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The Ubyssey Mar 2, 2015

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Array MARCH2,2015 | VOLUMEXCVI | ISSUEXLII
FACE COMBUSTION SINCE 1918
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OMEN   AND   MEN
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** // Page 2
EVENTS        V THIS WEEK, CHECK OUT.
PHOTOGRAPHY CONFERENCE
11:00 A.M. -2:00 P.M. @ LIU INSTITUTE FORGLOBAL ISSUES
Wantto learn howto be a better photographer? UBC is playing hostto several
renowned and award-winning photographers at this conference that blends
talks on photojournalism, photography and international relations. Free
WEDNESDAY ' 4
JUSTIN TRUDEAU
12:30 P.M. @ SUB BALLROOM
Liberal Party of Canada leader Justin Trudeau is giving a talk and Q&A session at UBC. Learn more about the politician, his party and his platform and
the issues that he believes are most important for Canada and students. Free
TUESDAY' 3
CSIS INFO SESSION
2:00-4:00 P.M. @ BROCK HALL EAST WING; 5:30 P.M. @ 1KB 182
Have you always dreamed about being a secret agent? Enjoy monitoring
phone calls and poring through newspaper article after newspaper article?
Learn about career opportunities at Canada's spy agency at this job fair. Free
ON
THE
COVER
It's like, ex-squeeze me, but have
you ever heard of styling gel?
- Kosta Prodovanic
Want to see your events listed here?
Email your events listings to
ourcampus@ubyssey.ca.
<*v
^^*f^  ¥ ■ < -v t  ■  «
UBYSSE
\JTHE
Y
MARCH 2, 2015 | VOLUMEXCVI | ISSUEXLII
EDITORIAL
STAFF
BUSINESS
CONTACT
Coordinating Editor
Copy Editor
Business Manager
Editorial Office: SUB 24
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Business Office: SUB 23
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a erh a rdt @ ubys sey .ca
OUR CAMPUS//
nwawflra
PEOPLE AND BUILDINGS THAT MAKE UBC
=HOTOTIMOTHY HOGGAWHE UBYSSEY
Tyler Han has yet to graduate from high school, but he's already taking courses at UBC.
Tyler Han is a web designer, UBC student and twelfth-grader
Leo Soh
Senior StaffWriter
Most undergraduate students
assume that their peers are
also studying toward bachelor
degrees. Though this is generally
true, Tyler Han is the exception
who proves the rule. Currently
a grade 12 student at Lord Byng
Secondary, Han is making his
presence felt in the lecture halls
ofUBC.
Han is one of a sizeable number
of grade 12 students taking courses
at UBC. Oftentimes these students
have completed AP level studies in
certain subjects, and are looking
to expand their knowledge and
experience university while still
in high school. In Han's case, he
has completed high school level
courses and AP level studies in
math and computer science.
I like the campus a lot,
and just the university
life in general. I've
even joined some clubs
— the Model UN Club,
and the Steppingbridge
Association."
Tyler Han
Grade 12 student and part-time
UBC attendee
"[By the end of Grade 10], I
finished all my computer science
courses at high school, the highest
level being AP computer science.
That wasn't too challenging, to
be honest." After a year of self-
study, Han decided to challenge
himself by taking courses at UBC.
"In grade 12,1 wanted to keep on
learning about computer science
and so that's how I came here. And
it's nearby, which makes it easier
to take courses here." Han com
pleted MATH 200 during the first
semester, and is currently enrolled
inCPSC210.
In high school, teachers
will constantly
prompt you... but in
university it stops. No
one specifically forces
you to do anything;
it's all based on your
own effort and merit. I
actually like that much
more."
Although he is waiting on his
application to the department of
computer science, Han is making
the most of his time at UBC. "I like
the campus a lot, and just the 'university life' in general. I've even
joined some clubs — the Model
UN Club, and the Steppingbridge
Association. Since you have a UBC
ID, you're able to go around and do
whatever everyone else does." As a
part-time student, Han recognizes
the advantages of being at UBC.
"The most important one is the
U-Pass. It saves me from having
to buy a concession pass every
month."
Although Han is hoping to
explore new frontiers of computer
science at UBC, he is already proficient at designing programs. His
first ever project was "SwitchEdit
— it was for an indie game; someone was making a browser game
called TagPro, and [SwitchEdit]
was the map editor. That was okay,
a couple dozen people used it."
Han has also been involved
with web design and "other projects on the side," but if he had to
point to one main project, it would
be ChairMUN. Han and another
student, Lee, spent months work
ing on this software, designed for
use during Model UN conferences.
"Basically every major conference
in B.C., including UBCMUN, and
also a lot of conferences in the
States have shown interest."
Having experienced higher-level education, Han now feels a
certain degree of separation from
secondary school education. "It
just feels completely different —
almost like living two completely
different lifestyles. I think it's the
amount of care people put towards
you. In high school, teachers will
constantly prompt you for homework, et cetera, but in university
it stops. No one specifically forces
you to do anything; it's all based
on your own effort and merit. I
actually like that much more."
Han believes that the difficulty
of university also poses challenges
altogether different from high
school. "I remember in a MATH
200 class, looking away for a
moment or two and looking back at
the board. I had no idea what was
going on!"
Like any other university
student, Han has run into his own
share of problems. "My grades for
my first course [MATH 200] were
not good at all; I just butchered
the final." He has also felt the
effects ofthe increased workload.
"My study habits aren't perfect,
so sometimes I fall behind and
I have to work extra hard. [This
happened] especially during the
winter season, when I had a lot
of university applications going
on and extracurriculars on top of
that."
Still, planting a foot on both
sides of graduation has proved
advantageous for Han.
"It doesn't make me any more
confident that I might get in [to
university], but at least I know that
I am prepared for the challenge." Xi
Know
somebody
interesting?
Do you have a brilliant prof or a fascinating friend at UBC? Send an email to
aerhardt@ubyssey.ca with some contact info and reasons why you think they
would be a good candidate to be profiled in The Ubyssey. // News
EDITORS JOVANAVRANIC +VERONIKA BONDARENKO
MONDAY, MARCH 2, 20
TRANSLINK »
AMS hopes to see students vote yes in transit referendum
Voting for the Metro Vancouver transit referendum will take place from March 16 to May 29.
Miguel A Rozo
Contributor
The AMS encourages students to
vote yes in the upcoming Metro
Vancouver transit referendum for
the Mayor's Council Plan.
The transit referendum, which
includes the construction ofthe
Broadway Line, increased light
rail services in Surrey and Lang-
ley and expanded bus routes,
would require residents of Metro
Vancouver to pay 0.5 per cent
more provincial sales tax.
According to Bahareh Jokar,
AMS VP External, the benefits
of this referendum far outweigh
the costs.
