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The Ubyssey Feb 28, 2011

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 Crafting little vignettes SINCE 1918
■   A■   *>   <"
OUR BEHINDS MAY FINALLY BE GETTING THE SUPPORT THEY
DESERVE. NEW CHAIRS FOR UBC!
PAGE 10
$136 MILLION:
THE PRICE OFTHE
NEWPONDEROSA
HOUSING HUB. 2/UBYSSEY.CA/E VENTS/2 011.02.28
FEBRUARY 28,2011
VOLUME XCII,  N°XXXVII
EDITORIAL
COORDINATING EDITOR
Justin McElroy: coordinating@uhyney.ca
NEWS EDITOR
Arshy Mann: news@ubyssey.ca
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
Kalyeena Makortoff: kmakortoff@ubyssey.ca
SENIOR NEWS WRITER
Mich Cowan: mcowan@ubysseyca
CULTURE EDITORS
Jonny Wakefield & Bryce Warnes:
culture@ubyssey ca
SENIOR CULTURE WRITER
Ginny Monaco: gmonaco@ubyssey ca
CULTURE ILLUSTRATOR
Indiana Joel: ijoel@ubysseyca
SPORTS EDITOR
Marie Vondracek: sports@ubysseyca
FEATURES EDITOR
Trevor Record :features@ubyssey ca
PHOTO EDITOR
Geoff Lister: photos@ubysseyca
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Virginie Menard: production@ubysseyca
COPY EDITOR
Kai Green: copy@ubysseyca
MULTIMEDIA EDITOR
Tara Martellaro: multimedia@ubysseyca
ASSOCIATE MULTIMEDIA EDITOR
Stephanie Warren:
associate multimedia@ubysseyca
VIDEO EDITOR
David Marino: video@ubysseyca
WEBMASTER
Jeff Blake: webmaster@ubysseyca
Room 24, Student Union Building
6138 Student Union Boulevard
Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1
tel: 604.822.2301
web: www.ubyssey.ca
e-mail: feedback@ubysseyca
BUSINESS
Room 23, Student Union Building
print advertising: 604.822.1654
business office: 604.822.6681
web advertising: 604.822.1658
e-mail: advertising@ubysseyca
BUSINESS MANAGER
FerniePereira: business@ubysseyca
PRINT AD SALES
Kathy Yan Li: advertising@ubysseyca
WEB AD SALES
Paul Bucci: webads@ubysseyca
ACCOUNTS
AlexHoopes: accounts@ubysseyca
CONTRIBUTORS
Kelly Han
Amelia Rajala
Taylor Loren
Zoe Siegel
Josh Curran
David Elop
LEGAL
Karina Palmitesta
Halle Hui
Noah Burshtein
Todd Mackenzie
Charles To
Nick Frank
The Ubyssey is the official student newspaper of
the University of British Columbia. It is published
every Monday and Thursday by The Ubyssey Publications Society. We are an autonomous, democratically run student organization, and all students are
encouraged to participate.
Editorials are chosen and written by the Ubyssey staff. They are the expressed opinion of the
staff, and do not necessarily reflect the views of
The Ubyssey Publications Society or the University of British Columbia. All editorial content appear-
ng in The Ubyssey is the property of The Ubyssey
Publications Society. Stories, opinions, photographs
and artwork contained herein cannot be reproduced
without the expressed, written permission of The
Ubyssey Publications Society.
The Ubyssey is a founding member of Canadian
University Press (CUP) and adheres to CUP's guiding principles.
Letters to the editor must be under 300 words
Please include your phone number, student number
and signature (not for publication) as well as your
year and faculty with all submissions. ID will be
checked when submissions are dropped off at the
editorial office of The Ubyssey; otherwise verification will be done by phone. "Perspectives" are opinion pieces over 300 words but under 750 words and
are run according to space. "Freestyles" are opinion
pieces written by Ubyssey staff members. Priority
will be given to letters and perspectives over free-
styles unless the latter is time sensitive. Opinion
pieces will not be run until the identity of the writer has been verified. The Ubyssey reserves the right
to edit submissions for length and clarity. All letters
must be received by 12 noon the day before intended publication. Letters received after this point wil
be published in the following issue unless there is
an urgent time restriction or other matter deemed
relevant by the Ubyssey staff.
Itisagreed byall persons placing display or classified advertising that if the Ubyssey Publications
Society fails to publish an advertisement or if an
error in the ad occurs the liability of the UPS wil
not be greater than the price paid for the ad. The
UPS shall not be responsible for slight changes or
typographical errors that do not lessen the value or
the impact of the ad
7\V
^» %f^ Canadian
-r-p. qi *--■ University
roL        Press
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Alliance
Canada Post
Sales Agreement
#0040878022
EVENTS
ONGOING EVENTS
UBYSSEY PRODUCTION • Come
help us create this baby! Learn
about layout and editing. Expect
to be fed. • Every Sunday and
Wednesday, 2pm.
RESOURCE GROUPS • Are you
working on a progressive project,
but need funding? Do you have
an idea, but can't get it off the
ground? Apply to the Resource
Groups for funding! Come in,
pitch your idea to us and we will
consider fully or partially funding
your project. • Every Monday
1 lam in SUB 245 (second floor,
north-east corner). For more info
email resourcegroups.ams®
gmail.com.
ILS00K YUNG MCLAURIN ART EXHIBIT:
THE BEAUTY OF NATURE • With
references to the tradition of
landscape painting that captures
the beauty of the land and
trees, Kyung's art pieces have
a surrounding landscape that
serves as a backdrop to her daily
life within her adopted homeland
of Canada. However, through her
works, she also illustrates the
darker side of the landscape,
confronting the troubling aspects
of environmental pollution that
threaten nature. • Runs until Feb.
26, artwork featured in Irving K
Barber foyer and Ike's Cafe gallery.
NOON YOGA $1 • Led by the UBC
Yoga Club—all skill levels are
welcome. Bring your own mat and
enjoy this invigorating session.
RSVP on the Facebook events
page. • 12-1 pm, UBC Bookstore, $1.
MONDAY, FEB. 28
PICTURE CHANGE • The Passion
Project is hosting "Picture
Change." UBC student photographers will be showcasing
their works and will get to learn
from local professionals. Come
explore the ways in which photography serves as a medium
to raise awareness of social,
political and environmental issues. • 5-7pm, Abdul Ladha
Centre, $10. All proceeds go
to the project participants' organizations of choice.
VANCOUVER 2010 ANNIVERSARY
GAMING PARTY* Relive the 2010
fun on the anniversary of the
closing of the 2010 Vancouver
Olympic games. Play with gaming systems, enjoy snacks and
win prizes! • 10am-4pm, UBC
Bookstore.
TUESDAY, MAR. 1
DRPASCALLAV0IE0NPR0FTALK*
On UBC CiTR Radio's Prof Talk,
host Farha Khan will speak with
Dr Pascal Lavoie from the Division of Neonatology. He will
discuss some of his recent research on protecting premature
babies who become sick from
infections or other diseases after birth, as well provide an overview on the clinical field of neonatology. • 3pm, live programming at citr.ca.
WEDNESDAY, MAR. 2
CARNIVAL IN JACMEL* Didier Civil is a celebrated Haitian painter
and papier-mache artist, and the
founding director of an art school
in Jacmel, one of the towns devastated by the recent earthquake
and cholera outbreak. He will
show projections of masks and
costumes from the repertoire of
Haitian carnival and talk about
the history of carnival and its
art forms. His visit to UBC is co-
sponsored by the Department
of Art History, Visual Arts and
Theory and the Morris and Helen
Belkin Art Gallery. • 5-6:30pm,
Coach House, Green College,
email gc.events@ubc.ca or
call (604) 822-8660 for more
information.
THURSDAY, MAR. 3
ENGLISH MAJORS: ICE CREAM SOCIAL • This event is for English majors and potential English majors (especially second-
year students). Alumni from the
program have been invited to
speak about their experiences in the work force and also
discuss internship opportunities. • 4-6pm, Room 261, Irving K Barber.
FRIDAY, MAR. 4
UBCSYMPH0NIC0RCHESTRA»Guest
conductor for this concert is Roman Brogli-Sacher, chief conductor and opera director of the
Philharmonic Orchestra and the
Theatre Lubeck, Germany. This
concert also features a new work
by UBC composition student Eileen Padgett and piano soloist
Bogdan Dulu, winner of the
2011 UBC Concerto Competition. • 8-10pm, Chan Centre, free.
For just $29.95, walk in with your taxes, walk out with your refund. Instantly.
You'll also get a free SPC Card to save big at your favourite retailers.*
student
pricing
free SPC Card
we make taxes easy
Follow us on Twitter and Facebook
H&R BLOCK
hrblock.ca
© 2011 HSR Block Canada, he. *$:g.95 valid for regular student tax preparation only. Cash back service included. To qualify for student pricing, student must present either (i) a 12202a documenting 4 or
more months oFfull-tine attendance at a college or university during 2010 or (ii) a valid high School identification card. Expires December 31,2011. Valid only at participating H&R Block locations in Canada.
