UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Nov 20, 2014

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0126800.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0126800.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0126800-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0126800-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0126800-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0126800-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0126800-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0126800-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0126800-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0126800.ris

Full Text

Array  // Page 2
uranium
nsa
tutwi
THURSDAY'20
TRANSGENDER DAY OF REMEMBRANCE
11:00 A.M.-6:00 P.M. @THE SUB
SASC and Pride UBC are teaming up to host commemoration events on
Thursday. Events are taking place throughout the SUB, and include a
candlelight vigil and memorial, and workshops. Free
THURSDAY / 20
%!»&$<'<
#•.#
p^iuj h, °«saj8J5j) |gvB
WINTERFEST
5:30 - 8:00 P.M. @ KOERNER PLAZA
Winterfest at UBC is continuing with this evening event. Enjoy more crafts,
music from the Blank Vinyl Project, Luke Wallace and beatboxers, and food
from Sprouts and Agora Eats. Free
FRIDAY ' 21
0>'
psychic
© Llipz'@
•1HES1LEND/IR
mdi=z
^m    «n
rs F^Biii!
DIGITAL ZOO DANCE PARTY
9:00 P.M. -2:00 A.M. @ HARBOUR EVENT CENTRE
In whatThe Calendar claims is going to be their biggest dance party ever,
there will be no shortage of colourful costumes and great music by DJs like
Psychic Type and Moiez. Tickets $15 pre-sale; 19+
ON
THE
COVER
We brought out the backdrop and
played around with four flashes
before we managed to get this
shot. Photo -Cherihan Hassun
Want to see your events listed here?
Email your events listings to
ourcampus@ubyssey.ca.
4^
^^*f^  ¥ ■ < -v t  ■  «
UBYSSE
\JTHE
Y
■*-                                 NOVEMBER20.2014 | VOLUMEXCVI | ISSUEXXIV
EDITORIAL
STAFF
BUSINESS
CONTACT
Coordinating Editor
Copy Editor
Matalie Scadden. a Pentland,
Business Manager
Editorial Office: SUB 24
Will McDonald
Ciaran Dougherty
FerniePereira
604.822.2301
coord i n ati n g @ u byss ey.cs
Design Editor
:opy@ubyssey.cs
Distribution Coordinator
Soren Elsay, Olamide Olaniyan,
_awrenceNeal Garcia,Taric
Vira, Kelley Lin, Jenny Tang,
_eoSoh, Mateo Ospina, Ll
fpereira@ubyssey.es
Ad Sales
Business Office: SUB 23
ADVERTISING 604.822.1654
Nick Adams
Lily Cai
Geoff Lister
nquiries604.S22.66S1
pri nted i tor@ ubys sey.cs
cai@ubyssey.cs
Zhang, Brock Newman, Koby
Michaels, Jasmine Cheng,
3dvertising@ubyssey.es
Student Union Building
Web Developer
Illustrator
Vliguel Santa Maris
Accounts
613S SUB Boulevard
Peter Siemens
Julian Yu
Thea Simpson
Vancouver, BCV6T1Z1
web@ubyssey.cs
julianyu@ubyssey.cs
3ccounts@ubyssey.es
Online: ubyssey.ca
News Editors
Twitter: ©ubyssey
JovanaVranic +
Veronika Bondarenko
LEGAL
news@ubyssey.cs
The Ubyssey is the officia
cannot te reproduced without
and clarity. All letters must te
student newspaper of theUniver-
the expressed, written permls
•ecei ved by 12 neon the day be
Culture Editor
sity of British Columbia. It Is pub-
sion of The Ubyssey Publica
fore Intended publication. Let
Jenica Montgomery
ished every Morday and Thurs
tions Society
ters received after this point
culture@ubyssey.cs
day by The U by ssey Publications
The Ubyssey Isa founding
will te published In the follow
Society. We aie an autonomous.
member of Canadian Universi
ing Issueunlesstherelsan ur
Sports* Rec Editor
derrcciatlcallyrun student crga-
ty Press(CUP)andadherestc
gent time restriction or other
JackHauen
nlzation.andallstudentsaieen-
CUPs guiding principles
matter deemed relevant by
sports@ubyssey.es
odu raged to part lei pate
_etters to the editor must
the Ubyssey staff.
Editorials are chosen anc
De under 300 words. Please
t Isagreed byall persons
Video Producer
Mitten by theUb/sse/ staff They
nclude your phone number.
Dlaclng display or classified ad
TimHoggan
are the expressed opinbn ofthe
student number and signa
vertising that If theUbyssey Pub-
video@ubyssey.cs
staff,and do not necessarily re
ture (not for publication) as
I cat ions Scclety falls to publish
flect the views of The Ubyssey
vvell as your year and faculty
anadvertlsementcrifanerrorln
Photo Editor
Publications Scclety or the Uni
with all submissions. ID will te
the ad cccurs the liability ofthe
Cherihan Hassun
versity of British Columbia. AI
checked when submissions are
JPS wil not tegreater than the
photo® ubyssey.c;
Editorial content appearing Ir
drepped effatt heed Iter el cfflce
Drlce paid for the ad. The UPS
The Ubyssey Is the property of
of The Ubyssey other wise ver-
shall rot te responsible for dlght
Opinions + Blog Editor
The U by ssey Ru b cation sSccety
flcation will te done by phone
changes or ty peg ra phlca I er rors
Stories, opinions, photographs
The Ubyssey reservesthe right
that do not lessen the value or
and artwork contained herein
to edit submissions for length
the Impact of the ad.
:@ubyssey.ca
OUR CAMPUS //
ONEONONE1
OPLE AND BUILDINGSTHAT MAKE UBC
=HOTO CHERIHAN HASSUN/THE UBYSSEY
As director of campus security, Barry Eccleton strives to ensure that everyone feels safe at UBC.
Barry Eccleton is the man in charge of keeping campus safe
Kari Lindberg
Contributor
Security is a significant part
of life at UBC. Students learn
about it, in various forms —
from political science students
studying international security
to civil engineers learning how
to build safe structures. For its
part, the UBC campus, from
residence to lecture halls, has
its security maintained by its
own dedicated team.
Director of Campus Security
Barry Eccleton describes the
role of UBC security staff as
"providing security services
to the campus community, but
— equally important — we see
ourselves as being ambassadors
to the community and helping
people out."
Eccleton is involved with
various endeavours outside of
his job at UBC — such as the
Special Olympics, in which his
son Jeff is an athlete.
Our top priority is
that we want people
to feel safe on campus.
We very much want
to be visible to the
community the
students, staff and
employees."
Barry Eccleton
Director of UBC Campus Security
Eccleton served in various
management positions prior to
coming to UBC, and feels that
his experience has transferred
over quite well to directing the
100-person organization that is
UBC Campus Security.
Campus Security's main job
is to make sure that people feel
safe at UBC. Patrolling in 12
hours shifts, there are some
places that are have permanent
patrols, and others that are patrolled on a rotating basis.
