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The Ubyssey Mar 2, 1979

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Array Gov't kills nurse stipends
By KEVIN McGEE
New applicants to nursing programs in the province are no longer
eligible for a monthly allowance of
$150, the B.C. ministry of health
has announced.
Ministry officials said Thursday
that students currently receiving the
monthly allowance will continue to
receive it until their training is completed, but no definite plans have
been made to fund future entrants
to the programs.
Andy   Soles,   associate   deputy
minister of post-secondary education said that although he agreed
with the policy change, the decision
had strictly been made by the
ministry of health.
"We (the ministry of education)
are responsible for all the students
in the province and those that need
support can get it through financial
aid," he said in a telephone interview Wednesday.
Health ministry officials seemed
confused about exactly what the
decision announced last month entailed.
"This thing is a pretty hot issue
— I don't know whether students
will be any better or worse off.
We've been accepting the cost for
several years, and now the education ministry will be taking over, so
we're putting the responsibility
back where it belongs," finance
division supervisor Bill Holburn
said Thursday.
Holburn denied Sole's statement
that the decision had strictly been
made by the health ministry.
"It was not a unilateral decision
at all. Both health and education
ministers agreed that responsibility
should be moved back to education."
Jack Bainbridge, an associate
deputy minister of health, said that
in some areas the attractiveness of
the stipend had brought in many
students and created a glut in the
market.
But the reactions to the announcement were mixed.
Sharon Carlson, UBC nursing
undergraduate society president,
and society secretary Lynne Ray
both  agreed that ending stipends
would not be too detrimental to
UBC nursing students.
They said the UBC nursing program would be changed in
September, enabling nursing
students to work for four months
during the summer, instead of doing school work and practicums for
virtually the whole year.
Ray and Carlson said that the
people hit hardest by the phasing
out of stipends would be students
enrolled in two-year nursing pro-
See page 8: NURSING
THE UBYSSEY 'Cops spy on
universities'
Vol. LXfl, No. 57
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, MARCH 2, 1979     °€ll
WELCOME TO UBC and all that garbage, so to speak. While on campus indulge in sightseeing, (make sure to catch this display beside
medical science block A building) and other public relations pasttimes.
But don't forget to ask about provincial government cutbacks threaten-
- ross burnett photo
ing the university, proposed tuition increases which will further limit accessibility to post-secondary education and other embarrassing problems. After all, UBC works for you — right?
Housing dep't investigation requested
H*7 £~lm?fXm? 117til?rrT urnir'inp ~ s
By GEOF WHEELWRIGHT
UBC's housing department
might be guilty of mismanaging
residence finance and establishing
residence regulations so severe they
scare students away from living in
residence, student leaders from
UBC's residences charged at a
meeting Thursday night.
Former Gage Community
Council president Mike Mooney
told 12 residence representatives in
SUB      206      that      housing's
management of conferences at
Gage was incompetent and
warranted a complete investigation
by an impartial management
consultant agency not based in B.C.
"We are somewhat concerned'
about the long-range objectives of
housing towards conferences versus
student needs," Mooney said.
He said the administration has
never looked into the matter
properly and suggested it spend
$10-$20,000 on an  investigation.
Mooney also said there is a need
for a cost efficiency study which
would examine questions such as
the effectiveness of UBC's physical
plant in repair and maintenance as
compared to similar services off-
campus.
Totem Park residence association
president Darrell Croft said
housing has increased the
regulations at Totem Park to
"make it a more beautiful place to
many
live"    but   nevertheless
students are leaving.
"It (Totem) has the highest
vacancy rate ever," Croft said of
the Totem exodus.
Croft said house advisors hired
by housing to enforce their
stringent regulations are another
reason for the vacancies.
He said the crackdown has had
the reverse effect of its original
See page 9: MISMANAGEMENT
OTTAWA (CUP) — The RCMP
security service has been unable to
distinguish between lawful political
dissent and subversion, according
to the Canadian Association of
University Teachers.
And what that has led to, CAUT
warns, is RCMP surveillance and
secret files on students and professors engaged in legal political
activity, especially left-wing
politics.
In a brief recently presented to
the MacDonald commission of
inquiry into the RCMP, the
association warned that this was
not conducive to free political
discussion on campuses.
"It would seem that in the past
the security forces have equated
various legal left-wing activities
with subversion. In the 1960s the
security forces attempted to recruit
informers among students in the
campaign for nuclear disarmament," the brief states.
"In the 1970s the security forces
appear to have considered membership in the Waffle faction of the
NDP to be the equivalent of
subversion."
The brief states that the RCMP
defended its position by claiming its
duty was to search out subversive
activities and espionage wherever
these occurred and that certain
organizations were prone to communist infiltration.
"The actions of the security
forces with regards to these
organizations seemed to some
academics to confuse dissent with
subversion and to be designed to
intimidate and define permissible
political activities by discrediting
such organizations," it reads.
These "ill-considered notions"
and "lack of sophisticated
judgment" led to several incidents
in the past 20 years where university
offices and meeting rooms were
bugged, and dossiers were compiled
on students and professors by informers and general and electronic
surveillance, the brief states.
In late 1977, for instance,
defence minister Barney Danson
confirmed that the armed forces
and the RCMP had electronically
surveyed the student assembly
room at l'Universite d'Ottawa, as
See page 9: RCMP
Government cutbacks policy threatens UBC
By JEFF PARR
An analysis of education and public
sector cutbacks and their effects.
UBC is in serious trouble. So are the rest
of the universities and colleges in Canada.
At UBC student politicians are predicting
a funding increase from the provincial
government pf only five to seven per cent
for the university.
Education minister Pat McGeer, at a
meeting with the B.C. Students'
Federation, said that even though the
universities   would  probably   receive
something more than a five per cent in
crease, the crunch will come in the near
future.
Inflation for universities is about 12 per
cent, according to the Council of Ontario
Universities. Last year UBC's board budget
request of 17 per cent was whittled-down to
9.7 per cent.
The provincial grant to the university the
year before was $16 million short of the
board's recommended budget. Tuition fees
increased by a whopping 25 per cent as a
result,   and   services   provided   by   the
university were reduced or allowed to
deteriorate. Potential students were being
asked to pay more for reduced university
services. .    ^     ...
In 1979, nobody is trying to hide the
Potentialfor another tuition fee increase.
Why are potential students being asked
to pay higher fees for a declining
educational service?
Because education is coming under the
same axe as health, social assistance, urban
transit and subsidized housing.
Despite predicted cost increases of about
8.5 per cent, hospitals in the province have
been told by health minister iBob Mc-
Clelland to limit budget increases to five
per cent.
The B.C. School Trustees Association
recommended a paltry four per cent increase for teachers' salaries, although the
cost of living increased at a rate of 8.6 per
cent last year.
Bed rates for extended care in Victoria
increased 650 per cent between 1976 and
1978.
See page 3: CUTBACKS Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March 2,  1979
RHODESANNUAL
SPRING SALE
CONTINUES WITH OPEN HOUSE SPECIALS
Technics
SA-80
GIGANTIC SAVINGS
Tfechnics
SL-19
FM/AM Stereo Receiver with Main
and Remote Speaker Connections
The power amplifier section generates 15 watts per
channel minimum continuous "RMS" into 8ohms, both
channels driven.
118
Semi-Automatic Belt-Drive
with DC Servo Motor
You'll discover that your records sound better than ever on
this handsome belt-drive turntable. Belt-drive with a DC servomotor means high speed stability and exceptionally low rumble. Wow and flutter are way down at 0.05% (WRMS) or less;
rumble is a low -65 dB (DIN B).
Complete
With
Cartridge
*168
Tfechnics
SB-P1000
Linear Phase 2-Way,
2-Speaker oyStem    featuring Acoustic Lense,
Woofer: 8 inch cone type. Tweeter: 2V4" cone   type.
Dimensions: 13%" (W) x 21 7/8" (H) x 9 3/8" (D)
Tfechnics sasoo
STEREO RECEIVER
35 watts per channel, minimum RMS at 8 ohms, from
20-20.000 Hz, with no more than 0.04% total harmonic
distortion.
Tfechnics SL-220
Semi-
Automatic
F.G.
Belt Drive
Frequency Generator DC servo belt drive turntable.
Semi-automatic operation provides tonearm return and
turntable shut-off. F.G. servo system maintains constant
platter speed despite AC line fluctuations. Superb
specifications include: rumble — 70 dB DIN B. wow and
flutter 0.045% WRMS. Complete with cartridge
OHME
The enduringly-popular OHM
E represents the successful implementation of a well
balanced loudspeaker design
at a modest price. The OHM E
uses an 8" woofer (with ex
cellent phase • and time
response characteristics) to
reproduce the bass and mid-
range. The 2" tweeter used is
the same as is used in the more
expensive systems.
OPEN HOUSE
PACKAGE PRICE
$788
Tfechnics sasoo
STEREO RECEIVER
35 watts per channel, minimum RMS at 8 ohms, from
20-20,000 Hz. with no more than 0.04% total harmonic
distortion.
Tfechnics SL-3200
Semi-
Automatic
Direct
Drive
Direct drive turntable with ultra-low speed, DC brushless
motor. B*FG servo control for superb rotational accuracy. Integral rotor/platter structure. Wow and flutter
0.03% WRMS. Rumble -73 dB DIN B.
Complete with cartridge.
L19
The L19 was designed to
meet the need for a small,
highly accurate loudspeake;
system capable of delivering substantial sound out-'
put from a moderately
powered   amplifier.
OPEN HOUSE
PACKAGE PRICE
$958
VISIT VANCOUVER'S GREATEST RECORD CENTRE Friday, March 2, 1979
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
SRA overrules fee banner motion
By GEOF WHEELWRIGHT
At a special student representative assembly meeting Thursday the
SRA overthrew a motion made by
its administrative body which
would have prevented the display of
an anti-tuition fee increase banner
and distribution of Freeze the Fees
buttons during Open House.
The SRA easily passed a new
motion approving the button
distribution, although Steven Jung,
Alma Mater Society director of
services, claimed it contravened
SUB building policy. Jung voted
against   the   distribution   at   the
original student administrative
commission meeting Monday which
banned the banner and buttons.
However, approving the
placement of a banner outside SUB
stating: "Open House today, closed
doors tomorrow. Freeze the Fees."
was no easy matter for the SRA.
Student senator Arnold Hedstrom and Bruce Armstrong,
student board of governors member
strongly opposed the banner's
wording and claimed it was vague
and inappropriate for Open House.
Hedstrom and Armstrong
proposed an amendment suggesting
that the banner read: "UBC needs
your support for funding" in order
to be more specific in outlining the
problems with university funding.
"The underlying question of
what we're trying to say is that the
university receives inadequate
funding," Armstrong said Wednesday.
But Kate Andrew, Alma Mater
Society external affairs officer, disagreed with Armstrong and supported the original slogan.
"The (original) phrasing focuses
in on the question of accessibility to
universities," said Andrew.
The two sides finally agreed on a
compromise which places a banner
on either end of SUB, each banner
bearing one of the slogans. The
motion approving the compromise
was passed after Hedstrom and
Armstrong tried to demand a two-
thirds majority for the vote and
failed.
But approval of the motion was
by no means unanimous. Hedstrom
and Armstrong were opposed to
any inclusion of the original text
and called the compromise
amendment redundant.
But Hedstrom said "redundancy
Graffiti attracts bores and buffoons
ByTIMLANGMEAD
mil JULIE WHEELWRIGHT
The real truth about the way university
students think is written on tbe wall — the
washroom wail.
UBC student interest ranges from the
bizarre to the banal, from Pavlov to poetry
and back to Barrett and Bennett, according to
the graffiti scrawled across campus.
In a discreet investigation, SUB washrooms
proved to be the most politically-oriented,
with graffiti advertising the Vancouver crisis
line. Rape Relief and demands for a lobby for
student jobs.  ■
But bathroom humor did rear its head and
one student had scawled: "does the name
Pavlov ring a bell?" Other jokes evoked
nauseous yawns like: "What did the old goat
say to the young goat? Hey kid."
Angus, Brock Hall, Scarfe and the
biological sciences building have been largely
purged of all washroom wisdom (probably for
\ppen House), but Buchanan and places like
the chemical sciences building still display a
,smsfll fare.
la the chemical sciences building there were
the usual tasteless jokes like Chem Science
forever, and for some variety, punk rock fans
had pledged their views.
"Punk rode is hare, stand aside Mick
Jagger," and "punk has no class," gleaned
from the men's washroom walls; and there was
even an advertisement for the Subhumans
complete with the Windmill tavern's address.
There was evidence of -the usual rotting
minds who express a death wish for other
faculties like Kill all artsies now.    .
Buchanan was a little wittier with such gems
as: "I've never been kissed before, do you
think I'm strange?" and "This js a urinal for
women. You needn't sit to pee."
But the last bastion of wit and wonder* the
graffiti gallup poll in itself, was Main library's
basement women's washroom.
There was advice for the frustrated,
probably produced by some poor soul fatigued
after several hours in Main's musty depths.
"Eat a bullfrog for breakfast and nothing
worse will happen to you all day," and "This
toilet is locked in for security, do not attempt
to remove it," graced the cubicles, but the
humor did improve.
Religious contemplators gave their subtle
wall sermons: "God is silent, now if he could
only get man to shut up," and "God dida't
create the world in seven days, he fooled
around for six and then pulled an all nighter."
The walls' words also asked for information, like: "Theories on the origins of
perversion in the faculty of engineering, any
mforroation?" *
The prophets also spouted love for their art
like: "Writing pn the walls is not dirty — it's a
form of human expression." The reply read;
"One should not have to rely on graffiti as
stimulation to think while they're in here, an
intelligent person is never bored."
And there was interfaculty rivalry in the
men's domain: "Commerce students are full
of bullshit." Someone else simply recorded:
"It depends on the market." ,
is a better device at getting at people
than vagueness."
"I think Arnold's amendment is
a crock of shit," countered law
senator Eric Warren, who supported the compromise.
Andrew said the banner and the
button distribution plans will now
go ahead as planned.
The holdup in the anti-tuition fee
campaign originally came Monday
when SAC passed a motion forbidding the distribution of anti-
tuition buttons and the placement
of an anti-tuition banner on the
SUB balcony.
SRA members reacted angrily to
the decision and circulated a
petition to force today's special
meeting to overturn the SAC
decision.
But Eric Vogt, vice-president of
faculty and student affairs, said
Wednesday the anti-tuition
campaign was not "in the spirit of
Open House."
"We need to work with all of the
voters and MLAs and the media to
show the easy access to our
university. But Open House is
another event," he said.
It's not
our fault
The Open House newspaper
which has been distributed on the
UBC campus is not a supplement to
today's Ubyssey.
Without consulting The Ubyssey
staff, the Open House committee
used The Ubyssey's name to avoid
taxation on the publishing of their
newspaper.
Cutbacks spark government glee
From page 1
As the economy slides, social
services and education are lined up
for the chopping block. Under the
title of fiscal restraint, the federal
and provincial governments are
chipping away the social services
that have taken half a century to
build up.
"The people most affected by the
cuts in education and social services
are the ones least able to afford it.
Social services provided by the
government ensure that the
province's poor have access to the
kind of services taken for granted
by the more wealthy," says BCSF
staffperson John Doherty.
The unwritten policy of social
service cutbacks was bared for
everyone to see last fall. The federal
cabinet ministers almost gleefully
announced cut after cut under the
new "economic recovery
program."
The  student   and   non-profit
survey, a compilation of available
jobs, was eliminated.
The $3.9 million federal information budget was cut by $2
million.
Manpower training was cut by
$18.2 million and the manpower
living allowance budget was cut by
$39.3 million.
Bilingualism development was
cut by $34 million.
The National Research Council
was cut by $1 million, the national
health and research program by $2
million and Canada Council by
$1.1 million. But the fall festival of
cutbacks was only the most visible
of an established government
practice.
A ceiling imposed by Ottawa on
federal transfers for higher
education in 1972 shifted total responsibility for the development of
education to the provincial
governments.
Governments have
chipped away the
social services that
have taken
50 years to build.
housing budget was cut by $85
million. Next year that budget line
item will be totally removed.
In the face of a record level of
unemployment, the Unemployment
Insurance Commission budget was
cut by $580 million. The size of the
cut next year is predicted to be $910
million. The eligibility restrictions
which accompanied the cut will
most seriously affect youth and
women.
The  federal   government's  job
The cost-sharing agreement was
renegotiated again in 1977. It
amounted to a $450 million cut in
federal funding for education.
Another cut to the tune of $165
million was successfully blocked by
the provinces last October.
Students were painfully aware
last spring that education, like
other social services, was no longer
a government priority. More than
25,000 students demonstrated their
opposition   to   cuts   in   education
funding across the country. Though
it might not have been common
knowledge, the cuts which sparked
last spring's demonstrations are an
about-face of previous government
policy.
The post-war economy of the
1950s was characterized by a high
level of direct government involvement in the economy.
Government participation was
supposed to compensate for the
peaks and valleys of the business
cycle. It was hoped that that would
serve to prevent another depression
like the '30s.
An important part of that
economic strategy was the development of a higher education system.
An educated labor force was
thought to mean increased production and a healthier economy.
To justify spending for the development of higher education, the
notion of education as a right was
given a high public profile. The
common belief was that higher
education would also lead to individual economic benefit.
The federal government became
involved in funding education in a
big way. Even though the British
North America Act gives the
provinces responsibility for
education, they accepted federal
funds with open arms.
The per capita grant to
universities was doubled in 1957. In
1958 the federal grant was raised
again. Then in 1967 the federal
government announced its intention to fund fully half of the
operating cost of higher education
or $15 per capita, whichever was
greater.
But the future was not to bring
good tidings. The end of the 1960s
witnessed a new economic
phenomenon, stagflation. Never
before had sky-rocketing unemployment and mounting inflation
been   co-existent.   Obviously   the
post-war economic strategy was not
working out. Education was not
proving itself to be an economic
panacea, and was ripe to be cut.
The organization also criticized
the lack of planning for higher
education in Canada.
As government  funding is  cut
campus activity and emphasize the
need to secure community support.
The federation's John Doherty
says the community is led to believe
that cutbacks in education and
social services means lower taxes.
"But that's not true. Income tax
increased by 51 per cent and B.C.
with no apparent goal in sight,
accessibility declines. Enrolment
for Canada's universities declined
by 376,590. According to Statistics
Canada the traditional university
age group will continue to expand
until 1982.
The National Union of Students
and BCSF are in the midst of a
national campaign to stop the cuts
to education. NUS will focus on the
need for a national plan for
education in Canada and for
greater access to higher education.
The campaign will be based on local
sales tax increased by 40 per cent
from its 1975 level.
"The economic recovery strategy
is only giving us 900,000 unemployed, declining social services and
higher taxes. Obviously cutbacks
don't make much economic sense.
We've had them for almost a
decade and still inflation and unemployment are on the rise."
(Jeff Parr is western fieldworker
for the National Union of
Students.) Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March 2, 1979
Back stage
The commotion, visitors and carnival-like atmosphere you see all
round UBC today is part of this university's triennial public relations
orgy. And for good reason.
There are many good and exciting things happening at UBC.
This university contains some of the best researchers and teachers
to be found in Canada and boasts a strong reputation of excellence
in many fields. But everything is not glitter and gloss at UBC,
although you will see little else during Open House. There are problems in this sleepy, isolated campus on the peninsula.
Every year, the university is threatened with potential financial
cuts as a fickle provincial government, notorious for cutbacks in
almost every progressive field in society (such as education, human
resources, health, public transportation and others) decides where
to next apply the paring knife.
Many of the latest gadgets and gizmos you will see displayed
here will be spanking new, but you won't see the dilapidated and
obsolete equipment many faculties must use every day, because of
past government cutbacks.
You also won't see many students from low-income groups studying at this institution. The vast majority of students at this campus come from pretty comfortable backgrounds, an indictment
against our inegalitarian education system, which supplies recruits
for our inegalitarian society.
And although you will see sowie of the many innovative ideas,
concepts and techniques being developed at this ivory tower promising a brave new world, most of the graduates from this institution are dedicated to a status quo mentality of supporting an unjust
economic system from which they intend to exact their substantial
pound of flesh.
If you are a taxpayer, you will be welcomed this week with open
arms, but you will not be consulted till, the next Open House, as to
how the university, a vital provincial resource, is managed.
That is the job of the UBC board of governors, a collection of
tired people dominated by industrialists, former politicans and the
university administration. There is little room for public participation in the management of this education factory although you
have paid through the nose for it.
Enjoy Open House '79.
Letters
Godiva 'symbolic insult'
If you are a member of the crowd
that obstinately refuses to believe
the Lady Godiva ride is nothing
more than a prank or a practical
joke, then read no further. This
letter is addressed to those who are
able to distinguish between an act
that is entirely funny and one that
attacks our fundamental principles
of civil liberty.
I admit that it is not always easy
to detect discrimination when it
occurs. However I am surprised
that the majority of our 'intellectual' community has failed to
perceive the ride for what it really is
— sexism.
The   Lady   Godiva   ride   is   a
symbolic insult to every woman on
campus. The engineers are once
again trying to perpetrate the myth
that women must play a subordinate role in our society. Their
attitude towards women stems from
their own moronic macho mentality.
Within the past week I have observed bitterness, resentment and
distress among a number of women
in the law faculty. I do not believe
the engineers fully realize the effects of their behavior, but if they
do then their plans can only be
described as insensitive and
sadistic.
Even though I oppose the ride, I
Lady no Socred
What's this? The engineers are
demonstrating for lower taxes,
public housing and a break for
welfare recipients and the unemployed? So it seems if we accept the
claim by some engineers and others,
they are simply honoring Lady
Godiva's legendary political action.
The engineers have not selected
Godiva as a patroness saint because
they want to protest poverty, inequality and social injustice. They
like naked women (and horses?) as
sex objects. And they like being immature and obnoxious. It's the
biggest thrill they can get.
I find the Godiva ride, as intended, offensive — as I find the
engineers' inability to recognize
that times have changed. Sex
stereotyping and jock humor of this
sort are repressive assaults on
human potentiality and sensibility.
In as much as their consciousness
appears to be impervious to
reasoning or raising, charges of
obscenity and indecent exposure
might be the best way to end it.
