 'slut' under the
Queen's picture," said Wanda Felt,
the Students' Architecture Society
representative on the University of
Manitoba Students' Union.
The SAS, which sponsored a
Man in Motion rally at the university earlier that week, organized a occupation of Manitoban offices the
day the paper was published. Its
members collected and burned
9,000 of 12,000 copies circulated.
"We worked hard organizing
Rick Hansen events on campus,"
said SAS member Margaret White.
Students called "sickos"
WINNIPEG (CUP) — Ten University of Winnipeg students were
labelled "fucking sickos" before
being recently ejected from a local
nightclub.
A man who later identified
himself as an employee of the
DeSotto's club objected when two
women of the university group
started to hold hands. He called
members of the group "fucking
sickos" and monitored the
students' actions throughout the
evening.
He later returned with a bouncer
to demand indentification of the
two women. They were singled out
and asked to leave. A third
employee told the group other
patons were complaining about
"touching and feeling" as well as
"irresponsbile behaviour" at the
table.
"How could there be various
complaints about touching and feeling?" asked Collen Funk, one of
the students. "There was no
touching and feeling going on and
he would be the one around to see if
there were."
"The treatment we received was
unnecessary, unsubstantiated and
overbearing," said Shianne Veeder,
another student. "It was
humiliating to be treated like that
when we hadn't done anything at
all."
The group is contemplating legal
action against the club.
This incident follows separate
ones in December in which two
black men were barred from
another Winnipeg nightclub.
"One word destroyed everything we
did."
The editorial collective of The
Manitoban apologized to Hansen
and its readers in a press conference
Jan. 26.
"The caption was irresponsible.
There was no excuse," said John
Ehinger, a Manitoban news coordinator.
"The caption was never intended
as an attack on Mr. Hansen," he
said. "It was intended as a criticism
of the media. The word 'fuck' was
never needed to state that point."
The Manitoban voted to suspend
three staff members who worked on
the issue. However, the paper's
publishing board, The Manitoban
Operations Committee (MOC),
later fired Ehinger and fellow news
coordinator Michael Malegus.
The Manitoban collective voted
to fight the firings on grounds of
editorial self-determination.
Pegi Hayes, regional Hansen
events organizer, had called for an
advertising boycott of the paper but
later said she "overreacted."
"The caption didn't show much
maturity," said Hayes, "but the articles on Rick are very good."
Other Hansen organizers said
they considered the incident "a
prank" and thought the caption
was "hilarious." Hansen himself
has refused comment on the issue.
OTTAWA (CUP) — The Canadian
book trade has won some concessions from the federal government,
but is still campaigning for removal
of a 10 per cent tax on many imported English-language books and
magazines.
The Mulroney government introduced the tariff in retaliation to
a U.S. tax on Canadian cedar
shakes and shingles, while threatening to place further restrictions on
publishers and distributors.
Marcia George of the Association
of Canadian Publishers, one of
four publishing organizations to
organize the Don't Tax Reading
campaign, said her industry cannot
afford to stand aside, dumbfounded by the government's retaliatory
tactics.
"We still don't understand the
tariff. These are completely
unrelated industries, and it's hurting us, not (the U.S.)," George
said.
However, George's industry-wide
coalition is worried that Canada
will debate cultural products with
U.S. officials during free trade
negotiations.
"By putting the tariff on the
books, they have all but guaranteed
that cultural industries will be on
the table," George said. "Our
government has to see that these
products are not negotiable. Recordings, books and films ar already
heavily dominated by the
Americans."
Students and faculty are not
greatly affected by the tariff, as all
approved curriculum books, books
imported by libraries, and books on
the hard sciences are exempt of the
tax.
"We don't perceive a great threat
to the university community," said
Vic Sim of the Canadian Association of University Teachers, which
sympathizes   with   the   book   in
dustry, but hasn't included the issue
on its current lobby agenda.
However, George said students
and faculty, as heavy readers are
bound to lose because of the tariff.
"We're all beginning to realize how
seriously we are affected by an increase in the cost of books," she
said, adding universities were
especially helpful in the Don't Tax
Reading postcard campaign.
Accused friend
The UBC graduate student charged with second degree murder
January 23 was "a friend" of the
victim, said a researcher in Family
and Nutritional Sciences.
Vivekano Amhadeo said he had
lunch with Zeron Seyoum and Ming
Trang Nguyen the day before the
murder.
"We had lunch in SUB and the
two men were joking around. The
event went smoothly," he said.
Nguyen was stabbed several times
on the fourth floor of the Old
Chemistry building and later pronounced dead at Health Sciences
Centre Hospital.
Seyoum, a fellow graduate student and co-worker of Nguyen, was
arrested shortly after the stabbing
and charged with murder.
Campus police later found a butcher knife believed to be the murder
weapon.
Richard Pincock, the chemistry
professor who hired Nguyen,
described the murder as "unbelievable."
"There was no difficulty before,
no argument between these guys,"
he said.
"They had no political discussions; Trang had his family, and his
main concern was work," said Pin-
cock.
Seyoum's second court appearance is February 26. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 3, 1987
Un sweet
Some students are blessed with parents prepared to finance their educations while they live at home. At the other end of the economic scale, some
students are left scrounging for living space wherever they can find it. For
many students, this means living in the basement of someone else's home.
In most parts of Vancouver, these suites are illegal, but largely ignored by
civic authorities.
Now City Council wants to crack down on the "problem," exhibiting
deep compassion for those who so live by saying they will not evict any
current tennants, but try to prevent new illegal suites in new or existing
housing.
How do they plan to do this? Search everybody's house on an annual
basis? Encourage neighbours to spy?
City Council is showing itself to be shamefully out of touch. As with
Sunday shopping, Vancouver residents have indicated that they are
prepared to tolerate illegal suites. A crack-down would force many otherwise law-abiding homeowners (and civic voters) into court.
The fact of illegal suites points to a much larger problem than bitching
neighbours bereating council. Vancouver, like most urban centres, faces a
critical shortage of affordable housing. In a city which contains a number
of post-secondary education institutions this problem is especially critical.
City Council should take some leadership here, and show that it wants
Vancouver to continue to be a learning centre by developing low-cost
housing all over the city. The symptom will disappear when the disease is
eradicated.
Meanwhile, on the subject of an illegal suite crackdown, City Council
should (and will) go back to sleep.
Welcome io the smallest illegal suite in
ity.