SPC Card offers valid from 08/01/10 to 07/31/11 at participating locations in Canada only. For Cardholder only. Offers may vary, restrictions may apply. Usage may be restricted when used in conjunction
with any other offer or retailer loyalty card discounts. Cannot be used towards the purchase of gift cards or certificates. 2011.02. 28/UBYSSEY.CA/NEWS/3
NEWS
EDITOR ARSHY MANN»news@ubyssey.ca
ASSISTANT EDITOR KALYEENA MAKORTOFF»kmakortoff@ubyssey.ca
SENIOR WRITER MICKI COWAN»mcowan@ubyssey.ca
Ponderosa housing hub set to be built
1110 new beds for upper level and graduate students by 2015
MICKI COWAN
mcowan@ubyssey.ca
A single building facility that
will benefit housing, childcare,
study areas and classroom space
all at once? Welcome to the
new Ponderosa Housing Hub,
a $136.4 million multi-function
facility that has been approved
at the intersection of West Mall
and University Boulevard, the
first of five hubs proposed to replace some of the less permanent annexes on campus.
Phase one will add an additional 590 beds by August 2013,
and phase two will add 510 beds
by August 2015, for a total of
1100 new residence spots targeted for upper level and graduate students.
Becca Thomas, a second-year
student intending to major in
fine arts, struggled to find housing after discovering she was
nearly 2300 people down on
the waitlist for her second year
in residence. At home in New
Brunswick for the summer, she
spenthours trying to find a place
to rent for September over the
internet. Eventually with the
help of her father, she signed a
lease for a place she had never
even seen in person.
"It caused a lot of problems,"
she said.
The university's resources
were of little use to her.
"They give you a few websites
to look at for rental places but
they're really not that great if
you want to find somewhere affordable. I had to do a lot of research by myself."
Thomas said she spends
a lot less time on campus
now than when she lived in
residence.
The Ponderosa Building, close to the proposed site of the new student housing hub. JOSH CURRAN PH0T0/THE UBYSSEY
"I feel like having a long day
at school and then having to
commute home just makes me
a lot more tired. If I stay late on
campus [the commute] gets longer because I live downtown."
For people like Thomas, the
housing hub might still be of
use.
"There are what we call col-
legiums, meant to be built in
for commuter students," said
John Metras, managing director of infrastructure development at UBC.
"The facility is not just about
students who live in the residence rooms there, but also providing space for students who
commute onto campus and don't
necessarily have anywhere to go
during the day when they're between classes."
The idea for the collegiums
was influenced by the UBC
Okanagan campus, where a similar development was extremely successful.
Matt Parson, VP Academic
and one of two student representatives on the Ponderosa Project
Working Committee, said that
the building is more than just
a residence.
"The intention behind it...is
for it to be more than just your
average residence building;
you're having classroom space,
you have a geology lab, there's
going to be food outlets, there's
going to be cafes and then also
recreational facilities. On top
of all that there's childcare (24
spaces) which is great to see,"
he said.
"The deal behind it is you're
providing people in that area a
reason to go to this hub, which
will hopefully attract a vibe
around the area, a buzz."
Both the Faculty of Arts and
Education will be benefiting
from and contributing funds
to the hub, which will include
classroom space for each faculty to replace older structures
that are being torn down. Additional features will include new
fine arts studios.
Aside from proposed contributions from these faculties,
80 per cent of the cost will be
supported by current rental
revenues.
"We're taking proceeds from
our market housing development, putting it into an endowment and then using the cash
from that endowment to then
provide financing, so it's not
funding—it's financing cash up
front to pay the capital costs of
the project," said Metras. "That
loan gets paid down over time
using the rents from the student
housing revenue."
Demand for a multi-function
building like Ponderosa were
influenced in part by the success of the I.K. Barber Learning Centre.
"When you look at the use of
the [Centre], it's incredible," said
Metras. "It's almost over capacity already and I wonder how we
survived without having that—
what happened, where did people go before that? I think we're
really trying to satisfy a latent
demand here on campus for this
type of space.
"I think it's a very exciting
project. The Ponderosa Hub development is really just the next
evolution in that process where
we're adding in all these different amenities and academic spaces that will really draw
the community together into
one great place." tl
AMS proposes lower AGM quorum, later exec turnover
ARSHY MANN
news@ubyssey.ca
Along with renewing the U-Pass
and restructuring fees, the AMS
is looking to change many of
the by-laws which govern the
society.
"The most important one in
my mind is the changing of
the Annual General Meeting
(AGM) quorum," said AMS President Jeremy McElroy. "The AMS
has never had quorum at an
AGM, at least not in the last
40 years."
By lowering the number of
people required to achieve quorum at an AGM to 500, McElroy
is hoping that the AMS will, in
the future, be able to change
by-laws at the yearly meetings.
"We felt that it was small
enough number to be attainable but a large enough number
to be accountable," said McElroy.
"There's no physical space on
campus that can accommodate
the 1000 people [currently required] outside ofthe Chan Centre and we're not about to book
that for an AGM.
Other substantive changes include changing by-laws so that
AMS Council can remove executives from office—a problem the
AMS encountered when trying
to impeach Blake Fredrick and
Tim Chu two years ago—as well
changing the executive turnover
from February to May 1st.
The latter change would
lengthen the current executive's
terms by three months.
"It puts us more in line with
our budgeting and hiring cycles.
[Other student unions] start May
1, the fiscal year starts May 1, so
it's a waste of time to have the
executives turn over in mid-February and just kind of sit around
for two and a half months while
waiting for everyone else to finish up," said McElroy.
"[Also] the current election
cycle is almost a barrier to entry for a lot of people because...
you either have to decide to
not enroll in classes and essentially gamble with getting
elected, or take the standard
number of classes...and possibly have to drop them ifyou
get elected." tl
Quorum may get cut in half. INDIANA JOEL ILLUSTRATION/THE UBYSSEY
NEWS BRIEFS
SRDJA TRIFKOVIC BARRED FROM
ENTRY INTO CANADA, UBC LECTURE CANCELLED
Despite UBC's approval of a
speech by controversial Serbian academic Srdja Trifkovic,
who was scheduled to speak
on February 24, the event was
cancelled after Trifkovic was
stopped at the Vancouver International Airport and sent back
to the United States.
According to his blog, Trifkovic
was detained for being a senior
official of a country which violates (or violated) the Crimes
Against Humanity and War
Crimes Act, which includes such
transgressions as genocide and
terrorism—namely, Serbia.
Trifkovic blames the campaign
on the Institute for Research of
Genocide of Canada.
"[They] demanded to have
me 'banned' from speaking at
the University of British Columbia on February 24. The ensuing campaign soon escalated
into demands to keep me out of
Canada altogether. The authorities have now obliged," he said
in an article posted on chroni-
clesmagazine.org.
Trifkovic justified his controversial position in his response article and gave Canada a warning.
"The Canadians will learn, in
the fullness of time, the price
of kowtowing to [Muslim] people's demands. They will become less free with each act
of surrender, and the demands
will have no end."
Ana Komnenic, who had lobbied the university to cancel his
speech, was happy to hear he
would not be at UBC.
"I had no idea he was going to be deported but I'm glad
the Canadian government did
a background check on him
and made the right decision,"
she said.
SEXIST POSTERS SPARK CRIMINAL
INVESTIGATION AT WATERLOO
WATERLOO, Ont. (CUP)—Earlier this month, an anonymous
attacker put posters depicting Nobel Prize-winning chemist and physicist Marie Curie
up over the posters of female
candidates in the University
of Waterloo's student federation election.
The posters read "THE
TRUTH. The brightest woman
this Earth ever created was Marie Curie, the mother of the nuclear bomb. You tell me if the
plan of women leading men is
still a good idea."
A fraudulent email with the
poster attached said to be from
UW president Feridun Hamdul-
lahpur was also sent out and social media outlets were used to
spread the sexist messages.
"On Feb. 9, in response to
seeing the posters up around
campus that denigrated women, they were taken down
immediately by campus police," said Ellen Rethore, associate vice-president of communications and public affairs
for UW.
The university's police service
has launched a criminal investigation to determine the identity of the attacker, tl 4/UBYSSEY.CA/NEWS/2011.02.28
From Buchanan to the barracks: Jason McEwan
Jason McEwan in his fatigues in front of the Seaforth Armory. CHARLES TO PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
JOE MCMURRAY
Contributor
Lieutenant Jason McEwan is a
bit like a younger and entirely
more Canadian (less brusque,
more polite) version of Lt. Dan
from the movie Forrest Gump.
Dressed impeccably in Canada's iconic woodland-'relish'
camouflage, McEwan, like his
filmic counterpart, speaks with
the confidence of someone certain in his beliefs.
"They call it attention to detail. It matters if your uniform
isn't on right or your button
isn't done up," explained McEwan, regarding the image he
likes to project as a member of
the military.
"It's not just how you look:
attention to detail can pick
up mistakes in more critical
functions."
Lt. Dan emphasized the importance of fresh socks along
similar lines.
At a time in his life when
many were debating whether
to go backpacking in Thailand
or Australia, McEwan already
knew that he was going to serve
with the Canadian Forces.