While we're on the subject, however, I'd like to point out that there
are other equally offensive events
going on all the time, in more invidious fashion. The movie Semi-
tough is being shown on campus
this weekend. Not only is the movie
itself insulting to all women
students at UBC, but the ad for it,
carried in The Ubyssey on Tuesday,
is a blatantly sexist come-on for
engineers and chauvinists of similar
ilk.
The Ubyssey should be ashamed
for contributing to the perpetuation
of an oppressive and anachronistic
myth. Are we really here for
juvenile, weak humor and tits-and-
ass movies? How about some films
of human and political relevance"
and some real political action.
Sheila McDonnell
do not support the aggressive
tactics of the women protestors.
Women's movements always seem
to be directed toward organizing
short-run, sensational demonstrations. Although this strategy may
be the easiest way for them to take
action, it certainly is not the most
effective way of convincing the rest
of the community that they have a
valid cause.
Their efforts would be more
productive if they were directed
toward educating others as to the
issues and problems facing women
in our society. A long-term
educational strategy would create
greater understanding between men
and women and hopefully prevent
situations like the Lady Godiva ride
from occurring.
I am further appalled by the ways
in which students have attempted to
justify the event. Arguments such
as 'engineers support charity,' 'it's
a tradition' or 'our society should
permit nudity' do not address the
central issue. The real issue is
whether the UBC engineers should
or should not publicly display
women as mere sex objects. In my
opinion they should not.
Art Hargrove
THF LIRY^XFY
;■;^-":::v-" - ;■:■'■ fW^wPtiCH-:;2, 1079  :
iiiWfiWd'::Tiu.fi^^dT|^^a^a;,:||:|jd: .Fridays throughout:the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of.-,
lliilillil^Wfl^NioWi;**i:':ih:teie' of the staff -and -not of ■ th*' ;:
AMS or the university administration. / Member, Canadian.'
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It is one of the most common occurrences at UBC: A student picks up a copy of the Ubyssey and thinks to him (or
her)-self "What a bunch of crazy, chauvinistic imbeciles."
You guessed, the person is reading an article on the
engineers' undergraduate society. The student body is always
brought to their attention on how the engineers play foolish
games on one another (ie: Throwing fellow engineers into the
pond and water bombing other engineering classes).
However, the EUS has never been given credit for all its constructive efforts done on this campus.
0y MMMMtt JMONG
Gears are nice guys sometimes
gained much fame for its achievements in the automotive
engineering field.
As a final bit of untold information, consider the biggest
event the EUS holds: The annual engineer's ball. Imagine if
you will (and if you can), a huge formal party with 1200 people: The men wearing suits or tuxedos, the women wearing
long evening dresses and half the people there being engineering students. Each engineering department has their own
area they must decorate to a certain theme and must also present a technical project. Both decorations and projects are
judged by special guests chosen by the EUS. If you don't
believe or can't imagine what it is like, just ask people like
president Kenny, vice-president Vogt or Peter Carson of the
professional engineer's association. Believe it or not,
engineers can have fun in other ways besides chariot races
and crazy stunts.
(freestyle)
Yes, the engineers do all these things. The funny thing is
that they achieve whatever they set out to do and they enjoy
what they do. They are very good at being loud and rambunctious, "but on the same token, they are very good
academically, at helping their school and at doing their part
for charities.
I will not bore you with further details of the other side of
the engineering personality, but I do hope you would have
reached a better understanding of some of the engineers' ef-
forts on and for this campus.	
Michael Mong is a Ubyssey photographer and a member-
of the engineering undergraduate society.
c
■)
Let us regress back a few years to 1975. In that year, the efforts of the EUS (with the help of other groups) forced a
referendum which led to the construction of our newly opened and greatly needed Aquatic Centre. The same year, the
Walter Gage Student Aid Fund was created as a result of a
testimonial dinner held in the honour of Walter Gage by the
EUS. In 1976, the EUS presented the Crane library with a
much needed tape recorder, as a birthday gift to Walter
Gage.
Perhaps you are still not convinced that the engineers are
trying to help the community. You might remember the pancake breakfasts held annually during engineering week. This
event is held by the EUS in conjunction with CKNW Orphan's Fund. During the most recent T-Cup Game, a total of
about $2,000 was raised (with most of the work being done
by the chemical engineers) for Muscular Dystrophy. Also the
annual civil engineers' blood clinic encourages students to
donate blood: a commodity which we all know is always
needed by our hospitals.
So you are still not convinced. Well let's try another point
of attack: The Shrum Bowl. Brian Short (EUS President)
had to make the motion to get the AMS to support the game.
Then the engineers helped relieve the pressure in the AMS
business office by helping with ticket sales. Also they led in
cheering the T-Birds to victory (in more ways than one).
The Shrum Bowl is an excellent example of the AMS actually doing something for the average student: a change of
pace, non-political, enjoyable thing. Other examples would
be the keg race last year and the car rally this school year:
Events that were strongly supported by the engineers. Concerts are another way of repaying the average AMS member:
Most of the time the engineers are called on to do the bouncing for concerts and other social event help on campus.
The EUS is concerned with the political side as well as the
down to earth image they are trying to give the AMS. Since
1976, the engineers have had at least two senators at large on
SRA and there are two engineers on SAC this year. What
other group on this campus cares enough about the well-
being of the society to actually get people to run for these
positions? On the same lines consider the present constitution. Back in 1976, the EUS supported it fully because they
felt a change of some kind was necessary. Now they painfully
regret and admit their mistake and want to change it. The
engineers do not like to see everything on this campus at a
stand-still. Engineers like to see things work for this campus.
Up to this point, topics discussed were 'on how engineers
help the campus in terms of spirit and financial support and
helping charities around the city. UBC receives much publicity through the media because of these functions. But the
engineers did not stop there. Consider the academic side. As
a result of the Electric Vehicle Project and its predecessor the
Wally Wagon, both projects of student engineers, UBC has Friday, March 2, 1979
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
Viewers passive not pacifist
v As a frequent visitor to your campus, I
have become more and more disturbed about
the engineers' Godiva ride. But equally
distressing are the arguments in defence of
the students who participate in this obscene,
oppressive, degrading activity. It is the
arguments from other students — frequently
women themselves — which provide an
atmosphere of legitimation, a sense of approval for the ride and all it stands for.
The ride is a metaphor for the degradation
and oppression of women. It is a symbol
which suggests that women are weak,
passive, defenceless and compliant with any
and all forms of assault. Such a symbol
perpetuates the myths surrounding our
attitudes toward rape, for example.
What is particularly distressing about the
letters which have been written to The
Ubyssey in defence of the engineers is not
G
By
CHARMS HAMILTON
3
only the confused thought demonstrated in
them, but the fact that they reveal just how
deeply the ideology of oppression has been
internalized and lived by all of us.
One of the most frequent arguments in
defence of the engineers is that they do some
good things so they should be allowed to
have their fun, do their pranks ("boys will be
boys, you know. . ."). A paraphrase in
defence of the Nazis would argue that they
gave us the Volkswagen and autobahn, so we
should overlook the gas chambers and
concentration camps. Of course all of this
merely casts the issue into the arena of
emotion, of bathos, and it camouflages, it
hides, the real question of evil, of wrongdoing. It suggests that one can earn the right
to oppress others in exchange for performing
a good act, say like giving blood or raising
money for charity. So it is a misplaced
defence of the engineers  to  excuse their
There is no socially
redeeming aspect to
this type of
human activity.
degradation of women by citing their good
acts elsewhere.
A second line of defence is the attack on
those who want the ride stopped. It is similar
to the previous type of argument in that it
also attempts to exonerate the engineers by
putting the onus on those who want to stop
the ride.This type of argument attempts to
cast the ride in a positive light by arguing that
it historically is an ingenious, brave, effective, successful political act against oppression.
But those who argue this confuse the
historical ride of Lady Godiva and the UBC
engineering students' parody. The Godiva of
legend acted alone, no one led her horse
around. The context of the event on the UBC
campus is completely alien from Godiva's
social, political and economic situation. Her
act was a political act of great courage and
self-sacrifice. The engineers' parade is a cruel
lie, a mockery, an affront.
Only ignorance supports the argument that
those who want the ride stopped are oppressors lacking respect for the engineers.
This argument which attacks the opponents
of the ride would be ludicrous were it not so
painfully, tragically, prevalent in our society.
There are the arguments that those who
oppose the ride should turn the other cheek,
passively accept the ride and hope that it will
go away of its own accord. The ride has been
occurring on this campus just about as long
as anyone can remember and only in the last
couple of years has any protest been made.
Clearly, the ride has not died with benign
neglect over the years. If anything, it has
become an engineering tradition. Other
forms of oppression, perhaps most notably
racism, have also been defended by those
who  suggest benign  neglect.   Those  who
Charles Hamilton is a graduate student at
Simon Fraser University. Perspectives is a
column open to anyone in the university
community.
suggest this path confuse passivism with
pacifism, the first a form of non-activity, the
second a form of activity.
But there is another argument which, at
first glance, appears to provide a strong, unanswerable defence for the Lady Godiva
ride. This argument wraps itself in appeals
for human rights and tolerance and notions
of "victimless crime" so thoroughly that
opponents of the ride are made to feel that
they are against motherhood, the flag and
applie pie.
The same tactic is used by purveyors of
1970s and the ensuing studies in ecology have
clearly demonstrated that we all live in a
systemic relationship with one another, that
an action in one part of our world has far-
reaching and often unapparent consequences
in other parts of our world. We are not
individuals in isolation. We are not islands.
We are our brothers' keeper. There is no
"victimless" crime.
In addition to the reliance upon the lies
inherent in traditional liberal ideology and
rhetoric, the argument which suggests that
opponents of the ride are totalitarians reveals
pornographic material which portrays
women and children as the objects of sadism
and violence. Women's groups and others
who have attempted to bring legal action to
halt such publication have been met with the
challenge that they — horrors! — are acting
as censors, as totalitarian Anita Bryants.
And women have reacted to these arguments
by apologizing for being censors.
But the defence of pornography and the
Godiva ride which relies on anti-censorship
arguments is a false defence based on false
premises. To begin with, it is based on a long
line of traditional liberal democratic
arguments in defence of individual freedom.
This tradition itself is based on two faulty
premises. The first is that human beings are
rational animals and will naturally do the
right and good thing. History, however,
shows the lie. The horrible deeds of the Nazis
are only the most infamous of the various
atrocities "rational" human beings have
perpetrated on their fellow beings. The right
and the good are not natural choices, the
Enlightenment notwithstanding.
The second faulty premise of traditional
liberal arguments is that we are all individuals, that we all act alone, that our
actions have no consequences for anyone
else. Thus we get the idea of "victimless
crime" — no one else is involved. However,
the environmental crisis of the 1960s and
an ignorance of socio-economic and political
reality. Censorship occurs all the time. The
very same page of The Ubyssey which announced intended legal action to halt the
Godiva ride also announced the cancellation
of a concert on the UBC campus under
pressure from the RCMP. There are constraints, there is pressure, there is censorship.
As a former member of the working press,
in fact the night editor of a medium-sized
daily newspaper in the New York
metropolitan area, I know there is censorship
of the press. We censored ourselves all the
time, sometimes for political reasons,
sometimes for economic reasons, sometimes
for social reasons. The problem, therefore, is
not censorship or authoritarianism; the
problem is rather whose ox is being gored.
The problem is power. Those in power can
censor with impunity. Those without power
who attempt to censor run the risk of offending those in power. It is the case with the
pornographers and it is the case with
engineers at UBC. In both cases "censorship" is a red herring.
We are all constrained. We live with many
constraints every day and none of us run
around like Chicken Little complaining of
Anita Bryantism. Even the legal system
based on traditional Enlightenment and
liberal philosophy recognizes that there are
and must be constraints.
The law, for example, does firmly
distinguish between a political speech and the
false cry of "fire!" in a crowded theatre. The
indiscriminate argument that the Godiva ride
should be tolerated because it is a form of
human expression, personal behavior,
obviously fails to recognize that there are
evils which are impermissible.
The most shameful, embarrassing actors in
this entire drama have been the university
administrators who have merely engaged in a
lot of hand-wringing, but who have taken no
action. UBC president Douglas Kenny and
vice-president Erich Vogt begin to appear
rather foolish as they deplore their inability
to do anything. Certainly men who can hire
and fire personnel, cut budgets and remove
the dean of women's position from
university administration can stop a mere
horse ride on campus. If they really wanted
to, that is.
There is a sense in which the engineers are
perspectives
more up front, more honest, about their
activity than either the university administration or their defenders in other
quarters. In giving notice that they will not
stop the ride, no matter what action opponents, the university administration, or
incoming engineering dean Martin Wedepohl
may take, they reveal the true nature of the
ride. It is a blatant, overt demonstration of
physical and political power much like the
actions of Hitler's Brown Shirts as they
ransacked the universities and terrorized
those who were physically and politically
weaker.
The actions of the engineers in defying
social, political and legal constraints in their
insistence on holding the ride reveal the worst
forms of human brutality which underlie the
entire event. There is no socially redeeming
aspect to this type of human activity. There is
There is nothing
defensible in what
the engineers do.
nothing defensible in what the engineers do
in holding this ride. As such, those who
remain silent, those who quietly stand by as
the engineers engage in this atrocity share in
their guilt. None of us, as Germany in the
1930s and 1940s so clearly demonstrated,
stand free and innocent.
Of. course, I am sure that there are some
engineers who don't agree with their
colleagues and are as disgusted by the ride as
I and others are. And in a sense, theirs is
perhaps the most difficult position. We who
oppose the ride share a sense of comradeship, a sense of having a common cause.
Engineers who oppose the ride risk ostracism
from their own friends. But those engineers
who oppose the ride also have the best opportunity to reach out to their friends, to talk
to them, to discuss the implications of the
ride, of their attitudes toward women,
toward the powerless.
After all, the Lady Godiva ride is only the
tip of the iceberg. As a form of sexism, it
provides a rather easy target. Ending the ride
isn't going to end sexism on this or any other
campus. The unwillingness on the part of
male UBC administrators to take any action
to end even this symbol of sexism is itself
evidence of the pervasiveness, depth and
subtlety of the problem. But ending the ride
is a beginning. And discussion aimed at
ending the ride is the beginning of the
beginning. A journey of a thousand miles
begins with the first step. The battle is not
with the engineers, per se, but with bigotry,
oppression, hatred and with those aspects of
society which support and continue the
presence of those evils in the world.
Finally, I am encouraged by those brave
women and men who have spoken out on this
issue, who have taken the risk of calling
attention to the ride. The abuse they have
already suffered from those who support the
ride is evidence enough of their courage and
dedication. They are not alone, however. It is
in bonds of friendship, sharing the spirit that
Martin Luther King knew, that we shall
overcome. Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March 2, 1979
Letters
1984 is already here, by George
Yesterday I heard some more fuel
being added to the taxpayers'
revolt, education division. The
event was an early-morning radio
debate between an inarticulate
engineering student and a blue-
nosed bowdlerizer who wishes to
hasten the onset of Orwellian
totalitarianism by banning Lady
Godiva's forthcoming ride.
The engineer claimed that
Godiva rides because she is the
patron saint of engineers, a position
he was unable to defend because it
is untrue. His best defence would
have been that most men like
looking at attractive naked women
and the ride provides that opportunity without hurting anyone.
The blue-nose, a gentleman
named Erich Vogt, based his objections on two points: the ride is
degrading to women, and it is out
of place at a university.
The second point can be easily
disposed of. Universities have
traditionally had three functions:
they were a storehouse of
knowledge, they provided an
education, and they were a place
where young people could sow wild
oats and let off steam without
embarrassing their parents.
Universities were never meant to be
convents or monasteries, something
opponents of Gage parties and
punk rock fail to recognize.
Vogt's second point, that the ride
degrades women, is as simple to
refute. There are four components
to the ride: a naked woman, a
group of engineers, a horse and a
public place. If Mr. Vogt is objecting to naked women, he is in the
wrong place. He should go
downtown and look for signs
saying "Topless and Bottomless"
or "Nude." These signs mean that
there are naked women on the
premises, and Mr. Vogt could really
do a Carrie Nation act.
If Mr. Vogt objects to horses, he
should picket all those riders that
threaten the life and limb of the
joggers on Marine Drive every day.
If Mr. Vogt dislikes engineers, he
is a bigot, a term that I am sure he
would deny. That leaves the fact
that the ride occurs in public.
If Mr. Vogt objects to seeing the
spectacle, he can betake himself to
the library and study while the ride
is taking place, as can the rest of his
joyless band.
Having commented on the
particular case at hand, I would
now like to turn to the general
principle at stake. I am sick and
tired (and somewhat afraid) of
people forcing their particular
beliefs on me under the flag of
equality. Certainly one must be in
favor of equality of pay and opportunity, if one lives in a society
that purports to be fair and just.
But it is equally certain that attempts to impose moral standards
on others have no more to do with
equality than do attempts to make
everyone hold the same beliefs.
It is as absurd to suggest that
having a naked woman ride a horse
across campus is degrading to all
women as it is to suggest that
allowing a pair of inept bunglers to
debate on radio is degrading to the
university. In fact, the latter is
probably more true than the former. If people want to flaunt their
breasts or biases in public that is
their affair. I don't have to look or
listen, but I can if I want and I can
comment on the size of the breasts
or the inanity of the biases.
I suggest that 1984 is coming all
too swiftly and we should be
striving to avoid the reality of Orwell's gloomy predictions concerning that date, rather than
ensuring their validity by using our
prejudices and biases to turn the
world into a grey, gloomy, Calvin-
ist sea of tasteless porridge under
the tired, tattered banner of
equality.
Head ed, Fred
Notice to all education students
— if you are frustrated by the
bureaucracy of the AMS, don't just
sit there or write letters to The
Ubyssey. You can represent
education on the student representative assembly of the AMS.
Time is short, as nominations for
education reps to SRA close 4 p.m.
Friday, March 2.
Three positions are now open.
Further information and
nomination forms are available at
the ESA office — Scarfe 4.
Frank Lee
education senator
The   Ubyssey   welcomes   letters    edit letters for reasons of brevity,
from all readers. taste or libel.
Letters   should
doubied-spaced.
be   typed   and
The Ubyssey reserves the right to
Pen names may be used of valid
reasons are presented and the
writer's real name is given to the
editor for our information.
AMS JOB OPPORTUNITY
EDITOR INSIGHT 79
DUTIES:
PERIOD:
To produce the editorial content
of the student handbook.
Contract basis for approximately
8 weeks.
COMMENCING:
QUALIFICATIONS
March 20,  1979
1) Must be familiar with A.M.S.
Structure
2) Knowledge of campus activities
3) Ability to write and
communicate effectively
APPLICATIONS AVAILABLE
S.U.B. 266 - 246
DEADLINE
March 15, 4:00 p.m. - S.U.B. 266
INTERVIEWS
To Be Arranged
Mr. Vogt, if the engineers can
convince some woman that disrobing and climbing on a horse in
March is enjoyable, let them. Take
your band of cheerless harridans
and go burn some books, but please
don't let the smoke blow in my
direction.
Just as the freedom of speech
does not extend to yelling "fire" in
a crowded theatre, the concept of
equality does not include yelling
"sexist" at everyone who looks up
from his (or her, or its) books once
in a while.
Ian Cameron
grad studies
Province of British Columbia
PUBLIC NOTICE
PUBLIC INQUIRIES ACT
(R.S.B.C 1960, Chap. 315)
ROYAL COMMISSION OF
INQUIRY HEALTH AND
ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION
URANIUM MINING
TAKE NOTICE that, pursuant to the British Columbia Public Inquiries
Act, His Honour the Lieutenant-Governor in Council has been pleased
to appoint as Commissioners the following persons, namely:
Dr. David V. Bates, Chairman
Dr. James W. Murray
Valter Raudsepp
The Commissioners shall inquire into the adequacy of existing
measures to provide protection in all aspects of uranium mining in
British Columbia. In particular, the Commissioners will examine the
adequacy of existing Federal and Provincial requirements in British
Columbia for:
(a) The protection of the health and safety of workers associated
with exploration, mining and milling of uranium, and
(b) The protection of the environment, and
(c) The protection of the Public.
The Commissioners shall make recommendations for setting and
maintaining standards for workers and public safety and for the protection of the environment in respect to the exploration, mining and
milling of uranium ores. They are to report their findings and recommendations to the Lieutenant-Governor in Council in accordance with
the provisions of the Act.
AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that Public Hearings by the Royal Commission of Inquiry Health and Environmental protection — Uranium
Mining will be held at selected locations throughout the Province, at
times and dates to be announced. The first series of Public Hearings
to receive Briefs will be held during the months of May, June, and July,
1979. An inaugural Public meeting is to be held
10:00 a.m., Tuesday, March 6,1979
Holiday Inn
711 West Broadway Avenue
Vancouver, B.C.
The purpose of this meeting will be to outline plans for future sittings
and rules of procedure.
AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that those persons or organizations intending to appear before the Commission at any of its Public Hearings
after March 6, 1979 are required to:
(a) Write immediately to inform the Executive Secretary at the ad-
„ dress below and inform him of such intention, and thereafter
(b) Prepare a Brief to be forwarded to the Executive Secretary prior
to their appearance before the Commission.
There will be an opportunity for informal presentations to be made
before the Commission during its Public Hearings without prior notice
being given.
The Executive Secretary will contact the parties concerned and certain other organizations and expert witnesses to arrange for their appearance at a suitable time and place.
Further Public Notices with respect to the Public Hearings will be
issued in due course.
On behalf of the Commission:
Brig. Gen. ED. Danby (retired)
Executive Secretary
Royal Commission of Inquiry
Health and Environmental
Protection — Uranium Mining
P.O. Box 46302, Postal Station "G"
Vancouver, B.C. V6R 4G6 Friday, March 2, 1979
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
Letters
Grubby gears duck discos
Please don't take pity on me, but
I am one of those unfortunate types
with "friends" in engineering.
Aside from the many outrageous
antics they perform during the
course of a year, there is one other
thing that strengthens my stand that
they are most insecure and out of
date: they all hate disco music.
The reasons for this are quite
clear. Firstly, engineers don't know
how to dance. They have no sense
of rhythm and lack the imagination
for body movement. Their idea of
dancing is jumping up and down on
the spot. If they are really creative
they might move around a bit, go in
circles or even jump on one foot.