Letters
With friends like Hiebert, who needs foes?
This letter is in response to all the
Muriel Hieberts out there. This
woman wrote a letter on Jan. 30th
saying that a friend of hers was having an abortion and that she could
not condone the murder. A friend?
When a woman decides to have
an abortion it is not a decision that
she makes lightly. It is also one she
will have to live with for the rest of
her life. A friend would not cry
murderer but let that person know
you are there and care for them.
Dear God, a decision made like
this is not like trying to decide if
you think you should have Shred-
dies or Corn Flakes for breakfast!
Why do anti-abortionists constantly
infer that a woman who makes such
a decision is nothing but irresponsi-
Hansen needs our help
bie and against life?
Why are women considered
responsible enough to bear
children, to care for them, but not
to make the choice not to have one?
Have you ever thought that not
having a child may be a more
responsible decision for some?
This propaganda that pro-choice
people are either extreme radicals or
absolute monsters is exactly that:
propaganda.
I am amazed at these people who
sit in judgement — look around you
please. Look at your mother, sister,
grandmother, lover. More than
likely someone you know and love
has had an abortion. These are
women sitting next to you in your
classes, women who care for you,
women who love you!
Unfortunately you will never
know what that women feels, how it
affected her or how it will affect the
rest of her life. A friend? When a
woman makes a decision to have an
abortion the decision is hers, she is
the one that lives with it. She doesn't
need guilt trips or judgements
thrown at them.
Try a taste of understanding and
caring instead of hate-filled accusations — you may learn what friendship and love is all about!!!
Tammy Anne Soper
arts 4
Rick Hansen, UBC graduate, and
wheelchair athlete extraordinaire is
finally on the home stretch of his
worldwide Man in Motion Tour.
The tour started in March of 1985,
and so far has raised many
thousands of dollars for spinal cord
research.
Rick is currently on the road out
of Winnipeg, Manitoba, after battling the harsh prairie cold, and a flu
virus the past few weeks. Hopefully
the icy temperatures will climb as he
moves farther west.
In Vancouver, Rick's arrival is
eagerly anticipated, but while we
wait, there is more that can be done
All letters must be brief and typed
on a triple-spaced, 70-character
line. They must be delivered in person with identification shown by
4:30 p.m. the day before publication to The Ubyssey office, SUB
241k.
The Ubyssey reserves the right to
edit for brevity, spelling and grammar, and libel. Sexist, racist, and
homophobic letters will not run. If
you have any questions or comments, or just want to shoot the
breeze, drop by SUB 241k, or call
us at 228-2301/05.
to further the current success of the
tour. In order to contribute to
Rick's cause, UBC Intramurals and
Brooks are sponsoring the
Boulevard Road Run. The run
takes place Friday, February 6th, at
12:35 p.m. The start is at SUB
Plaza. Participants are given a
choice of running either 6.8 kms, or
3.0 kms.
Donations will be collected all
week before the event, at the Intramurals office in Lower SUB
Concourse. Recognition will be
given to the Faculty, Club, Fraternity, or Sorority who makes the
largest contribution. It should be
noted that in order to be part of this
challenge, participation in the run is
not mandatory.
Hopefully, many dollars will
have been collected by that time.
The contributions will be sent to the
Man in Motion Tour, along with a
huge, 18"x48" card, signed by as
many donators as can fit. There is
no doubt the visible collective effort made by UBC students to contribute to the Man in Motion Tour
will be a boost to Rick Hansen and
the rest of the Man in Motion crew,
as they make their way home.
Jane Gowan
UBC apathy makes sour Mustard
When I set out to write this letter,
the first and foremost idea in my
mind was to thank those who took
the time out to vote for me over the
last two weeks, and that I do wholeheartedly.
Now to my other order of
business. If you ask students why
they didn't vote, the most likely
answeres are "I didn't know any of
the candidates" or "what difference does it make? They're all
the same anyway" now both those
statements carry merit.
Paralleling this university's theme
of Tuum est (it's up to you), your
selected representatives take the
position that if you want to know
what we're doing, you have to come
and find us (upstairs, west corner of
SUB Building). In fact, the only
time that you hear from them is (1)
when they need you to elect them,
and (2) when the Ubyssey writes
about what they've done wrong.
And where does that leave us
now? It leaves us in a university
without a student voice. The university is asking for more funding, our
tuition fees are being raised once
more, yet when Dr. Strangway
comes out to talk to students (a
poorly advertised event last week)
only a handful of students are there
to show the public the sentiments
that most of us feel: that university
education in British Columbia is
truly suffering in terms of quality as
well as accessibility.
It is important that student
government makes an effort to not
only reach the administration of
this university, and the provincial
government with our needs, but
also reach out to students on campus, tell them what is happening
within   their   own   administration,
and give them a role in protecting
their education. This university was
built by students. It was their Great
Trek that showed the government
that higher education was needed in
B.C.
Your AMS president elect Rebecca Nevraumont ran on a campaign
of making this organization more
student-oriented. That, to me,
means getting out and talking to
students, visiting constituencies, using the press to tell students what is
going on within the AMS. That is
not going to be easy, but I believe it
is necessary, and I'll do my
damnedest to try and make it happen. And if the AMS does open
itself to a larger student input, I
hope that you all will be ready to
make your contribution.
Don Mustard
Student Senator at Large
Blair blames beating on boring bleaters
THE UBYSSEY
February 3, 1987
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Friday
throughout the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and are not necessarily those
of the administration or the AMS. Member Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is SUB
241k. Editorial department, 228-2301/2305. Advertising
228-3977
Exiled Russian boxing champion Mikial Groberman (played by David Fermanl takes on two contenders from the streets (Steven Chan and Allison Felker) and shpaes them into champions in this hot,
new flick from Malcolm Pearson Productions. The plot is woven and intertwined to the point of
dramatic climax at which point the fireman (played brilliantly by Ross McLaren) douses all with a surging stream of water from his hose. Svetozar Kontic, Neil Lucente and Evelyn Jacob play the three-
headed water boy who parlays his post-boxing endorsements and gets a 3-D talk show. First of all he
must clean up the mess and smoke three cigarettes. Scott MacDonald and Peter Burns of "At the
Movies" call this a real "charm" as they choke on their popcorn. And Robert Groberman sat home
eating birthday cake.
My thanks to all those who voted
for me. For any who are interested I
offer this analysis of the AMS executive election.