"We do lots of different
things. Lots of time is spent
responding to alarms and also
to provide access to people
who have forgotten or locked
themselves out of their rooms.
We provide support to the Safe
Walk program, which runs from
7:00 p.m. to 1:00 a.m.. Our guys
will provide transport [vehicles]," said Eccleton. "If there is
overflow of Safe Walk callers,
then we'll help take over. We
provide important services to
the community, such as jump-
starting people's cars, and we
also have a 24 hour hotline service that anyone can call if they
have concerns or questions."
It was kind of baptism
by fire.... I had been
in the position a very
short time and had to
deal with it — but it
was okay We got very
good support."
Barry Eccleton
Their main modes of transportation are bikes, vehicles and
walking, though emphasis is
being increasingly shifted to the
use of bikes — partially due to the
visibility and accessibility of staff
compared to other transportation
methods.
"Our top priority is that we want
people to feel safe on campus. We
very much want to be visible to
the community, the students, staff
and employees. That's why a huge
emphasis for us now [is] community outreach and that's what we're
doing through crime prevention
week," Eccleton said.
Eccleton started in his role
at UBC two years ago, and the
string of sexual assaults in 2013
came relatively early in his career at the university.
"It was kind of baptism by
fire.... I had been in the position
a very short time and had to
deal with it — but it was okay.
We got very good support. The
media took a great interest in
it as well.... As much as these
incidents were awful, there was
a silver lining in that it forced us
as an institution to take a long
hard look at how we deal with
security and safety," Eccleton
said.
Eccleton highlighted the need
for the public to understand that
with a campus of UBC's size, it
is hard for Campus Security to
see everything.
"I encourage that if anyone
sees anything suspicious or sees
a crime occurring to call 911 immediately. We are a non-emergency service — a very important distinction to make. The
police have a detachment two
minutes away and if anything
happens we call them."
Eccleton stressed that basic
measures and precautions
can go a long way in regard to
personal safety.
"Simple things, like don't
walk alone late at night with ear
buds," Eccleton said.
As for the recent coyote sightings on campus, Eccleton's main
warning was to not feed any
wild animals.
"Unless any community
members have been threatened
or bitten, [animal control organizations] tend not to act on these
type of cases."
With passion, dedication and
advocacy for campus safety,
UBC Campus Security does its
best to always have the community's back. Xi
— '"—Cd // News
EDITORS JOVANAVRANIC +VERONIKA BONDARENKO
.NOVEMBER 20, 20
NEWS BRIEFS
Investigation into alleged UBC
Denistry fraud continues
An additional RCMP unit is now involved in the investigation for fraud
at the UBC Faculty of Dentistry.
The Federal Serious and Organized Crime unit ofthe RCMP has
joined the regular UBC RCMP unit
in order look into an alleged case
of over $5 million in fraud in the
faculty's General Practice Residency program. The RCMP began
the investigation in February 2014
after they were first notified of
the matter.
Specific details surrounding the
allegations and the investigation
have not yet been revealed.
Ponderosa residence block the
site of frequent flooding
Three floors ofthe Arbutus house of
the Pondarosa residence were flooded on the evening of November 18.
The residence, nicknamed Pond
by students, experienced a major
flood caused by plumbing failure
last year. Since then, smaller issues,
such as ceiling leaks, have been
reported by residents frequently.
Accordingto Student Housing
and Hospitality Services Director
Andrew Parr, residence life and
building services staff were called
within five minutes of Tuesday's
flood.
They cleaned up and replaced
the broken hot water faucet that
caused the flood by 11:30 p.m. Two
Residence Life Managers were on
site following up with impacted
students, said Parr.
Temporary relocation was offered, but residents opted to stay in
their units or with friends.
SHHS is working with their
suppliers to investigate the causes
of Ponderosa's plumbing issues and
prevent any future incidents. Xi
RESEARCH»
Pot and PTSD: studying the benefits of medical marijuana
UBC professor Zach Walsh is researching marijuana as a treatment for PTSD
Karolina Kapusta
Contributor
Aside from being a common recreational drug, marijuana may be
able to help with the side affects of
anxiety and fear that are common
with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).
Zach Walsh, who is an associate
professor of psychology at UBC
Okanagan, studies the roles of substance use and the impact of drugs
on behavior. Walsh first started
researching the impact of cannabis
six years ago, as he was interested in finding out more about
the world's most widely-used
illegal substance.
Walsh believes that cannabis
has great remedial potential that
hasn't been examined because
of "the stigma around marijuana
and the prohibitions against
research related to it."
Walsh is also interested in
studying how and why people use
marijuana. As part of his latest
project, Walsh hopes to look into
the ways that marijuana may help
with the symptoms of PTSD.
"People who suffer from PTSD,
veterans in particular, report anec-
dotally that cannabis is helpful
with their symptoms," said Walsh.
Accordingto Walsh, a couple
of states in the US already have
cannabis medical laws that include
PTSD as one ofthe conditions for
which it can be prescribed.
Walsh also said that there are
brain imagery studies that show
reduced levels of naturally occurring cannabis-like chemicals and
higher numbers of endocannabin-
oid receptors in the brains of people
who have PTSD. There are also
several animal studies that show
Accordingto UBC prof Zach Walsh, marijuana can help treat anxiety and fear in PTSD patients.
=HOTO STEVEN DURFEEffHE UBYSSEY
that the endocannabinoid system is
important for the maintenance of
fear-related memories which play a
big role in PTSD in humans.
Walsh's study, which would
conduct clinical trials that look into
the effects of smoking marijuana for
people with PTSD, still needs the
go-ahead from a UBC ethics committee and Health Canada in order
to proceed.
If the study is approved, Walsh
and his team of researchers expect
to have the results ofthe clinical
trial by late 2016. By aiming to back
up the links between cannabis and
PTSD with research, Walsh hopes
to eventually help it be recognized
as a prescription medication for
PTSD in Canada.
"There is a lot of therapeutic
potential and we just need more research to figure out the parameters
of what that might be," said Walsh. Xi
MEDICINE »
UBC medical researchers receive $2.3 million grant
g*4C      *hL «*v j
r> ♦TitL^ ■'
fS£fff»-«95i
=HOTO CHRISTIAN GUTHIER/FFICKR
Phil Hieter and his research team study the genetic mutations that cause rare diseases.
Veronika Bondarenko
News Editor
UBC will be creating a network
for the study of rare genetic
diseases with the help of a $2.3
million grant.
The grant, which has been
awarded by the Canadian
Institutes for Health Research
(CIHR), will help link biologists
who are studying diseases that
affect fewer than one in 2,000
people with a community of
other scientists.
Phil Hieter, a UBC medical
genetics professor and head of
the Canadian Rare Diseases
Models and Mechanisms Network (RDMM), said that bringing
together researchers and clinicians will help shed some light
on the causes behind rare diseases that may not have received
as much attention otherwise.
"[There is] something like
5,000 rare diseases that have a
genetic basis, but no one ever
knew what the gene was because
they populate in small numbers
for each disease," said Hieter.
His team's research focuses
on matching genetic diseases
with the gene mutations that
caused them.