"After high school I applied
to the RMC [Royal Military College] with the intent of 'going
air force,'" he recalled with a
chuckle and a disarming grin.
"I wanted to go fly jets and
helicopters."
Like most teenagers, McEwan
soon faced the all too familiar
conflict between his adolescent
aspirations and certain annoying existential forces.
"The application didn't work
out for me," McEwan said. "I
didn't end up getting in [to the
RMC]."
McEwan didn't have time to
be wistful. After accepting that
he wasn't going to fly jets, he
immediately began to work on
his contingency plans for both
school and the military.
McEwan's narrow, L-shaped
office is lined with posters of
men in traditional military
garb, maps and placards inscribed with slogans ofthe Seaforth Highlanders of Canada.
It's an office filled with military
nostalgia.
It occupies one of the many
rooms ofthe Seaforth Armoury,
a veritable fortress on the corner
of Burrard and 1st, which, despite
its immensity, is dwarfed by the
neighbouring Molson Brewery,
"As a backup I had UBC and
a couple other universities. I
attended UBC, and halfway
through the first year I started
thinking, 'Maybe I'll go back and
try [joining the forces] again."
At the end of his first year,
McEwan became a reservist. He
spent that summer doing training before starting his part-time
career with the military the following September, beginning
with weekly training sessions
called "Parade Nights."
"There wasn't much parading
involved," he said.
McEwan majored in political
science but continued to aspire
to a career in the military.
"I was encouraged to look at
the officer route as an additional challenge, to get some leadership training and exposure out of
it and to make use of my degree."
Now, several years later, McEwan works as a commissioned officer—a second lieutenant.
"I do a bit more of the administrative and the leadership side
of things, and a bit less of the
hands-on, boots-on-the-ground
sort of stuff."
His day-to-day work largely involves the administrative intricacies of large-scale conflict and
emergency management.
And when he is on the ground,
his duties include "developing
training plans, giving orders,
leading platoon-sized elements
and following up with details
and reports.
"It's quite a wide range of responsibilities, [including] some
very challenging leadership situations, constantly pushing my
own perceived limitations and
boundaries."
McEwan argued that there
aren't many jobs that make the
same kind of rigorous demands,
or that require such highly-organized and well-coordinated
levels of leadership.
"You wouldn't normally get off
the couch one morning and coordinate a forty-man raid on an
objective at night in a swamp.
Those kind of horror stories that
you hear about training are actually very rewarding."
As a reservist, McEwan does
not have an obligation to serve
abroad. Nonetheless, lastyear he
spent seven months in one ofthe
most punishing environments
in the world: Afghanistan.
McEwan served as a "force-
protection platoon commander" within the National Support Element, providing logistical support to forward units
in Kandahar.
"I had aplatoon of 45 traveling
all around Kandahar province
dropping supplies at forward operating units. Essentially convoy
security was our big deal."
Regardless, McEwan said that
he was never "in the shit."
"We had a remarkably quiet
tour. Some ofthe more intense
situations that we were involved
with included providing first-
aid at traffic accidents, or to civilians who had been injured
by explosive devices."
McEwan said that he was not
looking for a fire-fight, contrary
to what he said one might assume about a member of the
Armed Forces.
He said that what he believes
may highlight a difference between the perception and reality of the armed forces.
"What I found is that like almost all members ofthe forces,
I have no interest in promoting
conflict," he said.
"I see this as an opportunity
to prevent and solve existing
troubles, rather than to be involved in some kind of violent
adventure." tl
Major changes coming to the Graduate Record Exam
ZOE SIEGEL
Contributor
Are you planning on going to
graduate school in the near future? If so, you might have to
crack the books earlier than
expected.
Beginning in August 2011,
the Graduate Record Examination (GRE), a standardized test
that is required for many graduate schools throughout the US
and Canada, will be changing
its format.
While Educational Testing
Services (ETS), the non-profit that writes and proctors the
GRE, is making these changes
in order to improve the exam,
how long it will take before these
changes become improvements
is debatable.
This will be the largest revision in the 60 year history of
the GRE.
ETS has stated that the motivation behind making these
changes is a result ofthe "changes in the demographics of the
test takers, technology changes, etc."
The new exam contains more
advanced software, allowing users to go forward and backward
within the section to change
answers and even flag difficult
questions.
In addition to improvements
in all sections, in the quantitative reasoning section, the revised GRE will include a calculator to avoid minor mistakes
and to emphasize that the test
is of reasoning ability not arithmetic calculations.
However, the implementation of an on-screen calculator
may mean more complex math
problems.
One major change will be the
new test score scaling. Presently,
each section has scores ranging
from 200-800 in ten-point increments. In the new GRE, scores
will range from 130-170, with
one-point increments.
Instead of being adaptive the
level of questions, the new GRE
will be adaptive at a section level. With the current GRE, ifyou
answer a question correctly,
the subsequent question will
be more difficult.
With the new GRE, how difficult the next section will be is a
direct result of how well you do
in the present section. The new
GRE will also be an hour longer,
increasing the duration to approximately four hours.
Although it's early third-year
GRE undergoing most significant revisions in 40 years. JOSH CURRAN PHOTO ILLUSTRATION/THE UBYSSEY
arts and sciences student Talia
Salzman has recently started
studying for the GREs.
"When I heard that the exam
format was changed I decided
to take the GREs sooner than I
had initially expected so I could
avoid the uncharted territory."
Kaplan Test Prep and Admissions agrees with Salzman and
is advising students interested
to take the test before the changes take effect.
Statistically speaking, when a
testing company makes drastic
changes to one of their standardized tests, there is a drop in the
initial test scores for a shortperi-
od of time after implementation.
Perhaps to offset lower marks
and overcome initial reluctance, ETS is offering a 50 per
cent discount to students who
take the test in August and
September.
Students interested in graduate studies who want to take
the old GRE have one piece of
luck: GRE scores are good for
up to five years.
But with less than a year remaining on the old test, they'll
have to move fast, tl 2011.02. 2 8/UBYSSEY.CA/NEWS/5
Tweeting from the podium
UBC professors using social media to enhance students' experiences in the classroom
TAYLOR LOREN
Contributor
Professors at UBC are showing that when it comes to social media, old dogs can learn
new tricks.
Political science professor
Dr Raul Pacheco-Vega is one
of many faculty members who
have introduced social media
as part ofthe class experience.
Students tweet questions, comment on his class blog and contribute to discussion topics on
his Facebook page.
"My goal as a professor is to
help students build skills for the
job market, using their fluency
and literacy in social media to
build professional networks for
when they graduate," he said.
Pacheco-Vega teaches public and environmental policy
at UBC. He has a professional
Twitter account, ©raulpacheco,
but also tweets as the popular
Vancouver blogger @humming-
bird604, where he has over 6700
followers. He is using his teaching as an opportunity to merge
his online identities to benefit
students.
"Using social media in the
classroom helps me build that
literacy for the students so when
they go out in the world, they
have these skills," he said.
Pacheco-Vega is using his personal social media capital for
online networking between students and other professionals
in his field. "With my double
identity I am able to push a lot
more of my students' content to
the outside world. Twitter has
helped me spread my students'
message."
Trevor Ritchie is a public policy student of Pacheco-Vega's POLI
*;!-'i':-i;:i-'fi^i-^*K"
Specialist in water
environment and p
civil society and ur,
sustainability
raulpacheco
I can't believe I missed #UBC's Mental Health Symposium. SO
SORRY @ubcmhac @empowrchange @healthyUBC
20 Feb
raulpacheco Dr Raul Pacheco-Vega
RT @salalknits: You should probably follow my research group,
WhalesandShips , because we're awesome.
raulpacheco Dr Raul Pacheco-Vega
ijonchiang LRTAP is part of the chemicals regime, so it's just a
£tl treaty. That should work.
raulpacheco Dr Raul Pacheco-Vega
I don't really do "FollowFriday" but you should follow my students
at UBC http://twitter.eom/#l/list/raulpacheco/my-students-at-ubc
smart!
26 Feb      Favorite      Retweet      Reply
raulpacheco Dr Rau Pacheco-Vega
RT @andrelorenzo: RT @grist: Sitting in traffic triggers more heart
attacks than eating, alcohol, cocaine, and sex http://ow.ly/42PHk
raulpacheco Dr Raul Pacheco-Vega
RT@poliskennedy: Brainstorming: Support for the Canadian Inuit
and legitimacy on an International Scale + Law ... what 'other'
evidence?
Dr Raul Pacheco-Vega
raulpacheco view fun profile —
n  Vancouver. BC. Canada
Teach, research & consult in environment & public policy. Regional
Director. Western Canada @CIELAP, instructor @ The University of
British Columbia (UBC) PltD. http://wwvj.raulpacheco.org
2,677      1,451
Tweets        Following
1,479
Followers
145
Listed
Follow
tt~
Recent Tweets
raulpacheco Dr Raul Pacheco-Vega
RT @UBC MURC: ©raulpacheco Would you know any
undergrads doing research? They can present at MURCI
http://bit.ly/ikasjn
raulpacheco ft Raul Pacheco-Vega
RT ©nlamontagne: Something we need on YVR streets: stylish
water dispensers, can refill bottles: http://bit.ly/fQaa6Q (via
@DesignObserver)
A prof goes viral COURTESY OF TWITTER
350andPOLI375 classes and enjoys how social media is enhancing his education firsthand.