The results are very similar to last
year, and thus were so predictable
as to be boring. The foremost
political habit is that 90 per cent did
not bother to vote. Amongst the
rest, there appear to be about 6 per
cent of students who realize they
benefit from the fees collected from
all other students and controlled by
the AMS, and this six per cent does
not wish for any changes. On the
other hand, four per cent care
enough to make the gesture to vote
for me to indicate their desire for
the AMS to change.
However, social habit dictates the
AMS will not change significantly;
the wishing change are not enough
to form a quorum at the AMS annual general meeting.
Students should realize that if the
Board of Governors did not force
every student to be a member of the
AMS and if the Board did not collect the AMS fee, then the AMS
would collapse and disappear. The
conclusion is obvious, at present the
existence of the AMS serves the interest of the Board of Governors.
Elitist educaton is a fait accompli
in B.C. The government policy over
the last twenty years has become (1)
anyone who wants a university
education is going to have to pay
for it themselves and (2) it will be
expensive. Therefore only the tiny
minority of the wealthy will be
educated. That will be the new reality of our society, and by then the
only students left at university will
be the privileged elite who agree
with this policy. Already it is the
case that the majority of politically
active students at UBC like to be
"reasonable" and collaborate with
the Board of Governors.
As I said to the Student Coalition
for   Accessible   Education   at   the
Board of Governors meeting,
January 29th, the government
regards them as a trivial nuisance.
Mass demonstrations in B.C. in the
past did not work, but rather were
broken up by the police. When
neither protests nor lobbying work,
then what is left?
If there are any students left who
need help, then they are going to
have to help themselves. I am still
looking for someone who was 18
years old on October 22nd, 1986,
and resents the fact that they were
denied their constitutional right to
vote enough to want to take the
issue to the Supreme Court of
British Columbia. If there is
somewhere amongst your readers a
person who was not old enough to
be able to vote, but old enough to
care that they couldn't, then if they
are interested in learning what they
could do about that, they can find
out from me at 228-9824.
Blair T. Longley
graduate studies Tuesday, February 3, 1987
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Twist and Shout examines love
By PETER BURNS
In the 1980s, the teenage film has
meant brat-packers, cheap sex and
shallow, American storylines. Twist
and Shout is a coming-of-age film
from Denmark which examines the
plight of teenagers with intelligence
and sensitivity, continuing the
tradition of compelling, small north
European films.
film
Twist and Shout
Directed by Bille August
The Ridge Theatre
Although Sweden and the
Netherlands have mapped out their
visions of cold and dreamy sadness,
director Bille August has secured a
Danish niche in the cinematic
psyche of the north.
The title reflects the influence of
the Fab Four on the time. It is 1964
and the Beatles are everywhere . . .
even in Copenhagen. For fashion-
conscious Bjorn, Saturday means
going out with mom to buy a felt-
collared grey suit and pointed
Liverpudlian boots. The good-
looking Bjorn plays drums in a
band of young lads who play
despicable Beatle covers.
One night the band is playing at a
club, Bjorn spots Anna (Camilla
Soeberg) and immediately falls for
her. On his bicycle, Bjorn chases
the yellow tram containing Anna,
c
By RONALD STEWART
Once again, MUSSOC has ambitiously attempted to recapture a
bygone era — and failed.
stage
Carousel
By Rodgers and Hammerstein
Directed and choreographed
by Norman Leggatt
UBC Old Auditorium
Until February 7
UBC's brave musical troupe have
as many problems with their ill-
chosen text as with their production. Rodgers' and Hammerstein's
Carousel, directed by Norman Leg-
periodically popping wheelies in her
honor. Their love affair blossoms,
but when Anna becomes pregnant
their relationship begins to
disintegrate, culminating in an
abortion (graphically detailed).
In the abortion, director August
ridicules the hypocrisy of Danish
society, a society often portrayed as
very progressive and sexually
liberated. Anna's mother unques-
tioningly offers the cash for the
abortion, but in her progressive-
minded indifference to the operation ignores her daughter's trauma,
and offers no emotional support.
Disconsolate, Bjorn turns for affection to the class Barbie doll who
has been chasing him with grim
determination. She is rich and
pushy, and so is her family. Before
he knows it, Bjorn is shoved into an
engagement with Kirsten (Ulrikke
Juul Bondo) and his coffin is slowly
nailed.
As Bjorn, Adam Tonsberg conveys a real innocence and
vulnerability. The uncertainty Bjorn
reveals throughout the film presents
adolescent insecurity in all its
shapes, from awkwardness in
lovemaking to shyness before
authority.
TONSBERG, SOEBERG ... the mosaic of emotion in adolescence.
As Anna, Camilla Soeberg makes
a powerful statement with the turmoil following her abortion — she
is a child herself. As she runs across
a bridge, away from Bjorn, we see
her leaving her childhood forever.
Meanwhile, Bjorn's friend Erik
(Lars Simonsen) is shy and uncomfortable with girls (he loves Kirsten
and idolizes Bjorn). Erik's father
has cruelly confined Erik's
psychologically disturbed mother to
her room and subjected her to
various forms of mental cruelty.
Erik is deprived of a real childhood
through the forced responsibility of
looking after his mother.
Lars Simonsen plays the
withdrawn Erik with a distance that
amplifies the strain of his situation.
Erik becomes the warden for his
mother, the prisoner, and the pain
it causes etches deeply into his relationship with his father.
The sunny innocence with which
the film begins is slowly shrouded
by the clouds of doubt that surround Bjorn and Erik, until they
are swimming in a sea of uncertainty and self-examination.
Bille August has created a film
that is at once warm and funny . . .
harsh and realistic . . . the mosaic
of emotion that is adolescence.
August carefully erects the walls of
prim, Scandinavian convention
around them, calling the boys to
gain their dignity by breaking these
walls down and entering adulthood.
KR OU Sf.
•  •  • J urns •  •  •
/
gatt, has not aged well.
The show's biggest problem is its
ridiculous plot (People keep telling
me that you don't watch a musical
for its plot; but if that's the case,
why do they have plots?).
Billy Bigelow (David
Woodhouse), a barker for a
carousel, and Julie Jordan (Rina
Renzullo), a young working-
woman, fall in love. Billy loses his
job, doesn't find work, and starts
verbally and physically abusing
Julie.
When Julie tells him she's pregnant, he resolves to support them —
through robbery. Unfortunately,
the robbery is foiled, and rather
than face jail, Billy kills himself.