Hieter also said that while
the number of people who have
one of these specific diseases is
very low, together they end up
affecting approximately three
per cent ofthe population. Since
the causes and treatment options
for these diseases are largely
unknown, they can also have
devastating effects on the people
who have them.
"[These diseases] cause so
much pain and suffering and so
it's a very exciting event when
the discovery ofthe gene is
found," said Hieter. "Now [the
patients] have a clear diagnostic,
they know their disease is the
same as other people's diseases
and it has same mutation."
The network would help match
researchers who, through gene
sequencing technology, have
identified the gene that causes a
rare disease with other scientists. Once a gene is matched
with a specific disease, researchers can then proceed to determine why the mutation occurs
within the individual.
"It's a great thing for scientists
because there's a much greater
awareness ofthe importance of
basic research [as] each gene, as
it's found, requires follow-up and
much of that is going to happen
in basic science labs," said Hieter.
Accordingto Hieter, a system
where scientists can collaborate
and share knowledge of these
rare diseases is an essential
step in developing cures and
management options.
"The next step is 'what are we
going to do?'," said Hieter. "We
know we have the gene, but what
can we do to try to benefit the
patient by understanding what
goes wrong so that we manage
the disease?" tJ
ALUMNI»
Founding Google investor donates
$7.5 million to UBC computer science
Jovana Vranic
News Editor
David Cheriton, a Stanford University professor, has donated $7.5
million to expand UBC's computer
science department.
His contribution came from his
wish for computational thinking to
become as commonplace a skill as
reading and writing.
Cheriton graduated from UBC
with a bachelor's degree in mathematics in 1973 and went on to
complete his Master's and PhD degrees at the University of Waterloo.
In 1998, he was one ofthe founding
investors of Google.
In 2010, Cheriton first invested in
UBC undergraduate education with
a $2 million donation to the multi-
year Science Education Initiative,
headed by Nobel Laureate Carl
Wieman. His recent investment was
aimed at strengthening UBC's computer science department, as well as
making it more accessible and useful
for students across all faculties.
"I am delighted that David
Cheriton has provided this support — computational thinking will
enrich the ways that UBC students
can create, collaborate, learn and
understand our world," said Anne
Condon, head ofthe department of
computer science.
Accordingto a media release, $7
million of Cheriton's donation is
going towards creating the David R.
Cheriton Chair in computer science,
which will allow the department
to hire a senior researcher. The
remaining $535,800 will fund the
implementation of a new first-year
course in computational thinking to
be offered in the Faculty of Science.
The course will be offered starting in the 2016 winter term and will
focus on using computer science
techniques for problem-solving.
"The new chair will hopefully
extend the already recognized
strength ofthe department," said
Cheriton. "[And] the new course
should make computational thinking accessible to students outside
of computer science, a thinking
discipline I regard as key to a 21st
century education."
His donation is a contribution
to start an evolution, a fundraising
and alumni engagement campaign
launched in September 2011 that
aims to collect $1.5 billion by 2015
for student programs, research and
community engagement.
"I am excited to invest again in
UBC to expand the department
of computer science and help
them meet demands at this time
of rapid growth in this field,"
said Cheriton. Xi
Write
Shoot
Edit
Code
Drin
COME BY THE UBYSSEY OFFICE
SUB 24, FOLLOW THE SIGNS NEWS    I   THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2014
ELECTIONS »
Professors weigh in on Gregor Robertson's re-election
Max Cameron and Kathryn Harrison analyze voter priorities and Vision policies
Kelley Lin
Senior Staff Writer
In this year's municipal elections,
the Vancouver public voted Vision
party candidate Gregor Robertson
into his third term as mayor.
"Transportation and homelessness, climate change and
opposition to Kinder Morgan,"
are some of Vision's priorities,
according to professor Max Cameron, who believes Vancouver
voters generally agree with these
main policies, but have issues
with the party's lack of dialogue
with the public.
Accordingto Cameron, the
Non-Partisan Association (NPA)
was able to tap into this flaw
during the campaign, but despite
this, voters did not abandon Vision. He suggests that City Hall
communicate with citizens more
clearly when proposing new
policies and projects to not come
across as dismissive.
"[Vision] will need to be more
consultative," said Cameron.
"It'll need to be more careful not
to appear to be ramming things
down people's throats."
Fellow department member,
professor Kathryn Harrison,
believes that homelessness and
affordable housing are two of
the biggest issues voters are
concerned with.
Because ofthe daunting price
tags of both projects, the city
will need to collaborate with the
provincial and federal governments for funding, said Harrison.
Robertson touched on this
concern in his victory speech,
saying "here at home, as the
weather gets colder and colder,
we need a new partnership ... on
homelessness, mental health and
addictions."
However, Cameron expressed
apprehension about the higher government levels' support of Vision
Vancouver's progressive policies.
"Unfortunately, [Vancouver has]
faced steadfast opposition from
the federal Tories," he said. "Part
ofthe problem with municipal
politics is that, even though we
identify civic governments with
local issues ... the reality is that our
cities have limited resources and
limited powers."
Harrison shares the same
concerns, rooted in the knowledge
of tensions between the current
federal government and the city.
She says disagreements on how
to solve drug addiction by having
only a law enforcement-oriented
approach instead ofthe city's proposed harm reduction framework,
for example, have caused strains.
"No single city is going to solve
[issues of homelessness,] and
certainly not on their own," said
Harrison. "But that shouldn't
mean we won't try... voters have
given the mayor a mandate to keep
trying."
Another obvious source of
tension between the different
levels of government is the issue
of the Kinder Morgan pipeline,
which Vision campaigns against.
According to both Harrison and
Cameron, opposition to the pipeline project is a voter priority.
"It was certainly one ofthe
areas that Vision works very hard
to establish as a clear difference
between [NPA and Vision,]"
said Harrison.
She said voters gave Mayor
Robertson another chance because they liked Vision's policies,
despite tension at a higher level.
"This wasn't just a personality
contest," said Harrison. tJ
Mayoral Race
Results
Gregor Robertson 83,529
KirkLaPointe 73,443
MeenaWong 16,791
BobKasting 1,682
Mike Hansen 714
Jeff Hill 611
Tim Ly.	
Meynard Aubichon	
Cherryse Kaur Kaiser	
 556
 508
 492
Colin Shandler 459
PHOTO KRIS KRUG/FFICKR
Gregor Robertson has been voted into his third term as Vancouver mayor.
THAN READY
EARN A DIPLOMA IN ONE YEAR
If you have previous post-secondary education, you may be able to earn
a BCIT diploma in one year. Check out our business diploma programs
and fast-track your career today.