My gear friends claim they just
dislike that type of music because
it's boring. In actuality, they are
just insecure  from not  knowing
how to dance with finesse. They are
even worse at touch dancing. I have
attended many engineering dances
and rarely have I witnessed touch
dancing. Obviously it's because
they are afraid the girls will laugh.
Another reason why engineers
hate disco is because they are so old
fashioned. Consider clothes for
instance: the disco scene is setting
the pace in fashion. But, as you
look around campus what do you
see engineers wearing? Unhemmed
jeans, T-shirts, Addidas and their
grubby red sweaters.
Their jeans are either half-way up
their legs or dragging all over the
ground. Some of these outcasts
even wear polyester. My gear
friends wear decent clothes though,
only because their mothers have
their clothes laid out for them when
they get up in the morning.
Which brings me to the point of
general appearance. These guys
that carry this macho image must
have very negative self concepts of
themselves: they not only dress like
slobs but they walk like real losers
(as they are), slouched and heads
down. Many of them cover their
zits by growing beards. Their hair is
either straight in a bowl cut (mostly
the oriental variety) or greased up
and curly (mainly because they only
take baths once a month).
Getting back to the original
topic: the disco scene can really
help build the character of people
with positive self concepts, but for
the engineer there is no hope.
In conclusion I'll say that the
macho image that these campus
assholes carry is all a cover-up for
the many insecurities they possess.
The engineers hate disco not for
what it is but for what it reveals
about them — out of date and
insecure.
Sonja Sinclair
arts 3
No pennies for pansies
Ker-punk!!
The RCMP clearly does have the
necessary authority to pressure the
AMS and any other group on
campus that desires the elusive
privilege of a liquor license.
In downtown Vancouver* these
licenses must, I suppose, be given to
certain establishments that have
been approved or at least not
condemned by the Vancouver
police force. Why then do
numerous places downtown
continue to gain the sanction of
legal authority for licensed punk
concerts while out here on this
cloistered peninsula such an event is
forbidden without even being tried?
Perhaps these two illustrious law
enforcement agencies should get
together and attempt the provision
of something at least resembling
consistency if not justice. If the
LAB can issue a liquor license to a
downtown club for punk concerts
there is no apparent reason why
they shouldn't do the same on this
campus.
If this request for consistency
seems a bit too ambitious, perhaps
a punk 'dance' could be arranged
— and I know that dances with live
music are regularly granted liquor
licenses on this campus.
Neil Cadger
arts 4
Such an approach is currently
being   investigated   by   the   AMS
programs   committee.   Long   live
rock V roll.—Staff.
Would you be fair enough to
permit the public an answer back in
your paper?
After paging through your
university newspaper The Ubyssey
and reading a letter submitted by
Mr. Remple RCMP catches
firebomb fever, I thought I'd
present you freethinking intellectual scholars with my view.
For Christ's sake Vancouver isn't
in the midst of some sort of
revolution, we members of the so-
called dumb working class are just
fed up. All we hear from you
university students is "no more
tuition increases," "more free
grants." If you add up all your god
damn tuition fees it would probably
only amount to about $15 million,
of which you get enough grants,
interest-free loans and awards
already. Where the hell do you
think the other $150 million comes
from to run that place.
We wouldn't mind supporting
you bastards if we got something in
return like fixing up this
hypocritical and costly so-called
justice system we're stuck with and
got some help from being stepped
on by these crooked companies and
paying impossible mortgage payments and taxes. But NO, what do
we get — a bunch of greedy, selfish,
snobby brats who just make more
of these stupid laws with more
loopholes for big business, government and the police to exploit,
manipulate, rip us off with and use
against us.
Well, I dor.'f support all those
firebomb ings a^d me and my wife
are too old to have been to, or plan
to go see, one of those punk rock
concerts, but I'd sure as hell put my
two bits in for their efforts before
I'd willingly give another penny to
you backstabbing pansies.
A dumb working class taxpayer
Excuuusse me!
I think after having read the
article in the Feb. 20 edition of the
paper, that there is some necessity
for clarification of a statement
made by myself.
The statement "the engineers
don't give a shit about anyone but
themselves" is rather misleading in
the context in which it was
provided. Like the women from
second year rehab., I am quite
aware of the engineers' community
efforts. Their participation in intramurals, concerts, the Shrum Bowl,
Open House and their aid to
Muscular Distrophy and Lion's
Crippled Children Funds are in
dications of this.
However, when it comes
specifically to the Lady Godiva
ride, I seriously doubt whether
opposition from anyone is going to
keep the engineers from holding
their "traditional ride." I feel that
most people are aware that many
people are offended by this ride,
and the basic principle behind it;
however, the engineers are known
for engineers week and it seems
Lady Godiva has become an integral part of it. It is with regard to
this that my comment applied.
Valgeet Johl
AMS president
Open House Today
Today the unive
its doors to the public. But those~doors
shut for many residents of thi£_ province if thei ^^,
increase in tuition fees next year, as now seems likelyT"We
proud of this university and the things it has to 6ffer, and
believe that every British Columbian should have the opportunity to benefit from it. The last time there was a tuition fee increase there was a two per cent decline in university enrolment. How much will it be this time?
— A message from the Alma Mater Society. Pag* 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March 2, 1979
Nursing cuts 'unhealthy1
From page 1
grams at colleges and at the B.C.
Institute of Technology.
"The $150 a month wasn't
enough to see you through, but
people were so grateful to be getting
even that they were afraid to remind
the government they were getting
it," Carlson said. She said it would
be impossible for students in the
two-year program to get by without
the stipend unless they had wealthy
parents or ran up heavy debts.
Community college reaction to
the move has been angry and rapid.
Linda Keefe, vice-president for external affairs at Caribou College,
has mailed a petition calling for the
retention of the stipends to all the
institutions in the province offering
nursing programs. Carlson said she
would urge UBC nursing students
to sign the petition.
Former NDP health minister
Dennis Cocke said the decision to
phase out the stipends had to be a
cabinet move.
"A bureaucrat would never dare
to do anything like that, it's unthinkable," he said in a telephone
interview Thursday. "If you are
waiting to find logic in what this
government is doing, I wouldn't
hold your breath."
He said the new policy offered no
encouragement to new students
who've considered entering the
field, and added the money spent
on the stipends had been one of the
best investments the government
could make.
Margaret Nylan, department
head of psychiatric nursing at
BCIT, said she was concerned over:
the financial implications removal
of the stipend would have on certain BCIT students.
She said that 240 BCIT nursing
students would be looking for jobs
this summer and that most of them •
needed to work even if they had the
stipend.
"In addition, students from the
department of health engineering
services, the medical laboratory
department and the department of
radiological technological services
now have to do practicums for both
summers in the two-year program
and they experience large travel expenses as well."
FOCUS ON THE CHILD
KIDS ARE PEOPLE TOO!
MARCH   4 - KID'S RIGHTS
Dr. Naomi Hersom Associate Dean (Academic)
Faculty of Education U.B.C.
MARCH 11 - KID'S RIGHTS TO GROWTH
Ralph Bagshaw — High School Counsellor
MARCH 18 - KID'S RIGHTS TO DISCIPLINE
Dr. Bruce Waltke, Professor, Regent College
SUNDAYS EVENINGS - 7:00 P.M.
WEST POINT GREY BAPTIST CHURCH
4506 West 11th Avenue
Vancouver, B.C. Ph. 228-9747
A magnificent year 'round wilderness centre
offering apprenticeship programmes in outdoor and environmental education. Enjoy the
beauty and tranquility of Vancouver Island's
mountains, forests, lakes and ocean.
Please send me your 34
page 1979 calendar of over
80 outdoor programs.
Name	
Address.
To:
STRATHCONA 	
Box 2160, Campbell River, B.C.
V9W 5C9
P.O. Code-
LAST CHANCE - (ARTS STUDENTS)
to have a say in the A.U.S.
NOMINATIONS CLOSE ON MARCH 2nd FOR
1. ARTS PRESIDENT — Lisaon between students and Admin., Chair, of
Arts Council, Arts Rep. to S.R.A.
2. ARTS VICE-PRESIDENT — Social Coordinator and assists president.
3. ARTS TREASURER — Looks after all financial matters.
4. ARTS  SECRETARY  —   Correspondence and  Chief  Returning  Officer
(Positions 1-4 — attend Arts meetings and Arts Council Meetings.)
5. 4 ARTS REPS to the Student Representative Assembly (SRA) (attend
Arts Meetings, Arts Council Meetings & SRA Meetings.)
ELECTIONS ARE MARCH 7th
Advice, Information and Nomination Forms Available
at Arts Office (Buch. 107)
OPEN HOUSE
CLASSICAL SPECIALS
James Galway
plays
Songs For Annie
JAMES GALWAY, Flute
James Galway Plays Songs
For Annie
Le Basque; Bachianas
Brasileiras Number 5 - Aria;
Liebes freud; Berceuse From
"Dolly"; AllegroC'ln An
Eighteenth Century Drawing
Room"); Annie's Song;
Tambourin; La Plus Que Lente;
Brian Boru's March; Belfast
Hornpipe; Spanish Love Song;
Carmen Fantasy
ONLY
$5.48
JAMES GALWAY
French Flute Concerto
VALDIMIR HOROWITZ
Golden Jubilee Concert
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Vladimir
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RED SEAL
ENCLOSED
Ibert: Concerto For Flute And
Orchestra; I Allegro, II Andante,
III Allegro Scherzando;
Chaminade: Conertino For
Flute And Orchestra Opus 107;
Poulenc: Sonata For Flute And
Orchestra; I Allegro Malinconico,
II Cnatilena, III Presto Grazioso;
$5.48
Rachmaninoff Concerto No. 3 In
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Non Tanto; Rachmaninoff Concerto
No. 3 In D Minor, Op. 30; II. Intermezzo: Adagio; III. Finale: Alia
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$5.98
JAMES GALWAY:
PLAYS BACH/ARLI-2907—$5.98
SONATAS FOR FLUTE & PIAN0/LRU-5095^$5.98
MAGIC FLUTE OF JAMES GALWAY/LRLI-5131—$5.98
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RECORD CENTRE
2671 W. Broadway, 733-2215 Friday, March 2, 1979
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 9
RCMP uncovered
From page 1
well as rooms at the University of
Toronto.
In 1963, the brief reads, the
principal of Huntington College at
Laurentian University in Sudbury
swore an affadavit that the RCMP
Mismanagement
charges raised
From page 1
intent, which was to change the
traditional "animal" nature of
Totem Park.
Croft said at least 27 cases have
come before the Totem standards
committee this year, while the
yearly average is 16 or less.  •
"People just retaliated against
the restraints put upon them," he
said.
Meeting organizer Craig Brooks
said the charges will be brought to
Erich Vogt, administration vice-
president of faculty and student
affairs, in the near future.
Brooks said if Vogt does not do
anything about the charges, he will_
take the matter to the board of
governors.
had interrogated him about three
students on a peace march, possible
communist tendencies in the
Canadian Peace Research Institute,
and whether there were staff or
students at the University with
possible communist tendencies.
The association also questioned
the security service's appreciation
of human rights, pointing to a
report written by an RCMP
sergeant in 1976 referring to alleged
incidents of improper police
conduct. In the report, the sergeant
said a student at the University of
Prince Edward Island had "the
misguided idea that he has all sorts
of rights and that they should not
be violated," and that the students'
formation of a people's action
committee was "under the guise of
civil rights."
The report suggests the sergeant
"had little awareness of the importance of human rights or civil
liberties."
The brief asks the government to
reaffirm its policy that there be no
general surveillance of university
campuses and no interference in
any way with the freedom of discussion so necessary to university
life.
YOU ARE INVITED TO A FREE LECTURE ENTITLED
"The Science of Christian Healing"
given by
MR. JACK EDWARD HUBBLE
Friday, March 9, 12:30 p.m.
Room 102, Buchanan Bldg.
Sponsored by the Christian Science Organization
on Campus.
AMS
ANNUAL
GENERAL MEETING
Monday March 5, 1979
SUB AUDITORIUM
12:30
BULLFROG RECORDING STUDIOS IS PROUD TO PRESENT
Blues
Showcase
featuring
BULLFROG BLUES BAND
with special guests
TONI HOYLAND
ROBIN SMITH CHARLES SAUVE
BARRY HALL
Join us this Friday, March 2, 1979
Graduate Student Centre Ballroom
Admission $3.00 Full facilities
Come and help us celebrate OPEN HOUSE!
SPORTS WORLD CLEARANCE SALE'
(While Supplies Last)
Clearance
Reg
JOGGING SHOES
Adidas Runner
Saucony Gripper
Mens & Ladies
Pony Marathon Blue
Polaris Jogger
Nike LD 1000
Nike Roadrunner
COURT SHOES
Puma Court
Volbi Tennis
Nike All-Court
LEISURE SHOES
Puma Racer
Kawasaki Racquetball
Racquet
Black Knight Fiberglass
Racquetball Racquet
Grays Red Devil
Squash Racquet (strung)
TENNIS RACQUETS
Dunlop Gold Cup 13.95
Dunlop Professional 13.95
Donnay Metal 13.95
Martin Attack 5.95
All other tennis racquets 10% OFF
45.95
39.95
23.95
15.95
45.95
28.95
19.95
17.95
16.95
16.95
19.95
36.99
34.99
15.99
11.99
33.99
22.99
15.99
13.99
13.99
10.99
12.99
"Sport" Jackets
14.95
9.99
Adidas Windbreakers
12.95
9.99
Ladies Antonnella T-Shirts
6.95
4.99
Pony T-Shirts
4.95
2.99
Umbro Singlets
4.95
2.99
Orron Velour Shorts
13.95
9.99
Satin Shorts
13.95
9.99
3 for
Slazenger Socks
1.95
4.29
Russell National
2 for
Tube Socks
2.45
3.99
Assorted T-Shirts
4.95
2.99
STRIP SALE
1 Sports World T-Shirt
2.95
1 pr. Fairline Shorts
4.95
1 pr. Slazenger Socks
1.95
16.95   12.99
29.95   19.95
NOW   5.99
AT 2130 WESTERN
PARKWAY
IN THE UBC VILLAGE
Phone 228-0626
Open Mon-Sat 9:30-6:00
EMPLOYMENT
IN QUEBEC
Here's an opportunity to gain a better understanding of the
culture and customs of the Province of Quebec and become
more fluent in the French language through summer employment
in the Provincial Government of Quebec. The British Columbia
Ministry of Labour is accepting applications now for the 1979
Quebec Work Exchange Program which will provide job
opportunities in a variety of ministries within the Quebec
Government for up to thirty university students from British
Columbia.
These job opportunities will involve a minimum of ten weeks work between
May 20 and August 31, 1979 and salaries will be determined according to the
student salary scale of the Province of Quebec.
Any registered full-time student at the University of British Columbia, Simon
Fraser University, or the University of Victoria is eligible to apply providing they
have a working knowledge of the French language and have lived in British
Columbia for one year.
information regarding available accommodation in Quebec will be provided to
students prior to departure, however, it is the responsibility of each student
accepted in the program to pay their own rent.
Students wishing to apply should complete a Ministry of Labour Youth Job
Application Form and Questionnaire.
Applications and Questionnaires are available from the Canada
Employment Centre on campus, from the Ministry of Labour
Youth Referral Service in Victoria, or any of the following Ministry
of Labour Youth Employment Offices:
Lower Mainland Areas: 4946 Canada Way, Burnaby V5G 4J6
291-2901
Victoria: 808 Douglas Street V8W2B6 387-1436
ALL APPLICATIONS MUST
BE SUBMITTED BEFORE
MARCH 7,1979.
Province of Ministry of
British Columbia Labour
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY PROGRAMS Page 10
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March 2, 1979
»r»?
Bird Droppings
UBC Intramurals stand to gain
about $17,000 if the Alma Mater
Society fee referendun: on March
12-15 is passed.
Half of the three dollar increase
will go to intramurals if the referendum is successful. The approximately $34,000 will replace the present $17,000 grant the AMS gives
intramurals each year.
Intramural director Nestor Korchinsky said the additional funds
will go to hire more support staff,
decrease entry fees, and extend the
programs into areas of great demand. He cited women's soccer and
men's indoor soccer as two probable sports to be introduced.
Korchinsky said intramurals also
want to change some activities from
tournament format to league play,|
and would like to expand the award
system.
The program currently operates
26 men's sports and 16 women's
sports, as well as special co-rec
events.
*    *    *
Much as a condemned man is
granted a final meal, all jocks who
have struggled all year for the glory
of UBC and the excuse to skip
classes will have evenings of mutual
adulation  before  facing the grim
reality of final exams.
The women's big block banquet,
at which varsity pins and letters will
be given to extramural athletes, will
be held March 14 at the faculty
club. The year's outstanding female
jock will also be crowned that even-'
ing.
The men's big block banquet will
be held March 15, also at the faculty club. The Bobby Gaul trophy will
be presented to the leading male
athlete.
All amateur athletes will get their
turn on March 20 at the graduate
student centre, when the intramural
dinner and disco will honor
outstanding efforts in the name of
arts and Gamma Gamma Goo.
About 250 awards will be
presented, including rings to the top
all-around male and female
athletes. Tickets are $8 each and are
available in room 210 of the gym.
*    *    *
The men's athletic committee has
made the engineering
undergraduate society the first recipient of the "Perennial Rookie"
award, a trophy created in honor of
UBC's 87-year-old band leader Arthur Delamont.
BIOETHICS: SCIENCE,
SELF & SOCIETY
DR. DAVID ROY - Director of the Bioethics Centre of the Clinical Research Institute of Montreal,
Philosopher & Theologian, March 6-9.
TU
ESDAY, MARCH 6th
Informal
"What Is
Reception
Dinner
Bioethics?"
with Dr. Roy
with Dr. Roy
Dr. David Roy
Everyone
Lutheran Campus
12:30 p.m.
Welcome
Centre 6:00 p.m.
SUB 207-209
Lutheran Campus
Centre 4:15 p.m.
Joint CCCM & LSM
WEDNESDAY,
MARCH 7th
'Euthanasia'.
Panel discussion with Dr. Roy, Ruth Bush
(lawyer). Dr. Colin Harrison (radiologist).
12:30 p.m.  SUB 207-209.	
THURSDAY,
MARCH 8th
"Genetic Research:
Who Should Set The Limits?'
Panel discussion with Dr. Roy, Colin
Johnstone (chaplain), Robert Miller
(biology), Adrian Marriage (sociology).
12:30 p.m. SUB 207-209.
FRIDAY, MARCH 9th
"ISSUES IN BIOETHICS"
Public lecture by Dr. David Roy
8:00 p.m. Buchanan 106
Sponsored by
CCCM, LSM &
FACULTY OF MEDICINE
HAWAII
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now for complete information and reservations.
HARWOOD AGENCIES
Suite 611,543 Granville Street, Vancouver, B.C. V6C1X8.
681-3401 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays.
Delamont, who started the Kitsilano Boys Band 51 years ago,
regularly attends UBC football and
hockey games with an entourage of
former band members and entertains fans between periods and after
scores. He also pioneered a painless
eight-bar version of the national anthem, which ends before most people have stood up.
The award was initiated by assistant athletic director Buzz Moore,
who last year went to the MAC and
"demanded they give (Delamont)
consideration for his tremendous
input."
"He never fails us," said Moore.
"We've now got about 10-15
oldtimers playing as the Kitsilano
Boys Band at every game."
The inscription on the trophy,
which hangs in the lobby of War
Memorial Gym, says it is "an annual award to an individual or
group emulating the spirit of Arthur Delamont." The EUS, according to Moore, was presented the'
award to recognize its efforts in
supporting football and athletic
events last year.
hair studio inc.
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Three new models from
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The Ditton 662 has been
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The Ditton 442 utilises a sealed box design which gives
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experience in sound reproduction. The three models shown here are the result of combining this experience
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model has been designed as a complete system and the drive units have been specifically designed for each application within the three systems. In accordance with Celestion policy the drive units are all manufactured in
the Company's own factories to ensure total control of quality standards. Superbly finished enclosures complete
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669-5525 Friday, March 2, 1979
THE       UBYSSEY
Pags 11
Tide could wash up 'Birds
SPORTS
By KEVIN FINNEGAN
The Thunderbird rugby team continues a month of intensive action this weekend with a second round McKechnie Cup
match against the Vancouver Island representative team
Crimson Tide Saturday at 2:30 p.m. at Thunderbird
Stadium.
A Tide victory would virtually clinch the cup, emblematic
of rugby union supremacy, for the island side for the second
year in a row. UBC has won the title twice in the past five
years.	
Bill Collins, Garry Hirayama,
Andrew Bibby, Dave Whyte, Rob
Greig and Graham Taylor will be
striving to make the final national
team that will play the United
States in May and tour Britain,
France and Italy in September.
— peter menyasz pnoto
DISCO, DISCO REF dances through intramural basketball game in annual Nitobe classic, oblivious to fierce action between Fijis and football team. Footballers blew this play and game, dropping 53-52 match to frat rats. Action resumes Monday noon in gym, UBC version of Studio 54.
The match will be a clash of
opposing styles with the quick,
back-oriented UBC team facing the
challenge of handling a physically
imposing squad that likes to keep
the ball with its forwards and push
the other team back.
Thunderbird captain Preston
Wiley says he anticipates a rough
game, with the island team attempting to control the play with its
large forwards.
"We'll try to open it up and get
their big boys running about a bit,"
said Wiley. "If we don't, we could
be in trouble."
The feature match, which was
changed from Sunday to coincide
with Open House, will be preceded
by an under-19 match at 1 p.m.
Next week, the Thunderbirds will
meet Meralomas in a match that
could clinch the Vancouver union
title for UBC. A win against
second-place 'Lomas will give the
'Birds an insurmountable lead in
league standings.
After that game the UBC team
will leave for a two-week tour of
California, with games scheduled
against Stanford University and the
University of California at
Berkeley. The winner of the
Berkeley match will receive the
World Cup, a trophy donated by
the now-defunct Vancouver World
newspaper and given to the winner
of an annual match between UBC
and the top California university
side.
The 'Birds will compete in the
Monterey Tournament, the largest
rugby gathering in the world, on
March 23-25. Over 100 teams from
across North America will play in
the double knockout tournament.
In an effort to get down to
manageable numbers, first round
matches will have 15 minute halves
and second round games 30 minute
halves. Final round games will use
the normal 40 minute halves.
Wiley leads a nine-man UBC
contingent recently named to the
Canadian national long squad.