But wait, it doesn't end there.
In  heaven   (yes,   heaven),   Billy
finds he can have one day back on
earth to do a good deed — such as
giving fatherly advice to his
daughter, now 15.
Up until the heaven part, it
sounds like a good story, doesn't it?
Unfortunately, the conflict is glossed over — the hunky-dory world of
musicals and songs such as It Was
A Real Nice Clambake prevail. The
story's resolution is also ridiculous:
Billy gets into heaven for
cheerleading at his daughter's
graduation.
The songs fail to convey any of
the emotion such a story should
have. Some of them — including
June Is Bustin' Out All Over —
have nothing to do with the story.
The only good song, You'll Never
Walk Alone, is milked for all it's
worth — played no less than five
times (sung twice).
The jokes rarely work, and some
— such as when Billy makes light of
hitting Julie — are deplorable even
for anachronisms. Finally, all the
characters are_ melodramatic
stereotypes; even'Billy's struggle to
become a good person is limited to
one song (Soliloquy).
MUSSOC cannot be blamed for
the problems with the text, but they
can be blamed for choosing to produce it, and for the problems with
the production.
To be fair, most of these people
are talented singers, and they do
well with the choral numbers.
However, Renzulo is weak at times,
and Woodhouse sings too
melodramatically.
AMS SPEAKERS PRESENT
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FREE INCOME TAX SEMINAR
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The two leads also have problems
acting: Woodhouse's Billy is too
cocky and slimy to elict any sympathy, and Renzullo fails to breathe
any life or interest into Julie.
Karen Thompson, playing the
daughter, has seen one too many
Stephen Spielberg movies. She's a
dynamite actor and dancer, but
she overplays her cuteness in a role
that demands melancholy. The rest
of the cast do what they can with
the script and libretto, but usually
end up gesticulating like psychotic
cartoon characters.
Leggatt provides some good, enjoyable choreography, althouth it
lacks originality. The set (by Owen
Lock) and costumes (by Natalie
Leismeister) are colourful, interesting, and well done (the only
exceptions are the angels, who look
like the Man from Glad). Finally,
the orchestra, despite more than a
few discordant notes, does a competent job under the direction of
David Smith.
The few good points fail to make
up for the bad. Carousel is a show
whose day has come and gone; it
has little contemporary relevance,
significance or meaning, and
MUSSOC barely manages an adequate production of it. One
wonders why they bothered . . .
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We put our Sole into your j
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I Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 3, 1987
tween dosses
TODAY
PRE-MED1CAL SOCIETY
A talk with medical students, noon-1:20 p.m.,
Woodward 1.
SUBFILMS
Film: "Last Tango in Paris?' starring Marlon
Brando, 7 p.m. and 9:30 p.m., SUB Auditorium.
UNITED CHURCH CAMPUS MINISTRY
Informal worship, all welcome, noon, Lutheran
Campus Centre.
PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB
Anson's Amiga Activists unite for a strategic
meeting concerning upcoming election campaign, 12:30 p.m., SUB 111.
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB
Warren Fong's IBM followers re-union. Topic of
discussion is how to clone a PC through mitosis,
12:30 p.m., SUB 205.
PACIFIC RIM CLUB
Speaker series: "Teaching English in China and
Japan?' 12:30 p.m., Asian Centre, Rm   604.
SIKH STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Executive meeting, noon, SUB 216.
UNITED CHURCH
Informal worship — alt welcome, noon. Lutheran
Campus Centre.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Co-op supper, 6:00 p.m., Lutheran Campus Centre.
ENGINEERING UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY
Display of technical models from all disciplines of
the engineering faculty,  8:30-5:30 p.m.,   SUB
concourse.
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL OF UBC
Letter writing group — non-members welcome,
noon, SUB 224.
hot flash
Want to get some money back
from the government? H & R Block
is presenting a free income tax
seminar for students tomorrow. If
you want to know all about tuition
fee deduction, education deduction, etc., come to SUB 212 on
Wednesday, Feb. 4th, at 12:30.
The Coalition for Universally Accessible Education is holding a
meeting in the Grad Student Centre
at noon on Thursday. All welcome.
JEWISH STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Hot lunch, 12:00-2:00 p.m., Hillel House.
UNDERWATER HOCKEY
Drop-in game, 7:00 p.m., UBC Aquatic Centre.
WEDNESDAY
IRISH PRISONER OF WAR COMMITTEE
Video on military involvement in urban planning
in Northern Ireland, 12:00 p.m., Grad Student
Centre Garden Room.
PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB
Andre's Atari Achievers meet to discuss PCC
election campaign, 4:30 p.m., SUB 212A.
INTER VARSITY CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Bible study and fellowship, noon, SUB 119.
AMS ROCKERS
Return   of  all   monies  and   unsold  tickets  for
ballroom   bash.   Attendance   meeting,    noon,
Rockers office.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Bible study and fellowship, 7:00 p.m., 1868 Knox
Road.
UNITED CHURCH
Potluck dinner and discussion — all welcome,
6:00 p.m., Lutheran Campus Centre.
THE UBC WOMEN'S CENTRE
Meeting to plan for t.W.D. '87, new members
welcome, noon, SUB 130.
JEWISH STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Dinner, 5:30-7:00 p.m., Hillel House.
THURSDAY
PRE-MEDICAL SOCIETY
Field trip to TRIUMF, noon-2:20 p.m., meet at
G-30 Wood.
PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB
Apple core meeting. William reveals the weekly
specials from his screen menu, noon, SUB 213.
Also commodore weekly rap session. Watch
Donald's 64K ram into Karen\ tiny modern,
noon-2:30 p.m., Buch B319.
POLITICAL SCIENCE STUDENTS'
ASSOCIATION
The Globe and Mail's Jeffrey Simpson on: "Is
Quebec Nationalism Dead?" noon, Buch A100.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
General meeting, noon, International House.
UNIVERSITY CHRISTIAN MINISTRIES
Robb Powell will conclude his series on confronting and conquering fears, worries, and anxieties, noon, SUB 205.
DEADLINE
for applications to the September 1987 class in
Rehabilitation Medicine
FEBRUARY 28, 1987
OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY, one of the fastest growing professions in Canada, applies knowledge from the Arts and Sciences to
the evaluation and treatment of dysfunction in self care, work, and
leisure activities. A client's dysfunction may be caused by physical
and/or psychosocial disabilities. Occupational therapists work in a
variety of settings, with children and adults of all ages. If you are interested in a challenging health care career, with many job opportunities, consider occupational therapy.