"There is quite a bit of gain
for students and very minimal
costs," said Jokar. "We estimate
that it is going to cost between
$30-50 a year depending on your
income bracket and spending
=ILE PHOTO GEOFF LISTER/THE UBYSSEY
habits, and really what you are
getting is tremendous amount of
service increase."
Jokar said that students will
benefit from a 25 percent bus
service increase, 400 new buses
across Metro Vancouver, and
increased night buses, among
other services. This also includes
a commitment to build an underground subway from VCC Clarke
to Arbutus, which would make
commuting to UBC easier for
students but would not take them
all the way to the university.
"Approximately 87 percent of
our undergraduate students are
commuters and 93 percent of our
graduate students are commuters," said Jokar. "Students that
live on campus also depend on
transit."
Jokar also said that the services are expected to decrease the
number of people on the roads,
even accommodating for the
expected growth ofthe city's
population within the next 25
years.
"It's a plan for a society that is
rapidly changing and growing,"
said Jokar.
Still, others have argued that
the increase in taxes would
not necessarily guarantee an
improvement in transit services.
Jokar said that although
challenges remain, the increased
collaboration between labour,
business and environmental
groups will ensure that the changes benefit the largest number of
people possible.
In the upcoming months,
the AMS will be encouraging
students to vote by helping those
who live in Metro Vancouver
register and hosting various sessions to talk about the benefits
ofthe referendum. Voting will
take place by mail-in ballot from
March 16 to May 29.
Any Canadian citizen over the
age of 18 who has been living in
Metro Vancouver for the last six
months is eligible to vote. Xi
TOOPE»
Former president Stephen Toope to receive honorary degree
Joshua Azizi
Senior StaffWriter
Former UBC President Stephen
Toope will receive an honorary
degree from UBC during the
Spring Congregation ceremonies
in late May.
Toope served as president of
UBC from 2008 to 2014, having
stepped down in order to pursue
careers related to international
law and international relations.
He now works as the director of
the University of Toronto's Munk
School of Global Affairs.
This announcement comes as
a part of UBC's annual honorary
degree program, which recognizes the achievements of individuals who have made outstanding
contributions to the growth and
well-being of local, national or
international society.
Toope's honorary degree
comes less than a year after he
resigned from his role as the
president of UBC. Since UBC
does not normally give honorary
degrees to current faculty members, his resignation has made
him considerably more eligible
for the award.
Toope attended Harvard University for his bachelor's degree
in English Literature and European History. He later received a
law degree from McGill University before eventually earning his
Ph.D from Cambridge University.
After graduation, Toope has
worked with various organizations focused on philanthropy
and international development
such as the Trudeau Foundation,
=ILE PHOTO GEOFF LISTERfTHE UBYSSEY
Stephen Toope will be walking across the Chan Centre stage for an honorary degree in May.
the United Nations, the Canadian
Human Rights Foundation and the
Canadian Department of Foreign
Affairs and International Trade.
He was also the youngest person to
serve as the Dean of Law at McGill
University from 1994 to 1999.
Through an honorary degree,
UBC will now be able to aptly
recognize Toope's accomplishments and contributions.
The Spring Congregation
ceremonies take place from May
20-22 and May 25-27.
Other honorary degree recipients include pioneer female
lawyer Constance Isherwood,
award-winning screenwriter
Hart Hanson, art dealer Uno
Langmann and Vancouver Folk
Music Festival co-founder Gary
Cristall.tH
AMS»
Former VP External candidate
Marjan Hatai withdraws from
race in AMS Elections
Joshua Azizi
Senior StaffWriter
UBC AMS Representative Marjan Hatai has withdrawn from
the VP External race in this
year's AMS Elections.
Hatai, who is a fourth-year
political science student, withdrew her candidature on February 25. She is still running for a
spot in the UBC Senate.
"Given the time commitment
and the responsibilities that come
with being a student senator, I
decided that it would be best for
the society for me to focus my
efforts in one place, and that my
work would be of most benefit as
a student senator than in the VP
External race," said Hatai.
With Hatai out ofthe race,
the two remaining candidates
are Associate VP External Jude
Crasta and Student Legal Fund
Society President Janzen Lee.
Hatai's announcement comes
after the withdrawal of many
other candidates from the AMS
Elections this week: Harsev
Oshan and Rohan Nuttal have
withdrawn from the Board of
Governors race, while Tanner
Bokor has withdrawn from the
Presidential race.
These withdrawals follow the
campaign blackout period, where
candidates were forbidden from
campaigning for a week after the
announcement ofthe candidates.
Hatai joined the AMS in her
third year, working on finance
commission and later as a referendum coordinator. She learned
a lot about the AMS in these
positions, and later became a
representative for the faculty of
Arts. She cites having all of her
referendum questions passed
last year as one of her greatest
accomplishments at the AMS.
"It was an incredible feeling
being in the Gallery and hearing
that they all passed — especially
the Whistler Lodge question,"
says Hatai.
Now that she is out ofthe VP
External race, Hatai intends to
focus her attention on campaigning for a Senate position. If elected,
she promises to work to develop
co-curricular transcripts and a
first semester reading break.
"I'm really excited to run forward with it," said Hatai.
The other Senate candidates
are Aaron Bailey, Anne Kessler,
Eric Zhao, Gurvir Sangha, Hannah
Xiao, Ian Sapollnik, Jenna Omassi,
Margareta Dovgal, Niloufar
Keshmiri and Viet Vu. Of these
candidates, five will be elected.
The voting period for the AMS
Elections begins March 9 and
ends March 13. Xi 4    I    NEWS    I    MONDAY, MARCH 2,2015
JOBS»
Adjunct professors and
sessional lecturers looking
to start conversations about
wages, job security
=ILE PHOTO CHERIHAN HASSUNfTHE UBYSSEY
Adjunct professors are hired on a contract and do not have a permanent position at the university.
Mateo Ospina
Senior StaffWriter
It is difficult to think of our professors struggling to make ends
meet, but due to the conditions
faced by sessional faculty, English
professor Sarika Bose keeps a
relief fund in her office in order to
help colleagues when they are unable to afford food for the month.
"There's a general state of fear. A
lot of people are very scared," said
Bose, who also serves as executive of
Contract Faculty in the Faculty Administration, regardingthe Adjunct
Teachers movement at UBC.
On February 25, Adjunct teachers across the United States and
Canada protested in a National
Walk- Out Day to protest low wages,
poor working conditions and a lack
of job security.
At UBC, which has over 600 sessional professors, Bose and the rest
ofthe Faculty of Adjunct Professors
decided not to walk out but instead
to promote discussion on the subject
by wearing blue and making an active effort to speak to students and
tenured faculty.
UBC Administration and the
Contract Faculty Association are
currently having discussions on how
to resolve these issues.
"We have goodwill on all sides,"
said Bose. "The administration is
committed to the principle of equity
and fairness for all. They are committed to what is best for students
which is what we all want."