"A lot of the focus on social
media has been on its applications in public policy" he said,
adding, "I've learned a lot about
how it can form grassroots opposition or support for proposed
policies."
Professors are also utilizing
Twitter for instant feedback, allowing students to contribute
to the class discussion without
having to speak up in class. David Ng, director ofthe Advanced
Molecular Biology Laboratory,
sets up a live stream during
his ASIC 200 class. Using the
hashtag#asic200, students are
able to communicate about the
lecture in real time, which UBC
student Dominika Ziemczonek
finds "both informative and
entertaining."
"I wouldn't be on Twitter without the class," said Ziemczonek,
who found out about ASIC 200
because of the website. She has
now learned how to tweet and
built a network of peers through
online class conversation.
Ritchie also enjoys the real-time
effect of Twitter in the classroom.
"Being able to instantly communicate with my peers and
have differing viewpoints at my
fingertips enhances my ability to understand the issues at
hand," he said.
Students are also incorporating academics into their regular use of social media outside
the classroom.
"A lot of students use Twitter
specifically outside of class to
ask each other questions, share
helpful links and set up study
sessions," said Ziemczonek.
UBC itself has become a
tweeting machine, with over
50 affiliate accounts delivering
daily updates to faculty students
and the neighbourhood.
The #ubc hashtag has been
a trending topic across Canada and a simple search delivers results from the entire
community.
Twitter can show the current
score in a sports game, press
releases about UBC's distinguished research and faculty,
students complaining during
a class and even update you
on the disgruntled residents
of Gage during those midnight
fire alarms, tl
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Stories for
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news!
Write for news,
seriously.
ARSHY MANN
news@ubyssey.ca
U THEUBYSSEYc 6/UBYSSEY.CA/ADVERTISEMENT/2011.02.28
ams Insider weekly ^
student society     a weekly look at what's new at your student society
28.02.11
The AMS Referendum: March 7th-11th
CHANGE YOUR AMS
Better services, clubs and events
KEEP THE UPASS
Learn more at
www.ams.ubc.ca
eeting
AMS Elections will be holding a Referendum Meeting on
Monday, February 28th at 5p.m. in SUB Room 205 to discuss the
upcoming AMS Referendum. AM students are welcome to attend.
Students interested in running a "YES!" or "NO!" committee with
associated funding from the AMS are encouraged to attend this
meeting to learn more.
CAREER DAY
March 16-17
10 a.m.-3 p.m.
Main Concourse, SUB
Come to the SUB to meet
recruiters looking for
UBC students to hire!
Bring your resume!
STAY  UP TO  DATE WITH  THE AMS
Facebook:
UBC Alma Mater Society
y Twitter:
AMSExecutive 2011.02.2 8/U BYSSEY. CA/S PORTS/7
SPORTS
EDITOR MARIE VONDRACEK»sports@ubyssey.ca
Dinos slip past Dolphins at Nationals
Rivalry continues as Calgary beats UBC for their second straight CIS title
KELLY HAN
Contributor
The CIS' prehistoric swimming
rivalry between Dinos and Dolphins reached its peak this weekend at the national championships were hosted by the defending champions, the University of
Calgary Dinos.
As the Dinos' top rival, UBC
kept neck-and-neck with only a 3.5
point deficit in men's overall and
were 50points behind in women's
overall after the first day.
"It's going to come right down
to the last race tomorrow and every swim is going to be important," predicted UBC head coach
Chad Webb.
Sure enough, on the final day,
the points came in with Calgary
women defeating UBC 778.5 to
648.5 points in women's races,
and with Calgary ahead of UBC
on the men's side at 543.5 to 493.
The UBC men edged out the Dinos by one tenth of a second in
the 4x100 metre freestyle relay
and provided the spark that the
Thunderbirds needed. Tommy
Gossland was an important point
contributor as he took home silver in both the men's 50 and 100
metre freestyle touching and also
participated in the 4x100 metre
medley relay with three others to
place third. The UBC men's team
fought their way to the forefront,
leading 354 to Calgary's 344.5 by
the end ofthe second day.
In the women's competition,
the Dinos captured gold in three
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UBC made quite the splash once again this season with back-to-back national silvers. JOSH CURRAN PH0T0/THE UBYSSEY
events while UBC captured a silver and two bronzes, as well as
placing second and third in the
women's 400 metre individual
medleys.
Kelly Aspinall took the second medal home for the Thunderbirds, winning a silver in
the men's 50 metre backstroke
while their rookie team also
placed third in the 4x100 metre
freestyle relay. Aspinall continued the mining for medals by
picking up the first gold in the
100 metre backstroke with 53.89.
The women also added a pair of
gold and silver medals to their
haul.
Despite Calgary's talent, rookie
Savannah King had an excellent
weekend leading from start to
finish in the 400 metre freestyle
and also picked up her second
gold medal in 800 metre freestyle. King's efforts resulted in
her being named the CIS Female
Rookie of the Year. Martha McCabe earned gold while Hanna
Pierse took silver in the 200 metre breaststroke, with McCabe
propelling her lead in the last few
seconds and taking over a three-
second victory margin. Fifth-year
Pierse closed outher career with a
silver medal in the 200 metre individual medley, as well as coming in second in the multi-stroke
event. The women also finished
second in the 4x200 metre freestyle relay with 8:11.44.
"We battled hard tonight
against a very strong Calgary
team and showed a lot of determination," said Webb, va
Thunderbirds dominate, but forget the basics
Men's basketball team surpasses 100 points twice to cruise past Manitoba Bisons
NOAH BURSHTEIN
Contributor
For all intents and purposes,
UBC's first round Canada West
playoff matchup with Manitoba
should not have been an eventful affair. The T-Birds are a bigger, stronger and more skilled
team, having won 18 games in a
row coming into this weekend.
That UBC swept the best of
three series 106-75 and 103-
85 was a surprise to nobody, as
the first-seeded Thunderbirds
eliminated the eighth-seeded
Bison with relative ease.
UBC's high scorer Josh Whyte
finally returned to form on Friday night, scoring 29 points on
a very efficient 10 for 18 from
the floor. Whyte, who averaged
a team-leading 18.1 points per
game during the regular season, had gone a few games without putting up his usual high-
scoring effort, but the veteran player seemed quite ready
and comfortable to start the
playoffs.
Nathan Yu led the T-Birds on
Saturday night with 19, but it
was his defence that was the
story for UBC.
Hanson said he was very
pleased how Yu "came off the
bench and sparked us from
a defensive standpoint," and
was satisfied with the "scores
in transition" that Yu's defensive intensity led to.
Of course, this series sweep
could have been easily predicted, as the Thunderbirds were
expected to dominate coming
into this matchup. But head
coach Kevin Hanson wasn't all
too satisfied with how his team
performed. "Obviously I'm happy that we won, but I wasn't happy with the way we executed,"
he said. "We made too many
slip-ups for this time of year."
Unfortunately for UBC, Hanson is dead on. While the Thunderbirds had little trouble putting points on the board due to
their size advantage and superior outside shooting, their defence was at times less than
stellar. "Manitoba just got way
too many easy baskets," Hanson
said. And he was right.
At times UBC seemed to be
making tactical and schematic defensive errors that are uncharacteristic of the T-Birds.
Dedication to defence would be
involved in the practices this
week, said Hanson.
"We need to focus on the little
things that we work on in practice and translate them over to
the game."
For a team that has been so
completely focused on winning
their first national championship since 1973, it's almost unthinkable that the Thunderbirds would be making the kind
of mental errors they committed this weekend.
With the CIS Championships
in Halifax just two weeks away,
it's easy for the players to begin
to look too far ahead and lose focus of the games they still have
left in the Canada West Playoffs.
With the series victory, UBC
secures home-court advantage
in the Canada West Final Four
next weekend, where they will
play host to Alberta, Trinity
Western and Saskatchewan.
Needing a win in the semifinal on Friday, Hanson faces his
most difficult challenge of the
season now, as he must keep the
players focused on the games at
hand and not on that March 11
date that every player has circled on his calendar, va
Josh Whyte is back in form for the 'Birds. JOSH CURRAN PH0T0/THE UBYSSEY 8/UBYSSEY.CA/SPORTS/2011.02.2 8
'Birds win third straight CanWest gold
Women's volleyball defeat
Trinity Western in five set epic
JUSTIN MCELROY
coordinating® ubyssey.ca
For most players, having the
game rest in their hands would
be cause for nerves. But getting
ready to serve at 15 in the fifth
and deciding set of the Canada West women's volleyball
championship, Shanice Marcelle was as calm as could be
for UBC.
Of course, it helped that she
didn't know what the stakes.
"I didn't even know the score
was tied," the third-year Human
Kinetics student and conference
MVP said. "I was just trying to
do what I do every day."