Henry Edmonds,   Robin  Russell,
Splash, flip,
grapple ...
Twenty swimmers, five gymnasts, three wrestlers but nary a
volleyball player will be representing UBC at various Canadian
Interuniversity Athletic Union
championships this weekend.
Swim coach Jack Kelso has three
divers and 17 swimmers in Montreal this weekend for the CIAU
meet hosted by McGill University.
UBC will have one of the largest
teams at the championships.
Gymnasts Ann Brunner, Leslie
Fortune and Laurel McKay are
UBC women entrants in this
weekend's CIAU gymnastics meet
in War Memorial Gym. Ralph
Bereska and Ed Osborne will represent the men's team in the action,
which starts tonight at 7 p.m. and
continues tomorrow with the finals
starting at 2 p.m.
Three UBC wrestlers have
qualified for the CIAU nationals in
Guelph this weekend. Martin
Gleave will compete in the 61-
kilogram division, with Peter
Farkas wrestling at .64 kilograms
and Lee Blanchard at 72.
Meanwhile, the CIAU volleyball
championships will go ahead this
weekend at McMaster University in
Hamilton without any UBC teams.
The Thunderettes, who have won
the national title for the past two
years, failed to qualify when they
lost the final match against
University of Saskatchewan in a
tournament last weekend in Saskatoon. The men's team finished last
in Canada West.
-\
Spirit, net fear, is the key — Fr. David Bauer
By TOM HAWTHORN
Canada will be unable to beat the Soviet
Union in hockey until human spirit replaces
intimidation, Canada's Olympic team
hockey coach says.
Father David Bauer, who lives and works
at UBC's St. Mark's College, says the
Soviets have an advantage over Canada in
team play, physical discipline, and strategy,
but could not beat Canadians because of
their spirit.
But that spirit has now been replaced by
intimidation, Bauer says.
"You know, it seems to be that we've
substituted intimidation in place of spirit.
There's no reason why we can't go back to
the spirit," Bauer said Thursday.
"We would like to try to have an influence in amateur hockey by balancing
those three areas with human spirit,
without intimidation."
He said there are now two objectives
which should be met to improve amateur
hockey: to remain in the Olympic games
and to hold more coaching clinics with the
Canadian Amateur Hockey Association.
"We know what our problems are. If
they didn't learn these skills as juniors, it
isn't just going to come to them as pros. If
we develop great amateurs, we're developing great pros."
Bauer says junior players face both long
schedules and the lack of attention placed
on developing basic hockey skills.
"One of the basic skills the younger
players are learning is intimidation instead
of team play," Bauer said. "We have to
balance off this enthusiasm we have. If
you're under six feet, you won't make the
(NHL) draft, at least not in the first
round."
Bauer says his philosophy is one that
hockey should exist for people and not
people for hockey.
"Hockey is one of the educational experiences in a boy's life. He'd be a full
human being if hockey was played
properly, with the decision about what he
wants to do with his life in his own hands.
"That (kind of training) wouldn't hinder
his development as a hockey player."
Bauer is also a member of Hockey
Canada's Olympic subcommittee, besides
being one of the most famous names in
Canadian amateur hockey. A player on the
1944 Memorial Cup champion Oshawa
Generals, Bauer went on to eventually
become a junior player at St. Michael's
College in Toronto and at the University of
Toronto.
In 1961, he became coach and manager
at St. Michael's, leaving because junior
hockey "was becoming a business, not a
sport." He then coached Canada's national
team out of Winnipeg and assisted in the
development of Japan's national team,
becoming a Hockey Canada director in
1969.
He says it was his interest in developing
amateur hockey which led him to becoming
involved with Canada's almost-defunct
Olympic hockey team.
Alan Eagleson, as a member of Hockey
Canada, negotiated with the International
Ice Hockey Federation a revamped role for
Canada in international hockey, including
competition in the Olympics.
Enter Father Bauer.
"There are other values more important
than winning a medal, but we'd like to
strengthen amateur hockey and win a
medal at the same time."
Bauer will coach a team of 30 Canadians
at the 1980 winter Olympics in Lake Placid,
after having played exhibitions in Europe
and Canada this summer. Training camp
will start in late June at Calgary.
"Our problem is that our competition is
the same as the NHL's. But our objectives
are different from the team that played the
Russians in New York. Not only would we
like to be able to stay in par with the
Soviets, we're also interested in the game of
hockey."
But Bauer says it might be too late for
Canada to again become the unquestionable world hockey champions.
"It might be one of the facts of life we
have to face, like England lost soccer, like
Australia lost tennis. We don't own the
game of hockey," he says.
"We should have gotten the message in
1972. Canadians don't want their games
based on intimidation; that's responsible
for the continued decline of (amateur)
registrations in our game."
BAUER . . . Olympic hockey coach Page 12
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March 2, 1979
'Tween classes
TODAY
YOUNG TRUTCHKEYITES
Closed house, noon, Trutch house.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Women's drop-in, noon, SUB 130.
PAN-AFRICAN UNION
Cultural show, dances, displays, 7:30 p.m., SUB
ballroom.
DEBATING SOCIETY
Dr. Ralph Loffmark speaks on English usage —
the  art  of  communication,   12:20  p.m.,   SUB
auditorium.
PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVE CLUB OF UBC
Open house display, 11 a.m.-10 p.m., SUB 113.
UBC HANG GLIDING CLUB
Meeting and slide show, noon, SUB 111.
SCHOOL OF NURSING PUBLIC
RELATIONS/INFORMATION SERVICES
COMMITTEE
UBC school of nursing celebrates nursing past,
present and future, 1 p.m. to 10 p.m., IRC mall.
PHOTOSOC
Photo exhibit preparation, 6:30 p.m., SUB art
gallery.
DEBATING SOCIETY AND THE SCIENCE
UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY
The great debate: Greenpeace versus the fusion
energy foundation, 1:30 p.m., SUB auditorium.
GAY PEOPLE OF UBC
Gay   coffeehouse,    9:30   p.m.,    Theodora's
Restaurant, 1812 West 4th Ave.
SATURDAY
SCHOOL OF NURSING PUBLIC
RELATIONS/INFORMATION SERVICES
COMMITTEE
UBC school of nursing celebrates nursing past,
present and future, 1 p.m. to 10 p.m., IRC mail.
YOUNG TRUTCHKEYITES
Closed  house and wing ding,  ali day,   Trutch
house.
PAN-AFRICAN UNION
Dr. V. D'Oyley speaks on The role of universities
in    developing    countries,    2:30    p.m.,    SUB
ballroom.
Annual celebrations, dance and food, 8:30 p.m..
International House.
PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVE CLUB OF UBC
Open house display, 10 a.m.-10 p.m., SUB 113.
PHOTOSOC
Photo exhibit, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., SUB art gallery.
MONDAY
COMMITTEE AGAINST SEXUAL ATTACK
General meeting, noon, SUB 130.
UNIVERSITY LECTURES COMMITTEE
Dr. Fred Munday speaks on Mousterian cultures
in the central Negev desert in Israel: a study of
prehistoric variability, 1:30 p.m., Buch. 2238.
Dr. Ulrich Weisstein speaks on recent trends in
comparative literature, 3:30 p.m., Buch. penthouse.
HISTORY DEPARTMENT
John Lukacs speaks on 1939-40: The last European war?, noon, Buch. 102.
John Lukacs speaks on some controversies over
World War II, 3:30 p.m.. Brock 304.
TUESDAY
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
General meeting, noon, SUB 130.
UBC JAPAN EXCHANGE CLUB
General meeting for anyone interested in going
to Japan this year, noon, SUB 212.
SCIENCE FICTION CLUB
Film: The caSe for ancient astronauts, noon, IRC
80.
BAHA'I CLUB
Informal discussion on the Baha'i Faith, noon,
SUB 113.
PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVE CLUB OF UBC
Annual election of officers, noon, SUB 205.
LAW STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
First annual law revue, 8:30 p.m., SUB ballroom.
Proceeds go to Vancouver Children's Hospital
fund.
PRE-MEDICAL SOCIETY
Dr.    F.    Bryans    speaks   on    obstetrics   and
gynecology, noon, IRC 4.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Reception for David Roy, 4:30 p.m., supper, 6
p.m,  overview of bioethics,  7 p.m.,  Lutheran
Campus Centre.
WEDNESDAY
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Lesbian drop-in, noon, SUB 130.
SRA PROGAMS COMMITTEE
Shirley Hans, a steelworker on strike against In-
co in Sudbury, speaks about this 6-month stike,
noon, SUB auditorium.
PSYCH STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Rick Benninger speaks on Reinforcement learning, noon, Henry Angus 110.
GAY PEOPLE OF UBC
Discussion with Vancouver novelist David Wat-
mough, noon, SUB 212.
PRE-VET CLUB
Dr. Udenburg speaks on mixed animal practice,
noon, McMillan 158.
Hot flashes
Go get bibbed
with baclava
If your mouth's watering for
souvlakia or mezedes, strap on your
Zorba boots, grab a bib, and dig in.
Vancouver's Greek community is
hosting an annual Greek food
festival between noon and 10 p.m.
on Saturday and Sunday. More
than 20,000 people are expected to
attend, admission is free, and it's
being held at the New Hellenic
Community Centre, 4500 Arbutus
It's been done
Ah, they've been doing it for
years . . .         	
UBC's science fiction club
presents the film: The case for ancient astronauts which discusses
pro and con views on the question
of ancient space exploration. For all
interested earthlings, it's Tuesday
at noon in IRC 80.
HOCKEY
THUNDERBIRD STYLE
UBC vs ALBERTA
FRI. & SAT. MAR. 2-3 - 7:30 P.M.
WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
STUDENTS FREE ADMISSION
See Top Class University Gymnastics
CANADIAN
UNIVERSITY
CHAMPIONSHIPS
March 2nd — 7:00 p.m.
Preliminaries and Team
Championship
March 3 - 2:00 p.m.
FINALS
WAR MEMORIAL
GYMNASIUM
Daily Admission:
Adult - $3.00 Student - $1.00
U.B.C. OPEN HOUSE
SPECIALS
Kneissel "Touring
Fishscale" non-wax
Ski, made in Austria (1
year breakage warranty)
$90.00
Tyrol "STROM" Boot
$55.00
"Stride" Tonkin Poles
$9.95
"Villom" Binding
$7.95
Total List Price
$162.90
Pack & Boots
.Special
$119.95**
^>
Harju   540   Mohair
Base Ski $65.00
Harju "Touring" Boots
$32.00
Stride "Tonkin" Poles
$9.95
"Villom" Binding
$7.95
Total List Price
$114.90
Pack & Boots
^Special $89.00*?
J
Canada "Mohair Skis
with 2 year breakage
warranty $139.00
Canadian Made
"Estrie Boot" $60.00
Fibreglass Poles
$14.95
"Villom" Binding
$7.95
Total List Price
$221.90
Pack & Boots
Special        $159.95*
* Price includes professional binding installation and hot waxing.
Regular prices in the Park and Boots Shops are generally lower than
manufacturers' list price.
PACK & BOOTS SHOP
3425 W. BROADWAY      V6R 2B4
in Victoria, 720 Yates Mall
phone 738-3128
383-2144
"JVPI-' 'I'M""? .' ."JJWJJUItlM)^ i L!WIWM. 1.W JlUg""1-! lI'i'PUMi ■
I fit: %JLA99iriJbU&
■X:
RATES: Student - 3 «**, 1 <fer«f,S9;-<
ComHftttvtal - 3 lines, t4iq4&ftoi408miit Wjii^Bfct JtfOftNwaf 4^$&SQ£^4$k
C&^fetf ^ *» art *eo^^
5 — Coining Events
WHO IS INSTIGATING
THE WAR IN S.E. ASIA
Norman Bethune Club
Public Forum
MONDAY, MARCH 5
SUB Foyer. 12:30 p.m.
TRAVEL to Japan — with the UBC
Japan Exchange Club. Organizational
meeting on Tues., March 6 at 12:30
in SUB 212 For further information
call Angus  at  987-6671.
30 —Jobs
BLUES NITE at the Grad Centre —
Come and enjoy an evening of listening/dancing with the Bullfrog Blues
Band featuring guest artists Toni
Hoyland, Robin Smith, Charles Sauve
and Barry Hall. This Friday, 9:00
o'clock, GSC Ballroom. Admission
$3.00.   Full  facilities.
DON'T miss the Pre-Met Car Bally
Saturday, March 10. $2.00 per car.
Meet in "B" lot, across from Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre. 4.00
p.m. Frizes! Party at finish.
10 — For Sale — Commercial
Need a Graduation Dress?
Bring your fabric and patterns to
"&A &teatto*4>
Special Offer: $25.00 to
make your dress. Offer expires 30 March, 1979. By appointment only: 734-5015.
11 — For Sale — Private
COMMUNITY SPORTS — Excellent
prices for ice skates, hockey, soccer,
jogging and racquet sports equipment. 733-1612. 3615 West Broadway,
Vancouver, B.C.
15 — Found
20 — Housing
25 — Instruction
INTERESTED in earning an extra income in your leisure time? A
business of your own at home?
Maybe $150,, $500., even $1,000 a
month? For interview, phone 530-
7867. No obligation. No information
over the telephone. Let's have coffee and talk.
SUMMER JOBS in B.C. — Clerical
Labour, Skilled, Un-skilled, Northern and local. Apply now! Send $3.00
for Summer Employment Guide.
LMESUB, Box 7810 (Sta. A) Edmonton, Alta.  T5J 3G6.
INTERESTED in earning an extra income in your leisure time? A business of your own in your own home?
Maybe an extra $150.00, $500.00, even
$1,000.00 a month? For info, phone
530-7867. No obligation. No information   over the  phone.
85 — Typing
TYPING — 75c per page. Fast and accurate by experienced typist. Gordon,
685-4863.
PROFESSIONAL Typing. IBM Selectric.
Essays, thesis, etc. Kits area. Phone
Lynda  732-0647.
FOR ACCURATE typing on an IBM Selectric Correcting typewriter call 986-
2577 after 2:00 p.m. Rush work accepted.
65 — Scandals
THANK  YOU   for the  return of  Hannah.   We   appreciate  it.   D.G.'s.
70 — Services
TYPING: Essays, theses, manuscripts,
reports, etc. Fast and accurate ser-
viae. Bilingual. Clemy 324-9414.
FAST efficient typing. Reasonable
rates.   266-5053.
TYPIST. Reports, essays, term papers,
etc. Also transcribes standard cassette tapes. Reasonable. June
682-4870   after   6:00   p.m.
90 - Wanted
.HELP WANTED
WEDDING Photography Specialist.
Complete professional coverage at
very reasonable rates. Call for consultation at your convenience.
732-9651  eves.
M.A. Grad will proof read theses and
papers. Can also check bibs. 684-7940.
Tony.
mane rmz
COSMETIOUE
TREAT YOURSELF
MID-WINTER SPECIAL
20% off on Facial:
3820 OAK ST.
733-1911
ART&
[CALLIGRAPHYI
SUPPLIES
NOW AVAILABLE.
For lower prices and a wide
range of office and school
supplies, try
MOLLIES
QUALITY STATIONERS
4479 W. 10th AVE.
99 — Miscellaneous
SKI  WHISTLER
Rent   cabin   day/week   732-0174   eves.
AFRICA — Overland  expeditions London/Nairobi     13     weeks.     London/
Johannesburg  18   weeks.
KENYA SAFARIS — 2 and 3 weeks.
EUROPE — Camping and hotel tours
from 4 days to 9 weeks.
For brochures contact TRACKS
TRAVEL, Suite 300, 562 Eglinton Ave.
East, Toronto, Ont. M4P 1B9.
INSTANT
PASSPOR1
;ameras ltqJ
4538 W 10th
,224-9112 or 224-5858!
=ir^ir=J[=ir=i|=ir=it=J[=Jr=Ji=r!
USE
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED
TO SELL - BUY
INFORM
=Jr=ir=Jr=Jr=Jr=in=Jr^r=Jr=Jr=Jr: INSIDE PAGE FRIDAY
POETRY CENTRE - audio-visual rhymes
MURDER BY DECREE -  Jack rips 'em up again
SON OF SOCRED -   with a pit-pat mini-WAC
GREAT TRAIN ROBBERY -   light larceny
FOLK MUSIC —   commoner's culture history
NEIL DIAMOND —  live performance
GRAND BALLETS - dance their toes off
ABSENT FRIENDS -   dies painful comedy
HARPSICHORDS —    building beautiful music
CITR —   fum on your radio
plus CREATIVE WRITING SUPPLEMENT classical arts
Love, lust inspire
Les Grands Ballets
By KERRY REGIER
Les Grands Ballets Canadiens
treated VAncouver to Fernand
Nault's lively choreography of Car-
mina Burana last week. But before
this powerful evocation of the joys
of the senses, the audience was forced to sit through two inconsequential exercises in futility.
Brydon Paige's choreography of
Mendelssohn's First Piano Concerto opened the program. As this
work is extremely complex, it does
not lend itself to the dance easily
and Paige achieved only limited
success.
Balancing tonal concepts of key
relationships against dynamics and
mood, Paige lost sight of the lovely
melodic aspect, so important in
Mendelssohn. Thus, it often seemedl
the dance was irrelevant to the
music, despite some admirable
details of mood and key-contrast
created energy.
Paul Taylor's Aureole was in a
similar vein, adapting concerto
movements by Handel to dance.
This music is perhaps slightly more
amenable to the dance, but only
because it is more rhythmically
dominated and less complex in its*-
interweaving of conflicting ideas.
Taylor's choreography here, like
Paige's direction suffered from a
lack of coherence with the music.
Much of the stage action might even
be equally at home with the Rite of
Spring as with Handel's music.
These two works were often interrupted by applause at every en
trance and exit and grand leap. A
claque is someone who is placed in
the audience to lead applause. I do
not connect this with several
gentlemen who loudly and obviously began applauding at every turn,
although at least one person sitting
near me did.
Having dispensed with these bits
of balletic fluff, the corps proceeded with a first-rate performance of
Carl Orff's earthy Carmina Burana,
choreographed by Fernand Nault.
Orff derived this work from
poems and songs of the late
medieval troubadors of northern
France and Germany, in particular
a series of manuscripts known as
Carmina Burana. They are mostly
songs of lust and love and of drinking and rollicking good fun.
Carmina Burana is arranged in a
vast cycle, opening with a hymn in
praise of Fortune and Fate. Orff
continues with scenes concerning
pastoral life and love, a rousing
tavern scene and a tribute to love,
physical and spiritual. The work
closes with a reprise of the opening
which completes the circle.
Nault's choreography of this
, titanic work is brilliantly imaginative though bound in some
respects to the classical tradition.
This results in a lack of coherence
between the various poems,
although individual movements
might be flawless in themselves.
The opening and closing had
tremendous effect with red cloaked
monks dancing feverishly, backed
ROASTING SWAN
mourns his lost past as two hungry monks cook him for dinner.
by a gigantic wheel suspended
onstage, and turned with great
muscular effort by one of their
number.
In the tavern scene, one movement is the song of a swan being
roasted for dinner. Jacques St. Cyr,
dancing the swan, portrayed the
reticent being humorously and with
fiery energy. Two monks, carrying
him onstage on a pole, supported
him as he gyrated in pain and
remorse for his lost life.
Had Nault's imagination been as
fertile throughout, his Carmina
Burana would be one of the great
ballets of modern times. It seems a
shame that he resorts to stock sequences in many of the movements.
One such moment is the peasant
dance with full company. Nault sets
it not so much as a peasant dance,
but reminiscent of the pointless
show of the previous two works on
the program. Even the costumes are
barely recognizable as stylized
classical pseudo-farmer.
Despite these shortcomings,
Nault's Carmina Burana was danced with vigor and devotion by the
company. Their ensemble sparkled
with life and was classic in its precision.
Les Grands Ballets Canadiens
showed themselves as a company
capable of great things and their
return to Vancouver is something to
be watched for.
Harpsichords preserve gentler age
By KERRY REGIER
On the top floor of a battered
building in one of Vancouver's
warehouse districts, a Bach prelude
floats delicately in the air. Like a
flower growing in a field of mud,
Sabathil Harpsichords builds
musical instruments here.
Sigurd Sabathil built his first
harpsichord when he was nine years
old in Munich. He followed his
father's profession and even today,
his father still comes once or twice a
week to help, though he is 82 now.
Why does he build harpsichords?
In Sabathil's own words, it is "the
charm of the instrument." In a
modern world of faster, bigger,
louder, Sabathil recreates an older
world of delicacy, beauty, and
gentleness.
From the fifteenth to the'
eighteenth   centuries,   the   harp
sichord was the central instrument
of Western music. Everyone wrote
for it. Nearly everyone who could
afford one, owned one and it appears in solo music as well as the
largest orchestral music.
In the harpsichord, the strings are
plucked, rather than struck as in a
piano. By depressing a key, a
leather or quill plectrum, fixed in ?.
jack, plucks the string. Releasing
the key brings a leather damper into
contact with the string, stopping it
from sounding.
This means that the string sounds
the same volume, no matter how
hard the key is pressed since the
plectrum plucks with the same
force. Different colors and ranges
are available and by slightly damping the ends of the strings with different materials, the harpsichord
can give a lute or harp-like sound
RECREATIING OLD SUBTLETIES .
energy environ.
kerry regier photo
a moment of quiet in a high-
and varying string lengths give different harmonics and timbres.
With the invention of the more
powerful piano in the eighteenth
century, the harpsichord declined as
the piano became common. Among
others, Felix Mendelsshon, began a
revival of the older instrument and
its music over a century later.
Perhaps the most important part
of the instrument is the soundboard
which underlays the strings and
amplifies their sound through
natural resonances. It is this which
brought Sabathil to Vancouver, for
B.C. forests produce some of the
world's best wood for musical instruments.
Large B.C. spruce and cedar
trees with huge planks free of knots
and flaws are the instrument
maker's dream. B.C. wood is in
such demand that there is even a
lucrative business in theft of logs,
according to Sabathil.
The traditional harpsichord has a
wooden frame which warps and
bends under the tension of several
tons, exerted by the strings. This
eventually results in a loss of sound
quality and Sabathil has solved this
problem with the use of metal
frames. The metal does not change
shape under tension and there are
no longer the frequent troublesome
tunings which were sometimes required of old unstruments every
half-hour.