While numerous adjunct
professors across the U.S. and
Canada have expressed dissatisfaction with the lower wages
and job instability facing adjunct
professors, others believe that
determination and collaboration
between both sides will yield
beneficial results. Sarah Parry has
worked in the Faculty of English as
a sessional lecturer for nine and a
half years.
Parry also hopes that UBC will
address the concerns in a way that
benefits everyone.
"I am hopeful that President
Gupta will consider this issue of
injustice and inequity and discern
the right ethical course for the
administration to adopt," said Parry.
"I am hopeful that UBC will show
leadership in this area."
Despite this hope, Parry still
deals with the same struggles relevant to many adjunct professors.
"I have a very modest lifestyle
and still have large student loans,"
said Parry, who works 12 months of
the year.
A major complaint from adjunct professors is the amount
of work expected of them with
little compensation.
"It is very difficult for contract
faculty to get a mortgage or support
their children through their own
first degrees unless they have partner who earns significantly more
than they do," said Parry.
Accordingto Bose, many adjunct
professors often have to make a
financial sacrifice in order to teach
and work in their field.
"People go into their careers
because of passion. People are
very committed to teaching and
research," said Bose. "People's
identities are bound to these kinds
of careers."
Bose also said that students will
face a loss by being taught by professors that are fearful of pushing
boundaries and losing their jobs.
"Professors are feeling an
insecurity," said Bose. "Without job
security your academic freedom is
affected negatively."
Bose believes that with that the
movement needs more popular
support campus wide from students
and tenured faculty. She encourages dialogue on campus and more
understanding for sessional faculty.
Though the current talks with
the administration are slow, Bose
believes they are a step in the right
direction.
"There's always room for
improvement but I think UBC has
done a lot of things right," said
Bose. Xi
AMS»
AMS President Tanner Bokor withdraws from race for re-election
Kelley Lin
Senior StaffWriter
AMS President Tanner Bokor has
withdrawn from the presidential
race in the upcoming elections.
Bokor has spent the past year
working on many different projects and is finishing up his last
weeks as the president tying up
loose ends with the new SUB, the
BuildAMS governance review and
AMS2030, a strategic plan he's
been creating since May.
"I think my year's been a lot
about building groundwork to
pass off to the next generation of
student execs," said Bokor. "[It]
was mostly spent in preparation
for the opening ofthe Nest and
also for the Centennial, so most of
the work that I was really focusing on this year was around long
term planning."
while Bokor had initially
hoped to serve as AMS president
for another year, he ultimately
decided that he would rather
step back and allow some new
faces to come to the forefront of
the society.
After serving as an AMS
executive for the past two years,
Bokor hopes to continue being involved with the AMS, but in a less
prominent role. He is currently
still in the running for positions
with the AMS Board of Governors, as well as the Student Legal
Fund Society.
"I think there's still a few areas
for me within the AMS where I
can still do some good and still
contribute back to UBC students, but in a smaller capacity,"
said Bokor.
He also hopes to refocus on
classes in the following school
year and get on track with finishing his degree.
"I've been at the AMS for
three years now and I absolutely
loved it, but I've put my studies
on hold for a majority ofthe time
while I've been here," said Bokor.
"Ultimately, I'm happy with what
I'm going to be able to pass off to
my successor after elections. I am
very excited to see what is in store
for the society heading into its
Centennial year, and wish all the
best to the candidates running in
the upcoming elections." Xi
The 2015 AMS Elections will be held Monday, March 9 through
Friday, March 13. Keep an eye out for our coverage ofthe races,
including candidate profiles, debate recaps and results.
THAN READY
EARN A DIPLOMA IN ONE YEAR
If you have previous post-secondary education, you may be able to earn
a BCIT diploma in one year. Check out our business diploma programs
and fast-track your career today.
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BCIT
50
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS II Culture I
JENICA MONTGOMERY
MONDAY, MARCH 2, 20
THEATRE»
ART»
Place vaniers musical production AMS Art Gallery honours UBC legends
of Rent aims to inspire
^HOTO COURTESY IVAN YASTREBOV
Rent is the latest in Vanier's series of annual productions.
Victoria Lansdowne
Contributor
Bisexuals, trisexuals, homo sapiens, carcinogens, hallucinogens,
men, Pee Wee Herman — this is
what you can expect from the
Place Vanier production ofthe
famed musical Rent.
"Music connects to us emotionally in a way words never can
and triggers different memories
and thoughts. [It] allows us to
make connections where we previously didn't see them, therefore
creating a new view on life," said
Ivan Yastrebov, director ofthe
Place Vanier production of Rent.
A rock musical that follows a
group of young artists through a
year of their life in East Village
New York in the mid-90's, Rent
shows the audience the beauty of
life through the honesty of death.
We see them deal with love, loss,
AIDS and life itself.
The original playwright,
Johnathan Larson, wrote Rent
with the intention to bring
musical theatre to the MTV
generations.
Although it is no longer the
mid-90's, this performance of
the musical intends to incapsu-
late the timelessness that the
musical embodies.
The characters search for
identity, belonging and love as
they share the toll AIDS takes
on one's life. Stephen Duncan,
who plays Mark and is also the
vocal coach, noted that music
guides them through the people
they meet, places they go and all
the highs and lows in between
— from the little celebrations to
overdoses.
"I think [the music] brings
about emotions in everyone in
a way that everyone can understand no matter what story
people have; music can connect
all people's stories together,"
said Duncan.
Yastrebov said the audience
can look forward to the performance for "No Day But Today." The
song is a message about living in
the moment, a perspective that
students can identify with.
"Don't take anything for granted because you don't know what's
going to come ... and there's much
more than that. Make sure you
come to the musical to learn it,"
said Yastrebov.
The musical committee will
also hold a silent auction during
intermission with all funds
raised being donated to the Crisis
Centre.
Rent will take place at 7:30 p.m.
on March 5-7 in the Place Vanier
Residence Ballroom. Tickets are
$8 and are available for purchase
within the Place Vanier Commons
Block. Xi
Write
Shoot
Edit
Code
Drink
COME BY THE UBYSSEY OFFICE
SUB 24, FOLLOW THE SIGNS
Lionel and Patricia Thomas played a large role in the development of UBC's fine arts program.
=HOTO CHERIHAN HASSUNfTHE UBYSSEY
Keagan Perlette
Contributor
This month, the AMS Art Gallery
is featuring a few works of visual
art by architect and painter Lionel
Thomas and designer and painter
Patricia Thomas.
The exhibition was put together with the help of two research
curators from the Collective for
Advanced and Unified Studies in
the Visual Arts (CAUSA), David
Bellman and Meirion Evans.
"[Lionel and Patricia] helped
create a new environment," said
Bellman. And in fact, their impact
is not limited to the historical
Vancouver cityscape.
L. Thomas was a professor of
architecture from 1950 to 1959 and
moved on to the department of
fine arts as an associate professor
until his retirement in 1981. Lionel
and his wife, Patricia worked
together murals in collaboration
with architects throughout the
city during their careers.