Broadcast
> Broadcast Radio
> Broadcast and Online Journalism
Management
> International Business
Management
> Business Information
Technology Management
> Business Operations Management
> Business Management
> Business Administration,
Post-Diploma
> Human Resource Management,
Post-Diploma
Marketing Management
> Professional Real Estate
> Entrepreneurship
> Marketing Communications
> Professional Sales
> Tourism Management
Finance, Accounting and Insurance
> Accounting
> Taxation
> Finance
> Financial Planning
> General Insurance and
Risk Management
For more information, visit
bcit.ca/business
BCIT
50
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS JENICA MONTGOMERY
II Culture I
DRAMA»
Spec Theatre makes drama about collaboration again
LECTURE »
fiW?.:
§?3©
W:
?H!rtl
■■I
t-:«
•D..
theatre
=HOTO COURTESY SPECTHEATRE
Spec Theatre was founded by UBC alum Ira Cooper and presented its first show Nov. 4-8.
Olivia Law
Senior Staff Writer
Sid, the character in Spec Theatre's first show Sid: the Handsome Bum, gets his catharsis
from watching porn. Ira Cooper,
founder and writer ofthe five
month-old Vancouver-based
theatre company, however, gets his
from the theatre.
"'Small' theatre companies is an
unfair term," said Cooper on the
discrepancies between the large establishments, and the huge number
of smaller, local syndicates around
the area. "They all produce some
amazing shows, which can compete
with anything that's up there. I
think the playing field is becoming
quite even for what makes a good
show — you have to come up with
such new ideas with what makes
you different."
And different Spec Theatre
certainly is. Their first show,
written by Cooper himself, Sid: The
Handsome Bum was performed just
five months after the conception
ofthe group. Originally envisioned
as a male lead, Cooper, seeking to
produce his show completely out
ofthe 'traditional' box, approached
some of his former classmates,
Kayla Deorksen, Joanna Rannelli
and Hilary Suzanne, to take on the
acting, production, directing and
management roles.
"We were just all wanting to
build our own kind of theatre, we
didn't want to wear the traditional
hats and titles, so we just all did
everything — just filling in for each
other," said Cooper. Theatre is traditionally a collaborative art form and
Spec Theatre definitely embraces
this to the full.
The process of forming the company certainly seems to live up to
the slightly crazed, quirky theatre
stereotype. "The idea for Spec
Theatre came together at a bar, as
most good ideas do," said Cooper.
After traveling for almost seven
years, living in China and cycling through the Netherlands, he
realized that the possibilities were
endless. "Rather than auditioning
and waiting for opportunities to
come to me, I realized that I could
just create them."
Certainly not one to sit on the
sidelines, Cooper graduated from
UBC's BFA Theatre program in
2007. Beginning as part of a class
of 12 undergraduates, Cooper
finished his degree as one of five
"survivors." "They threw so much
at us, it was great.... And after I
graduated I was given the amazing
opportunity to travel to the Czech
Republic, as part ofthe first North
American company to perform in
their International Theatre Festival in the 14 years of its operation."
Although Cooper has produced
films and done plenty of play readings in his time, Sid: the Handsome
Bum was his first live show to be
produced for the public — and it
doesn't stop there. Written three
years previously, the rehearsal process for the show involved several
months of collaborative rewriting,
"throwing it back and forth, and
firming it up" before performance.
The collaboration extends beyond
the confines ofthe Spec Theatre
family. "We're all about theatre for
non-theatre people, the process of
product and local written shows,"
said Cooper. "We want to attract
people who have all sorts of other
interests, as the "theatre people" are
such a small collective."
Part of Spec Theatre's ethos is
to offer accessible theatre which
appeals to all. Their next show,
Allergy Boys is an interesting conceptualization on the 'bubble wrap
generation,' with a larger focus on
the nature versus nurture debate.
Cooper also wrote Allergy Boys, and
he hopes that everything produced
by the young theatre company will
be written in house.
"You really have to have the full
package to work in this environment," said Cooper, full of compliments to his team. "I think that's
our schtick. We're small and always
working on the process of trying to
figure out new ways of displaying
theatre." tJ
POETRY»
Oily wood questions the role of poetry in environmentalism
Oilywood is a poetry chapbook that has been shortlisted for the bpNichol chapbook award.
PHOTO COURTESYOIFYWOOC
Jamey Gilchrist
Contributor
Can poetry help to teach and
encourage people to take action
against major industries accelerating climate change? Christine
Leclerc, UBC alumna, author and
activist, challenges such local environmental issues in her thought
provoking poetry book called
Oilywood.
Oilywood has been shortlisted for
the bpNichol Chapbook Award, an
award that recognizes excellence in
Canadian poetry in chapbook form.
The eye-catching title was thought
of while Leclerc and colleagues
were brainstorming a way to hang a
banner of an orca, which had a message of saving the coast on it, from
the Lions Gate Bridge.
"One ofthe idea's was to put a
giant 'Oilywood' sign on the North
Shore mountains as that image
would act as a mirror to the Hollywood hills sign and its associations
with a pro-development and a
pro-oil stance that we are seeing in
Western Canada and around the
world," said Leclerc.
Leclerc found inspiration for
her poetry when she spent a summer around different regions of
the Burrard Inlet. During her time
there she went around the beaches, collecting interviews, pictures
and water recordings. She noticed
how many people spent their time
there and if they knew about the
proposal to expand the pipeline
significantly. This curiosity led
to community workshops where
"people were asked to write down
some memories and knowledge
about the inlet on a rough map.
These sorts of community inputfs]
were used to create the chapbook,
in addition to Kinder Morgan news
releases," said Leclerc.
Kinder Morgan is the largest
midstream and the third largest
energy company in North America. Their pipelines transport
natural gas, refined petroleum
products, crude oil, carbon dioxide
and more. The Burnaby pipeline is
just one of many in the northern
hemisphere.
"I took an environmental
policy course in the philosophy
department at UBC that really
opened my eyes to some ofthe
issues that our generation is
facing, and what many generations to come will face, regarding climate change and some of
the other major contributors to
climate change, aside from fossil
fuels consumption like deforestation," said Leclerc.
Most ofthe poems are autobiographical, some from the community workshops, interviews,
and others based upon Kinder
Morgan's news releases. After
having read the book, Leclerc
said she hopes it gets people talking about the Burrard inlet.
"Those are some conversations
that I think are very important
to be having especially in terms
of the threats that can be posed
by the Tar Sands pipeline as well
as the tankers going through the
inlet and what we'll see much
more of if Kinder Morgan is allowed to expand their pipeline,"
said Leclerc.
If poetry such as this can start
people talking about environmental issues, it can inspire more
action against the oil companies
and other major contributors to
climate change in our society. Xi
UCLA prof
lectured
on Egyptian
King
Hatshepsut
and gender
inequality
Adam Waitzer
Contributor
On Tuesday night, Buchanan
A203 was transformed into a
hive of activity. People of all ages
streamed through the doors,
some with chairs in tow, frantically searching for a place to sit
or stand.
Kara Cooney is an associate
professor at UCLA's department
of near Eastern languages and
cultures and was invited to speak
as part of a series of lectures by
the Archaeological Institute of
America (AIA).
The lecture opened with a
composite image of Michelle
Obama, Hillary Clinton, Angela
Merkel and Margaret Thatcher.
"How does this make you feel?"