Sabathil pioneered the use of
modern materials for jack and plectrum. Old instruments used pear-
wood jacks with quill or leather
plectra. These wore out quickly and
were subject to constant changes in
shape and size with weather
changes. Jacks would become
sticky, and the plucking action
would become uneven.
In his jacks, Sabathil uses a self-
lubricating nylon-like substance
known as Delrin which is highly
resistant   to   temperature   and
volume adjustment screw (d)
jackslid
PLUCKING IT
plucked.
humidity changes and in plectra it
wears much more slowly and evanly
than quill.
Some have criticized Sabathil's
instruments as being metallic and
harsh in sound, trading delicacy for
strength. Sabathil considers this untrue; his philsosphy is to build instruments that are "sensitive and
intimate, but not weak; rich and
generous, but not loud."
Sabathil also builds clavichords,
which are odd little instruments, used in sixteenth and seventeenth century homes for solo and practice.
The clavichord was Bach's favorite
instrument and it is notable for its
quiet nobility of sound.
In the clavichord, pressing a key
pushes a metal stop against the string.   This   stop   determines   the
pressing a key raises a jack, and the string is
length of the string and when it is
released, the string falls back and is
damped by a line of leather or
cloth.
One result of this arrangement is
that the player has direct contact
with the string and can achieve a
beautiful vibrato and other effects
not possible with other keyboard in-
stuments.
Sabathil again sits at the
keyboard of one of his display instruments and begins a Handel
suite. Looking out the window at
the contrasting noise and scuffle, it
is hard not to think of past days of
gentleness and quiet. Music was for
oneself and a few friends and not
for the millions, consuming it as
they consume movies, hamburgers,
and their lives.
Page Friday, 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March 2, 1979 theatre
Absent friends are always the best kind
By WENDY HUNT
Absent friends are the best kind.
They don't remind you of what you
used to be and they don't rub your
nose in what you've become.
Ayckbourn's black comedy picks
up the time honoured theme of
disillusionment. The characters
have not fulfilled their expectations
and are embittered by petty,
fruitless lives.	
Absent Friends
A play by Alan Ayckbourn
Directed by Kathryn Shaw
Presented by Westcoast Actors
Absent Friends is neither funny
enough to be a rip-roaring comedy
nor insightful enough to be serious
drama. Instead Ayckbourn treads
that shadow area of human relations where one person's laughter is
the verbal expression of another's
pain.
Colin is the friend who has been
absent for three years. His fiancee
recently drowned and although no
one really wants to see Colin, his
friends feel obliged to console him
and invite him over for tea.
Death brings them together
where friendship could not. These
six mismatched personalities are
thrown together to confront and
clash and eventually savour the bitterness of life's deceit.
Diana is the kind and matronly
hostess. Her children sent off to
boarding school she finds herself
alone with a philandering husband.
Diana's husband Paul is boorish to
the point of being cruel. Even his
backseat lover Evelyn has nothing
good to say about him.
Colin epitomizes English good
humour. At first his cheeriness is
refreshing, but it soon becomes tiring. Colin cannot see beyond his
rose coloured glasses. He is blind to
others' problems and impervious to
the real tensions in the room.
The reunion and not Colin acts as
the catalyst. Tea time, the
quintessential ritual of civilized
society becomes a pressure cooker.
Etiquette demands that the
characters keep their cool while remaining in the room. The tension
puts them on edge and makes them
vulnerable.
Yet Colin is the source of energy
which fuels the polite conversation
during which he blithely and
unknowingly opens old wounds.
Director Kathryn Shaw has kept
up a fast pace. Sight gags and broad
caricature which go together well
provide plenty of laughs and serve
to lighten the blacker side of Absent
Friends.
The comedy in Absent Friends is
not the artful thrust and parry of
Neil Simon where equally matched
opponents engage in a blinding battle of one-liners, each cut rapier
sharp. Ayckbourn's characters use
broadswords to desperately hack at
each other, to ease their own pain.
It is difficult to laugh when carnage
litters the stage and blood flows so
freely.
Paul deliberately embarasses
Diana in front of company. He
denies that she told him Colin was
coming and he refuses to attend her
tea. He makes her look like a fool
and treats her as one.
Colin recounts the story of how
he and Paul were both courting
Diana. Paul was so taken with her
he pinched a serviette as a memento
of their first tea. Diana is positively
charmed by this display of affection
until Paul gives a malicious chuckle
and says "I still have that old-
serviette. I use it to clean the car
windows."
Westcoast Actors has come
through again with the high quality
acting on which they have built a
solid reputation. Goldie Semple as
Diana and Nicholas Rice as Colin
deserve special mention..
Semple brings differing
characteristics to light in Diana. She
cries like a vaudeville comedienne,
barks like a sergeant, is meek and
forceful. She combines all these
things together into one character
and creates the believable portrayal
of a woman having a nervous
breakdown. Rice is so repulsively
cheery that it is a pleasure not to
know him. His character is a study
in mannerisms. He is a delight to
behold as he eats party sandwiches
and tells tales.
The overriding image I have of
Absent Friends is of a bug being
squashed, soft guts spreading out
from a hard shell. Ayckbourn
places his characters in a hopeless
situation and then watches them
squirm. But because he never looks
closely at either them or their
broken dreams he never gives them
the chance to leave the realm of the
stereotype.
ABSENT FRIENDS . . . family feud gets out of hand as Goldie
Semple dumps on Allan Gray.
Hard work,
no pay.
It may be just what you're looking for.
If you're between 17 and 81,
willing to travel, get involved
and work with people,
Katimavik has an opportunity
for you.
Katimavik. It's an Inuit word
meaning "meeting place". Now
it's something more, an idea that
could he just what you're looking
for.
Katimavik is a total life experience for nine, demanding,
challenging months. It's an
opportunity to live and work
with other young Canadians of
different backgrounds from
across Canada.
Hard work and satisfaction
The projects that you and your
group will he working on will
improve and help many communities. The work is varied and
different, hut all projects measure up in three ways. Outdoor
physical work aimed at protecting or improving the environment, community service, plus
cultural and educational
programs.
Katimavik is offering you an
opportunity, hut not a job. We're
asking you to give a lot while at
the same time you may find out a
lot about yourself. You'll go to
three different provinces of
Canada. Learn new skills, including a second language. (French).
You'll lead a simple, conserver
life-style.
There are four project dates to
choose from: with the following
starting and application dates.
June 13th. (Application date
April 23rd.) July 11th. (Application date May 9th.) August 8th.
(Application date June 6th.)
September 12th. (Application
date July 11th.).
A dollar a day.
We'll pay your travel and living
expenses. We'll also give you a
dollar a day pocket money, plus
$1,000. at the end of the program. That's the money, but we
think you'll get a lot more out of
it. Write to us today and we'll send
you full details on the Katimavik
program and how to apply. As we
said, it may be just what you're
looking for. In the meantime,
we're looking for you. Let's get
together.
KATIMA/K
U70 Jraat Pttm Sapi; Ctti in Him, HoeItmI, Qutie 8SC SM
Brochures and information can also be obtained from the following retail outlets:
A & A Records, Arlington Sports, BcKTeans, Bootlegger, Jean Junction and Outdoor Stores.
r
Yes I am interested in your program, please send me an application form
and more details. Mail to:
1
Ieuiu mure uouoiis. mem uu:
KATMA/Kjk?k
I
I
I
S«laction, 8870 Avenue Pierre Dupuy
Him, Montreal, Quebec H8C 3M
Name-
Address.
-City_
Province-
-Postal Code-
I    BCU-l
D In French O In English
J
Friday, March 2, 1979
THE      UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 3 folk music
Local culture
feeds folksong
By TONY MONTAGUE
Folksong has been identified variously as the
music of illiterate, rural labourers or
synonymous with popular, non-electric,
music and indeed it is one of the qualities of
folk that it escapes glib definition or labelling. But while it is true that at most folkclubs
you are likely to hear songs ranging from the
Victorian music-hall to Joni Mitchell, my
concern is with the mainstream of folk.
Although still rare on the west coast, such
gatherings are increasing — in Britain they
have been a feature of social life in many
towns for a decade at least, and are now
spreading throughout north-west Europe.
Vast numbers of young French, Dutch and
Germans are rediscovering folk: both the rich
traditions of the British Isles and North
America and most recently and significantly,
their own regional and national musics — a
development which has accompanied the
resurgence of homegrown and local culture
in these 'conglomerate' nations.
There is a return to
basics: the human vmcef
a song or tune and
unaccompanied singing
is common,
This is the music of traditions that have
evolved by being communicated from mouth
to mouth. Thus, literacy has never been a
prerequisite for access. Folk is characterized
by a measure of continuity, linking the present to the inherited past; variation, a lesser
form of improvisation which emerges from
the creative impulse of either the individual
or the group and a process of selection where
certain songs, tunes and music forms are retained or abandoned. These characteristics
apply to original compositions which become
absorbed into the living tradition, but not to
composed popular music which comes and
goes, leaving no trace but a dwindling
memory and deleted disc.
Such music is still to be found in unbroken
tradition in the West, around areas which
have retained their local and particular identity, in the main by virtue of lying on the furthest peripheries of metropolitan society. The
Hebrides and Western Isles of Scotland, the
remote swamplands of the Mississippi, the
Gaspe peninsular and Acadia are instances of
these 'economic backwaters'. But such communities are changing fast as the dominant
culture spreads and replaces local self-
sufficiency with dependence on the products
of a centralized system for everything from
food and clothing to an evening's entertainment. As their economic base has been
broken up these 'backward' areas have lost
increasing numbers of young people who go
to the cities in search of work.
Folk does not necessarily die when removed
from its native soil. Although the industrial
revolution in Britain had such a devastating
effect on the lives and culture of working
people, nonetheless they were resilient
enough to adapt to a new context. Industrial
folksong retains the same essential function
as rural folksong, giving voice to the protest,
the pride, the humour, the pains and the few
pleasures of working communities.
Revival
Yet this urban folk culture has in turn
become vulnerable to the attack of the
various entertainment 'businesses' which
have boomed in the twentieth century. The
lower classes were taught that they had no
'real art', no worthwhile history, no enduring
values — that the best they could do was to
emulate their betters, ape their fashions,
swoon over their stars. A similar trend is
observable today with third-world and
developing nations.
Naturally there was always a strong
resistance to this process on the part of many
workers and the beginnings of a 'roots' folk
revival came from within the very eye of the
storm America during and after the Depression. Groups of workers such as the Wob-
blies (or International Workers of the World
— especially strong in the northwest) had
continued to use songs as weapons in their
struggle, led by genial poet-singers such as
Joe Hill, murdered in 1915 for his efforts.
The miseries of the thirties further radicalized
a large section of the American poor and
again they turned to song as a focus for their
protests. A new lower class identity
developed, with respect for its speech, dress,
customs, and values. The old songs were
revived and adapted in new ways. Woody
Guthrie linked folk and protest to country
and western and the folk revival spread
among radicals and workers throughout the
thirties and forties, gathering pace.
Identity
After the war this movement reached
metropolitan Britain. North American imports such as Burl Ives, blues and skiffle
became popular and sparked an interest in
what remained of the indigenous folk and
working class musics. The revival was based
around clubs, usually urban and radical in
complexion, that met once a week in the
upstairs rooms of pubs.
In the early sixties the folkscene boomed.
It became fashionable and commercial,
energetic and controversial, typecast by
rollneck sweaters and denim for all and long
straight hair for women. The boom faded as
the bandwagon rolled ori to rock, but the
clubs had given an invaluable and creative
grounding to many English soft-rock groups
such as Fairport Convention, singer-
songwriter Al Stewart, Donovan or virtuoso
guitarists Bert Jansch and John Renbourn.
The term 'folk' was made to represent an
absurdly wide range of music at the time a far
cry from the traditional sense yet one of the
principal roles of folk is to act as nursemaid
for other, contemporary musics.
In addition to its appeal as sheer entertainment traditional music can provide a vital
focus for our search for identity; both on the
collective and individual levels. Communities, especially minority groups or the
opposed have long found expression for their
thoughts and feelings in the shared experience of the song or ballad. The words
and tune are familiar, the group joins in the
chorus or even the whole song. If there is a
solo singer, then, he or she is simply the instrument through which the song and its
message are conveyed.
Struggle
To give an instance from the present day:
the indigenous music and language of Brittany has given the Breton people a sense of
unity and continuity, in the struggle for
liberation from French domination; through
the harpist Alan Stivell, who combined
Breton folk with elements of rock, their
cause has reached out to millions in North
LOCAL FOLKSINGERS  . . . Rika Ruebsaat and John Bartlett at
America as in Europe who would otherwise
be oblivious to the existence of a distinct
Breton culture.
Traditional song helps us to realize that the
problems we face are not unique or without
precedent — but different formulations of
the same problems that have been faced and
dealt with for many generations. It provides a
bond between past and present and even an
alternative view of history.
'■-$m^'ekarM*mrtee&
-hy'.'.a measure of
eomt^My, Uniting the
present to the
A few weeks ago 1 was at a concert given
by Utah Philipps, a 'wobbly' from
Washington State who explained why he is
still singing these old songs: "because they
can help us to understand our background
and our own history. Not the history of kings
and queens and the ruling classes but the
history of ordinary people that is stolen from
us, taken from us."
three parts — 'a warm-up' by the club
residents, a performance by a paid guest, and
in between, an open space given to floor-
singers. Anyone in the company is invited to
'take the floor' for two or three numbers and
visitors and newcomers are encouraged.
The lack of 'baggage' — the lack of obsession with obtaining recording contracts, or
dependence on elaborate and expensive
equipment and amplification, of the need for
stages, large venues and audiences, makes
folk appropriate music for the economic circumstances of recession. There is a return to
basics: the human voice, a song or tune, and
unaccompanied singing is common. Folk is
essentially open, accessible, direct.
A person is helped to find his or her identity within a group context. Songs are no less
expressive or emotionally alive because they
are a collective heritage and not personal property. The creative, shaping, process is still
active. Traditional music in the main escapes
from the excessive cult of the individual
which besets modern urban art and culture,
fostering the bogus mystique of the 'star' or
'superstar' and the expert and praising narcissistic postures.
History
While being entertaining folksong can at
the same time be educative in the best sense
of the word. It can lead us out of absorption
in our personal troubles and aspirations to
see them within a wider cultural and human
context. As Utah Philipps summed it up:
"You can't know where you're going
unless you know where you're coming
from."
Folk   is   the   musical   equivalent   of  the
various    self-help    movements    that    have
developed in the last ten years. It stresses participation on every level — both in the immediate making of music, in the choruses
which depend on everyone joining in and in
the very structure of the folkclubs and their
evenings'   format.   The   clubs   are   run   by
groups of people who are themselves singers
or musicians, not agents, promoters, or other
'middlemen' and most sessions are divided in
Page Friday, 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March 2,  1979 poetry
n Cove Coffeehouse.
On a still deeper level folk responds to
sychological needs. The recurrent 'patterns'
f situations and images in folksongs may
;lp the psyche come to terms with aspects of
fe; yearnings, griefs, threats and fears.
To give an instance: 'the Outlandish
night' is an ancient ballad concerning an
'il man who deceives a young woman into
oping with him and them reach a river,
ders her to strip and threatens murder,
"For six pretty maidens have I drowned
here and the seventh will surely be
thee."
But the woman outsmarts the knight,
akes him turn his back and then cast him
to the river to drown. A naive tale perhaps,
at an archetypal situation — related to the
luebread male-ogre legend that com-
unicates directly to the female psyche. It
so happens to be at least two thousand
:ars old in origins and in its innumerable
triants, is a feature of folk cultures from the
eppes of central Asia to the Appalachian,
/hen I have sung this ballad it is extraor-
nary what a deep chord it has struck in
omen who have never heard it before,
iven the current concern over rape and
brutality the "pattern' presented by this
ballad is entirely relevant and helpful in a
contemporary context.
What does the future hold for folk? While
the centralized and depersonalized socioeconomic system will gnaw away at what is
left of the folk 'heartland', the traditional
communities, it will increasingly and inevitably, produce a reaction among rising
generations and fuel the urban revival and
even a new rural revival.
The related threat posed by the music industry also has a positive side. As people
become sick of synthetic slickness masquerading as the expression of true feelings,
mind-numbing beats and diluted protests,
they will turn to folk and other 'roots' music:
punk (temporarily), jazz and blues.
Blatant commercialism has tended to out-
mode the old polarity of 'art' (middleclass)
music and 'folk' (lower-class) music. This is
now too simplistic and has lost validity with
the growth of pop and mass, manipulated,
musics. We now have the far more relevant
polarity — for those who care sufficiently
about the politics of everyday life — between
commercial exploitive music such as disco
and non-commercial, non-exploitive music
such as jazz.
This opposition provides a structure that
helps up to decide what values, if any, the
music holds and in the very widest sense,
what it does and what we want it to do.
Similarly, folk has always been
characterized by a creative polarity or tension
between loyalty to existing forms, stability,
and openness to emerging forms, evolution.
Its great strength is the ability to balance
these elements, and adapt to changing circumstances without losing sight of its purposes.
Hopefully the revival will avoid the trend
of so many music movements to become the
preserve of exclusive groups — cliques, experts of all ilks, and narrow-minded and the
chauvinistic. Clubs and musicians alike must
accept the cultural plurality in which we live
and appreciate, though not without a critical
eye and ear, the extraordinary process of
cross-fertilization, exchange and borrowing
that has taken place in music.
Folk encourages people to take culture
back into their own hands — or mouths
rather. Far from being a spent force it is continually growing, expanding in all directions
and in all countries. Recent developments in
Britain have been the revival of instrumental
and dance music, particularly Irish music and
the parallel revival of dances, barn-dances,
'knees-ups' and ceilidhs.
Thanks to the consumer revolt of Camra
— the Campaign for Real Ale — good beer
has become more widely available, old pubs
and breweries are prospering despite the
recession and due to the intimate connection
between booze and folk, more and more people are discovering traditional songs and
entertainment in their 'local'. Perhaps the
most significant development of all has been
the spread of this movement to Europe, and
beyond. Folksong is once more creating a
sense of belonging to both shared traditions
and new communities.
Audience vindicates
bill bissett's poetry
By DONA STURMANIS
With the exception of the Patti-Smith
school of poets who like to back their utter-
ings with rock and roll music, sound poetry is
the most highly entertaining form of verse in
performance.
This certainly proved to be the case on the
evening of February 23 when Canada's top
four high priests of the mode read at the
Italian Cultural Center on 12th and Slocan.
Over half of the thousand who showed up
had probably never been to a poetry reading
in their lives. I'm sure they left satisfied, if
not a little confused about what it all meant.
This was the first in a series of poetry
readings sponsored by the Vancouver Poetry
Centre. I'm sure much of the response to this
reading came from those serious about the
"obscene" poet bill bissett as much as wanting to see bp Nichol, Steve McCaffrey, and
Victor Coleman. The Poetry Center was
formed partially in support of bissett and
Talonbooks, publisher of his controversial
'poems for yoshi'.
Robin Blaser, one of Vancouver's literary
patriarchs, opened the reading with some
comments about sound poetry in general:
and the works of the four poets: "They
all work very intimately with the language,"
he said. "They break it down, rebuild it, and
really believe that truth is laughter."
Steve McCaffrey and bp Nichol worked
well together for the first half; the result was
tight and well-orchestrated. They alternated
between individual pieces and sound duets.
They astounded the audiences with their jazzlike human voice experiments, gargling,
coughing duets, grunts, squeaks and body
antics.
The tmal piece was action.-oriented and entitled "Contribution to Futility Four."
Nichol brought a ladder on stage, McCaffrey
climbed it and dropped eggs into it one at a
time while reciting: "as/ as the/ as the eggs/
as the eggs get/ as the eggs get less/ as the
eggs get less the/ as the eggs get less the
omelette/ as the eggs get less the omelette
gets/ as the eggs get less the omelette gets
more."
Then Nichol picked the eggs out of the
bucket and tossed them back up to McCaffrey who recited these same lines with
omelette and eggs reversing roles. Adding a
visual as well as a sound element makes
poetry very entertaining.
At intermission, the proles and the
literareii mingled to eat quiche, drink booze
and examine the display of small press books
out in the lobby. When asked to comment on
the evening so far, many of the local
celebrities were stumped for words:
"I thing the Poetry Center is wonderful,"
said bill bissett.
"Coffee and porridge," said Jerry
Newman, novelist.
"This poetry is real news. It pushes us out
of the power system that language
represents," said Robin Blaser.
Blaser introduced the second half of the
program with cigarette and drink in hand,
then Victor Coleman put on a set twice as
long as any of the others. He opened with a
fine jazzy piece backed by the sounds of
"Louie, Louie" played by locals Gary
Cramer and Mike Beddoes.
However when they left, Coleman was on
his own and the hecklers started in. As he
read, beer bottles fell to the floor and the
SOUND POETRY . . . mets with enthusiastic and even shocking response
Enjoyment of sound poetry has to be like
Zen. One must close off his logical mind and
respond purely to the sounds. Triggered are
those same sensations we sometimes feel
when listening to instrumental music. Much
of the audience was spellbound because the
form seemed new and probably didn't realize
that the form has been around for a very long
time.
Individually, McCaffrey proved to be
outrageous, cryptic and downright humorous
with some pieces that included mixed-order
wordstreams, working class Koans and The
Communist Manifesto translated into dialect
from the "West Aiding of Yorkshire."
Shades of Monty Python.
bp Nichol contributed a few longer pieces
which were entertaining for their witticisms,
wordplays and wisdoms: "Definition of electric poetry: he's plugged in definition of a
collection of electric poetry: he's plugging
along." He'd already put one poem called
"Apollinaire" through "fifty'seven systems
of translation" and come up with a new
sound version which he performed while flipping pages madly.
poet was constantly interrupted and razzed.
When one heckler displayed his finger, Coleman told him to sit on it. When the heckler
yelled, "Bullshit," the poet speculated that's
what it was he must have had on that finger.
Coleman continued to read short little
pieces full of such revelations as:
"/ could have worn braces on my truth/
but when it came out crooked/ they called it
avante-garde . . . Will I fuck the slim blonde
in the diner/ will I suck the flame out of the
truth " or "the woman is simple/sex is not. "
The line breaks are approximate in these
quotes.
The hecklers continued and Blaser
couldn't take it anymore. He stormed
onstage and asked them to leave.