Featured in the exhibition at the
AMS Art Gallery are photographs
of some of these works including
the mural on the now demolished
former central branch ofthe Van
couver Public Library. However,
you can get a fuller sense ofthe
couple's mural work by checking
out the south wall of Brock Hall
Annex and the freshly restored
Pacific Rim mural that will be
featured in the new SUB.
The show itself is minimalistic,
showcasing almost entirely abstract works created by L. Thomas
and three works by P. Thomas.
P. Thomas' work lays mostly in
architecture and public space and,
accordingto Bellman, she was one
ofthe first colour consultants in
North America. This is reflected
in the pieces of hers presented in
the show.
Gallery volunteer Jasper
Wrinch noted that "Patricia
Thomas' [work] is more about
design than art," observing her
colour block work "Self Portrait"
(numbered one on the handout
which you can pick up at the front
desk).
In the summer of 1949 Lionel
studied with Mark Rothko in San
Francisco. The Rothko influence
is evident in the experimental
abstraction Lionel executes in the
piece "Untitled." His colour play
in "Plankton" and "Holecium and
Lurking Fish" are reflective ofthe
kind of colour Rothko presents in
his work.
The most interesting pieces in
the gallery might be the cloisonne
and copper panel "Centaur and the
Wolf" and "Aquarius (The Water
Bearer)" because they combine
what the research curators note as
L. Thomas' passion for astronomy,
as well as his inclination towards
abstraction with the ancient
technique of cloisonne. The latter
piece belongs to the AMS collection. Both are incredible works of
craftsmanship and invoke in the
viewer the sense ofthe possibility
of a more mystical modernity, one
in which we are still intimately
aware ofthe constellations above
us and our place in the universe.
This exhibition is an important first taste ofthe works ofthe
Thomases' and comes at a crucial
time where progress and transition is leaving the history of art
in Vancouver and on the UBC campus in the dust.
"The mural ["Pacific Rim"]
being moved is evidence of a great,
we hope, resurgence of interest in
a historical period of great importance," said Bellman. tJ
=HOTO CHERIHAN HASSUNfTHE UBYSSEY CULTURE    |    MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2015
VIDEO GAMES »
CJR held a conference to open dialogue about video games
Topics covered at the conference included gender and representation in video games.
Miguel Santa Maria
StaffWriter
Playing Mario Kart to avoid studying is a well-known student activity,
but video games aren't yet recognized by the academic community.
Press Start conference aimed to
change that.
Press Start, a conference on
Japanese gaming being held this
weekend by the UBC Centre for
Japanese Research (CJR) intended
to remedy the absence of video
games in academic discourse
through meaningful discussion by
both academics and members ofthe
industry alike.
With representatives from major
video game companies such as
Sega, Capcom and Bandai Namco
attending, plenty of topics were
presented. Topics include gender
issues within Japanese video games,
as well common traits they share
with other Japanese pop-culture
mediums.
Professor Sharalyn Orbaugh with
the department of asian studies and
the institute for gender, race, sexuality and social justice, is expected to
join the discussion panels at the conference. Though not a gamer herself,
Orbaugh admits that she has been
heavily interested in the gaming
industry since its rise, particularly
with its interactive aspects.
"I feel very strongly that when
people are reading [or watching
a movie] narrative that it actually
changes them, it changes the way
they think, the way they understand
the world," said Orbaugh.
"The interesting part about
gaming is that people are actually doing it themselves and so it's
much easier to imagine a connection between what they're doing in
a game and what happens in their
brain [and perhaps] change the
way in how they see the world."
This kind of interest from both
gamers and non-gamers alike was
one of the main reasons the project
came to fruition, particularly at
UBC.
"The idea for the conference
was [to] bring together parts of
=HOTO JASON DEVAUN/FLICKR
UBC that were normally not in
conversation with each other,
that was the basic motivation,"
said Christina Laffin, co-director
of the CJR and the project director for Press Start. "I thought
if we have a topic that brings
all these separate parts ofthe
university together [then] it will
be a much more interesting and
compelling conference ... it didn't
have to be gaming for that to
happen but it seemed both timely
and appropriate."
Accordingto Laffin, with
plenty of companies from Japan
branching out along West Coast
such as Capcom, and Sega, gaming itself has been a significant
inspiration for many students
with, regardless of major.
"Many of them would like to
work in the industry as writers,
editors, in helping development of
content," said Laffin. "They're not
necessarily programmers... but they
want to work in related fields."
More importantly, both organizers and panelists hope that the conference would help bring gaming to
academia as currently the medium
is still underestimated in that sense.
"They think it's a waste of time ...
and I don't think they understand
how complex and rich a lot of them
are," said Orbaugh, being reminded
ofthe same issue that plagued
anime and manga in terms of scholarly work. "It took us years to get
anime taken seriously as a subject
of study.... Still now it's harder for
people to get it seriously."
PhD candidate and project
coordinator Ben Whaley, an avid
gamer himself, shares the same
sentiment. "In Japan Studies, many
scholars focus on the importance
or expressive power of manga and
anime but few pay the same sort
of attention to video games. This
has always struck me as odd given
Japan's huge contribution to the
medium," Whaley said. "We need to
bring games into the classroom and
into academic conferences so we
can discuss all the myriad ways this
wonderful medium can teach."
In any event, Laffin and Whaley
hope that with this conference,
more companies and universities
can join discussions in the future.
"I think we also need 'think tanks'
or 'do tanks' like the Asian Pacific
Foundation to be also involved,"
said Laffin. "As a topic, it concerns
not just industry, not just scholars
or academics but also government
because that's a really crucial length
for the companies here."
"We [hope] to strengthen ties between the university and the many
game companies that make their
home in our province," said Whaley.
"B.C. is a major hub for video game
creation on the west coast and it's
high time we looked to forging
bonds with these industries." Xi
POETRY»
Strangers on a Train gives students and alumni the venue to share poetry
Tammy Hsieh
StaffWriter
Metaphorical fireworks explode
when writers, poets and artists get
together to share their ideas, and
Langara College's reading series
Strangers on a Train aims to help
create the spark.
The February 24 edition of
the series also included two UBC
alumni: Sheryda Warrener and
Laura Matwichuk. Warrener is the
author of Hard Feelings and has an
MFA in creative writing and Matwichuk was an art history major
who was the poetry finalist in the
2013 RBC Bronwen Wallace Award
for Emerging Writers.
With writers coming from diverse communities and of different
generations, Strangers on a Train
provides a chance for strangers
to gather and share their love of
poetry.
The event is organized by Heather Jessup and Thor Polukoshko,
instructors in Langara English
department.
"Langara has had reading
series for a while, but not really
active. We talked about getting
funding but we didn't get it. But
who cares if there is funding or
not? We just wanna do it, so let's
go with it," said Polukoshko.