No matter. Marcelle hit one
ace, then another—and just like
that, the T-Birds were Canada
West champions for the third
consecutive year, defeating Trinity Western in a five-set epic (25-
22, 21-25, 18-25, 25-21, 17-15).
Though both teams had already clinched a spot in the CIS
championships by virtue of their
semi-final victories the night before—in UBC's case, a 3-0 over
Manitoba—the teams were playing for more than seeding at
this week's CIS Championships
in Laval.
In October, TWU ended UBC's
40-game winning streak with
two straight victories and the
T-Birds were intent on not giving them a third.
"It's always nice to get revenge
against a team that snaps your
winning streak," said Marcelle,
who finished with 12 kills and
six aces on the night. "It's pretty crucial to be No. 1 out of the
Canada West; you get an easier game and makes our route
a lot easier."
Aside from Marcelle, UBC
was led by Kyla Richey (19
kills, 12 digs) and Jen Hinze
(10 kills—both of whom missed
the first half the season playing
for Team Canada at the world
championships. The trio provided the bulk of UBC's offence
against a spartan team that
had only lost three games all
season and seemed to be on the
verge of a victory in the fourth
set when they took a 19-15 lead.
But two straight kills by first-
year Lisa Barclay turned the momentum to UBC, who went on a
10-2 run to win the set 25-21,
sending the match to the fifth
and deciding set.
"We needed this kind of
pressure match," said Reimer,
whose team had won an astonishing 21 straight sets before
Saturday's final. "Before, you're
thinking seedings, you're already [at the nationals], but you
see the emotion on the court
and frankly, being able to push
forward, you see the effect of
hours of practice."
Tuesday, UBC heads to Laval, where they will attempt to
win its fourth straight national
championship. If they succeed,
it will be their eighth all-time,
which would set a CIS record.
Reimer's prediction?
"It won't be easy, but we're
ready to go." tl
Shanice Marcelle sealed the banner win with both tying and match points. CHARLESTO PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
Thunderbirds end season without playoff run
Four hockey warriors hang up their Blue and Gold forever
Team captain Matthew Schneider in his last game as a Thunderbird. JOSH CURRAN PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
MARIE VONDRACEK
sports@ubysseyca
Ifyou had just stumbled into the
T-Bird rink this weekend and
seen the UBC men playing, you
might not have been able to tell
that they had already lost their
chance for a playoff berth the
weekend previous. This passion
has characterized UBC hockey
all season.
"We battled a lot this year
through some adversity and I'm
hoping it'll make us into a better hockey team down the road,"
commented UBC head coach Milan Dragicevic.
The 'Birds were led over the
weekend by second years Jordan White and Wyatt Hamilton.
Hamilton had two goals in the
3-2 Friday night win and White
38 saves in their 4-0 loss.
The weekend split with the
CIS third-ranked Alberta Golden
Bears (19-6-3) means the 'Birds
finish 11-12-5 on the year, sixth
overall in the Canada West and
five points out of a playoff spot.
"What killed us this year was
losing those four games in a row
to Lethbridge and Saskatchewan," commented Dragicevic,
referring to his club's late-season slump.
The 'Birds could summarize
their season in a single play sequence from the weekend: after
missing an open net tap-in, their
opponents regrouped at centre
and sprung Colinjoe on a breakaway, which went backhand-forehand and under White's left leg.
"Every team goes through
a bad stretch throughout the
year. It just turned out that ours
was at a time where we had the
most amount of injuries," said
Dragicevic. But he refused to
make excuses for his team—or
deny their progress.
"Everyone had the opportunity to play and progress. We were
one game from being above .500,
and we were ten points above
where we finished last year. To
me that's an encouraging sign
that the team is on its way up."
During Friday's game, U of A
captain Eric Hunter suffered a
concussion in the third period
after being punched by UBC forward Mike Liambas. He was assigned an additional two game
suspension upon review after
the game, on top of his two-minute minor, five minute major
and game misconduct awarded by the on-ice official.
Liambas has been on the receiving end of numerous past
suspensions but is a player who
teammates expect to bring passion and emotion to every game,
this season and beyond.
With the season over, UBC
vets Matthew Schneider, Dalton Pajak, Craig Lineker and
Max Gordichuk will leave behind foundations for successful
years to come as they hang up
their Blue and Gold with pride.
Schneider will end his Thunderbird career with 15 goals
and 18 assists, while Pajak and
Lineker both reached career
highs in their final season, with
nine points for Pajak and five
goals for Lineker despite missing three weekends with an injury. Max Gordichuk has been an
imposing presence on the blue-
line for five years and a leader
off the ice who will be missed
by teammates and fans alike.
"When I look at the players
that are going to return, [they're]
our second- and third-year players with one more year under
their belt," said Dragicevic.
"They'll have more hatred for
losing after two years not making the playoffs." tl 2011.0 2.2 8/UBYSSEY.CA/SPORTS/
Basketball women lose control of own fate
MARIE VONDRACEK
sports@ubyssey.ca
Alberta (17-7) swept the UBC Thunderbirds (17-7) 80-74 and 73-60 in
their best-of-three Canada West
quarterfinal series last week.
The close back and forth battle
in Game 1 was reminiscent ofthe
2010 Canada West quarterfinal
series between these two teams,
which saw Alberta take game one
(also in overtime) and game three
by two points.
"After that good start, we just
got outplayed," said UBC head
coach Deb Huband. "They had
people stepping up and contributing all over the place. We just
couldn't match them. We got frazzled, offensively, and stopped executing as a team." UBC relied
heavily on their starting five,
with each player seeing at least
30 minutes of court time. As a
group they supplied 66 of the T-
Birds' 74 points.
Major contributions came from
Kris Young, who scored 18 points
in the loss, and Alex Vieweg, who
notched a team-high 22 points.
"Kris did a really terrific job as a
rookie. She had a strong defensive
game which may not have shown
Zara Huntley led her squad in the loss. DAVID EL0P PH0T0/THE UBYSSEY
up in the stat sheet. On offence,
she was able to take advantage of
some opportunities and finished
really well," added Huband. "For
the third straight weekend, Alex
brought a lot of energy, focus and
determination. She has been tremendous for us over the last few
weeks."
Despite earning a 38-32 first
half lead, the Thunderbirds fell
victim to a 27-point onslaught to
be defeated 73-64. Vieweg and
Young were once again effective
with 18 points and 13 rebounds
together but were limited all afternoon with foul trouble.  UBC
struggled as a team, shooting just
21 of 62 (33.9 per cent) from the
field.
"We came out ofthe gates very
strong," said Huband. "It was a
dominant first quarter. We got
hit with some foul trouble in the
second and with Leigh [Stans-
field] outwith an injury from last
night, we didn't have much size
off the bench. That said, I think
our bench did a great job coming in and playing some extended minutes in the second and
third quarters."
Despite the loss, UBC's season
is not necessarily over. The new
CIS format for women's basketball sees five teams automatically qualify for the final eight—four
conference champions and host—
with the other three spots going
to the winners of three regional
four-team tournaments.
"We'll be watching with great
interest over the next few days.
It's unsettling to not be in control
ofyour future and having to rely
on other teams but there is a solid chance our season will continue. It's important for us to get a
bit of rest over the next few days
and then refocus and move forward," said Huband. tl
THUNDERBIRD ATHLETE COUNCIL
ATHLETE OF THE WEEK
TANYA MCLEAN
The Delta, BC native hit her opponents out of the park this week. GEOFF LISTER PH0T0/THE UBYSSEY
Tanya McClean of the Thunderbird softball team is this week's athlete of the week. The team
recently returned from a reading week road trip to Oregon and California with four wins and
two losses, improving their season to 500 (8-8). During the trip, McClean racked up a total of
9 home runs, while the team earned a total of 30!
—Amelia Rajala
celebrate
research
March 4-11,2011
A campus-wide showcase of
public events on a variety of
research topics and themes.
All members of the UBC
community are welcome.
Playoffs have begun, be a part ofthe passion.
Write about it.
marie vondracek |sports@ubyssey.ca
U THEUBYSSEYc UBYSSEY.CA/CULTURE/2011.02.28
CULTURE
EDITORS BRYCE WARNES & JONNY WAKEFIELD »culture@ubyssey.ca
SENIOR WRITER GINNY MONACO »gmonaco@ubyssey.ca
ILLUSTRATOR INDIANA JOEL»ijoel@ubyssey.ca
RIP No fun city? City reviews archaic noise laws
i MUSIC
GINNY MONACO
glmonaco@ubyssey.ca
Heather Deal is a guardian
angel for the Vancouver arts
community.
In August 2 010, the city councillor stepped in to protect Little Mountain Gallery, the independent artist and performance
space just off Main St, from an
arbitrary noise complaint that
could have seen the venue's
doors close for good.
The case of Little Mountain
follows an all-too-familiar pattern for venue space in the city.
Both established and start-up
cultural spots face an impossible network of noise, zoning
and liquor licensing, violation
of which can force the space to
shut down.
"Running a legal,
all-ages venue is
basically impossible
at this point.'