Cooney asked the audience. A
visceral murmur ran through the
crowd. She then flipped to a slide
of male leaders, eliciting little to
no reaction.
"Are you looking at jewelry?
Are you looking at hair? Are you
looking at some ofthe clothes?
Pantsuits? What are you distracted
by? Do they seem angry to you?
Are you threatened in some way?
So this is the crux of it all... why
we are still so hostile to women in
power."
Classifying power as ideological, economic, military or
political, Cooney put forward
sobering statistics of modern
gender inequality in all four
categories — particularly in the
business world.
"The situation is brutal. When
human beings are given the
choice of giving women power
over money they all go 'Let's
not do that'. Women, money and
power: these things do not go
along," Cooney said during her
lecture.
Cooney then examined several
famous women who held power
throughout history. An overarching trend emerged: all these
well-known female figures had
actually failed to successfully
govern their respective nations.
Cleopatra's reign saw the Roman
conquest of Egypt; Jezebel was
murdered at the hands of her
retinue and is remembered by her
penchant for cosmetics.
Hatshepsut, a highly able
Egyptian ruler, was — by contrast — largely forgotten. Rising
to power as a "stopgap" during
a time of dynastic crisis. Cooney
said Hatshepsut "pushed the
envelope within the acceptable
social context." Commanding religious authority, military might
and strict economic control,
Hatshepsut brought prosperity to
ancient Egypt.
"And in some ways, that success was her ultimate undoing,"
Cooney remarked. Hatshepsut's
successors rushed to claim her
admirable legacy.
In our modern society, there
is no shortage of discourse on
bridging gender-based gaps in
power. Yet how can we deconstruct stigma associated with
female leadership? Hatshepsut's
parable offers some insight in
this regard. tJ 6    |    CULTURE    |    THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 20,2014
Reiki
ion
rermaix
When the Dalai Lama came
to UBC in October, he attracted thousands of students and
Vancouver residents to the Chan
Centre and Thunderbird Stadium.
No matter their faith or their degree of religiosity, a large number
of students flocked to hear the
head of Tibetan Buddhism lecture.
Tickets to attend his appearance
inside the vast amphitheatre were
snapped up in just a few minutes.
The curiosity and enthusiasm
expressed by students, regardless
ofthe status ofthe Dalai Lama,
echoed both the freedom and discretion of religion on campus.
The drive towards
open multiculturalism
More than many countries,
Canada has experienced
the secular tide ofthe second half
ofthe 20th century, and Vancouver seems to further enhance
this march towards secularism.
Stereotypes ofthe city depict a society where meditation, yoga and
praying are a way for people to
feel more healthy and
connected to themselves. Reversing the
idiom "a sound mind
in a sound body," Vancouver culture raises
the exercise ofthe body onto a
pedestal, while soul-searching is
becoming more ancillary.
Despite this idea, the UBC
campus is home to several dozen
religious groups, clubs and
churches. Forming a vivid and
active network, they perpetuate
the tradition of a multi-cultural
landscape, where attachment to
the structure that religion provides is as valid as the attachment
to any other cultural trait. Rabbi
Philip Bregman, the executive
director of Hillel House on campus, describes the evolution that
he has witnessed in the Jewish
community over the years. It has
vastly evolved since the early 20th
century, when quotas prevented
Look
place
Jews from freely applying to the
major universities, to become the
multicultural Canada that people
now know.
"There are many more opportunities for Jews to interact...
with the surrounding communities in which [they] are living,"
said Bregman. "And with that
comes something called assimilation, in which one loses one's
identity specifically and morphs
into something different."
UBC strictly applies Canadians'
respect of religion and welcomes
all faith traditions on campus,
abundantly mixing dozens
of denominations.
"Now we live in a world with
universities filled with different
cultures and different religions ...
a world that I think focuses more
on, I would not say sameness, but
interacting with one another,"
said Jordana Shani, managing
director at Hillel. This multicultural perspective benefits from a
positive consensus in the student
population, but also opens new
discussions on identity among
religious groups.
ing for home and a
o
to belong
o
Greater interaction can mean
a unique opportunity for
dialogue and enrichment. Some
followers of diverse faith traditions say they've participated in
positive collaborations with other
churches on campus. "So far it has
been really good talking to other
[members of different churches]
about their religion and how they
interact on campus," said Sivar
Rajab Khan, a member ofthe Muslim Students' Association. "It has
been fruitful, I would say, so far."
Yet other students feel the need
to reconnect with like-minded
people, people who share their
beliefs, culture and perception
ofthe world. "I guess one ofthe
reasons why students would join
... is because they are looking for
a sense of home and belonging,"
said Rajab Khan.
The desire for like-minded
friends is exemplified in faith
traditions that are seldom represented in secular Canada. Accord
ing to Rajab Khan, international
students form the bulk ofthe
Muslim community on campus
and they can "feel displaced" and
"not really have a community."
For them, as for others, religion is an essential bond with a
community that can be difficult
to grasp on such a large campus.
"The university is really big, and
so it is hard to find people who
share the same beliefs. Having
a club is super useful, because
it is right there and people can
just show up and meet other
[like-minded] people," said Na-
thania Ho, a member
ofthe Intervarsity
Christian Fellowship.
The continued
desire for connection
among students with
religious backgrounds is served by a
cohort of 17 chaplains
from a wide array of
backgrounds. From
Theravada Buddhism
to Roman Catholicism, these community-appointed representatives of faith
try to keep in contact
with the different
student groups as
well as lead religious
celebrations. These
community representatives of faith
make a point of being
available on campus
as much as possible.
"They are not
hiding. They are very,
very present," said
Bregman. "Be it on Imagine Day,
Clubs Day or directly contacting
them, the clergy try to keep in touch
with the students. We are not selling
anything... we are just saying we are
available to talk and share."
Now we live in a world
with universities filled
with different cultures
and different religions
o
... a world that I think
focuses more on, I would
not say sameness, but
interacting with one
another."
Jordana Shani
Managing. Director at Hillel THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 20,2014    |    CULTURE    |   7
Leaders of religious groups try
to keep a casual and approachable
tone to their presence on campus.
"Because [Bregman] is in jeans
and sweater, it makes it a lot more
acceptable," said Shani. An attitude that is shared by many chaplains on campus, who also favour
informal talk on neutral grounds.
Uninterested
undergraduate
students
Despite the efforts of religious
communities on campus,
many students — especially among
the undergraduates — do not seem
to have a desire to engage with the
members ofthe different churches.
This seems to reverse as years go
by, as students mature and reconnect with their faith tradition or
further interact with others of
different traditions.
Bregman paralleled the
graduate orientation day with the
undergraduate one. He noted that
with graduate students, "there
was not a moment where we were
not engaged in some conversation with graduate students who
stopped to talk." Undergraduate
students, however, seemed uninterested. "On Imagine Day, we
could have 10 or 15 or 20 minutes
of nobody stopping, with a hundred times as many students going by," said Bregman.