To correspond to the venue,
The Railway Club, they named
the event Strangers on a Train,
which is also the name of Hitchcock's movie in 1951. In contrast
to the film, Strangers on a Train
introduces poetry in a relaxing
atmosphere.
The event doesn't require a
central theme but features a variety of writings and people from
different literary circles. This
time, two UBC alumni are invited to share their works for the
first time in the reading series.
"I love that they choose to
feature student readers rather
than more experienced writers to
read books.... The main point is
for them to read not for us," said
Warrener. With a stage for the
young writers to shine, the event
encourages them to continue
reading.
"We make sure that we feature
at least one Langara student
in every single event. And the
students probably have never
met a lot ofthe writers," said
Polukoshko. Students might have
the fortune to meet writers they
admire or even study in class.
UBC also holds a similar event
hosted by the creative writing
program.
The event, titled Outwrite, is
for undergraduates and Locution
for graduate students. But age
is not a limitation, everyone is
welcome.
"Try to find your voice by
writing what's closest to you
possible. Be yourselves in your
writing. And you have to read,
read, read," said Warrener.
"You just have to work at it.
Make it part of your daily life.
Read. Read a lot," said Matwichuk. Xi
ILLUSTRATIONJULIANYUfTHE UBYSSEY
Strangers on a Train is a monthly poetry reading at the Railway Club.
Outwrite and Locution are similar
events hosted by the creative writing
department. These events give students the opportunity to have their
works heard by their peers.
Ghost Town Open Mic nights
are held once a month and are
events. This event is hosted on
Main Street at the Angst Gallery.
be featured at Vancouver Poetry
Slam. This event will take place
trance is $6-$10. II Opinions
SPORTS »
Why don't people come to
UBC sports games?
JACK HAUEN
Op-ed
There was an article in the Province recently by Howard Tsumura
in which he spoke to a couple
members ofthe 1970-71 UBC
men's ice hockey team — the last
team to compete in a home playoff
series until the 44-year dry spell
was broken just last month.
In it, the players speak of fond
memories of playing in front of
sold-out crowds. Former right
winger Doug Buchanan said it
was "the golden age of (UBC)
hockey." Wesbrook, accordingto
Buchanan, was lined up and down
the street with people just wanting to watch the Thunderbirds
play a game.
How much of this is rose-coloured reminiscence is up for
debate, but one would assume
that Buchanan, now a successful
lawyer, doesn't have much reason
to lie. And if that was the case,
what happened? Why do a paltry
200-300 people show up to T-Bird
home games? It's not cost of entry,
since a ticket is $2 for a student, or
$20 for every home game in every
sport, all season. It's not location,
since every stadium is on campus.
It might be because our teams
that play the more stereotypically
popular sports (football, men's
hockey) aren't exactly dominant,
but the men's hockey team made
the playoffs, and even opened the
postseason at home this year.
What we do know is that students will show up when games
are marketed properly. AMS
Events, in conjunction with The
Calendar, put on a stellar evening
for the Winter Classic game,
shattering attendance records
with 3,049 butts in seats. When
there's a Facebook event with
nice graphics, a catchy title and
some manipulation ofthe sports
fan within everyone (admit it,
you loved getting day drunk and
belligerent at Homecoming),
we'll come out to cheer on our
teams. Even though the 'Birds
blew a three goal lead and lost in
double overtime at the Classic,
you'd be hard pressed to find a
single attendee who didn't have
a blast.
We also know that if nobody
does anything, or if the marketing is left up to UBC Athletics,
it's a different story. A nonexistent story. How many of you
visit gothunderbirds.ca, or pay
attention to Facebook events put
on by them? 2,200 people like
their Facebook page (compare
that to The Calendar's almost
13,000), and a good deal of those
are alumni. It serves its purpose,
if that purpose is to inform those
who are already interested in
UBC varsity sports about upcoming UBC varsity sports games.
But in terms of garnering new interest, they have a long way to go
before they're attracting anyone
new into a stadium.
So how can we solve the problem? It looks like Athletics isn't
going to put in the effort to make
their product more enticing, or
update their Facebook model of
posting updates and previews
of varsity games (a handy thing
to have for the Sports and Rec
Editor of a student newspaper,
but not very enticing to the casual fan).
So it falls on the shoulders of
the AMS Events team, and their
successful partnerships with The
Calendar.
Obviously a Winter Classic
isn't feasible for every game, but
a few more special events over
the course of next season might
be enough to start getting students interested in coming out to
games again. At least, it's worth
a shot.
Jack Hauen is a second-year prospective English major and Sports
£t J?ec Editor at The Ubyssey. Xi
DIVESTMENT »
The wolf in sheep's clothing: how BDS harms Israel,
Palestinians and peace
ARIELA KARMEL
Letter
At the upcoming AMS meeting,
UBC's Solidarity For Palestinian
Human Rights group intend to put
forward a motion to boycott and
divest from Israeli companies as
part ofthe global Boycott Divestment and Sanctions movement.
While this is an inherently
discriminatory motion from an
intellectually bankrupt and morally obtuse movement, more than
anything, it is dishonest. BDS
poses as a human rights organization, a pro-Palestine movement,
but if aiding the Palestinians is
their true goal, then they have
been a complete and utter failure.
For a pro-Palestine movement
they seem to be quite uninterested in aiding the Palestinian
people in any meaningful way.
They could help the Palestinians improve their lives, develop
their economies, democratic institutions, universities, facilitate
state building or promote peaceful relations with their neighbours. Truly, there is no shortage
of productive things that those
who promote BDS while claiming to uphold Palestinian rights
could actually be doing. They
do none of these things, and one
must wonder why.
Instead, the BDS movement
is obsessively devoted to the
demonization of Israel. Boycotting Israeli products does not
help the Palestinians' quality of life or achieve a state of
their own. Instead, it increases
division between Israelis and
Palestinians and exacerbates the
conflict. Peace is necessary in
order for a Palestinian state to
be achieved — one cannot exist
without the other. It is clear
that if you are truly interested
in helping the Palestinians or
promoting peace then this is the
least effective means to do so.
BDS succeeds in accomplishing exactly two things: shutting
down dialogue and fostering
a culture of marginalization.
Universities should encourage vibrant dialogue, including and especially over views on which we
disagree. A boycott is antithetical to dialogue and those who
support it seek to censor speech
that is unfavourable to them, the
last bastion of the bully when
logical argument evades them.
But, conflict can only be ended
through dialogue and by promoting a culture of inclusivity, not by
demonizing one group.
No one in the UBC community should be made to feel
unwelcome due to race, religion, ethnicity, nationality, sex,
gender or sexual orientation.
The sole purpose of a boycott
is to marginalize people of one
country — Israel. A boycott
sends a clear message to Israeli
and Jewish students that they are
unwelcome on their own campus,
and truly all those who favour
open dialogue.