MARITA MICHAELIS-WEBB
SAFE AMPLICATION SITE SOCIETY
For groups like the Safe Amplification Site Society (SASS),
which is aiming to launch an
all-ages space in Vancouver,
the bylaws seem like an insurmountable obstacle. "Running
a legal, all-ages venue is basically impossible at this point,"
said Marita Michaelis-Webb, a
Fun, the sleeping giant, still slumbers. JOSH CURRAN PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
member of the organization's
board of directors.
"There's a weird web of bylaws that are really outdated and
make very little sense and don't
really work together. The more
you learn about them, the more
you realize it's hard to navigate
them."
Now, according to Michaelis-
Webb, these laws are shifting
in favour of cultural establishments—and Councillor Deal is
part ofthe driving force behind
these changes.
In 2008, Deal presented a motion to review the regulatory
structures for venue space in
the city. Hindered by a municipal election that year and the
lead-up to the Olympics, the Regulatory Review for Live Performance Venues, as the motion
came to be known, has finally
started to bear fruit.
The review was presented to
city council on February 3, 2011
and takes serious initiative to,
as the preamble states, "better support cultural spaces."
Deal explained where these
changes will be seen. "Over the
next couple of months, you'll see
the temporary changes... By summer at the latest, we will have
cracked open a huge new inventory
of potential performance spaces.
"The more thorough review
of the liquor policy piece won't
be until the fall at least. That
will require a certain number
of requests to the province because they are our Big Brother
when it comes to a lot of the liquor bylaws."
The Regulatory Review includes a provision that allows
venues to temporarily work
with the city to bring themselves up to code, without worries of being shut down for bylaw violations.
Moving into nextyear, the review will be looking at "changes to permanent places," said
Deal. "This is about the building. What do you allow in residential zones? In office zones?
In industrial areas?"
After the Live Performance
Venue Regulatory Review, Deal
and her staff will tackle artist galleries and studio space.
Though it is an exhaustive undertaking, the changes to these
regulations will benefit both the
arts community and the city. According to Deal, "[The city] does
not make money off the existing bylaws. They cost us in paperwork and staff time. There
are actually very few concerns
with this."
Michaelis-Webb called the review a "boost of energy." Like
many others trying to sustain
Vancouver's cultural heritage,
she and SASS are looking forward to a collaborative relationship with inspectors and city
council. "Sometimes it can be
really upsetting and depressing
and bring you down because
you put so much work into it
and it seems bigger and bigger
and harder and harder.
"But then something will
counteract it and we'll see that
we're getting closer and closer
to our goal." tl
New chairs deserve a standing ovation
i CAMPUS LIFE
University consults on new model for classroom chairs
BRYCE WARNES
culture@ubyssey.ca
Classroom Services is introducing changes that have the potential to unseat common assumptions about what chairs are and
what they can do.
On February 24, Classroom
Services held a furniture test
and survey in the SUB main concourse as part of a consultation
process to decide what will be
used to furnish new and renovated buildings.
Students were allowed to inspect, test and lovingly caress
the chairs on display and were
asked to provide feedback via
printed forms.
Some, like Steel Case's Node,
seek to redefine the chair.
"The Node is a specific chair,
it's developed by Steel Case," said
Jodi Scott, manager of formal
learning for Classroom Services. She gestured at a slick little
unit, a combination chair and
desk on wheels.
With a one-piece polypropylene contoured shell seat and a
swiveling, no-handed personal
workspace, the Node puts your
run-of-the-mill molded plastic
Right: options for chairs of the future. Left, the new "node" chair. GEOFF LISTER PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
buttock storage appliance to
shame.
"We don't have it on campus
anywhere yet," said Scott, but
that could soon change.
Unfortunately, not every piece
of furniture was as technically
beautiful or concept-challenging
as Steel Case's Node. The lower
echelons of chair-dom are filled
with tight-budget options with
standard, hum-drum features.
"The first kind is a basic chair,
what we call a Type One chair,
they're like a stackable chair,"
said Scott, referring to a piece of
furniture that would completely fail to stand out in a crowd.
"Now, if we were to move up to
a different level, we'd go to something that's got a little bit better
back support, some padding,
arms, wheels. Here's a range,
what looks good here?"
The fancier models failed to
meet the new standard set by
the Node, but they offered some
of the practical comforts Scott
listed. More important than the
flexibility of the user's spine,
though, is the flexibility of the
classroom's layout.
"Instructors are telling us that
they would like to have more flexibility in the classroom, to have
tables and chairs on wheels so
they can reconfigure the classroom from maybe rows into discussion groups, different configurations," said Scott.
"The way we are teaching has
changed...there's more collaboration. It's not really just somebody listening to somebody at
the front of the class."
Scott envisions a future in
which a panoply of different seating styles can be found across
campus, each classroom adopting a chair suited to its purpose.
To cynics, such ideals may seem
Utopian. But to Scott, they are
born out of necessity. As we plow
forward into the 21st century, it
may be that only the Node—or
even one of its slightly cheaper
substitutes—can provide the support students ofthe future need.
"There's new stuff out there
that's better," said Scott. "Chairs
have changed." tl
— with files from Jonny
Wakefield 2011.02.28/UBYSSEY.CA/CULTURE/ll
Give me a burger, make it raw
Week one of our three part series: raw food
iSERIES
JONNY WAKEFIELD
culture@ubyssey.ca
During my first 12 hours on a
raw food diet, I just wasn'twork-
ing right. I'm not being dramatic
when I say my body was covered in
a cold sweat. I felt distracted—partly by low blood sugar, partly by
the bags of carrots and almonds
I had to keep munching to stay
upright. So when I called Alexia
Harris—an employee at the East
Van raw food restaurant Organi-
cLives—I was fairly desperate to
find out what I was doing wrong.
Turns out, it was mostly
everything.
"I would say take it really slow,"
said Harris. "It's not about going fully 100 per cent raw right at the beginning. It can be very detoxifying
on the body to go fully raw."
This detoxifying process feels
pretty gross. It's also coupled with a
gnawing hunger. Because only food
thathas notbeen cooked above 46
degrees Celsius is considered raw, I
find out quickly that there are few
raw options in the SUB. My general
failure on the first day should not
be seen as a reflection on the idea
of raw food, which actually makes
a good deal of sense.
The idea behind a raw food diet,
explained Harris, is that raw or
"living" food retains enzymes, vitamins, minerals and, perhaps
most importantly, water. All or
most of these are destroyed in
the cooking process. All of these
elements expedite the digestion
process. The thinking is that by
eating foods that retain their enzymes and water, we'll be more
efficient in our digestion, leaving
us more energy for other processes. Generally, we'll be healthier.
Once I figured out that one
cannot survive on carrot sticks
alone, I was forced to innovate.
I started with a few soups from
a raw food cook book. Most of
them call for coconut water as
the base, combined with onion,
lemon juice and garlic (generally
an offensive amount). These were
mostly pretty bad. I made some
guacamole and a concoction of
chopped walnuts, soy sauce, coriander and cumin that was supposed to emulate taco filling and
ate it on some leafy greens. I
also whipped up a sort of cheese
sauce made from bell pepper,
tahini and sunflower seeds. A
word of warning: don't attempt
this diet unless you have a blender, or at least a Magic Bullet.
But sometimes you want to just
sit down and order food, which
can be hard ifyou're eating raw.
I stopped by OrganicLives twice
while on the diet and ate some
pretty innovative creations, like
a "burger" with a patty made of
ground masala and a bun of dehydrated yam paste. This sort of
specialized equipment—have you
ever seen a food dehydrator?—relegates 100 percent raw to a boutique diet. But as Harris said, 100
percent raw isn't the point.
"It's not about being on a 'raw
diet,'" she said. "It's not a trendy
thing. It'sjust about incorporating
more raw food into your dietwith-
out it being a label." Whether that's
having one raw meal a day or having a huge green salad with every
meal, Harris said it's a step in the
right direction.
RAW FOOD STAPLES
V^lpium and Iron: leaWZ
greens like Arugula or
kale
Vitamin C: fruits'.and
veggies.
Protein: nuts and seeds
Fermented foods: Sauerkraut and miso
By limiting access to prepared
food—specifically SUB food—
a raw food diet (or any diet for
that matter) forces you to live a
little more deliberately It forces
you to manage your time better,
to take time out to eat and actually think about what you're putting into your body. When you
have to gather ingredients and
prepare them, rather than simply grabbing something in a bag
or ordering across a counter, you
have time to reflect, tl
—Full disclosure: beer was consumed per usual over the course of
this experiment.
DAVID MARINO SCREENCAP/THE UBYSSEY
Kombucha crafting: you know you wanna        "F00D
MICHAEL GARTEN PHOTO ILLUSTRATION/WIKIPEDIA COMMONS
HALLE HUI
Contributor
Kombucha is a fermented
tea that is being touted by
the health-conscious as the
latest miracle-worker. Propagated for its medicinal purposes and healing properties,
this bubbly tonic was first documented in Russia during the
late 19th century. Made properly, kombucha is 0.5 to 1 per
cent alcohol and contains a host
of acids, enzymes, minerals and
vitamins. Kombucha proponents
claim the drink can lead to increased energy levels and better digestion. It's relatively easy
to brew at home.