Members ofthe religious community raise
the fact that religion,
alongside philosophy
or even politics, is
minimized by students
so as to keep their
focus on school. "You are finally
on your own ... you are trying to
figure out how to manage your
classes and papers, and there is
the whole social aspect in terms
of making sure you have a life outside as well. [Religion] might be
something that you do not want to
think of," said Shani.
Seen as too serious, time-consuming or simply irrelevant,
the practice of religion has been
dismissed by many students on
campus, Bregman said. "[The
students] are concerned about
schools, grades, now there is the
issue of tuition... where does
religion fit into all of this? I think
it has taken a back seat in this
university."
Another source of this first-
year reluctance appears to be a
fear of being but put in a religious
category. "As soon as you say 'I
am a Christian, I am a Muslim,'
people have a bias. They auto-
The university is really
big, and so it is hard to
find people who share
e same beliefs. Having
o
a club is super useful,
PHOTO KOSTA PRODANOVIC
Jordana Shani and Rabbi Philip Bregman are prominent figures in the Jewish community on campus.
matically think 'Oh, then you
must do that and you must think
this,'" said Christian Vela, a third-
year economics student, who is
currently putting the finishing
touches to the foundation of an
Orthodox Christian club.
Even Canada's tradition of
respect for many faiths does not
prevent the fear — rational or not
— of being reduced to an identity
solely revolving around religion.
There is a latent feeling of regret
among some religious observers that they have shied from
engaging in what plays such an
important role in their lives, for
fear of being stereotyped.
"Clearly [religion] means a
lot to people, and it is a big part
of how they see the world," said
Vela. Rajab Khan mentioned the
harmony, peace and the sense of
direction that Islam brings her.
trend of new wave soul-searching
appeared in Vancouver during
Towards a new wave
of spirituality without
religion?
o
A the 1960s, and has continued
to grow since. A quest for
spirituality — the expansion ofthe
mind beyond the limits of tangible
reality — seems to have overtaken
the quest for religion.
"The new word on the street
over the past 15 or 20 years has
been 'I am not religious, I am
spiritual,' which would mean 'I
do feel a certain connectedness
beyond just science or what I
can see or hear, I do believe that
there is a soulfulness to life, but
I am not sure that it needs to be
manifest in this specific fashion,
on this day, at this time, in this
way,'" said Bregman.
Secular meditation and belief
in flows of energy as part of
a body-mind consortium are
picking up speed. Chandima
Gangodawila was appointed
campus chaplain for Theravada
Buddhism in 2012, and has been
helping students develop their
meditation abilities ever since.
He has seen an increase in the
number of students who take
interest in Samatha, the secular
branch of Buddhist meditation
that seeks to develop appeasing
breathing techniques.
"Mostly these are liberal
seekers of meditation. Some of
them come from the background,
but most of them want to know
about meditation in general,"
said Gangodawila.
The liberal practice of religion
has never been a problem for
him. "I do not think it is mandatory for one to embrace a
religion to be a good person,"
Gangodawila said, summarizing his perception that formal
religion is an acceptable omission
in one's life.
Beyond this commonly accepted idea, some religious practitioners remain critical ofthe
informal practice of soul-searching activities. "It almost feels like
a very new-age, feel-good sort
of thing that does not
really have a particular aim, a particular
structure and that
ends up being an 'it
is up to you, whatever you want to be,'"
said Vela.
For Vela, as for
Rajab Khan, spirituality cannot
possibly be separated from the
structure of religion.
"I guess people are ... thinking
that it is just the spiritual aspect
of a religion that gives you that
sense of purpose, but really there
needs to be a balance," said Rajab
Khan.
"If there are boundaries in a
religion, [they are] there for a
reason. Maybe we do not see it
now, but that is to make us more
spiritual."
Those boundaries, no matter
what their purpose, seem to put
off many students who just got
their independence from home
and the family sphere.
It appears that few students
seek to infuse their lives with
religion at UBC. In a land where
mountains, snow and sea are a
holy trinity on its own, a look
past UBC's Rose Garden or a sunset on Wreck Beach are uplifting
enough for many of them.
Yet Bregman is convinced
"there is a hunger for something." Something beyond the
beauty of nature.
Students who seek are likely
to find a helping hand among the
archipelago of religious groups
and churches on campus. tJ
because it is right
o
there and people can just
show up and meet other
[like-minded] people."
Nathania Ho
Member ofthe Intervarsity
Christian Fellowship
"They are not hiding.
They are very very
present.... The clergy try
to keep in touch with the
students. We are not sell
ing anything ... we are just
saying we are available to
talk and share."
PHOTO COUI F      CI )IM        IGODAWIFFA
Rabbi Phillip Bregman
Executive Director
ofHillel House
Chandim Gangodawilla was named chaplain of Theravada Buddhism on campus. // Opinions
EDITORIAL »
Students in rez should be treated like adults
PETER SIEMENS
WEB DEVELOPER
Editorial
Last Thursday I was cooking breakfast in my boxers when I looked over
and saw two strangers standing in
my kitchen.
Dressed in uniform, the intruders
were UBC Student Housing and
Hospitality Services employees,
&LEEP TIGHT,
CAMPER&!
who informed me with smiling faces
that they were there to perform a
cleanliness inspection.
I live in a shared apartment in
Marine Drive, where — like all UBC
residences — semesterly inspections
are mandatory.
Although I didn't feel threatened
by the inspectors (they were likely
more offended by my lack of clothing), I was upset when they didn't
have the decency to knock before
entering my, for lack of a better
word, home.
While this rude invasion wasn't a
big deal, it represents a larger issue.
For somebody who pays upwards of
$800 a month in rent, I expect many
basic needs to be met, one of them
being my right to privacy. I know
privacy in residence is hard to come
by and, while I tolerated the lack
thereof while living in a dorm room,
I expected more when I moved into
an upper-year apartment. At the
very least, I didn't expect to have
any unannounced visitors.
This is why I have a hard time
calling Marine Drive my home.
The truth is that living in residence
almost feels like summer camp.
UBC creates the illusion that we
are being trusted, but in reality we
are still being treated like children.
I can't have a group of friends and
alcohol in the same room without
risking eviction. I might have to pay
a fine if I'm caught without spotless
countertops. Quite frankly, I'm surprised my residence advisor doesn't
put me to bed every night.
If you're going to charge us like
adults, treat us like adults. The lack
of trust is both disappointing and
insulting, and doesn't help us grow
as young adults. Although I may be
young, I'm living and studying away
from home in an expensive city,
all while balancing a full-time job
to help make it affordable. I work
long hours and spend many nights
studying — things that can only be
done by somebody who has reached
a certain level of maturity. My point
is that $800 is by no means a small
sum; it's a monthly payment that
would be expected from a mature
adult. That's right, an adult.
Last month a friend ordered a
package online and had it delivered
to my residence. A mistake was
made and the shipment arrived
under his name. I explained the
mixup to a man at the front desk, but
he refused to help me track down
the package, grumbling under his
breath that he didn't have time for
it. I went back every few days to
try again, but it wasn't until two
weeks later that somebody finally
looked behind the counter (where
the package had been sitting). This
is the second time UBC has lost my
mail — last year they misplaced a
new license plate for my car, forcing
me to re-register my vehicle. Occurrences like these force me to ask the
same question: why am I paying for
something that doesn't meet such
basic needs?