It is incredibly tempting to
reduce this deeply complex and
emotionally triggering conflict
to a victim-aggressor binary. And
while a blanket condemnation of
one group may be easy and emotionally satisfying to some, it is
dishonest, intellectually lazy and
unworthy ofthe principles of this
institution. More than anything,
it does a great disservice to all
those who are actually affected
by this conflict.
To those who support peace,
coexistence and the rights of humans in equal measure, I assert
that a BDS motion has no place at
UBC. We must fervently oppose
efforts to boycott any people,
country or perspective and not
permit purely divisive forces to
hijack our campus.
Ariela Karmel is a second-year
political science student. Xi
AMS ELECTIONS »
State of the student society
AARON BAILEY
Letter
The AMS, in its current form,
is out of touch with the demographic it exists to serve. Although it succeeds in providing
services and opportunities to
students, apathy towards our
student society has never been
more prominent.
From my experience as a
student politician, I know how
easy it is to collect titles, produce
reports, cast votes, and to continue telling yourself that your
peers share the purpose you find
in student government. However,
through countless conversations
over the past four years, I've
come to understand that the
average individual sees the AMS
much differently than its "insiders" do. From within the AMS, I
see an organization that supports hundreds of campus clubs,
while others see bureaucratic
communication and frustrating
financial policies. When I look
ahead to the possibilities of how
a new Student Union Building
can connect communities, what
are really visible are continual
delays and perceived mismanagement of funds. When I see hours
of hard work being poured into
AMS services, businesses and
events, most people struggle to
even identify who is behind it all.
For me, the question of
engagement is a systemic one
that revolves around a central
tenet: as students, we actively
seek memorable, positive, and
fun experiences during our time
at university. For the AMS to be
recognized as a source of that, we
need a cultural paradigm shift
away from self-serving pompous-
ness to an organizational attitude
that better reflects the awesome
community we serve.
A president has three unique
opportunities to be the catalyst
for such a change in the AMS:
The president is responsible
for setting the tone within the
team. The attitude with which
they approach developing the
dynamic that guides the work
of those around them directly correlates to how well the
organization operates. Over the
past few years, this tone has been
overshadowed by a sense of inane
seriousness. Each decision made
is the most important ever, with
no room for humour, positive
discourse, or fun. Therefore,
the president needs to build a
team dynamic that is outwardly
focused and emphasizes the student within student politics.
Next, the president is the
spokesperson for the entire student body, and is responsible for
representing the views of many
during stakeholder conversations. Because of this responsibility, it is imperative for a president
to set aside their personal beliefs
to most genuinely represent the
opinion ofthe students. Although
the AMS presidential office has
made strides to be available
when necessary, the fortitude
and authenticity of these efforts
has been lacklustre in recent
months. With regards to the
recent fee increase proposals
from the university — arguably
the most visible and important
issue that affected students this
past year — the AMS' lobbying
lacked passion when it was needed most. Even when provided
with a clear democratic basis for
strong advocacy from the historic
Annual General Meeting, the
response from the AMS executive was slow and ineffective
on the pretence that they feared
risking diplomatic relations with
UBC central. Unfortunately, the
AMS failed to demonstrate any
real desire to fight on behalf of
students — a responsibility that
falls at the feet ofthe president.
Therefore, the president's office
needs to show genuine passion
regarding issues that affect the
constituents of the AMS, both in
public and behind closed doors.
Lastly, and most importantly, it
is the president's job to dream big.
From their position, they have a
view ofthe entire Society's operations, making them the ideal person to guide its future direction.
The AMS is uniquely structured to
create imaginative opportunities
for our members. Initiatives like
lobbying for free access to the UBC
Aquatic Centre or building a new
Student Union Building exemplify
the AMS' history of doing amazing
things for this campus. Recently
however, the focus has been on
keeping the machine oiled in order
to stay afloat, lacking any meaningful risk-taking. For the AMS
to truly reignite engagement, the
president needs to be willing to
take chances, make mistakes, and
get messy.
With elections upcoming in
March, I urge you to read into the
issues, think deeply about what
you look for in your student government, and vote at ams.ubc.ca/
elections.
Aaron Bailey is a student senator
and a presidential candidate in the
upcoming AMS election. Xi ?/'* iiWmli
Mason Mcintosh
Sj#ffWriter
ft iwgfcmuch tighter than the
(inaffcore on Friday night, but
UBC Thunderbirds came out
torious over the University of
Regina Cougars on the last day of
jEeljruarywith a 68-63 win.
Fi*iditfrnight was a walk in the
the 'Birds, who came out
tfrd aHl handily disposed ofthe
ouglirs 7i59. The effort was
ed by ftaflene Sidhu who had a
game-high 23 points.
' ^Saturday night in the War
Memorial Gym saw a sleepy UBC
te,am in the first half as Regina
jumped out to a 21-4 lead by
draining ninaiof their first 10
shots thanks to some stellar work
from jfclischjik, Kajati, Coppola
and Kot.
The home team wasn't about to
be embarrassed on home court,
however, as they promptly went
tin a 11-2 surge to get themselves
back in the game. They followed
that up with a 15-2 run to get
back where they belong: in front.
T-Birds Kara Spotton, Cassandra
Knievel and — surprise, surprise — Harleen Sidhu were the
main contributors to the magical
second quarter, which ended 32-
30 in favour of UBC.
They continued that energy
for the third quarter, giving up 11
and scoring 21, enough to carry
them through the rest of the
game and Regina's fourth quarter
push that saw them score 22 in
-a desperate effort to claw back
into the game. The Thunderbirds
ere able to strap down on D
and get the buckets when they
needed them. Five points ended
being enough of a difference
Ld the Cougars' season, and
Birds walked away with
win.
Sidhu capped off an extraordinary weekend with 21 points
and eight rebounds. She was an
■Ssial in the paint and took the
game in her hands when UBC
needed their talented leader.
Right behind her was the impressive Kris Young who finished
Saturday night with 11 points and
seven boards in her 38 minutes
on the floor.
Regina's starters had a strong
final game, highlighted by
Kajati's 16 points and an outstanding 10 rebounds in just 28
minutes on the floor. Also, all
starters reached double digits,
despite the heartbreaking loss.
We spoke with Young after the game about how it felt
knowing that her time as a
Thunderbird was coming to a
close, and her expectations for
her last playoffs as a T-Bird. "I
have had an amazing career at
UBC. Of course I would like to
add a national championship to
the list before I head out, but no
matter what happens I have had
an unforgettable five years as a
Thunderbird," said Young before
celebrating the series win.
The women's squad now heads
to their next challenge: hosting
the Canada West Final Four. The
'Birds will play the University of
Alberta Pandas on Friday at 6:00
p.m. at War Memorial Gym. The
teams split the two games they
played this regular season, UBC
dropping the first one by a score
of 63-71 but storming back the
next night to take it 73-66. The
Pandas finished in third place in
the Pioneer Division with a regular season record of 16-4. They're
coming into the Final Four hot,
as they decisively swept the
MacEwan Griffins in their home
quarterfinal series by scores of
87-58 and 67-46.