The UBC School of Rehabilitation Medicine offers a baccalaureate degree program of three years of study following one year
of pre-requisites at a university or college. Enrollment is competitive,
as class size is limited. Information:
School of Rehabilitation Medicine
T106—Acute Care Unit
2211 Wesbrook Mall
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1W5
Telephone: 228-7394
APPLICATION
FOR GRADUATION
Application for graduation cards have now been mailed to students registered in the
graduating year of the following degree programs: B.A., B.F.A., B.Mus., B.Com.,
Lic.Acct., B.Ed.-Elem., B.Ed.-Sec, B.Ed.-Spec, B.P.E., B.R.E. and B.Sc. All
students who expect to graduate this May or November are requested to complete and
return both cards to the Registrar's Office (Mrs. Donna Anderson) as soon as possible,
but no later than February 16, 1987 for graduation in May and August 15, 1987 for
graduation in November. Any student in the graduating year of these programs who
has not received cards in the mail should confirm with the Registrar's Office (by phone
at 228-4455) that his/her local mailing address is correct.
Students in the graduating year of all remaining degree programs, except Applied
Science and Graduate Studies, should obtain their "Application for Graduation" cards
from the Dean's or Director's Office of their Faculty or School. Students on Applied
Science, Graduate Studies or diploma programs should obtain their applications from
their departments.
"Application for Graduation" cards are also available in the Office of the Registrar,
2nd Floor, General Services Administration Building.
PLEASE NOTE:
EVERY STUDENT WHO EXPECTS TO GRADUATE MUST
MAKE APPLICATION FOR GRADUATION. ANY STUDENT
WHO DOES NOT APPLY IS INELIGIBLE TO GRADUATE.
Tower
3616 W. Broadway
738-9520
THE PLACE TO BE FOR SUPER UBC SPECIALS
SUN.
25% OFF
GREEK
ENTREES
MON.
25% OFF
PIZZA
TUE.
25% OFF
PASTA
WED.
BURGER
& BEVERAGE
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THUR.
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CHICKEN
$6.50
MUCH MORE THAN A PIZZA PLACE!!!
PLEASE PRESENT AMS CARD
PRIORTO ORDERING
VALID TIL FEB. 12/87
DINING IN ONLY 4-9 P.M.
NOT VALID WITH OTHER SPECIALS
CHINESE CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
The power of prayer, all welcome, noon, Scarf
Building, rm. 209.
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
General meeting and talk, "The Role of the Holy
Spirit," noon, Wood IRC H-4.
SIKH STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Seminar on Sikhism, noon, SUB 125.
PHILOSOPHY STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Philosophic conversations:  "Why Should I  Be
Nice?" Why are we meeting at 7:10:00 p.m.?,
and Why are we meeting at the Upstairs Lounge,
International House?
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Club meeting, noon. Brock Hall 304.
AMS INTEGRITY IN ACTION CLUB
A talk by Susan Maranda, "Communication and
Creativity:   The   Key   to   Integrity   in   Action,"
noon-1:20 p.m., Buch B225.
NEWMAN CLUB
Discussion: "Paul and Women," noon, St.
Mark's College, Music Room.
CYCLING CLUB
General meeting for spring events, noon, Hennings 301.
STUDENT HEALTH SERVICES
Information about new methods of contraception — pamphlets and advice available, 12:00
p.m., SUB Main Concourse next to Speakeasy.
JEWISH STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Close encounters of the intermarriage kind —
final session, noon, Hillel House.
HANG GLIDING CLUB
Important general meeting, noon, SUB 111 (ir
the caf).
PRE DENTAL CLUB
Dr. Fraser lectures on Endodontics, noon, Wooc
THE CLASSIFIEDS
I RATES: AMS Card Holders-3 lines, 1 day $2.75; additional!
lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $4.75, addi-|
tional lines,  .70c. Additional days, $4.25. and .65c.
| Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the day |
before publication.
Publications Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders over $10.00. Call 228-3977.
COMING EVENTS
CHINA-TIBET
unique 30 day adventure
Depart May 5
Return June 4
$3229 Cdn.
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Includes rtn. airfare
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all accommodation &
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CONTACT
875-6483
In association with
——Renshaw Travel
20 - HOUSING
1 BR. SUITE S. Granv. in new house. Cable
& util. incl. N/S, no pets, female or couple
preferred. $450. 266-8423 aft. 4 p.m.
ROOM ONLY AND ROOM/BOARD avail
able for immediate occupation in the Single
Student Residences: Fairview Crescent,
Walter Gage, Place Vanier & Totem Park.
Contact Student Housing Office at 2071
West Mall, 228-2811, 8:30-4:00 p.m.
weekdays.
4TH & DUNBAR. 1 Br. Apt. Lots of room,
very conveniently located in a well managed
building. $480. 222-0801.
ROOMS FOR RENT $200/month (no utilities). 1 blk. from campus. Available immediately. 224-2662, 732-0529.
30 - JOBS
SOUNDS FISHY? BUT IT'S NOT. I need
promotion-oriented people for my enter
tainment company. You can work in your
spare time & make extra income the funest
way possible. If you are a social organizer,
have lots of energy, and enjoy people, yi^e
me a call. Eran 261 FISH
THE   PEAK   PUBLICATION   SOCIETY   is
seeking a business manager. Applicant
should be experienced in financial state
ment preparation, all aspects of financial
record keeping including PC computerized
(Bedford} system, budget preparation Et
general office procedures. Experience in a
co-op environment and/or background in
campus papers is desireable. Resumes & a
handwritten covering letter should be sent
to: Business Mgr., The Peak, SFU, Bur
naby, B.C. V5A 1S6, no later than 12 noon.
Wed., Feb. 4, 1987.
35 - LOST
LOST ON 27 JAN.-gold bracelet w/'pink
rubies - family heirloom, return will be
rewarded. Any info., call 324-7991.
65 - SCANDALS
70 - SERVICES
FIND A TUTOR
BE A TUTOR
Register at
SPEAKEASY
Mon.-Fri.
9:30 a.m.-9:30 p.m.
SUB Main Concourse
Phone 228-3777
75 - WANTED
OCCASIONAL OVERNIGHT WORK avail
able for person wanting to work with
animals. Call Dale, 925-2463, 681-2822.