If UBC follows through with
their plan to increase residence
fees next year, I hope they take
time to address some ofthe needs
that aren't being met. There are
many ways in which residence
life could be improved, but some
are more important than others
— things that are illegal under
the B.C. Residential Tenancy Act
(which UBC doesn't need to abide
by). Things like students being
forced to sleep in floor lounges.
Things like poor living conditions.
But at the very least, UBC needs
to do abetter job of respecting the
privacy of its tenants. I shouldn't
have to tell them the same thing I
told my dad when I was 16: can you
please knock next time? tl
LAST WORDS//
ELECTORAL AREA AISN'T
A PERMANENT SOLUTION
While residents of Vancouver voted
for a mayor, UBC students voted
for a candidate who will be one of
38 directors on a Metro Vancouver
board to represent their interests
at a municipal level. In addition to
representing campus residents, the
director or Electoral Area A is also
responsible for the booming metropolis of Barnston Island, among
other rural areas.
UBC has been a part of Electoral
Area A since Bill 20 split it from
Metro Vancouver in May 2010. This
was supposed to be a temporary
solution until creation of a better
governance model to represent the
over 20,000 students, faculty, staff
and other residents who live west
of Blanca. Except that temporary
solution seems to be becoming more
and more permanent.
The majority of UBC's municipal-type decisions are made by
the Board of Governors, of which
11 of 21 members are appointed by
the province. Though the Board's
decisions on land use are supposed
to comply with a plan approved by
the province, the university is pretty
much the judge, jury and executioner when it comes to building
new academic buildings, condos or
student residence on campus.
Take the Tall Wood Residence
as an example. The plans for the
18-storey building would make it
much taller than building codes
allow. UBC would have to apply
for a variance to build something
that height, which keeps them in
check, right? Though the process is
unclear (surprise, surprise), it seems
the university themselves would be
responsible for approving breaking
the rules.
While the director of Electoral
Area A represents campus residents
on things like sewage services and
has a seat at the table on Transit discussions, she has little power when
it comes to the day to day decisions
that affect students and non-student
campus residents alike.
The University Neighbourhoods
Association has been acting more
and more like a municipal government for campus residents, which
is concerning, given that they
represent the interests of campus
residents who are by and large much
older, wealthier and opposed to
noise and concerts than your average first year in Totem Park.
Separating from Metro Vancouver arguably helps the university,
though Bill 20 was supposed to be
a temporary solution. But over four
years later, there don't seem to be
any signs of progress. As we've seen
with the housing and tuition fee
increases, the university has the
power to do pretty much whatever
they want. UBC's current governance structure only enforces that
inflated power.
MORE GREGOR: TIME TO
TALK ABOUT BROADWAY
The people of Vancouver have
spoken, and we have another four
years of Gregor Robertson. Our
editorial board has disparate political leanings, but none of us really
felt strongly in favour of any of the
candidates in this election — a few
of us even ended up spoiling our
ballots out of dissatisfaction with
the options. It's safe to say that many
students support Robertson's vision
— a green city with a platform for
ending homelessness. We've just be
come a bit skeptical about whether
or not anything is actually going to
be done.
The Broadway Subway line
is probably the issue that most
significantly affects students. It's
a good campaign issue, and one
that probably drew a lot of support
from students (and anyone else
who has a Broadway commute).
Very few would disagree with the
notion that a rapid transit line in
some form would be a good idea
for Broadway — it's the obvious
next step for such a high-traffic
corridor. But pursuing a project
with so high a cost as a subway
line — particularly in the face of
budget tightening — is questionable at best. Maybe it really is the
case that a subway line is the most
(or possibly only) feasible option
— but when prominent critics like
Burnaby mayor and former B.C.
Transit chair Derek Corrigan have
spoken openly against the idea,
often in favour of light-rail and
other alternatives, more consultation and community discussion
seems necessary.
It's a fine line that the public
and the government has to walk,
between due process and consideration and actually getting something
done that this generation of students
will live to see.
GUPTA ON UBC SPORTS
We recently interviewed President Gupta to talk about the
future of athletics on campus.
Naturally, we were excited to
speak to the highest-ranking
UBC official about his plans. The
problem is: he didn't really tell us
anything.
We recognize that he's just
starting out in this job, and won't
have a full idea ofthe future that
he sees UBC Athletics taking until
he finishes speaking to those who
have been involved in the community for a long time — donors,
alumni and staff. He mentioned
that he didn't begin the job with
a pre-set agenda and is learning
about UBC sports as he goes.
We just expected a little more
— a vague idea of a plan or set
of goals that the university is
working toward in this turbulent
atmosphere for UBC sports. But
this school is facing very important issues that require big
decisions. The fate of athletics,
like all things at this school, only
time will tell, tl
' The most certain way
to succeed is always to try
just one more time."
Thomas Edison: Relentless Inventiveness
Failure is no biggie. Just ask Edison. If he stopped at failure, he would never have moved
on to invent a little thing called the light bulb. So if you've failed a class somewhere else,
or have a scheduling conflict, come on over. You can catch up with our world-recognized
online courses, then move on to bigger successes.Talkabout a light bulb moment.
open, online, everywhere.
Learn more @ athabascau.ca/edison OUR AMS PRESENTS
ELD AT THE AMS SPECIAL
GENERAL MEETING
CALLING OUT ALL UBC TALENT!
Record your ta ent
and submit it to:
pr<^vents@ams.ubc.ca
Submit by
Nov. 30
AUDITION TODAY!
MORE INFO AT ams.ubc.ca/sgi 10    I   SPORTS   |    THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 20,2014
ADMINISTRATION »
President Gupta still in "learning
mode" on UBC athletics
PHOTO MACKENZIEWAFKERFTHE UBYSSEY
President Gupta did not begin the job with his own athletics agenda, and is listening to the community to become informed.
CJ Pentland
Senior Staff Writer
When Arvind Gupta replaced
Stephen Toope as president of
UBC back in July, he took over
during a time of great importance for UBC Athletics. With
the university's Sports Review
coming to a close in February,
UBC is currently in the process
of transitioning to a new athletics model with fewer varsity
teams and competitive clubs —
with a goal of fostering excellence and promoting sport across
campus. Throughout the process,
student-athletes and alumni
alike have been vocal with their
thoughts on the changes.
Gupta's goal right now is to listen to those voices. The president
did swim and play hockey while
growing up in Timmins, Ontario,
but admits that he's not very
familiar with the inner working
of university sports. By talking
to a broad range of people that
includes students, coaches, staff
and donors, he is learning more
so he can soon make his own
informed decisions.
"We've done the athletic review, [and] we're implementing
the changes," said Gupta. "Obviously there are friends ofthe
university who think we could
be doing a better job on some of
these things, so I've just taken
the task of listening to what
everyone is saying, and trying
to make up my own mind where
this should be going."