"You guys have got limp dicks," he
shouted and asked the audience to help him
remove them. Three hundred people stood
up, ready to trample and kill. But thank
goodness, the flock of bluebirds called
"higher consciousness" flew into the hall
and reminded everybody that in civilized
society, free speech is okay and violence is
Turn to PF6
Friday, March 2,  1979
THE      UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 5 poetry ^^^M
Sound poetry
From PF5
not fashionable.
So Coleman continued fighting
the hecklers. "You're boring,
you're an asshole," one shouted. In
the middle of one of his poems
about the bicameral mind, the P.A.
system blew out. Then Coleman
pleaded with the audience to let him
do one more, appropriately entitled, I Want to Forget. It was a long,
powerful piece which brought great
applause.
Then came bissett, the sexy proverbial little boy, in his jeans, plaid
shirt and John-John hairstyle.
Despite the jaded who say bill has
not changed his style in ten years, I
have to admit I was moved by his
performance. In many ways he is
the original poet, the west coast personified, but most certainly natural.
He works damn hard at his
readings, moving, sweating and using his powerful voice to send chills
up and down the spines of the
transfixed audience.
"He's a fucking genius," said
one of the hecklers.
Like a happy kid deep in his
private world after several hours of
meditation, he danced, whooped,
sang, and used his voice like an instrument. His material varied from
Indian style chants, to humorous
vignettes, including a piece for different voices about lawn-bowling,
sensual love and nature -verse in
breathy effectiveness, and of course
some hilarious bits about the
RCMP with whom he has had much
personal experience: "they listen to
yr most secret farts/ rewinding the
tape to get the hidden meaning ".
It was almost 12:30 a.m. by the
time bissett ended; he was sweating
from the effort. He was given a
deafening applause by the audience.
NEW
ZEALAND
The New Zealand Work Exchange is a programme
that A.O.S.C. offer in conjunction with the New
Zealand Universities Student Association (NZUSA).
Fifty successful applicants will be provided with
work permits in New Zealand for a 3-month period.
May 15 to August 20.
COST: From Vancouver $923
DEPARTS: May 14, 1979
RETURNS: August 18, 1979
Eligibility:
This programme is open to full-time students enrolled at member colleges and universities of A.O.S.C,
• V
••V
AUSTRALIA
BEAR MINIMUM FARE
SAN FRANCISCO - SYDNEY
from (U.S.) YU lO  return
You must make reservations and purchase ticket at
least 45 days in advance. Contact us for full details.
Tasting
is believ*
Ton wont
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RCbeer
Isn't it the best beer yoa've ever tasted?
f BRITAIN
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Africa and within europe
Page Friday, 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March 2, 1979 Sci-fi author robs trains for entertainment
By LARRY GREEN
The Great Train Robbery is
about three likeable rogues who are
decidedly, unswoonily out for
themselves. To this end they conspire to carry out the first train robbery 1855 England has ever know.
This picture is neither flashy swash
like Richard Lester's Musketeers
films, nor oh-so-amusing-with-a-
wink like The Sting. It's fun, like
Murder by Decree. It's thinner, but
it's mostly fun.
The Great Train Robbery
A film by Michael Crichton
Starring Sean Connery and
Donald Sutherland
At the Capitol Six
Sean Connery is a magnetic,
underestimated movie star. Lesley-
Anne Down recalls a younger
Elizabeth Taylor, without the hardness. Donald Sutherland is often
likeable but always inadequate.
He's awfully lucky somebody
decided he was star. He's in town
now in three movies. Yet to come
are Blood Relatives, A Man a
Woman and a Bank, Bear Island
and goodness knows what else.
Michael Chrichton is the physician turned SF novelist turned
scenarist turned director. He has
said that he does things solely to
entertain. Compared to directors
who also have dealt with luxurious
sets and heavy plots like Herbert
Ross and Sidney Lumet he's still a
petit maitre. Fortunately he has
some visual technique, unlike the
way Ross and Lumet have been
known to throw away the decor and
atmosphere in entire movies with
heavy-handedness.
It's pretty. Clothes by Anthony
Mendelson, sets by Maurice Carter,
with editing by David Bretherton
and photography by Geoffrey
Unsworth, who were both deserved
Oscar winners for Cabaret.
Unsworth is dead, and this was his
last work. His second last work was
Superman, which would make a
poor legacy for any
cinematographer. He acquitted
himself well here.
Connery will not set foot in the
United Kingdom so the film was
made in Ireland. He did his own
stunts. There's a neat little part for
te'ymim#%$&fc.
W':~t
CONNERY . . . criminal mastermind in turn of the century train robbery
Wayne Sleep who also does his own
stunts playing a neat little crook.
This film beats out light entertainment like Murder On the Orient
Express and The Seven Per Cent
Solution because it doesn't have
their structural lapses. It's
resourseful, steady and light, even
lighter than most light pictures. For
lack of a better description it's plain
fun. Not plain in the sense of complete or rapturous. Just plain.
Holmes examines human motives
By JOHN DOOLAN
In the contemporary cinematic
wasteland, Murder by Decree
soothes our otherwise abused
sensibilities.	
Murder by Decree
Starring Christopher Plummer and
James Mason
At the Vancouver Centre Cinema
There is not much question that
the modern cinema has largely
replaced the theatre as a vehicle for
visual representation. But has it
fulfilled its responsibilities as the
most popular artistic medium and
social forum of our world?
I think not. With the ever-
increasing desire to produce
marketable themes and million-
dollar profits, the Shakespeare of
the stage has fallen to the Spielberg
of the screen. The special effects
man wins out over the screenwriter
and language is drowned in the
flood lights. We are asked to believe
in flying men and space heroes,
rather than in the more ennobling
qualities of the mind and heart.
Somehow we are kept from the
"truth of things."
But Murder by Decree brings us
down from the stars to examine
some of the basic principles and impulses of human.nature. This John
Hopkins screenplay plots Sherlock
Holmes against Jack the Ripper in
an interpretation of the Ripper
Murders suggested by detectives
John Lloyd and Elwin Jones in
their book The Ripper File. The
theme is not a new one, but its
presentation is superb.
Christopher Plummer is the best
Sherlock Holmes yet, and James
Mason is his witty and squeamish
companion, Dr. Watson. Add to
this the fine supporting cast which
includes Donald Sutherland, Anthony Quayle and Genevieve Bujold
and you have the ingredients for
•••——••••••••»
! PACHEENA j
FRASER ARMS
1450 S W. Marine Dr.
one of the best-acted dramas of our
screen.
The newest Holmes is not only
the best, but the most moving. He is
an aristocratic humanist in search
of the truth "no matter how unpalatable it might be." He is a man
of reason and action who devotes
both these qualities to the discovery
of the truth behind the grotesque
Whitechapel murders.
The case is full of suspense and
we are ever-aware of the dark,
"maligned force" at work. And the
unravelling is, at the least, surprising, involving high-society members
right up to the very monarchy. The
final question is that of responsibility. Having finally grasped the actual murderer, Holmes leaves him
to pursue the man who directly
prompted the acts.
The responsible group is the
society of Free Masons to which the
Prime Minister, Chief of Police and
even members of the Royal Family
belong. They enlist the psychotic
Dr. Thomas Spivey, who, convinced he has "political authority of the
highest command," leaves a trail of
brutal murders to cover up a royal
indiscretion.
Holmes' final accusation of the
parties involved is a masterpiece of
modern cinema. He describes the
"chain of circumstances" with a
deep sense of personal devastation,
holding in his conscience the death
of one girl to whom he led the
killers and prescribing "eternal incarceration" for the ultimate initiators of the crimes: "You create
an allegiance separate from your
allegiance to humanity — there lies
the madness."
An almost-Shakespearean concern with language underlines this
moral frarnework. These murders
are not simply the workings of a
madman, but coldly calculated executions and Holmes is the noble
voice of humanity throughout.
Near the beginning of the movie, he
says, "we are grasping at some dark
intention and I have a vague
outline." The language suggests
both the careful concealment of the
ominous force at work and Holmes'
dreadful awe, in his consciousness
of it.
On the question of responsibility,
he labels a leader of the radicals "a
man devoid of conscience, as guilty
as the murderer himself" and calls
the Prime Minister "a man who has
no place in this world or the next."
These are men who take no active
part in the actual crimes, but whose
souls are marred by their ultimate
accountability.
The language also provides the
movie with a tinge of comic irony.
At the booing of the prince, Watson remarks that "more respect is
wanted." Holmes replies: "No, the
prince wants more respect. If the
prince wants more respect, he
should conduct his affairs with
more discretion." Such reversals
are common in the work and often
point to the truth.
The acting, highlighted by the
fine performances of Plummer and
Mason, blends together in a finely-
crafted harmony. Plummer's sensitive portrayal of Holmes gives a
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
ALL'S WELL THAT
ENDS WELL
By William Shakespeare
MARCH 2-10
(Previews Feb. 28-March 1)
8:00 p.m.
(Thursday Matinee — March 8 at 12:30 p.m.)
Student Tickets: $2.50
Thursday Matinee: $2.00
BOX OFFICE * FREDERICK WOOD THEATRE *
Room 207
Support Your Campus Theatre
serious tone to his intellectual and
moral pursuit, while Watson with
his "instinctive grasp for the obvious" and a splendid dissertation
on 'eating a pea,' provides comic
relief.
Murder by Decree affirms that
the cinema, like the drama, can be
at once popular and serious. The
fine acting, elevated language, and
sustained social context are asserted
in a way that most of our screen, in
an endeavour to be visually
brilliant, has forgotten.
CANADIAN ODEON Theatres
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION PHONE 681-7836
W*i     Show Times: 1:00 3:05 5:107:209:30
tm
Sunday 3:05 5:10 7:20 9:30
(4
Warning:    Some
swearing      and
coarse
language.—   B.C.
) Director.
voquE
918 GRANVILLE
685-5434
GEORGE C.SCOTT
HARDCORE
Show Times: Odeon I
1:00 3:15 5:30 7:45 '
10:00   Sunday 3:15
5:30 7:45 10:00
Dunbar 7:30 9:30
Warning: Some violence, Nudity £t course1
language. - B.C. DIRECTOR.
» M«Ml.aCI IOM1I0MIM
ocJeon
881  GRANVILLE
682-7468
duisibAR
DUNBAR at 30th
214-7252
HALLOWEEN
CORONET 1
• 51  GRANVILLE
68S-6S28
Warnlnjpsome frightening scenes-B.C. DIR.
Show Times: 12:40 2:20 4:10 5:50 7:45 9:45 '
Sunday 2:20 4:10 5:50 7:45 9:45
HMtKWmAM.      *, Show Times: 2:05 4:05 6:05
LAMP99H* 8:05 10:05 daily
'ANIMAL;"-
sional
suggestive!
scenes,   coarse |
language
throughout.
B.C. Director
CORONET 2
851   GRANVILLE
68S-682S
NOMINATED FOR 6
ACADEMY AWARDS
Show Times: 7:20 9:30
Warning:   Frequent
violence,    ce
language
MiWUftlll
70 7   W. BROADWAY
874-1927
CAUfCKNIA
SUITE
NOMINATED FOR 3
ACADEMY AWARDS
including Best Actress
-Maggie Smith
in a supporting role. L
Show Times: 7:30 9:30707 TiffS£WAY|
bROAaw/Av 21
Alan
Alda
NOMINATED    FOR
ACADEMY AWARDS
inc. Best Actress Show Times: 7:20 9:30l
r^alUC llllKf suggestive scenes.
GNext«l£ar" BC-DirecJer-
DARK
CAMBIE at 18th
876-2747
unmarried
Woman
- ^•Warning: Some suggestive scenes
NOMINATED     FOR
ACADEMY AWARDS
Show Times 7:30 9^0	
224-3730
& coarse language. B.C. Dir. *37^ w. loth
Friday, March 2, 1979
THE      UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 7 book review I
Son of Socred slashes MiniWAC
By TOM HAWTHORN
Socreds are a wacky bunch of
people.
They'd probably be humorous, if
only they didn't control our
government. Now they're a pain in
the ass.
So says self-proclaimed author
Stan Persky, whose own sanity
often comes into question.
Son of Socred
By Stan Persky
New Star Books Ltd., 1979
$2.95
In Son of Socred, a rambling
319-page account of the first few
years of Mini-Bennet's regime,
Persky details the meteoric rise and
phenomenal bungling of the
Socreds under the boy-king and
heir to the throne, Bill Bennett.
Essentially, Son of Socred is
Persky's attempt to provide some
contemporary account of the provincial scene in Victoria, and he
borrows heavily from the commercial press to do so.
But the primary focus of Son of
Socred is whether B.C. is moving
again, as MiniWAC promised on
election night, when the socialist
hordes retreated back to their
clandestine meeting halls.
Persky determines that it isn't,
that B.C. is facing an even more
sluggish economy than under fat l'il
Dave's regime.
The best part of Son of Socred
isn't to be found in his analysis of
the Socred performance though.
The humor of the work, although
Persky says that wasn't the intention of the book when he wrote
it, is to be found in the Socreds
themselves.
B.C.'s own version of Eisenhower.
Grace McCarthy, who was to
eventually become provincial
secretary/tourism minister and
human resources minister, was so
enthusiastic about selling new $5
memberships into our own
boosters' version of the Free Enterprise Party that anyone with the
bucks could buy himself a
nomination.
Mysterious millionaire Alan Lau,
as Persky points out, read the
bubble gum selling attributes of
McCarthy so well that he took more
than 300 friends from the Chinese
community to dinner before
bussing them to the Socred
nomination meeting in Vancouver
Centre. Needless to say, he won.
Yes, from the same party that
brought you flyin' Phil Gaglardi
came Alan Lau, graduate from the
non-existent Golden West
University in Los Angeles.
But seriously, folks, Persky's not
trying to be humorous. He's just
pointing out the facts.
And old image Socred Agnes
Kripps was so upset at losing the
nomination in Vancouver South
that she bemoaned the fact that
"big business has taken control of
the party." (As Persky says, she
came up with that earth-shattering
reflection only 20 years after the
fact.)
But all joking aside, the Socreds
are really a serious party.
Just ask Pat McGeer, who, after
only two weeks in office following
the blessed dethroning of the
socialists,      decided      to      as-
AUTHOR PERSKY
Persky says any humor is unin
tentional, but that almost-pixie of
the alumni association big business
seminars could not help but point
out the comical errors of the
Socred's version of bread and
circuses, without the bread.
For there is no better show than
the Socreds in action.
While Persky points out the
many failings of Barrett's Old
Democratic Party, only the party
retreads and turncoats found in a
revitalized anti-socialist, free enterprise alliance Social Credit party
evoke the ringing laughter normally
reserved for Three Stooges reruns.
Indeed, it is the three stooges of
the Liberal party (Pat McGeer,
Alan Williams and Garde Gardom)
who find out that when the going
gets tough, find solace in numbers.
By the time it gets to the Night of
the Car Dealers, the Social Credit
party has as many $79 leisure suits
in its ranks as it does opportunist
university degrees.
Persky points out the bumbling
ineptness of these old Socreds, who
clown around even when it comes
to revitalizing a party which
stagnated under the leadership of
—peter menyasz photo
. wacky writer dumps on Socreds
tronomically raise the Insurance
Corporation of B.C. rates. But that
wasn't enough for Pat. No sir.
Then he went on television to tell
the people that if they couldn't
afford their new insurance rates,
they should sell their cars.
Then human resources minister
Bill Vander Zalm, not to be outdone by fellow former Liberal McGeer, decided to eliminate the Vancouver Resources Board. And not
gradually either. No sir. It had to be
all or nothing.
His performance at the breakfast
table with his corn flakes box only
confirmed to those on the other side
of the granite curtain that this is
indeed a wacky province, second
only to California for silliness.
Alan Williams (yes, yet another
Liberal) also had a trick up his
sleeve, called Bill 89. In one fell
swoop, it became harder to
unionize. ("Hell, that isn't strong
enough," said the old woman with
sneakers in the old image Socred
tradition. "Should close down
those god damned atheist commie
unions.") Now labor was unhappy,
too.
Then there was Jack Davis and
his ferries, not to mention the
casebook of corrupt government
Socreds. And Ed Smith.
But when everything is all done
and finished, Persky's work is a
credible look at the two and one-
half years of floundering in Victoria. Although Son of Socred is
unfortunately lacking in analysis,
Persky's discussion of the events
and characters involved in shaping
B.C. politics are well worth the
effort.
Persky, currently a sociology
teacher at Northwest Community
College in Terrace, a former
candidate for chancellor at UBC
and a student radical in ■ 1967,
successfully blends the hard nose
political aspects of the wacky world
of B.C. electioneering with the
phenomenal bungling of a provincial government.
One can only hope though, that
Persky won't have to write a book
titled the Return of the Son of
Socred after the next provincial
election.
That would be too much like a
rerun of a late night horror show.
McGEER
'sell your car if you can't afford ICBC
Bacardi rum.
Sip it before you
mix it.
Just this once, taste Bacardi rum
before you add anything. It's a
beautiful way to see why Bacardi goes so well
with soda, water; ginger and almost anything else.
BACARDI rum
'li^SIl'Sti,',0.  IS, S ™?rRA,"P'0N   0m,R"J IW2L3  BACARDI RuMcSi PRODUCED BY SPECIAL AuThORiT. AND UNDER THE
AND BAI OEVICE ARE REGISTERED TRADEMARKS Oh BACARDI S COMPANr LIMITED   BOTTlID BV FBM DISTILLER* CO   LTD    CANADA.
Page Friday, 8
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March 2,  1979 music/radio
New wave on the air
By JEFF RANKIN
If a tree falls in a forest and there
is no one nearby to hear, does it
make a sound? Or more originally,
if we have a student radio station
and the students can't listen to it,
do we have a student radio station?
Such is the dilemma facing
campus radio CITR. At the
moment the station only has the
facilities to broadcast over cable
and since there is no cablevision in
any of the university residences,
CITR staff is worried over a
shortage of student listeners.
There is a system in existence
which transmits to Totem Park and
Gage Towers through those
building's existing electrical wiring,
but according to CITR business
manager Rob Whiteley, the
resulting reception is so poor as to
be almost unlistenable.
"The whole idea is to make it
accessible to the students," said
Whiteley Tuesday. "How many
students have access to
cablevision?"
The problem has a simple
solution, he explained. "All we
want is a low-power FM transmitter
to reach the student ghetto; that's
west of Granville and the west end.
Unfortunately, low-power FM
transmitter antenna systems go for
about $8,000 each and it doesn't
look like the station is going to be
able to afford one for a while yet.
Whitely maintains that although
the CITR-run mobile disco brings
in enough money each year (approximately $10,000) to make the
station almost completely self-
supporting, there is nothing left
over for any expenditure on new
equipment. And although the
Student Administrative Commission has supported the principle of
low-power FM, they have not come
through with the bucks necessary to
make it happen.
"We've got a $1,000 loan for the
antenna and transmitter," said
Whitely, "and that's all the support
we've got from SAC. It's kind of a
token gesture."
McDONAGH
gives music its direction
"We call ourselves a progressive
or alternative music station," said
CITR music director Dave Mc-
Donagh Tuesday. "We try to steer
away from the stuff you hear every
five minutes on the radio, such as
Billy Joel, Rod Stewart."
"We concentrate on a fair bit of
new wave, the more intelligent
stuff," he said.
According to Sun music critic
Vaughn Palmer, Radio UBC has
the "best new wave playlist in the
city, maybe best this side of the
Atlantic."
The station playlist is posted on
the walls of "just about every
record store in the city," according
to McDonagh and its contents are
best summed up by a short ad they
frequently air:
"CITR: We play all the music
your mother can't stand."
A random sampling would range
from bands like the Blues Brothers,
Blondie, the Boomtown Rats and J.
Geils to lesser known artists such as
the Fabulous Poodles, Lol and Kev,
Amon Duul II and XTC.
Besides the music, UBC radio
offers a variety of other diversions.
"We have major news broadcasts
at two and four o'clock," said
Whiteley. "They're four-minute
broadcasts (with) news, sports and
weather."
"We do live play-by-play
broadcasts of hockey and football," he said. "We have remote
broadcast booths in the War
Memorial Gym and the Thunderbird Sports Centre."
CITR also does interviews with
major recording artists that play
UBC or downtown clubs such as
the Tubes, Bob Segrini, Lisa
DelBelo, the Battered Wives and
Cano.
—tim langmead photos
WHITELEY . . . Don Juan of the new waves
But Whiteley insists that the
radio station has another role aside
from entertainment, and few
people realize what it is.
"Training," says Whiteley, "we
train people in broadcast journalism, production for radio,
engineering, editing, script-
writing," he said. If people want to
write radio plays, we've done more
than one. . ."
"Those types of skills are not
easily available. We provide an
opportunity for students to explore
the different facets of radio, from
the training of on-air jocks to the
administration of the station."
The present CITR facility was
built to professional design
specifications at a cost of $50,000
and new equipment combined with
an extensive record library combine
to make it anything but a mickey
mouse operation.
"The experience you get here at
CITR for free, is worth thousands
of dollars," said Whiteley. "You
could do two years at BCIT and not
get the same training."
Diamond doesn't sparkle any more
By JULIE WHEELWRIGHT
Neil Diamond's Friday night concert was a
disappointing attempt at heart warming
sentimentality which marred the otherwise
energetic and enthusiastic music.
Appealing largely to his over thirty
and conservative middle class, audience that
packed the Coliseum, Diamond played
nostalgia and his mass appeal to it's fullest.
Diamond resorted to such tactics as making up an improptu song about Vancouver's
rain and introducing his 8 year old son, Jessie
Diamond. Jessie's appearance brought about
a motherly sigh from the audience as papa
Neil said, "Jessie keeps me normal when I'm
travelling."
Diamond's theme travelled from the early
sixties to his latest songs from his new
album. Familiar oldies like Solitary Man,
Kentucky Woman, and Cherry Cherry were
received with enthusiasm, by a religiously attentive audience. Diamond's backup band
was incredibly high powered and provided a
high polished sound that contrasted with the
singer's raw energetic voice.
During the concert Diamond played the
audience to it's fullest. At several points he
requested that the lights be turned up so he
could, "get a look at the people," and the
tone of the concert changed and it began to
seem like a gospel hour.