HAVE YOU OR A FRIEND experienced any
unwanted sexual contact while dating or in
a relationship with a boyfriend? We would
appreciate being able to talk with you. We
are researching this area, Et hope to create
resources for women in dating relationships. Please cail the SFU Criminology
Research Centre at 291-4127 between
8:30-4:30 p.m. weekdays to set up a
TELEPHONE interview with either Karen or
Cindy. All interviews will be kept strictly
confidential.
80 - TUTORING
ENGLISH TUTOR: G. Harding-Russell
(PH.D) will tutor or give help with essays.
Phone 594-0960 after 6 p.m. $10/hr.
FRENCH TUTORING - Translation, experi-
enced teacher. Masters degree. Call Mike
874-0394 or 733-0441 after 11 a.m.
85 - TYPING
MINIMUM NOTICE REQUIRED Essays,
term papers, resumes, editing. UBC location. 224-2662 or 732-0529.
ARE YOU LOSING MARKS BECAUSE
OF YOUR WRITING STYLE? Call a professional writer with M.A. for quality word
processing, editing Et writing services.
Resumes, theses, essays, letters, etc. Hand
in work you can be proud of! 324-9924.
WHO DO YOU LOVE? The Ubyssey is now
accepting Valentine messages for the
Valentine Special Issue, Feb. 13th. $2.75/3
lines. Forms SUB Rm. 266.
To those rowdy men in red
HAPPY ENGINEERING WEEK!
M.T. FOSTER
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST. 30 yrs. exp.
Wordprocessor Er IBM typewriter. Student
rates. Dorothy Martinson, 228-8346.
UNIVERSITY TYPING word processing.
Papers, theses, resumes, letters, P-U Et del.
9 am - 10 pm  7 days.'wk. 734 TYPE.
STUDENT/FACULTY RATES: $1.50 pg.
dble spaced text Equations Et tables:
$14 hr. Resumes: $5 pg. 50 personalized
form letters only $35 Cerlox Binding Ef
photocopying Fast professional Service.
Jeeva's Word Processing. 201 636 West
Broadway. 876-5333. M C & Visa accepted.
ADINA WORD PROCESSING for resumes,
essays, theses. Discount for students, 10th
& Discovery   Phone 222-2122.
WORD   PROCESSING   SPECIALIST.    U
write,  we type,  theses,  resumes,  letters,
essays. Days, eves., wknds  736-1208.
THE ORIGINAL fast accurate typing. $1.25
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ARISTOGRAPH    WORD    PROCESSING.
essays, thesis, letters, resumes, med./legal
terminology. Ph. 224-7690.
YEAR-ROUND expert essay, theses
typing from legible work. Spelling/grammar corrected. 738-6829, 10 a.m.-9 p.m.
King Ed. bus rte.
K.E.R. WORD PROCESSING. 1633 E. 12th
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Kerry Rigby at 879-2895.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING - essays, theses
resumes, etc. UBC Village, behind Kinko's
Copies, 224-0763. Student rates.
USE
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED Tuesday, February 3, 1987
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
Referendum failed due to confusion
By VICTOR WONG
If there is anything on which the
anti-apartheid groups of UBC can
blame for the failure of last week's
referendum to ban Carling
O'keefe/Rothman's products, it
would have to be confusion. Confusion over what the actual issue of
the referendum was.
The principle the anti-apartheid
groups were promoting was that
students, to protest apartheid,
should not purchase products of
companies proven to be owned by
South African business.
Chair in question
By DAVID PARKINSON
CALGARY (CUP) — The University of Calgary has secured funding
for a chair in American studies,
though sufficient funding for a
chair in Canadian studies has not
yet been raised.
University official Bill Selby said
Texaco Canada and an undisclosed
partner have put up $500,000 to set
up a chair in American studies at
the U Of C. The Alberta government will contribute an additional
$1 million in a two-for-one matching endowment.
Funding for the chair in Canadian studies, however, is about
$100,000 short of the $500,000
needed, according to Merlin
Brinkerhoff, associate vice-
president of research.
Chairs of study are established to
bring esteemed academics to teach
and to conduct research in their
specific areas of expertise at the
university.
David Tarras, director of the
Canadian studies program, said setting up an American studies chair
will be a positive move, especially
for the Canadian studies department.
Terras said, however, that the
Canadian chair is needed more than
an American chair. "I think the
Canadian chair is more important
because we have to find our own
identity," he said.
Grant Chin, president of the
Canadian studies association on
campus, concurred. "We are
already shamefully aware of too
much of American policies," he
said. "We need to understand
ourselves."
Students' Union vice-president
academic Tim Wild, however, said
that while it's "a shame" that the
money for the Canadian post hasn't
been raised, it would be foolish to
turn donations down.
"Any money for education is
good money," he said.
Brinkerhoff hopes the funding
for the American chair will
stimulate interest towards the Canadian post. "Lots of people have
given money (for the Canadian
chair) but just in little drips and
draps," he said, adding it has taken
"about 10 years" to raise $400,000.
The university set up a program
for a visiting professorship in Canadian studies in 1979, for which the
U of C set aside a $120,000 fund to
partially finance the post. Student
council secretary Alison Heal said a
referendum passed in 1983 called
for the money to be donated toward
a Canadian studies chair.
Last year, the council voted to
donate an additional $12,000 to the
post.
While donations for the post of
Canadian studies have come in
slowly, the American studies chair
came together within a year, said
Selby.
Happy Birthday to
Mo and Bo.
But the practical point of it — the
most visible manifestation of a successful vote — would have been the
removal of Rothman's cigarettes,
O'Keefe's Extra Old Stock, Miller
beers and Foster's Lager from SUB
concessions.
And, like it or not, it is the
ownership status of Carling/
Rothman's that the referendum
really called into question.
Let's face it: Carling/Rothman's
is the most visible company on campus that has a South African connection. The removal of that company's products was what the
referendum was looking for, no
matter how much the anti-apartheid
groups argue about principles.
The groups claimed, in last Monday's issue, that if Carling is not a
company "whose profits flow back
to the apartheid economy of South
Africa," then Carling/Rothman's
products would continue to be sold.
But by trying to campaign on this
general principle, the "Yes" side
lost sight of its specific purpose of
getting those products off campus.
All the "No" side had to do was
throw doubt upon Carling ownership, and there would be no point
to the referendum.