WHATYOUILNEED
• A Kombucha "mushroom"
mother. Also referred to as the
"culture," the mother is a symbiotic culture of bacteria and yeasts
(SCOBY) that reproduces itself on
an ongoing basis. The mother resembles a large, glossy pancake
and is used to ferment the tea,
and can be bought for under five
dollars from independentsellers
over Craigslist or Freecycle.
•2-3 tsp. loose-leaf tea or 5-6
teabags. Stick to black, oolong,
green or white tea foryour kombucha - teas with additional oils
or flavours could interfere with
the good bacteria produced during
the fermentation process.
•Sweetener of your choosing, %
cup. Sugar, agave nectar and raw
honey are most commonly used.
• Kombucha starter, 1.5 cups. The
starter tea can either be from your
previous kombucha preparation, or
ifyou're without any kombucha, it
can also be store-bought, raw and
unflavored kombucha.
• Filtered water, 12 cups.
• A large container. A glass bowl
large enough to hold all the ingredients is definitely recommended
forthe brewing process. Make sure
there is no exposed metal.
• Clean cloth, big enough to cover
the opening of the glass.
DIRECTIONS:
1 In a large pot, bring your water to a boil and
promptly remove the pot from heat.
2 Steep your loose-leaf tea or tea bags for at least
15 minutes. Remove afterwards.
3 Add your sweetener of choice and mix until it's
been fully dissolved.
4 Leave the tea/sugar mixture to cool to room
temperature. Only when it has cooled completely
should you put the solution into yourglass container.
5 Add the starter culture and stir evenly to distribute
it throughout the solution.
6 Add the kombucha mother.
7 Cover the container opening with the cloth and keep
it securely in place with the rubber band.
8 Put your container in a quiet, undisturbed area
where it won't be exposed to smoke, pollen, or
direct sunlight. Make sure it gets enough airflow.
9 Let it ferment for roughly seven to ten days
depending on the temperature (the warmer it
is, the shorter the time it takes to ferment) and
how acidic or sweet you'd like it to be. A longer
fermentation period makes for a strong, tart tea,
similar to apple cider vinegar. Ideally, it ferments
best in constant temperatures between 21 and
22 degrees Celsius.
10 After the seven to ten days, remove the original
mother and the new baby that has formed on the
surface of the tea. For the first 2-3 batches, use
the mother and the reproduced baby together
since they are new and can be delicate. After
each brewing, the layer of culture formed gets
thicker and eventually can be separated and
used individually for future brewing.
11 Strain the kombucha and set aside 1.5 cups as
your starter foryour next brew. Your drink can be
bottled and stored in the fridge. Bottoms up! tl
New Japanese
Kitsilano
j \i\ • spi mis i >\ t\
^pmcefood
until March 1st
3132 W. BIN )ADWAY  OPEN AT 5:00
604-738-3132 12/UBYSSEY.CA/CULTURE/2011.02.28
Mount Garibaldi boasts a great view
The Varsity Outdoor Club climbs another geological protuberance
TODD MACKENZIE
VOC
Mt Garibaldi is a large glaciated
volcano located in, you guessed
it, Garibaldi park. Mt Garibaldi
dominates the skyline of Squamish to the North with its diamond shaped massif, making it
a desirable objective for many
mountaineers. Late in January,
fourteen VOCers were rounded
up for an attempt. Nine of us
were to tackle the mountain
from the west and five from
the east.
By 10am on a Saturday morning, we were all shouldering
our heavy packs and skinning
up the logging road that marked
the start of our adventure. We
eventually gained Brohm Ridge
and were out ofthe trees for the
first time. The ridge approaches
the mountain from the west and
is broad and long. The weather
was intermittent and visibility
variable, but we were optimistic that it would improve.
By the time we finally set foot
on the glacier, we were all thoroughly exhausted. Itwas getting
late in the day and the sun was
setting. Camp was situated on a
relatively flat section of the glacier and a safe distance from
Garibaldi's north face. We ate
dinner quickly and crawled into
our tents.
Garibaldi stirred in the darkness. Sounds of rock and ice
crashing down its crumbling
faces made for an uneasy, restless night. Several times during the night, I would tense up
A VOC member surveys the way ahead. PHOTO C0URTESYT0DD MACKENZIE/THE VOC
and my mind would race, wondering if our camp was really
a safe distance from the face.
We awoke in the early morning. We were soon pulling on
our harnesses and laying out the
ropes, preparing for the coming
day. The sky was now clear and
the sun would soon rise.
A few hours of skinning put us
at the bottom of the north-eastern face. We took off our skis
and started to kick steps up the
steep face. The snow was soft but
secure and we slowly plodded upward. The other group of five now
arrived from the east and were
following us up. Finally, we arrived at the summit.
It was fantastic—360 degree
views inperfectweather! We spent
an hour celebrating, taking pictures and eating lunch before
heading down. While some boot-
packed down, a companion and
I put on our skis and prepared
for a ski descent. The snow was
soft, but the headwall was steep.
At the bottom of the headwall is
the bergshrund. That's essentially a bottomless hole between
the rocky summit and the start
of the glacial ice. It was mostly
covered with snow, but was still
open in some sections. Falling
here would not be a good idea.
My companion skied the face
first, cutting the slope at the
top to test its stability. Nothing
budged, so off we went. The skiing was fantastic and thick with
powder. We crossed the bergshrund and continued down the
slope until we found a spot to
sit and wait for the others.
After a few minutes of relaxing
in the sun, we heard some yelling from above. Avalanche! A VOC
member had triggered a slab near
the summit. The avalanche traveled down the headwall, narrowly missing Michael Duncan and
tearing out wider and wider slabs
further down the slope. At the bottom of the headwall was a group
of three who were frantically attempting to escape. Fortunately
the avalanche missed them too
and came to a stop, burying a
pair of skis at the bottom of the
headwall. Close call.
After that, the rest of the trip
seemed uneventful. We packed
up camp and began the long slog
out, finallyreaching our vehicles
at dusk.
HS4J FREE AWARENESS EVENT
TOPLAY
TUESDAY, MARCH 1 - 6:45pm
SUB AUDITORIUM - NORM THEATRE
UBC CAMPUS - 6138 Student Union Boulevard
A RARE OPPORTUNITY TO LEARN ABOUT RIGHT TO PLAY'S VITAL IMPACT ABROAD-
SPEAKERS INCLUDE
Right To Play Representatives from LIBERIA, & Athlete Ambassador and OLYMPIC GOLD MEDALIST
TO REGISTER
Canadian International
Development Agency
Agence canadienne de
developpement international!
CALGARY       EDMONTON        TORONTO        OTTAWA        VANCOUVER        KELOWNA       MONTREAL
www.righttoplay.ca 2011.02.28/UBYSSEY.CA/ADVERTISEMENT/13
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64. Writer Hentoff
LAL WEEKLY TOP FIVE FLIRTS (LIKEALITTLE.COM/UBC)
SOLUTION
AT 41 BUS: Female, Brunette. Yesterday, Saturday, I saw you on the 41 and you got off at
Cambie before I could get the nerve to say hi.
You were wearing white headphones over a
blue toque and a beige pea-coat. Your wavy
hair framed your angelic face, my friend also
offered you a seat before you got off. I was sitting right in front of you.
AT SUB: Male, Brunette. You are wearing a leather jacket and carrying a longboard. I always see
you at Honour Roll, you are the sexiest thing
ever. How am I supposed to talk to you if you
make me speechless?
AT 1KB STACKS STAIRCASE: Female, Black hair. You
were coming out of the third floor stacks and I was
looking at the map. I held the door and the smile
you gave me made my day. Absolutely breathtaking.
AT GAGE: Male, Brunette. You, your skateboard, and
your dimples... I just wanted to say thatyou're insanely cute. Thanks for holding that door for me :)
AT BUCH D: Female, Black hair. You were giving
out free cookies!:) Wearing a blue jacket, black
glasses, pearl (??) earrings and a ponytail. Thanks
for brightening up my day, wish I'd said 'hi' and
asked for your number.
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ubyssey. cal volunteer I
submit-a-comic.
VIRGINIE MENARD |
production@ubyssey.ca
<£|T lEUBYSSEYca 2011.02.28/UBYSSEY.CA/OPINIONS/15
OPINIONS
DO YOU CARE? WRITE US A LETTER»feedback@ubyssey.ca
EDITORIAL
IF YOU CAN'T BEAT EM, JOIN EM AND THEN BEAT EM
It's that time of year where many of the undergraduate societies—Arts, Science and Engineering chief
among them—gear up for their main elections. And
as tradition dictates, The Ubyssey would like to remind you, the student, to shape up and pay attention.
In light of last year's embarrassment of an undergraduate election cycle (which cost nearly $50,000
and barely increased turnout), the undergraduate
societies could useyour engagement. Andyou could
benefit too. Think ofthe undergraduate societies as
the municipal to the AMS's federal government.
You don't get to make big sweeping manoeuvres-
like launching UN complaints, hunting terrorists
or claiming to represent all students—but you do
get to fix the plumbing and make sure the roads
get plowed. Compared to the stifling bureaucracy
ofthe AMS, the undergraduate societies offer real
opportunities for normal students to interact with
the elected representatives. And perhaps most importantly, they provide a launching point for the careers of many student politicians.