In fact Diamond came across as a cross
between a Baptist preacher and a used car
dealer. His blessing during the encore and
Diamond's praying hands while singing
"Johnathon Livingston Seagull", seemed
less than sincere.
It was a shame that his trite actions so marred his otherwise dynamic and entertaining
performance. There was a gloss over
such actions as pointing out to his audience
that he had sold more programs to them than
Bob Dylan had.
"And remember folks, all that money goes
to charity," said Diamond.
Adding to the effect that the show was
unoriginal, even banal was the stage setting.
Not that anyone expects Neil Diamond to
DIAMOND
studded performer with jaded manner
enter in a puff of green smoke but you would
expect a better attempt at creativity.
Diamond's wooing of the audience reached even lower levels. Two girls left a pair of
roses on the stage for Diamond, who exclaimed, "we have some roses by the
speaker."
Not only were we then blessed with
another impromptu ditto about, you guessed, Roses in Vancouver, but Diamond asked
the girls to come up to the stage.
"You've brought me to my knees," he said
as he knelt down on the stage to chat with his
fans.
"Where were you girls in the tough years
when I had pimples in high school," said
Diamond.
But Diamond lost no audience appeal as
they laughed and sang and clapped along
with their star. Admittedly, some of his songs
such as Forever in Blue Jeans, were as vibrant
and entertaining as his old favorites such as 1
Am I Said.
Tom Hensy on piano caught the fever as he
rocked and bounced to Diamond's melodies.
The other members of the band were equally
talented, King Arison on the bongos, Alvin
Lingwin on percussion, Linda Press vocals,
Ronnie Press on base, Richard Bennet on
lead guitar, and Dennis St. John on drums
blended well and contributed to Diamond's
performance.
The only reminder I had of the once
rebellious, blue jeaned singer of the sixties
was "Hot August Night," that was sung during his second encore.
Diamond also sang Johnathon Livingston
Seagull, with a blast of organ music and ended the song with a God Bless You. The final
encore, Diamond's third, was a powerful 'He
Ain't Heavy He's My Brother.'
My disappointment laid with Diamond's
image, an aging singer who's moving with the
times and becoming more mellow and more
commercial. But the music had not lost its
charm.
Therefore the best thing to do is stay home
and listen to Diamond, it's too painful to see
him open his mouth.
Friday, March 2,  1979
THE       UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 9 CAPITOL 6
PARH ROYAL
-RICHMOND SQUARE,
NUMBER THREE ROAD 273
 GUILDFORD,
GUILFORD TOWN CENTRE
Cap:   1:30,  4:15,  7:05,
10:00
Richmond    Sq:    7:00,
9:30.  Mats.  Sat.,  Sun.
2:00
Guildford:   7:00,   9:40.
Mats. Sat., Sun. 2:00.
Park Royal: 7:00, 9:30.,
Mats: Sat., Sun. 2:00.
A
FAMOUS
PLAYERS
theatres
MOVIE    LISTINGS   EFFECTIVE
MARCH 2-8
SHOWTIME INFORMATION
681-4255
WALT DISNEYS
NOW in STEREOPHONIC SOUND
7:00, 9:15. Mats. Sat., Sun. 2:00
 STANLEY —
GRANVILLE ol 12th 733 2622
11)6 mosi incredible case of
srierlocK Holmes career
Van. Centre.' 2:00,4:20, 6:45, 9:15ng£fv]
Lougheed    Mall:    7:00,    9:15
Mais. Sat., Sun. 2:05.
-VANCOUVER CENTRE-
GRANVILLE&GEORGIA 6694442
LOUGHEED MALL
adevlllslily
clever iqysiery.
Warning:    some    gory
violence—B.C. Director
Capitol:    3:15,    5:15,
7:15, 9:20
Park Royal: 7:30, 9:20.
Mat. Sat only 2:15.
 CAPITOL 6	
B20 GRANVILLE MALL 669 6000
Warning: some gory
violence and nudity—B.C.
Director
■ PARh ROYAL
WEST VANCOUVER
'This is her search for'Love
Eroticism (jOO&V
and
Pleasure
Goodbye
zssm
BEST FILM OF THE YEAR
NATIONAL SOCIETY OF FILM CRITICS
A GEM!
High comedy is alive and well."
~~W6X IvOOO
GET OUT YOUR
HANDKERCHIEFS
A Film Oy BERTRAND BlIER   A Robert A McNeil Presentation    From New Line Cinema
Warning: occasional
nude and suggestive
scenes—B.C. Director
ACADEMY    AWARD    NOMINATION    FOR    BEST    FOREIGN
LANGUAGE FILM
FRENCH WITH ENGLISH
SUBTITLES
 DENMAN PLACE	
1737 COMOX 683 4647
7:30, 9:30
ANDREE PELLETIER   JOHNJULIANI
PRODUCED BY FIL FRASER   DIRECTED BY R. MARTIN WALTERS
A PRESENTATION OF THE MOTION PICTURE CORPORATION OF ALBERTA
7:30, 9:30. Mat. Sat. only 2:00
FINE ARTS
FIRE
SALE
ADMISSION $3.00
Free parking for Bay theatre patrons at the
Community Centre lot, 1700 block Haro.
Warning:   occasional   suggestive   scenes   and
dialogue; some coarse language—B.C. Director.
 THE BAY.
DENMAN at BARCLAY
Fire 7:30
Wedding 9:10
ROCKY HORROR PICTURE
SHOW
PLUS
PHANTOM OF THE PARADISE
FRIDAY, SATURDAY, SUNDAY ONLY
Warning:   musical   comedy  satire;   suggestive
scenes and coarse language; some frightening
.scenes—B.C. Director.
— LOUGHEED DRIN _-
BROADWAY E.of BOUNDRY 294 2W1
Gates 7:00, Show: 7:30
HEAVEN n
CAN WAIT
GOIN'
SOUTH
SWAP 'N SHOP SUNDAY AT DELTA DRIVE IN
FRIDAY, SATURDAY, SUNDAY ONLY
Warning: some coarse language—B.C. Director
 DELTA DRIN
i.Wot KNIGHT ST BR.
GATES 7:30, SHOW 8:00
Never
have
so few
taken
so much
from so
many.
DINO DE LMJRENTIIS presents
A MICHAEL CRICHTON FILM
starring
SEAN      DONALD
CONNERY SUTHERLAND
Cap.: 3:35, 5:40, 7:50, 10:00
Lougheed Mall:  :7:40, 9:50.  Mats.  Sat.. THIIU
Sun 2:15 TRAIN
THE
GREAT
CAPITOL 6
LOUGHEED MALL
Warning:    occas
ional violence and
suggestive scenes
— B.C. Director
MP
Dustin Hoffman   Vanessa Redgrave
A fictional solution to the real
mystery of Agatha Christie's
disappearance.
Warning: occasional nudity-B.C. Director
CAPITOL 6
 GUILDFORD	
GUILFORD TOWN CENTRE 5811716
Capitol:   2:15,   4:10,   6:05,
8:05, 10:05
Guildford: 7:15, 9:15. Mats.
Sat., Sun 2:15.
NOMINATED FOR 9
ACADEMY AWARDS
BEST PICTURE
HEAVEN
CAN WAIT
Van. Centre: 2:15, 4:05, 6:00, 8:00, 10:00
Columbia: 7:00, 9:00. Mats. Sat.. Sun. 2:00.
Delta Dr. In: Gates, 7:30; Show, 8:00.
-VANCOUVER CENTRE-
GRANVILLE &GEORGIA 6694442
 COLUMBIA	
NtW WESTMINSTER 521 0830
 DELTA DRIN	
i.W.ol KNIGHT ST. BR. 2782710
Cunt
Eastwoo!
WILLTUR
YOU
Every
Which Way
Downtown: 1:35, 3:35, 5:35, 7:40, 9:45
Lougheed Mall: 7:15, 9:30. Mats. Sat.,
Sun. 2:00.
Richmond Sq.: 7:00, 9:00. Mats. Sat.,
Sun. 2:00.
DOWNTOWN
LOUGHEED MALL
.-RICHMOND SQUARE
NUMBER THREE ROAD 27:
But Loose'
Warning: frequent coarse
language; occasional
nudity—B.C. Director.
Page Friday, 10
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March 2,  1979 Creative Writing
Supplement
O Night
Dragging your dark skirts
Across the sullen pavement,
Pressing your cold cheeks
Against the glass
Like a child looking into a candy store,
You are no child, but a woman,
Black and irreversible,
Dressed for a funeral.
O Night
Is it your face or mine
Behind that black veil?
SUSAN WARD
night breath
New York Arrivals
Summer night, half past eight at Kennedy . . .
The heady, humid smell presses in on my mind
And shades of a former life,
Clothed in deja vu images,
Flit in and out of consciousness
Under the weight of fear
I want to crawl back into that past
Rather than face this moment of terror.
Van Wyck knifes into the blackness,
Treading lazily death's balance.
In all directions,
despairing,
hopeless,
faces
Caught in the neon freeze-frame of time
Seem almost real;
Their all-consuming obscenity captured
— and forgotten —
In the shuttered click of conscience.
Each time I come to New York, I die.
THOMAS FRIEDMAN
it seems to fit as easily
as a brassiere hook or a lie,
and it slips like a key
under the doormat.
the night's breath,
with its heavy words
shapes my indiscretions,
it turns me into an old-time flume,
bark and leaves
running through me like water.
the moonless sky
is farther from its destination
than yesterday, like i am.
i confront you with a dead whisper,
even the crackling of the white
laundry-starched sheets is louder.
the priest is saying "our father"
from behind a blackness,
and momentarily, the night
breathes.
the air
enters through the floorboards
and the wood panels, i am crying
but your tongue is in my mouth.
RACHEL BONACCI
Friday, March 2, 1979
THE      UBYSSEY
Page Friday, U i am the Angel
i am the Angel
the Angel of Death
burned, blackened
consumed by your fire,
where will you find me
when words are beyond us?
abandon your search . . .
you can't touch me now.
no, not even you.
little hot mustard love
with your sparkle-blue eyes
and Cheshire cat grin
i won't smile for you now i can't
i can't
i've become encapsulated,
groaning
like a fetal nightmare, awaiting
rebirth
i've awakened alone,
the flames screaming louder —
i'm lost in a vacuum, these tears
are like acid: corrosive
and cold,
i'll put you behind me
and die in your shadow
these wounds have lain open
far, far too long,
turn your back
on my sorrow, your concern
is not needed
. . . watch me rise
from the ashes  — the phoenix
in chains.
LAURIE ALLAN
Bus Trip
A giant fish tank pulls up to the curb.
Wavy faces float
Behind the vacant glass
Of the rimmed aquarium.
The doors spread.
I wait for the water to run out
As I rummage for a fare.
This womb runs on quarters,
Not love.
Inside
The seats are hard
And neutrally uncomfortable.
The huge metal vagina
Is lined with people,
Little white growths sprouting
Aimlessly from the blank
Airless walls, clinging
To the long thin umbilical cord
Bolted to the grim walls.
An anxious hand clutches
It spasmodically,
A mechanical contraction
Forces a convulsive jerking,
Belch ing  up and out
Into a world as neutral.
A new shiny face hurries down the street.
I wait for my own stop,
My own time to be born.
SUSAN WARD
Page Friday, 12
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March 2, 1979 Tales To Be
Told
TRANSLATED FROM THE SPANISH
BY KICO GONZALEZ
By OSWALDO DRAGUN 1956
(The action takes place in the present.)
PROLOGUE
ACTRESS: Audience of the hall, good evening!
We are the new comedians,
four actors who go from town to town,
who go from plaza to plaza,
but always forward!
Only a seed is man so frail,
and his tale.
We exist
because you exist.
Your tales weigh upon our souls
and our hands cry them out.
We bring tears from deep inside
and also a laugh.
And if one of you, dear fathers,
has a laugh that should be laughed
or a tear that should be shed,
then at the end of the act come right ahead
to us, actors,
singers,
singers,
weepers,
Laughers,
starhunters.
Your tale we'll tell
to no one dr many.
What's important is to tell it,
and your little tale riddled and cold
will be another Tale to be Told.
■ACTOR 1: And to begin, we're going to tell you the
tale . . .
ACTOR 2:
ACTOR 1:
ACTRESS:
ACTOR 2:
ACTRESS:
ACTOR 1:
ALL:
MAN:
... of a gumball ...
... a woman . . .
. . . and two men.
Don't think it never happened.
And if you do think that . . .
. . . then think also that if it didn't happen . . .
... it could happen to you very soon.
I am the man. In the tale, a street vendor, one of
those who shouts: Paddle-balls . . . paddle-
balls! On Corrientes and Carlos Pellegrini.
WOMAN: I'll be his wife in this tale. And if you always see
me very serious, it's because I'm his wife.
Maybe if I had married an engineer . . . (she
sighs) . . . like mama wanted . . .
ACTOR 1: In this tale I'll play many characters. But I'll
usually be the dentist. To guide you, when you
see me put on my glasses it means I'm the dentist. Don't forget it. And don't be surprised that
a dentist figures in this tale. Oh, my name is
Gutierres Najera.
VENDOR: This tale began on the second of November of
1956. I was working . . . (He does.) Paddle-
balls, paddle-balls! . . .
WIFE: I was cooking . . . (She does.)
DENTIST: (He puts on his glasses.) And I didn't know
them.
VENDOR: Paddle-balls . . . paddle-balls!
Paddle-balls . . . paddle-balls! . . . I'm on the
corner of Carlos Pellegrini and Corrientes.
Carlos Pellegrini and Corrientes is famous for
two things. Below run three subway lines and
above, like a monument, they've put the
obelisk. Not an Egyptian pyramid. The obelisk.
Paddle-balls . . . paddle-balls!
WIFE: The obelisk. He always talks to me about the
obelisk. I don't know what it could mean to
him. For those who fly in planes, yes. But for
him who looks at it from below ... I imagine
that if he thought less about the obelisk, he'd
work more and I could have a servant.
VENDOR: Paddle-balls . . . paddle-balls! The 2nd of
November of 1956. I tell you this tale so that
you'll know these things happen. I don't think
you can help me. I thought the dentist would,
but he couldn't help me.
DENTIST: I'm sorry. My name is Gutierrez Najera.
VENDOR:  And my wife ...
WIFE: I'm cooking. I've been cooking for three hun
dred and six days.
VENDOR:  It's a nice day. I'm working. It's a nice day.
"Palermo you've got me
dry and sick so,
badly dressed and without
eating!"
Paddle-balls . . . paddle-balls! And suddenly
we come to the story: Ow! I start to feel a pain
in my molar. Paddle-balls . . . paddle-balls! It
really does hurt a lot. And I can't even go to a
drugstore. Paddle-balls . . . paddle-balls! I
have to work; maybe opening-my mouth
more . . . (He does.) Paddle-balls . . . paddle-
balls! Now I can't close my mouth! But I have
to work! (He makes a supreme effort.)
Paddle-. . .! It's swelling! . . . This demon sun
warros my face and makes it hurt more! Paddle -
ba-. . .! And this wind cooling my face and
making it hurt more . . . I must have a gumboil.
I don't know why, but I must have a gumboil.
WIFE: And that's how he came home on the second
day of November with a gumboil. It's nothing,
you have to take an aspirin.
VENDOR:  I'm not going to eat. It hurts too much.
WIFE: It's not that bad. You have to eat.
VENDOR: I have to work . . . and I can't open or close my
mouth! How am I going to work if I can't open
or close my mouth?
DENTIST: Actually, as I told him later on, it was a matter
of time.
VENDOR: I don't have time! I have to go back to work this
evening . . .
WIFE: Take an anacin! For quicker relief. And you
have to go back to work this evening . . .
VENDOR: And that evening I went back to work. My face
was swelling more and more. (He shows the audience.) Take a look. On other days I loved
listening to the people argue about politics. Today I can't stand it. It's the gumboil. On other
days I always kept an ear open to listen to the
girls talk about their boyfriends. Today the
handkerchief squeezes my head. It's the gumboil. Now only the gumboil and I exist. I can't
shout. And since I can't shout, I don't sell
anything.
And when he came back he told me he hadn't
sold anything. To me it seemed absurd that he
would do that, right at the beginning of the
month. You can't continue like that! First thing
tomorrow you're going to the dentist's office.
I don't have time! I have to work.
I already know you don't have time! But if you
run down the stairs, that's one minute; if your
cross the street halfway down the block and no
cars pass, that's thirty seconds; if you go running to the dentist's office, that's five minutes, if
you ring the bell as soon as you get there, that's
ten seconds . . .
DENTIST: Good evening. Of course, you have a gumboil.
VENDOR:  (With his mouth open.) Aha.
DENTIST: That's all.
VENDOR:
DENTIST
When can you pull out my molar? I have to
work.
WIFE:
VENDOR:
WIFE:
Of course. First you'll go to this address so that
they can take an X-ray.
VENDOR:  Will it take long? I have to work . . .
DENTIST: Two days, no more. It's a hundred pesos a visit.
(To the audience.) My name is Gutierrez Najera, all of you know.
VENDOR: And since they were my last hundred pesos, I
had to pawn my watch. And now I go running,
because I don't have time to get an X-ray taken;
I go down the stairs in half a minute; I cross the
street in one minute; I arrive in five minutes.
DENTIST: And he went to the clinic. He had a gumboil,
that was quite clear.
VENDOR:  It cost me two hundred pesos.
WIFE: He came back home with his face more swollen
than ever. I gave him another anacin, but it
didn't calm him. He sat down . . .
VENDOR:  I sat down . . . Damned pain!
WIFE:        He got up . . .
VENDOR:  I got up . . . Damned pain!
WIFE: I wanted to read him a heavenly poem I'd seen
in a book . . . (The VENDOR leaves.) ... but
he opened the door and left. Why does he
always behave the same? When he comes home
after work, and I want to tell him that an
astronomer discovered a new star and called it
Lucia, like me, he falls asleep.
VENDOR:   Why did I have to get a gumboil? I have to
work! Paddle-ba-. . .! I can't, I can't.
"If you knew
that in my soul
I still keep that fondness
I had for you ..."
No one cares about my gumboil!
WIFE: I cared; and it was the beginning of the month
and he couldn't work. What are you going to
do? Am I going to have to go back looking for
work?
VENDOR: Today I'm going to shout even if my gumboil
explodes! Paddle-balls . . . paddle-balls! (He
almost starts to cry.) Paddle-balls . . . paddle-
balls! . . . Mama! Do you remember when I
had mumps and I cried? I can't, I can't, 1
can't ...
Turn to PF15
Friday, March 2, 1979
THE       UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 13 The Yarker Boad
SCHOOL DISTRICT 88
(TERRACE)
Applications are invited for teaching positions to be effective September 1, 1979. Vacancies are expected at all levels though not necessarily in all speciality areas. Known vacancies include Primary, Imtermediate, Library, English, Girls' P.E., Industrial Education,
Senior Business Education.
Interviews will be conducted at U.B.C. on March 12, 13, 14 by District 88 personnel.
Students who wish to be interviewed please sent a completed application '.'orm (available
al Ihe Canada Employment Centre on Campus) and completed resume directly to the address below. Notification of interviewing arrangements and the interview times will be arranged by the Canada Employment Centre.
Mr. M. Bergsma,
Director of Instruction,
School District 88 (Terrace)
Box 460,
Terrace, B.C. V8G 4B5
Open During
OPEN HOUSE
March 2 and 3
In SUB
Basement
• Sausage Rolls
• Meat & Vegetable Samosas
• Potato Chops
• Italiano & other Submarines
• Ice Cream
• Also Special Sandwich
Counter open 10 a.m.-3 p.m.
IT'S THE WORLD'S GREATEST GAME
(AND IT SURE AIN'T FOOTBALL.)
Another fantastic
feature film from
Sub
Jilt gufBUMH
Filmsoc
hotline
228-3697
i saw you yesterday evening
walking along the main road
your body was hidden by the drifting snow
your head was all that showed . . .
i watched you through the frosted window
in the kitchen
you   were   a   picture,   framed   by   crystal
your face was all aglow . . .
i encouraged you to hurry along your way
the last few steps up the path.
warm yourself inside
the snow is deep
there's a fire inside
only then,
closing my book
and losing my place
caught in motion between the chair
and the door
did i realize my purpose in life
which came as somewhat of a surprise.
WAYNE DECLE
Next time, pick up same smooth, refreshing,
imported Heineken.
Whether you buy it by the bottle, the six-pack,
or the case, you're assured of good taste.
And isn't that whatB.Y.GH ts all about?
Its all a matter of taste.
Represented in Canada by SaJrabwy Unrated
IMPORTED WEBM£K£N-AVAILABLE AT LiQUOR STORES.
Page Friday, 14
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March 2,  1979 The Bacchae
v»
Here I squat,
Theban squaw,
Masked and assinine
On platform high
Of plexiglass.
Just so
Was my friend Alice
Her first daguerrotype,
Glass-bottomed;
And no boat around
To catch
The dripping splinters,
Should mirrors
Decide to crack.
At least she was allowed to sneeze,
To twitch and wheeze if she had the need.
Tales To Be Told
From PF13
DENTIST: And he came back with the X-ray. He was thinner and I almost didn't recognize him.
VENDOR:  Here it is, doctor.
WIFE: To pay for it we had to sell the tea-set. As a
result I was already imagining we wouldn't be
drinking tea for a long time.
VENDOR: It's a gumboil. When will you pull my molar? I
have to work.
DENTIST: Certainly, we all have to work. It'll be simple.
First a bit of rest, no talking — not even a word,
and after seven days you'll be like new ...
VENDOR: What? . . .
DENTIST: I didn't finish speaking. He looked at me like a
madman and ran out. I had to send the nurse to
bill him.
WIFE:        We sold the kitchen utensils to pay him. What's
more, he wouldn't eat.
VENDOR:  I can't go seven days without talking! I work
talking ...
WIFE:        Try to make an effort. (She takes his jaws with
her hands and begins to separate them.) You
see . . . you see how it's not so difficult? Now
say — pa-ddle-balls . . .
VENDOR:  Paddle-balls . . .
WIFE: You see . . .? It's all a matter of making an ef
fort.
VENDOR: But I couldn't. Paddle-balls . . . pa-ddle . . .! I
couldn't, I couldn't, I couldn't.
DENTIST: And he came back again. Don't talk — not even
a word, and after seven days . . .
VENDOR: I don't have time, doctor! Take out my molar, I
don't have time.