The fact that Carling/Rothman's
ownwership status is under review
by Statistics Canada did not help
the "Yes" side either, since the
referendum question would use
StatsCan records as proof of
ownership.
Think about it. If the referendum
passed, and StatsCan printed that
Carling/Rothman's   was   actually
(freestyle)
owned by British interests (as
evidence presented by the "No"
side would indicate), then the
specific reason for banning Carling/Rothman's products would no
longer exist.
The referendum would then be
judged as a waste of time. If that
would be the case, then what would
be the point of voting yes?
The anti-apartheid groups, in
fighting the referendum on general
principle, have neglected to
discover and inform campus if any
other companies with South
African connections have dealings
with the AMS.
Because of this, their campaign
was informally directed at one company only — and because there is
doubt about the ownership of that
one, students may have wondered if
the vote was redundant, in view of
the federal government's planned
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sanctions, (Canadian businesses are
no longer allowed to be owned by
South African interests).
The question, for the moment, is
what the AMS plans to do now.
The referendum failed to reach
quorum, so its results technically
cannot be considered binding on
the AMS.
Council could, in the near future,
impose a ban without seeking consensus from the student body.
But the majority of the vote said
"No" — which informally suggests
that students would still like to see
such products. Should council impose a ban next year, it could be accused of ignoring student interest.
The whole point of this depends
on Statistics Canada's eventual ruling — and even if StatsCan changes
the definition of Carling/Rothman's
ownership to the U.K. there are still
students who feel that Carling/
Rothman's products should be banned, because a small connection still
exists, somewhere in that tangle of
corporate ownership, between Carling/Rothman's and the South
African Rembrandt group.
The StatsCan ruling, though,
would take enough wind of the current movement to blow the issue
back to the outskirts of the lunatic
fringe.
This issue has certainly been dealt
a critical blow by students. Only
Statistics Canada can actually kill
it.
Victor Wong is a long-time
Ubyssey staffer who prefers Fosters
lager to other brands.
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CLOSE ENCOUNTERS OF THE
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A JEWISH PERSPECTIVE
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FROM OUR OWN
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UPCOMING
Whistler Ski Trip leaves this Saturday evening
For more information, phone 224-2512
MUSSOC
CAROUSEL
Direction & Choreography     Musical Direction by
NORMAN LEGGATT DAVID SMITH
JANUARY 29 - FEBRUARY 7
UBC OLD AUDITORIUM 8 P.M.
TICKETS: $6.00 Students/Seniors
$8.00 Adults
AMS Box Office
228*5656/228-6902 Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 3, 1987
Basket 'Birds foul
By CHEW WONG
Billed as the game of the year,
Saturday's UBC-UVic men's
basketball game turned out to be
"the game" the 'Birds would rather
forget. The University of Victoria
thumped UBC 82-61.
fell out for the 'Birds.
UBC went through a seven
minute drought where they did not
score a point. At 13:00 UVic led
45-43, at 5:21 the Viking lead
mushroomed to 59-44.
"They forced us to do things we
(     SPORTS    )
— Malcolm Pearson photo
TEAM CANNONBALL CATCHING is making an impressive come-back.
Here a white cannon-ball plummets from the ceiling of War Memorial Gym
as rival teams position themselves for the catch.
Paul Johansson led a sputtering
Thunderbird attack with 16 points.
Geoff McKay was Victoria's high
scorer with 22 points — including a
perfect 11 of 11 from the free-
throw line.
Victoria controlled the contest
from the opening tip to the final
free-throw. On UBC's first offensive set, forward Aaron Point's
right contact lens slipped backward
to the top of his eye and hampered
him for the rest of the first half.
For the 'Birds this ominous sign
was only a prelude of what would
ensue.
UBC was behind by as many as
14 points in the first half but battled
back to a 29-29 tie, only to have
UVic sink two late free-throws and
Geoff Makay hit a buzzer-beater
shot from centre court. The Vikings
took a 34-29 lead into the locker
room.
"Our offense fell apart," said
UBC co-captain Kevin Hanson.
"Our defense kept us in the game
until the last few minutes."
UBC kept pace with the Vikings
in the opening minutes of the second half, but at 13:00 the bottom
wouldn't normally do," said Hanson.
Things like turnovers. During the
seven minutes, UBC was unable to
penetrate  UVic's  tough  2-3 zone
defense. The bulk of UBC's 24
turnovers were committed in this
chaotic time.
UBC never recovered from their
seven minute hiatus. The last five
minutes of the game was turned into a free-throw derby as the 'Birds
kept fouling UVic intentionally to
stop the clock.
"We just didn't finish off
inside," said Point. "Last week
(when the 'Birds won in Victoria)
we took it inside, but tonight we
didn't."
The loss drops UBC's Canada
West conference record to three
and three.
Gymnast 'Birds'
success is routine
'Birds manage two wins
By LOUISE PANZIERA
The UBC women's volleyball
team travelled to Victoria this
weekend hoping to spike the
University of Saskatchewan and the
University of Calgary and
guarantee UBC a playoff spot in the
Canadian Interuniversity Athletic
Union playoffs.
Unfortunately, UBC returned
from the Canada West tournament
two and two, both losses being to
Saskatchewan and Calgary.
UBC played Saskatchewan on
Friday and lost in a 2 Vi -hour-long
match 6-15, 15-7, 11-15, 15-8 and
7-15.
Although the loss was a disappointment UBC coach Donna
Baydock was proud of her team
who played a strong match which
was a definite improvement over
last weekend's three game loss to
Saskatchewan.
Sheila Jones had 29 kills in the
game, Trina Hewlett had 13 blocks
and Vikki Lalari and Rhonda
Sampson scored three ace serves
each.
UBC was up against Calgary the
same day with little time to rest bet
ween matches and lost 5-15, 6-15,
15-6, 10-15.
Heather Olafsson made 17 digs,
Sheila Jones put in 21 kills and Amy
Ku contributed three ace serves.
UBC started fast against Calgary
but a couple of substitutions saw
Pam Walker and Jacquie Capewell
out on the floor to give UBC some
fresh energy. The 'Birds won in
three games.
On Saturday UBC easily defeated
Lethbridge 15-2, 15-5, 15-3 and
Alberta 15-8, 15-10, 15-6.
The overall top statistics from the
tournament showed Sheila Jones
with 66 digs, 68 kills and eight ace
serves while Trina Hewlett was
strong at the net with 26 blocks.