Following thisyear's AMS elections, you may have
noticed that many ofthe candidates who won were
of a certain hacky centrist persuasion. We know
this left some of you saying, "Why bother, it's an insider's game." You adorable silly goose. How do you
think those insiders got to be insiders?
They almost all got their start by getting involved
with their undergraduate societies, then running
for other positions from there. Every now and then,
a dark horse rides up to wrestle power from the established candidates in an election, but that's the
exception more than the rule. Already we've noticed
a few SJC candidates make some runs for AUS positions. To this we say: smart move.
Think you can do better than last year's crop of
politicians? The niggling yenta that is The Ubyssey
wants you to find yourself a nice position from a
good family to run for. Ifyou remain unengaged,
don't be surprised ifyou see another year of an insular crowd of hacks using your fees to throw parties for themselves.
VP EXTERNAL WILL NEED TO PUT POLITICS ASIDE
"We did it—Christy Clark is the new Premier of BC!
Thank you to all those I worked with as the Provincial Youth Chair of this amazing campaign."
This tweet would mean very little to us, if not
for the fact that it came from Katherine Tyson,
your newly-elected AMS VP External.
In other words, the person directly responsible for representing UBC students to provincial
government has just played a key role in electing
the new head of that government. And ifyou can't
see the major conflict of interest that entails, we
strongly suggest an optometrist.
To be fair, student politicians are free to do
what they want with their private time, VP Externals are often very political in the AMS (last
year's excepted) and Tyson took on this responsibility before she ran for VP External.
But one ofthe key duties of her job is to be resolutely neutral, advocating for the best policies for
students regardless of what party they come from.
And to put it mildly, the BC Liberals have done
little for students in the last five years: slashing
budgets for student support while keeping student
loan conditions among the worst in the country.
So should Tyson take a conciliatory, long-term
approach in lobbying the person she just helped
get elected premier, you can bet critics will claim
she's putting politics ahead of students.
It's a quandary, but there is a solution. If she
wants to maximize her effectiveness and minimize conflicts, Tyson should focus on federal issues, TransLink and UBC's ongoing governance
debate—and declare that she will be leaving issues of provincial lobbying largely to her associate vice-president and Presidentjeremy McElroy,
a formal VP External. Such a decision would be
a refreshing show of integrity from student politics and pre-empt inevitable criticisms of her
neutrality. Otherwise, she risks being doubted
by students and marginalized by her fellow executives in short order.
Tyson has had a month any student politician
would envy, and for that she deserves personal
congratulations. But for both her sake and the
dynamic between executives this year, we wish
her the best of luck in straddling what will be a
very narrow personal and professional line, va
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OPINIONS
BRYCE WARNES GRAPHIC/THE UBYSSEY
Why I am against giving AMS more money
NICK FRANK
Perspective
Bound to run a referendum to continue the U-pass program, the AMS is
hoping to increase your student fees
and change its governance structure
dramatically at the same time. Active
student leaders and I disagree with
the changes because they create slush
funds and make it easier for the AMS
to make drastic changes to our $31
million Student Society while keeping the average student in the dark.
I've included some information here
to demonstrate why AMS is not yet at
a point where we can trust it with such
sweeping powers.
FEE STRUCTURE
The new fee structure gives the AMS
over $800,000 in new funding without any accountability. It creates slush
funds with catchy labels (such as Resource Groups, sustainability, internationalization) without an accountable governance structure. The AMS's
history is the best example of why this
structure lacks accountability.
Lastyear, the AMS Resource Groups
took fees collected as part ofyour tuition
and wired it offshore to fight the Gaza
blockade. The year before that, the AMS
filed a complaint against the Government of Canada and BC to the UN Human Rights Commission for raising tuition. Total cost ofthe flotilla: $15,000;
total cost ofthe UN resolution: $20,000.
Is this the kind of organization that
I would trust with more funds that
they can spend at their full discretion?
Additionally, the decrease on fees in
the Health and Dental Plan is a gamble with the students' extended insurance. The decrease will eliminate the
reserve fund which has protected students against increases in coverage
cost. Without this reserve, at the next
increase of insurance costs, the AMS
will cut coverage substantially or increase the Health and Dental Fee to
previous levels. Seventy-five per cent
of students are on that plan and we
were never consulted on this change.
The only people consulted about the
new fee structure were the beneficiaries ofthe fees.
Finally CiTR and The Ubyssey receive
increases- a strategy that has already
shown results: give the major media
a piece of the pie and they will support
the referendum publicly. Meanwhile,
students have not been consulted.
BYLAW CHANGES
The most significant change is that the
AMS is decreasing quorum at its Annual General Meeting from 1000 to
500. This would mean just 500 students could make any changes to the
AMS, including giving the executive
further slush funds.
How is it good governance for 500 students to decide the fate of a society representing more than 48,000 students?
The AMS is making the change because ithas never been able to get 1000
students to its AGM. Before AMS asks
students for more money, it should make
itself more relevant by showing that it
brings value to the student experience.
The first step is creating a more accountable student government.
When was the last time the AMS asked
us what we wanted to see in student
services?
We are not a cash cow. As fee paying students, we deserve to be included in the decision making process. Until AMS changes its attitude, I am not
paying more AMS fees, tl
Nick Frank is Chair ofthe 'No' Campaigns for the AMS Referenda Bylaws
and Fees Questions.
McElroy: The case against the NCAA
JUSTIN MCELROY
coordinating@ubyssey.ca
Over the next two months, UBC's Administration will be listening to the campus
community as it decides whether to become the second Canadian school to join
NCAA Division II.
To help, I'm presenting the most honest,
ethical and straightforward arguments I
can for and against moving to the NCAA.
Here's the case against the NCAA:
Moving to the NCAA is a giant change.
We'd be waving goodbye to competing
in Canada against Canadian student-
athletes for southern pastures, sizable
scholarships and better competition.
Given the change and that according to
a 2008 survey, more ofthe community
is against the change (52 per cent) than
for it (48 per cent), such a move should
only be made after considering this
question: Who does this change benefit?
One thing is for sure, it doesn't benefit UBC's bottom line. To join the NCAA,
UBC would have to undergo US accreditation, a process that could cost $2-3
million over the next three years and
$100,000 annually after that.
Excluding accreditation, Athletics has
claimed switching to NCAA would give
UBC a net savings of $ 153,53 7. But their
calculations assume that men's and women's hockey would stay in Canada—something that is impossible because the CIS
doesn't allow dual memberships. As the
hockey teams UBC would play includes
schools in Michigan, Minnesota and
Wisconsin, this is creative accounting
at best and deception at worst.
Will this benefit school spirit and get
people to actually attend games? Athletics thinks it will, but there's absolutely
no evidence to support that. Instead of
playing Victoria, Trinity Western and Calgary for CanadaWest dominance, we'll
face Western Washington, Central Oregon and SFU for the right to be kings of
the more competitive Great Northwest
Athletic Conference. If that's enough
to get you to start cheering the T-Birds,
then you're an imaginary person created
by UBC Athletics to support their point.
People don't attend games for a variety
of reasons, but Athletics uses virtually
none of its budget, which is nearly $20
million, to try and change this culture.
So who does this help? Well, it will allow a few dozen more Canadians to get
full-ride scholarships. Which is nice, unless you believe that a university should
reward excellence in academics and citizenship, not being over six feet and able
to put a ball/puck through a hoop/net.
There's also the question of where this
would come from. Athletics "is confident
in reaching an ultimate goal of $75 million in athletic scholarship endowments
through [an] upcoming university-wide
campaign." But this hasn'thappenedyet,
and what if they're overly optimistic?
In many ways, the desires of Athletics
to move to the NCAA is like a B+ science
student who, after getting her bachelor's
degree, has decided she wants to be an
astronaut and work at NASA.
And just like any responsible parent
would tell that kid to go back to school,
if UBC has a responsible administration,
they'll tell Athletics to raise money and
attendance before joining the NCAA.
Being ambitious is only good if you're
prepared, tl 16/UBYSSEY.CA/OURCAMPUS/2011.02.28
OUR CAMPUS
BRYCE WARNES
culture@ubyssey.ca
Displaying tool-making abilities rivalled only by the great
apes, a pack of approximately
fifteen UBC students frolicked
in the snow Saturday night. This
particular form of play served
as a way for male members of
the pack to resolve conflicts
pertaining to social dominance
in a relatively non-violent and
harmless way. The game also
provided hunting practice for
the younger students. Much like
human groups, students use ritualized forms of interaction to
relieve tension within the pack
and reinforce the social roles
of members.
Climbing to the top of the
Knoll with their respective pieces of cardboard, each student
would arrange the ad-hoc sled
beneath them and then, riding
on top, descend the hill. While
no injuries were sustained, several members ofthe group tumbled from their sleds into the
snow and were rewarded by the
chittering, laughter-like sounds
of their peers.
Photographed by Geoff Lister,
this image is a rare glimpse into
the remarkable variations in activity within the social life of the
UBC student. tJ
GEOFF LISTER PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
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