DENTIST: Impossible, sir. If it becomes infected, I'll be the
one held responsible. A gumboil is a gumboil.
WIFE: That's when I want to speak to the dentist.
DENTIST: Impossible, madame. If it becomes infected, I'll
be the one held responsible. A gumboil is a gumboil.
WIFE: But he's very tough, doctor! It sounds like a lie,
so skinny, and the things he put up with during
his life. Take out his molar.
VENDOR: He didn't take out my molar. And my face
looked like a watermelon. I would never again
live without the gumboil.
DENTIST: I advised him that if he didn't get operated on,
the infection could spread throughout his head.
WIFE: I told him that evening to make one last effort.
But I swear to you, I said "last" just as a way of
saying it.
VENDOR:  I've got to be able . . . I've got to be able . . .
WIFE: Of course you've got to be able. How is a pain
going to stop you from working?
VENDOR: And I went. When I left, I was thinking of
her . . . and I think I hated her. And I went ...
WIFE: Why did I tell him that? And now . . . why did
I tell him that? What happened in our lives that
made me tell him that?
VENDOR: Carlos Pellegrini and Corrientes . . . I've got to
open my mouth . . . Paddle-balls! It hurts, it
MARGARET MARY RANSFORD
hurts so much . . . Paddle-balls! Three subways
and the obelisk. Paddle-balls . . . Carlos
Pellegrini . . . they say he was an Argentinian
president ... he was rich, sure ... he didn't
have to talk . . . Paddle-balls! No one cares
about my gumboil. Listen to me! It hurts. It
hurts a lot. I have a gumboil . . .
ACTOR:     A gumboil is a nuisance.
ACTRESS: A gumboil is a bother.
ACTOR:     He should consult a dentist.
ACTRESS: Poor dear!
VENDOR: Mama ... I have mumps and you caress
me . . . Why doesn't anyone care about me?
Did you know it was like this? Mama . . .
ACTRESS: Poor dear!
VENDOR: Night's falling . . . and it almost doesn't hurt
anymore. My face is no longer a watermelon,
it's a globe . . .
"If you know
that in my soul ..."
Listen to me, you've got to care about
me . . . because when I die you'll be missing a
piece! Listen to me! Listen to me! Don't walk
by me whistling! It no longer hurts,
sure . . . but my face — doesn't it tell you
anything? Don't any of you look like my face?
Don't any of you have a gumboil? Then listen to
me and know that I have to work and that I
don't have time, and than now the obelisk is the
monument to a dead pharaoh!
Paddle-balls . . . paddle-ba-. . .! (He dies.)
Sf"
SEE THE
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8ased on an average daily rate, please note rates may be higher in certain countries.
w
Friday, March 2, 1979
THE       UBYSSEY
Page Friday, IS Seven Signals From A Dead Orchestra
This is not a collection of poems; it is a single poem containing a number of constituent poems in the same sense that a
single sentence contains a number of words.
II. Banting Scene
You have spent many evenings watching the hunting scene on the ceiling of
your room, though you have never truly been able to say when it first appeared, whether it existed before you, or that it existed at all. You would often
come home after the exhilarations of new experiences, see only water stains
and promise yourself that in the morning you would notify the landlord.
Finally you told yourself that the whole affair was a curious ritual and innocently went on watching the wounded lion turning in its tracks, the archer's
horse rearing up, and the archer himself pulling back his bow. But never has
the arrow taken flight until now. You cry out. Because the arrow has somehow
flown into your chest and you understand that you are dying. The room falls
utterly silent. And then you remember that there is someone you must see. But
opening the door, you realize that you will never reach them in time, yet it is
too late, you cannot stop; and you set out into the cold intimate darkness of
the night.
III. A Woman with Green Eyes
There is this house. Armless red delicate hands cling to the windows, or turn
into silken gloves and fly away. Albinic children linger at the windows. A convalescent soldier repeating strange words stands beneath a tree of chiming bells
in the garden. A small electric horse moves tranquilly among the eastern
fragments of starlight. It is always midnight. The moon unfolds into an apple
blossom and snows pollen. Inside the house there is a small, oddly shaped
room beneath the stairs. A woman with green eyes takes me to this room. The
floor is made of water, in the obscure depths tiny yellow fish flicker. She takes
my hand and we walk across the floor of water and through the far wall which
is a veil of black fire. All that I remember is an intimation of apricot, the
sound of beating wings and stone bursting into flame.
JOHN E. VAN BUREN
OPTIC
ZONE
Student Discounts
ARBUTUS VILLAGE
733-1722
KORRES
*** MOVING AND T.
PO TRANSFER LTD.>
lSTORAGE
Big or
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Reasonable
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2060 W. lOthi
Vancouver
732-9898
ALSO GARAGES.
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CLEAN-UPS
I       SP
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SPECIALISTS SINCE 1938
I
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Call Days Evinlnf s t, Weekends
University Village Bldg.
4900 25th Avenue N.E.
Seattle, Washington 98105
(206) 523-7617
For Information About Other Centers
In Major US Cities & Abroad
Outside NY State
CALL TOLL FREE: S00-223-17I2
Hong Kong
Chinese Food
(Self Serve
Restaurant)
^UNIVERSITY BLVD ^
tfr-,     Eat in and Take Out      J*r
j* ;      OPEN EVERY DAY       .
4:30 p.m. TO 9:30 p.m.     fK
Phone: 224-6121A
*
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RESTAURANT
,  Luncheon Smorgasbord
Authentic Chinese Cuisine
in the West at a
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■ FREE DELIVERY
from 4:30 p.m.
10% Discount on all
cash pick-up orders
    2142 Western Parkway
its*     U.E.L. Vancouver. B.C.
\&teefi:fooct
VJL/CM«.KnflKN
LUNCH
11:30- 3:00 Mon. - Sat
DINNER
5:00- 1:00 Mon. - Sat
5:00 - 11:00 Sunday
W*w.I0th.Aw.
ALEXI'S
GREEK RESTAURANT f
Welcome to
my house!
GREEK FOOD AT
REASONABLE
PRICES
OPEN EVERY DAY i
11:30 a.m. 1 a.m.   i
SUNDAY 12 10 p.m.
FULLY LICENSED
2291B W. BROADWAY     734-4424
WHITE TOWER PIZZA &
SPAGHETTI HOUSE LTD.
KITS - DUNBAR - PT. GREY
Open For Lunch
: Open Till 2:30 Weekdays'
3:30 Weekends
12:30 Sundays
738-9520        I  DOWNTOWN
or 738-1113     I   1359 Robson
3611 W. Broadway I        688-5491
Dining Lounge - Full Facilities -
Take Out or Home Delivery
l-ate delivery call 'it hour before closing.
jl)Ur=irJi=Ji=lr=Jr=Jr=]r=ii=Ji=icJr=Jr=JcJi=Jr=Jr=Ji=ii=Ji=Jr=
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SPECIALIZING IN
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& PIZZA
FREE FAST DELIVERY.
228-9513
4510 W. 10th Ave.
ffl.
££9&N
2.904 W. <»*» AVE.    733-3713
'An eating experience not to be under
estimated as one of the best mexican restaurants north of California.' Thats what
it is all about!
OPEN TUES.-SUN.
TAKE OUT ORDERS WELCOME!
LICENSED
■CAFFE ESPRESSO*
LA BOCA BAR
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
ALL DAY TILL MIDNIGHT
3S2S W 4th at Collingwood
RENOS
Pancake House & Restaurant
FULLY LICENSED
Breakfast Special
2 eggs, pancakes
with bacon or sausage
$1.90
Chargex Accepted
Hours: Mon.-Fri. 9:0011:00
Sun. & Holidays 9:00-8:00
2741 West 4th Avenue
 738-3814	
DINNER
FOR TWO
UNDER
$10.00
ELEPHANT & CASTLE
PACIFIC CENTRE.
2523 Alma Street
(at Broadway)
Phone: 733-1225
L
Salad Bar * Caesar Salad
Charbroiled Steaks * Seafood
Licensed Lounge
PIZZA
Free Delivery
Open Daily from 11 a.m.
SUNDAY from 4 p.m.
4450 W. 10th Ave.
224-3434 224-6336
Tender, thick
& juicy.
The only steak
we serve.
GRANVILLE ISLAND - 685-4735
Page Friday, 16
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March 2,  1979 The Drowned Forest
By PETER HODGE
"God, what's that smell?"
"Carrion. Spring thaw. Lots of little dead
things thawing out. Back in the woods,
y'know."
They'd been paddling for about half an
hour and had reached the shallow end of the
lake. Stacy dragged her paddle in the water
now, watching the ripple patterns against the
side of the canoe. Ross continued paddling.
"Isn't this it?"
"Yup."
"Oh."
"We're gonna go under this tree here."
Ross stopped paddling and the canoe moved
without sound, the lake so clear they could
see their own shadow on the bottom. Rotting
tree trunks still stood on the lake bed ten or
fifteen feet below, their tips almost breaking
the surface.
"Jeez, look."
"Yeah. A drowned forest. This is a dammed lake."
"What?"
"Dammed. On the other end. Killed all the
trees."
"Eerie, eh?" Ross shrugged. Stacy dipped
her arm underwater and touched the top of a
drowned truck beside the canoe, patted it like
an animal.
"Don't."
"Eh?"
"Don't do that. You'll uh, scare the
fish."
Ross manoeuvred them toward the tree, an
ancient cedar leaning at a gentle angle over
the water and rooted, it seemed, on nothing
more than boulders on the lake's edge.
"Lotsa flies."
"Yup."
Ross tied one end of the canoe to the
lowest bough of the cedar. The sun was high
now, midmorning, but the air stayed cool. A
strong current turned the canoe around, pulled it gently under the cedar bough. Ross took
a worm out of a large plastic honey container
with one hand, freed the hook from his rod
with the other, bent over and skewered the
worm lenghtwise on the hook. He wiped the
guts on his jeans.
"Doesn't that hurt them?" Stacy wrinkled
her nose.
"What, the worms?" Ross smirked. "No.
He likes it. Right up the ass. Makes him feel
real good."
"Shut up." The words came out of her like
a reflex, emotionless. She leaned back on her
lifejacket and watched him as he turned away
to cast, watched his back move, muscles
tightening as his arm raised, the smallest
pause before the cast, then the whine of the
line, the ploop sound of the bobber hitting
the water. He belched softly.
"You're cute." Stacy extended her foot to
rest on him, toes curling up and stretching in
a caterpillar imitation as she made it crawl up
his back.
"C'mon, eh?"
"Mmmm? What's the matter?"
"Jesus Christ, can't you see I'm trying to
fish here? Pause. "Man, I can't understand
you. You didn't want to last night. You never
feel like it.except times like now." All this
with his back to her, his voice muffled.
"Sorry." The foot came down. Stacy turned on her side and peered again into the lake,
bridge of her nose resting on the canoe. A
pallid face stared back up at her, undulating
gently. Raising her head, she spit into the
water and watched as the saliva dissipated in
its own widening ripples.
"That carrion smell sure is strong."
"You'll get used to it."
Ross fished in silence for several minutes.
The lake was dead calm. Nothing broke the
quiet except for the buzzing flies. Stacy, still
on her back, turned and rummaged in her
purse, brought out a book, laid back and'
held it above her head, blocking the sun while
she read.
"Gimme my chocolate bar." Ross' hand
reached back and grabbed one of her bent
knees.
"What. Now.
"Yeah." Stacy arched her body, pulled
two flattened Crunchies out - of her back
pocket. Their seams oozed chocolate.
"Oh, shit. Forgot about 'em. Here." She
threw one toward the front of the boat. Ross
turned around, looked down. "Jesus, Stacy,
you're a ... what'd you do. I bet you put 'em
in your pocket and forgot about them. As
always."
"As always." Stacy sighed, reading once
again.
"Fuck. I can't eat this. It's inedible. Inedible." Ross held it gingerly in his open palm
like a dead bird. "Bloody useless." He tossed
it into the water.
"Hey!" Stacy jerked her head up, watched
didn't turn around.
"Nothing."
The sun was almost straight overhead now.
It was noon. Ross sighed noisily, reeled in.
"Well, there's nothin' doing here. Let's go
over there."
"Where?"
"There. That little cove over there."
Stacy watched Ross' back as they paddled,
watched the hard muscles under his shirt
working, pulling them both along. She could
see his face reflected in the water beside the
canoe, opposite to the side he was paddling
on: eyes half-closed, mouth open slightly.
"Ross."
"What?"
"Do you think I'm pretty?"
"Yes. Sure."
"You're handsome, y'know. Quite handsome."
"Yeah." The conversation fitting into the
rhythm of the paddles.
his ribs submerged like a water cave. The
female, headless, bobbed slightly in the
canoe's wake. Water made a dull plopping
sound inside her nearly skinless ribs.
Stacy almost gagged. She could taste the
odour now, thick on her tongue. "Oh ... oh
"Shit." Ross splashed his paddle in the
water. "Poachers. Look — all they took was
his tree. Just dumped 'em here. Shit."
Stacy was crying now. At first just silent
tears, but as they rowed away and down the
lake she began to sob, making little guttural
noises each time she took a breath.
"Mericans want them for trophies,
y'know, so they take her head, his antlers.
Leave the rest 'cause it's illegal anyway."
Ross turned around, pursed his lips, and
shrugged his shoulders, a gesture of sympathy. "They're out of it now. Can't do
anything about it." He paddled faster.
But  Stacy continued  to  cry.  The tears
the Crunchie turn in little circles as it sank.
"That's littering."
"Yes." Ross had reeled in his line. He
recast. "It is."
Stacy propped herself on one elbow and
opened her Crunchie, peeling back the wrapper carefully. She scooped the melted
chocolate up with her index finger, making
loud slurping noises as she looked at Ross'
back. Finally, she licked the wrapper clean.
"Mmmm."
"Good?"
"Yeah."
"Thanks for saving some for me."
"Welcome."
Stacy carefully shaped the foil wrapper
with her fingers. She made a tiny canoe.
Looking in her purse, she found a box of
cough drops, removed two, positioned them
in the tin-foil canoe, and placed it very gently
in the water.' "What're you doing?" Ross
"It's two years this August."
"Eh? What is?"
"Two years since we've been going around
together. Since the dance at the rec. centre."
"Oh. Yeah. Really? I guess, yeah."
"Doesn't seem like two years, does it?"
"Nope, hon. Sure doesn't."
"I love you." A pause.,"I really do."
"I   guess   we   should   celebrate,   or
something."
"What'll we do?" Ross didn't answer.
He'd stopped paddling, was looking toward
the shore.
"Hey, what's that? Over there." Two
small islands, near the bank. They changed
direction, rowed toward them. Stacy made a
face.
"God, it smells around here. It's . . ."
The bodies of two deer lay in the shallows.
Flies were everywhere. The male, antlerless,
legs stiff in the water; the great half-circle of
came, running down both cheeks, distorting
her vision so that Ross' back, the canoe, the
lake became one blurred image.
"Come on now. They were only deer."
Stacy's sobbing gained intensity. Her eyes
were screwed shut, face red and contorted.
And the tears came still. She shook her head
slowly from side to side.
"Hey, you'll drown us both." Ross tried
to laugh, a dry croaking sound. He turned
around in the canoe, awkwardly, and put his
arms around her. She pushed him.
"Go away." Ross' jaw muscles twitched.
"Shut up, now. Shut up, Stacy." His clenched hands on the sides of the canoe. Goddam it, shut up!"
"I can't! Really, I can't!" Stacy tried to
say, but the words blubbered out, distorted
by sobs. She hid her face in her hands.
"SHUT UP. SHUT UP!" Ross' voice
echoed down the lake one, two, three times,
.making birds fly, like the cry of a wild,
frightened animal.
PROFESSIONAL
RESUME SERVICE
"Serving Greater Vancouver for over 19
years" — Please phone for appointment
PERSONNEL SERVICE
220-522 7th St.. New Westminster
526-4671
BLACK & LEE
TUX SHOP
NOW AT
1110 Seymour St.
6882481
ROD MARINING (Greenpeace)
debutes against
DR. STEPHEN BARDWELL
(Fusion Energy Foundation)
on the resolution
That Nuclear Energy
Development Be Halted
Friday, March 2, 1:30 p.m.
Sub Auditorium
presented by
The UBC Debating Society and
The Science Undergraduate
Society
KJliLIC
228-61^1
FRI. 8. SAT.
7:30 p.m. - 9:45   p.m.
SUNDAY
1:00 — 3:00 p.m.
STUDENTS
& CHILDREN     .75
ADULTS $12S
THUNDERBIRD
WINTER
SPORTS CENTRE
RENATO LENTINI
PIANO TUNER TECHNICIAN
Grands and Uprights
Reconditioning and Rebuilding a Specialty
Formerly 15 years with
Williams Piano House
sj? Craftsman Member of Piano Technicians Guild Inc.
<v
324-3488
Friday, March 2, 197?
THE       UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 17 vista
The first weekend in March provides a wide selection of musical
entertainment. Sinfot nia Trombones will play Sunday from 3-4
p.m. at the Surrey Centennial Arts
Centre. Four Vancouver based
trombonists have chosen works
which range from a classical to contemporary brass sound. A brief
discussion will accompany each
piece. Students 50c, adults $1.
Trio Victoria is for adventurous
early risers. Sydney Humphreys,
violin, James Hunter, cello, and
Robin Wood, piano, are featured at
the Queen Elizabeth Playhouse
Sunday, 11 a.m. Tickets $1.00.
Kay Gardener, a classical flautist,
will be on hand at 8 p.m. Saturday
at the Russian Community Centre,
2114 West 4th. Tickets $4 available
from Ariel Books and Women's
Bookstore.
Bob Murphy, Torben Oxbol and
Al Wiertz are Jazz at Gambados
Sunday at 9 p.m., 55A Powell.
Tickets $2.
For music with movement the
Burnaby Arts Centre presents
Mountain Dance Theatre Friday at
8 p.m. for $1.50. Two new works
choreographed by Paula Ross will
be presented at the Dance Centre
Studio Theatre, 3488 West Broad
way, every evening at 8:30 from
March 1-10. Tickets $4. For info
call 732-9513.
Or for something more lively the
rafters of Kits House Hall, 2305
West 7th, will ring to the sounds of
an Old Time Dance, 7:30-10:30
p.m. Friday. The Sunshine Band
will play waltzes, fox trots and
polkas for anyone who knows how
to do them. Admittance 50c.
Of special mention is the rare
showing of Potemkin, Eisenstein's
classic propaganda film about the
Russian revolution, Saturday at 2
p.m. in the UBC Anthropology
Museum. Entrance to museum free
Saturday during Open House.
THE BOOKSTORE
WELCOMES YOU TO
OPEN HOUSE
Serving the Student Needs
Is Our Specialty!
Textbooks - Reference Books — Leisure Reading
Magazines - Art Supplies - Stationery - Calculators
UBC Sportswear - Rings — Campus Souvenirs
Giftwear - Greeting Cards and Sundries
ubc
bookstore
University of British Columbia - 2075 Wesbrook Place, V6T 1W5
Phone 228-4741
STAN PERSKY
will   be   autographing
copies of his new book
SON
OF
SOCRED
at Duthie Books
919 ROBSON
something extra
from Labatt's.
MARCH 5th
12:30-1:30
r-* ««**«<
\Aj
-'"ft*
,-s
-**>
%'
******     ■*
-":■. ■,: '<■'":    ''■
Page Friday, 18
Brewed for extra flavour, extra smoothness and extra taste
satisfaction, John Labatt's Extra Stock is our newest premium
qualify product. You'll find it smooth and mellow going down.
Founded by John Labatt in 1828, and still owned by
Canadians, Labatt's is proud to introduce John Labatt's Extra
Stock. It commemorates our 150 years of brewing fine, quality
beer in Canada. It's truly something extra ...for our friends.
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March 2, 1979 The Westcoast
Greetings from the perimeter
where waves wash up great hunks of metal
and decaying fish bloat in the twilight
trapped between the volcanic rock of the shoreline
where twisted wreckage falls from the sky
and radioactive messages penetrate
the bodies of naked swimmers as they obliterate
their memories in the moonlight
alone
well into the night.
Greetings from the perimeter
where time and sperm are spent
and roadmaps are drawn out on the skins
of dead animals
which have been long since eaten
and forgetten.
Greetings from the perimeter
where thoughts not people are crowded
and words fall on deaf ears
paralysed by sonic booms
long since a forgotten issue
where fruit laden plum trees
bend with evening breezes
and old age homes collapse
under the weight of rotting peaches
left hanging ripe and succulent
to mature and be forgotten
bulldozed under for future
generations to reclaim
and in turn lay waste.
Greetings from the perimeter
where insects outnumber
lovers left wishing there was one more
western city further west
where they could finally resurrect
the statue of Sir Thomas More
without anything seeming ironic.
Greetings from the perimeter
where roosters reincarnate seagulls
and highways aren't paved with gold but ashphalt
leading anywhere there is to go
except east
michael markham
Lethbridge
The ice—thin sheets of frozen lace—hardening
on margins of ponds. Muddy ruts
turning to stone. Clothes
stiffening on the line—cardboard shirts,
unflappable sheets.
Greetings from the perimeter
where rocks have voices
that curse through the night
the ever infringing tides
that wash in from far eastern shores
where the heat rises and infests
the imaginatios of the dead
and always a stillness at night
and always a stillness at night
flowing west where they meet the
waters edge
and vomit violently
retching, heaving reluctantly
towards an Orient.
where the green shades of vegetation
meet the eye like a fountain
eternal.
Two people meeting. She
in a grey coat, red hat. He
all in black—their conversation
silent and visual (white clouds
rising and blending)
The fields, vulnerable in their nakedness,
waiting for snow. A duck
flying north, northwest,
into the cutting edge of winter.
BARBARA POWIS
WAYNE DECLE
to the
University of British Columbia
Be sure to see our
professional pharmaceutical
display window
Unusual Artifacts
UNIVERSITY
PHARMACY LTD.
5754 University Blvd. - 224-3202
I In the village — 1% blocks east of the pool)
Friday, March 2, 1979
THE       UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 19 REWARD YOURSELF
with Home Entertainment
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ONLY
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ONLY
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The SEA-20G has seven frequency "tone-
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Slip into the PRO/4 Triple A and you'll know
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ONLY
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The musical chain begins with the Shure M70B
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Page Friday, 20
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March 2,  19.

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