Even though the team played inconsistently at times, Sheila Jones
was "strong, very aggressive offensively as well as defensively — she
was outstanding and solid the whole
time," said Baydock.
As a result of this weekend UBC
is fourth in the Canada West
League standings, UVic is first
followed by Saskatchewan and
Calgary. Only the two top Canada
West teams receive national playoff
spots but things might change in the
future to include all four.
But UBC is not out of the picture
yet. This weekend UBC hosts
Calgary and Lethbridge and the
following weekend, UBC will play
their last regular season CIAU game
against the number one Victoria
Vikings.
By PAUL PENNER
UBC's women gymnasts scored
their third consecutive win at home
in a tri-meet at Osborne Centre
Gymnasium Friday evening.
UBC narrowly edged the University of Calgary 137.2 to 134.3 points
while York University finished a
distant third with 128.83.
Jennifer Dong was the top individual performer for the second
time in three meets as she continues
to have a strong season.
The UBC squad had the bye in
the final rotation and had to wait
anxiously on the sidelines as
Calgary turned in some of the best
scores of the evening in the floor exercise. Although Calgary won that
event they could not ovecome the
wide margin the Thunderbirds had
established with a superior team
performance on the uneven bars.
Few gymnasts can consistently
excel in all aspects of competition
and as the overall  standings are
determined by compiling a team's
top four scores in each discipline it
is a team with depth that wins
meets. The women's team has
displayed such a depth as different
individuals continue to contribute
in different events.
Team member Chrissy Mittern-
dorfer points out "in each event we
have at least five girls who are really
good."
Although the 'Birds have enjoyed
a measure of success the memory of
a disappointing performance in last
year's national championships has
prevented anyone from being overconfident. Team spirit is high yet no
one is making brash predictions
about the future.
"Last year we were hot right
about now, then we died," said
gymnast Janet Rosenfeld.
The team now has a two week
break in which to polish their
routines and nurse the inevitable
nagging injuries.
Two wins for Mens volley'Birds
By KRISII BLOCKER
The UBC men's volleyball team
came back from Victoria with a two
win — two loss record on the
weekend in Canada West league action.
On Friday the 'Birds came up
against the number two nationally
ranked Saskatchewan Huskies.
When the smoke cleared the 'Birds
had lost a heart breaker 15-13 in the
fifth game (10-15, 15-11, 7-15,
15-11, 13-15).
Unfortunately the match ended
with controversy, at 13-14 in the
fifth game with the 'Birds serving to
tie the game, both game officials
missed an illegal back court spike
by the Huskies. Saskatchewan then
served the next point to win the
match.
Ski'Birds dominate the summit
With great ski conditions at
Whistler Mountain last weekend,
the UBC SkiBirds managed to
clinch the men's and women's
alpine-nordic combined titles. After
winning their final northwest ski
conference northern division meet,
the Thunderbird men and women
are looking forward to the regional
championships in two weeks time.
UBC coach Tom Stewart is confident in the team's ability to perform
at the all-important regionals.
"Everyone is skiing fast. This
weekend we had some problems
because of the huge amounts of soft
snow and deep ruts. Conditions
were great for recreational skiing
but not too good for us."
"But," he said, "on the basis of
our weekend performances, I'd say
that we have a good chance to
qualify for the national championships at the regionals."
The women's team won their second straight slalom title, defeating
SFU. The lady Clansmen's Elke
Socher won the race in 120.15
seconds but the Birds were close
behind. Wendy Morrison placed second in 120.43, Andrea Jaegli was
fourth in 123.80 and rookie Mary
Fraser had her best finish so far
with a fifth place showing.
The men's team dominated the
giant slalom. Stu Gairns beat his
rival, Robert Bartsch from Western
Washington, while Dave (Buck
Ford) Buckley was third and Gerry
Haag fifth.
The 'Birds were playing without
injured starters Kelly Bukowski and
captain Shane Bellman.
Coach Dale Ohman said "the
boys played their hearts out. We
now know we can beat them if we
get to CIAU's."
Two hours after this defeat the
weary 'Birds came up against a
fresh Dinosaur team from Calgary.
The 'Birds succumbed in three
straight games, 13-15, 11-15, 10-15.
"We just didn't have enough
mental or physical energy to stay
with them," said coach Ohman.
CANADA WEST CURRENT STANDINGS
FOR MEN'S VOLLEYBALL
MW Ml GW
Saskatchewan 12 0 36
Calgarv 2 2 29
UBC 6 5 21
Alberta 5 7 19
This sets the stage for a must win
this Friday night when the 'Birds
host Calgary at 8 p.m. at the War
Memorial Gym. The Thunderbirds
need a strong showing Friday as
they are still in the running for the
final wild card berth for the CIAU
tournament in March.
On Saturday the 'Birds rebounded to hammer hapless Lethbridge
15-8, 15-4, 15-5 and destroy the
pesky Bears from Alberta 15-10,
15-3, 15-9.
During the weekend the 'Birds
were led by power hitters Greg
Williscroft and Phil Boldon with 39
and 46 kills respectively.
Gairns also won the slalom by a
margin of five seconds, but both
Buckley and last weekend's slalom
champ, Sean Jaegli, were disqualified.
The men's nordic team displayed
winning form and superior fitness
in winning both the three by 10 km
relay and the 15 km individual
events.
The women's team upset heavily
favoured Pacific Lutheran in the 10
km event. Siri Gjessing captured second spot behind PLU's Ase Bak-
ken. Sue Hagen, who also competes
on the UBC tennis team in her spare
time, placed sixth and Lynda Cooke
rounded out the scoring with an
eighth place showing.
Victoria
Lethbridge
2
0
9
II
2
GI
P
7
12
9
9
18
6
24
5
28
2
33
0
Lads succomb to Reps
Without nine of the team's
regular starters, UBC's rugby team
was handed a 44-18 loss this
weekend by the Vancouver Reps
rugby squad.
The stronger and more experienced Vancouver Reps were in control
from the start of the match and
there was never any doubt concerning the outcome as the game progressed.
Hampered by the team's injuries,
UBC coach Barry Legh was forced
to call up two freshmen from the
junior varsity Braves squad.
After the game he said it was the
first time that the varsity team had
started such young players. But,
"Gavin Dry and Connor McMullen
accorded themselves well against
tough opposition," he said.
The Thunderbirds return to
regular club action this Saturday
when they visit Richmond. With so
many new faces in the lineup the
Birds will be hard pressed to emerge
victorious.

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