The other matchup will feature the universities of Victoria
and Saskatchewan squaring off.
The winner of that will face
the winner ofthe Alberta/UBC
game to decide who's heading to
Quebec City for the CIS finals.
-With files from Jack Hauen Xi
75-59 y^f
68-63 y^f *?.
Jacob Gershkovich
Senior StaffWriter
Onto the Canada West Final Four
it is for the UBC men's basketball
team. The 'Birds swiftly handed the
visiting UNBC Timberwolves their
return tickets home after sweeping a best-of-three series this past
Thursday and Friday.
Emotions were expectedly
running high to begin Thursday's
playoff game. Looking excitedly tense, both teams began the
game by throwing errant passes,
committing unnecessary fouls and
performing a wide array of other
birdbrain errors.
One UBC player seemed
unaffected by the heightened importance ofthe match — who else,
but Tommy Nixon. Nixon, whose
regular season success landed him
a spot on Canada West's First All-
Star team, put up 12 first quarter
points and finished the half with 16.
In spite of their size, and the
unrelenting chirps dished out by
members ofthe UBC football team
who happened to be in attendance,
the Timberwolves put up a fight.
Going into the half, UBC led 45-38.
Four of UBC's players finished
in double figures in the scoring
department, the high-point man
being Nixon with a game-high 23.
UNBC rallied late, but the scoreboard exaggerates how close this
game really was. The 'Birds won
g_ame one, 83-77.
UBC's head coach, Kevin Hanson, spoke of his plans for game
two. "I didn't think we defended
the dribble penetration very well,
so we'll make a few defensive
adjustments. I thought they scored
a lot in transition. You just can't let
teams out-hustle you, and I thought
tonight they did a really good job of
that. It's a best-of-three series, and
you really want to win in two and
get that extra day's rest."
Not the least intimidated by UN-
BC's late game push, UBC resumed
hacking down the Timberwolves'
,an, tr
tMfh
aifffir
Lefftyl
defence with alacrity in the sec	
game. Connor Morgan, tlw6'9 Vifc
toria native, scored ttai first i '
points for UBC as%i<T
jumped ahead t» an e|
after one.
The thick-skinned TimB
wolves looked helpless. Shooting
a lacklustre 33.3%>er cent frgathe
1 field in the first half, UNB(Ms     . >
simply lost. And with the prospect of prolonging their^ason _     .
dwindling, their body language
communicated defeat. ^»
Morgan added to the growing
pit in their stomachs after emphatically throwing clown a monstrous   "
one-handed dunk before the appreciative football team, who, fuelled
by liquor and pizza and shirtless
with their bodies painted blue and
white, returned to Friday's game to
further harass the Timberwolves.
Hanson expressed his gratitude
for the lively hometown crowd.
"It was a great crowd tonight. In
basketball it's about a'10-15 point
advantage when you do have that
home crowd. The football guys, it
was great to have them out here.
We love to have these crowds out to
support us, and it's something we're
going to look to build on next year
when we host the nationals."
UNBC flared on the scoreboard
in the third quarter, the effort
akin to the embers of a dying fire.
When the clock ran out at the War
Memorial Gym, the score read 88-
78 for UBC.
UBC has beat the odds to get
to where they presently are. /
After a 1-5 start to their season, critics were beginning to
doubt how relevant they'd be
come March.
"I'm just very proud of these
guys. They've accepted their
roles. Our game plan was know
your job, do your job, and I
thought our guys really did that
well tonight and throughout the
season. We're thrilled to be going
to the Final Four; and we're going
to give it our best." tJ
'C
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END
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Jenny Tang
Staff Writer
After earning a week off before
opening the playoff season, the
UBC women's hockey team split
Friday and Saturday's playoff
series against the University of
Manitoba Bisons.
In a thrilling first night,
the 'Birds came out flying and
scored one goal on the powerplay, and killed off all six power
play opportunities — including a
four-minute double minor — the
Bisons had in a 2-1 victory.
UBC's first goal came eight
minutes into the first period
from Tatiana Rafter, after teammate Nicole Saxvik flew off the
bench and weaved her way up
and around the goal before feeding it to Stephanie Schaupmeyer
and Sarah Casorso, who then
sent it for Rafter to bang home.
The 'Birds kept their lead in
the second period, extending it
just 26 seconds in after a shot
from Kelly Murray sailed past
Bison goalie Rachel Dyck to make
the score 2-0.
Despite many opportunities
afterwards, the 'Birds were unable
to capitalize while Bison captain
Maggie Litchfield-Medd managed
to beat Danielle Dube with only
one minute of play left. Luckily,
the Thunderbirds were able to
hang on for the one-goal win.
"It was too bad for Dubes,
she had a great game and played
really well," said coach Graham
Thomas on the non-shutout. "But
it's a chance to get that playoff
experience and how to defend that
minute-to-go kind of rush.
"It's a classic playoff game.
The teams battled hard, they're
going to go all the way from start
to finish. We've got to have that
same mentality, we've got to have
a game plan, be ready to execute
and just play our best tomorrow."
Unfortunately, this wasn't«   /
enough on Saturday night. The''
Bisons opened the scoring in
the second period after a double
minor from Tatiana Rafter put
Manitoba on the powerplay.
But UBC managed to tie it up^
just three minutes later. Kelly
Murray was able to fire a shot
from Sarah Casorso past Dyck's
shoulder to even things out.
Despite many opportunities, the 'Birds were unable to
capitalize, and the score remained 1-1 after the end ofthe
third period, which meant that
the game would go into sudden-death overtime.
Both teams were hungry for
the victory; UBC was determined
to put this weekend away and
move on to the finals against the
University of Alberta Pandas,
and the Bisons were desperate to
hang on to fight another battle
on Sunday.
Manitoba's Alexandra Anderson
determined the winner ofthe game.
17 minutes into the second round
of overtime, she managed to wire
the puck past Samantha Langford
in a dramatic finish to the match.
The teams are now tied 1-1 in the
series, which will be determined by
Sunday's game.
"It was a really tough one, we had
so much hope. I honestly thought
we would have a better fate," said
Thomas. "Our girls just have to keep
their heads up, not get down and
just get focused and ready to go."
Of course, the Canada West
conference is extremely competi-
K**
tive.
UBC
did well
in the
regular
season ,
standings,
placing
second and
earning the bye-
week. However
Manitoba were not
far behind, and the
'Birds knew that they
would be a tough team to
contend with.
"It was to be expected in
this kind of playoffs and t6 play'
through we've got to be resilient.
I'm really confident that we'll
pull through'," said Thomas.
The winner of Sunday's game
will move on to the finals, where
they will face off against the
University ofAlberta Pandas
in Edmonton next weekend.
The 'Birds are determined to
reach their end goal of Nation
als, and to bring home some
company to their Canada West
2012-13 banner hanging in
Thunderbird Arena.
>*^>
*r\
\    -r
A
1   •
As of press time,
'the Thunderbirds are
just about to face off against
the Bisons in the final game of
the series. Get the full recap
at ubyssey.ca to find out who's
moving on to the Canada West
Conference Final. Xi
/ 1:
<s>
ELI
MIN
ATED
^=r
L'#5S?S     V
\^4
\j
/
*rfl
\
\
final
/«
Jack Hauen
Sports and Rec Editor
A gutsy three-game quarterfinal
win followed by a two-game
lowe
ousting at
the hands ofthe
University of Alberta
Golden bears. Sound familiar?
That might be because it's the
same situation the Thunderbirds
found themselves in last year.
The quarterfinal teams were
different (Saskatchewan last
year, Manitoba this time), but the
V
derail
schematic is
eerily
similar. The
Bears are becoming to the
'Birds what the
Blackhawks were
to the Canucks in
'09and'i0.
After what looked
like a convincing series
victory over the Bisons in
t.V quarterfinal, the 'Birds
were i^ing high. They were
getting ralfensive input from
their top gvr^s with help from the
depth (11 goamin three games
is nothing to sneeze at), their
defence was solid and goalie
Eric Williams wa\playing with
more confidence tJten he had
ever shown at any pOyit this year,
allowing just one goa^^two of
the three matches.     ^B»
Leave it to the best team in
the league to send them cjjyihing
back to earth.
lm m
cmshi
Alberta took the first game^j^^^^ackffl
a score of 3-1, holding UBC to 21
shots in the game and scoring a
pair of third period goals to get
past the visitors. One of those,
it should be mentioned, was
into an empty net, so the game
was even closer than the score
would suggest (mostly due to
another stellar performance from
Williams, who stopped 34 ofthe
36 shots fired at him). Jordan
Hickmott tallied the lone marker
for UBC — the 'Birds would need
more offence if they were to even
things up in the next game.
They'd get it. And who else but
Cole Wilson and Anthony Bardaro
to give the T-Birds a 2-0 lead. A
lucky bounce off Wilson got the
team off to a good start 2:15 into the
game, and a wicked slot shot from
Bardaro gave the Bears something
to worry about. Alberta's Jamie
Crook pounced on a loose puck to *
respond with just eight seconds
left in the period, but the visiting
team had to feel good about a lead
heading into the intermission.
Some hard-nosed play led to
Luke Lockhart's 3-1 rebound goal
about halfway through the game.
It would take 20 minutes for the
Golden Bears to respond, but at
11:10 ofthe third period, Jordan
Rowley scored on a powerplay
one-timer to pull his team within
one. This goal would spell the end
ofthe game for Williams, who until
this point had done everything he
could to keep the 'Birds in front,
as he was injured on the play. Matt
Hewitt, who hadn't played since
January 29, came in relief.
Five minutes later, the Bears
caught up, courtesy Levko Koper.
Then, with 33 seconds left, the winning goal came as Kruise Reddick
put a one-^aer through Hewitt.
The Thu^ rbird goalie would
head to the iench for the extra
JrmTe final seconds, and
Lockhart and Fleming had multiple
chances in tight, but Golden Bear
goaltender Luke Siemens held fast
to give his team the win.
Giving up three, third-period
goals to lose by one is a heartbreaking way to go, but credit the T-Birds
for never giving up against the best
team in the league. This series was
much closer than last year's (5-1,6-2
losses), and the team played with
serious heart facing slim odds. It's
easy to get caught up in 'what ifs'
after a close playoff loss, but one
can't help but wonder what the outcome could've been had Williams
not been taken out ofthe game,
especially considering the way he'd
been playing.
Either way, this season has
been one of impressive growth
for the Thunderbirds, as they
finished fourth overall in the
Canada West conference to earn
themselves a home playoff date
for the first time since 1971.
Their regular season improved
under new head coach and longtime Thunderbird Tyler Kuntz,
and some new additions, most
notably Eric Williams, the first-
year who will surely be their
starting goaltender for the foreseeable future and Manraj Hayer,
the speedy winger who seems
to have found a home on the top
line with Wilson and Bardaro —
helped them along the way.
Only forward Nate Fleming
and captain D-man Ben Schmidt
are in their final year of eligibility — no doubt two big pieces
of this team, but in terms of
quantity lost, the T-Birds are in
good shape. And with the new
additions looking comfortable in
blue and gold, the future is looking bright. If you'll indulge the
Canucks-Blackhawks metaphor,
we're due for a dramatic finish
next March. Xi 12    |    GAMES    |    MONDAY, MARCH 2,2015
lidterms make heads explode
PHOTO TIMOTHY HOGGAN/THE UBYSSEY
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S0URTESYBESTCR0SSW0RDS.COM
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= EB26 ANSWERS
30-Sawbuck
ACROSS
31-Toy racer
33-Dallas player, briefly
1-Some mattresses
34- Paris possessive
7- Hawaiian food
37- Pro
10-Crime boss
38- "Rope-a-dope" boxer
14-Author Leonard
39-Bass, e.g.
15- Delivery room docs
40- Legal science
16- In a frenzy
41-RR stop
17-Showy pretense
42-Actor Beatty
18-Meadow
43- Graceful roundness
19-Granny
45-Male sheep
20-Capital of Utah
46-Suffix with ball
23- Does a Daffy Duck impression
47-Cornerstone abbr.
26-That's gotta hurt!
48-Oohedand
27-Ways to the pins
51-To's partner
28-About
52-... who lived in
29-Hindu title
53-Readiness
56-Sea eagle
57-Holiday start
58- Deceives
62- avis
63- Rosenkavalier
64-To bargain
65-Interview-wear
66-Grads-to-be
67-Main course
DOWN
1-A collection of articles
2-Biblical high priest
3- LBJ's successor
4- Drunkard
5- Bailiwicks
COURTESY KRAZYDAD.COM
6- Exchange for money
35-Keep an the ground
7-Hoi	
36-Celsius, for one
8- Belief involving sorcery
44-Final course
9- Writer Dinesen
45-Say again
10- High-kicking dance
46-Commands
11-At full speed
48-Copycats
12- Florence's Vecchio
49- Chilean pianist Claudio
13-Green-lights
50-Artist Matisse
21-Oppressively hot
51-Abnormal body temperature
22-Cricket team
52- Continental identity of a Chi
23-Wears well
nese person
24-Atoll unit
54-Cincinnati club
25-Mouthlike opening
55- Dresden's river
29- "The Crucible" setting
59-Orch. section
30-Claw
60- Driving peg
32-Alberta's home
61-Source of iron
33- Dark brownish red color
34- Partly melted snow

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