"We just want to make sure
we can maximize what our
varsity teams do and their
outcomes. We don't have
unlimited budgets, we don't
have unlimited bandwidths,
so we just want to get the best
outcomes we can."
Gupta understands the importance of athletics on campus,
having been a strong supporter of
the McMaster Marauders during
his undergrad years. At UBC, one
of his main goals is to use varsity
athletics as a rallying point for
school sprit. Over 23,000 students are involved in intramurals
on campus, which shows him
that the potential is there.
"I see the varsity program as
this platform
to promote
excellence, to
promote leadership, to promote
development of
young people
in a much more
multi-faceted
way than I originally realized,"
said Gupta.
University
donors possessed
some ofthe most
prominent voices
during the sports
review process,
and Gupta is
trying to make
sure those
voices are heard.
The president
said he's been
amazed at how
many people he's met have come
through UBC Athletics, which
has led him to realize how athletics provides a training ground
for not only sports, but also
leadership, teamwork and other
positive qualities. He therefore
holds the opinions of alumni and
donors in high regard.
"I think that as alum ofthe
Athletics program, they should
have a strong voice; they're not
the only voice, but they do have
a strong voice. And they have
a lot to contribute, and I don't
think anyone would deny that we
need to be listening carefully to
what they're saying because they
want what's best for the program
[and] they want what's best for
Wejustwantto
make sure we
can maximize
what our varsity
teams do and their
outcomes. We don't
have unlimited
budgets, we don't
have unlimited
bandwidths, so we
just want to get
the best outcomes
we can."
Arvind Gupta
UBC President
the athletes," said Gupta, who
doesn't see donors and alumni in
separate categories.
"I haven't had a donor say
to me 'why are you changing
things? They used to be better in
the 70s.' Everything they're saying to me is about 'we really care
about the young men and women
playing on UBC teams — we want
them to have great outcomes.'"
Athletics has also recently
hired several
new UBC varsity
club positions.
Two new positions include
a director of
team services
and a director
of marketing,
community
partnership and
sponsorship, and
a new strength
and conditioning
coach. Gupta
sees these positions as crucial
to helping
UBC remain
one ofthe top
programs in
the country.
The 13th
president of UBC
said he didn't
come in with a pre-set agenda in
regards to athletics, but stands
behind the decisions that Toope
made during his tenure and
thinks there's no doubt that UBC
is staying in the CIS. For the time
being, he trusts the decisions that
Managing Director of Athletics
Ashley Howard and VP Students
Louise Cowin are making, and
will continue to listen.
"I've very purposely not tried
to set... my own agenda, just to try
and understand the various facets
ofthe sports, the various outcomes
we could be looking for. And so I'd
say I'm still in learning mode."
"I want to hear everyone's
voice, and then figure out the
next steps." Xi
T-BIRDS 5-ON-5
BRAINS AND BRAWN
Hockey
ROSIE
SCHLAGINTWEIT
Volleyball
JONATHAN
BROWN
Swimming
1. So you're good at your sport(s) and
in school... what is something you're
embarrassingly bad at?
2. What is your favourite study place on
campus?
3. What's your dream job?
Skateboarding. Could
never get past the ollie.
I'm not bad on a Bongo
Board though.
My desk at home. While
studying, I'm always
walking around and
eating.
Playing hockey is my
dreamjob.
I am embarrassingly
bad at improv. Grade
nine drama was a pretty
stressful experience —
safe to say I'll never have
an acting career.
I'm a fan of Wood
basement. It's close to
food and there's always
familiarfaces.
I have applied forLaw
school next year, so I
would love to become
a lawyer.
I'll have to admit, I'm extremely bad at picking
up girls... just not really
one of my strengths!
Everyone seems to love
studying and sleeping at
the Aquatic Centre, but
that's where I have some
of my darkest times...
prefer Starbucks.
Probably to coach
alongside Steve Price
and fill kids'goggles
with tears of pain.
Singing. I couldn't sing
to save my life!
Artwork.
Definitely the Law library.
It's beautiful and seems
to be full of good-looking, soon to be lawyers.
Aski coach.
Koerner. No cell signal in
the basement so fewer
distractions.
Doctor.
4. What was the last book you read?
5. What has the little voice inside your head
been saying lately?
Man's Search for
Meaning by Viktor
Frankl.
Itusuallytellsmewhen
I'm hungry and when I
need to pee.
This is quite nerdy, but
an LSAT prep book
called Mastering Logical
Reasoning. I wrote the
LSAT a monthago.lt
wasn't a casual read.
Lately it's been telling me
to just enjoy my fifth year
and nottake things too
seriously. Things usually
seem to fall into place.
Actually, I just finished a
really great read called
FindingAWayOnFridays
forDummies.
Swimming is love. Swimming is life.
Sadly, itwasa bookfor
English class. I don't
seem to have much time
for reading anymore.
Which one?
Whateverthe CAPS 391
textbook is.
Why haven't you graduated yet? THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 20,2014    I    SPORTS    I   11
EXPLORE»
Places to Be:
Pender Island
The Ubyssey's annual "Pender Bender" was a smashing (or smashed) success.
Ubyssey Staff
This Rememberance Day long
weekend, 15 Ubyssey editors,
volunteers and alumni escaped to Pender Island for our
annual retreat.
The ride over
The trip to the tree-lined heaven
that is Pender will take you on a
two-hour ferry ride from Tsaw-
wassen. The ferries stop at several
ofthe other islands, including Galliano and Mayne, before alighting
at Pender.
Besides looking through the
silly knickknacks in the gift shop
and trying hard to resist the
temptation to run around singing The Lonely Island's "I'm on
a Boat," our main activity on the
ferry was revelling in the stunning
views ofthe Strait of Georgia.
Even if you're making the trip in
the dead ofthe winter, you don't
want to miss heading out onto
the deck to look at the views. You
will be greeted with lovely sights
ofthe islands, the water and, if
you're really lucky, the occasional
whale. If you're taking the 7:00
a.m. ferry back to Vancouver, you
can also catch some views ofthe
sunrise while you're tiptoeing past
sleeping passengers.
Hiking
Our accommodations were lush:
a huge mansion right on the coast
with a hot tub on the roof. It was
tough to leave the easy comforts of
our luxurious abode, but one look
out the window served as all the
inspiration I needed.
I made my way down the hill
from the house to the edge ofthe
developed property, relishing the
last few minutes of dirt road before
it gave way to the mossy terrain
that covers much of Pender.
The owner ofthe property had
built a staircase against the cliff,
the only way down from the sheer
drop that towers over it. I found
myself pressed against the railing
at some points and crawling at
others to fit under an overarching rock that jutted over the
creaky steps.
The end of civilization was
marked by a thick, algae-covered rope that serves as a lifeline for anyone traversing the
60-degree slope.
I'd done this hike a year before
with a few former Ubyssey staff
members, but this time I broke the
first rule of hiking by going at it
alone. Everyone else was playing
disc golf, and I was taking the
ferry home later that evening.
There was no semblance of a path
after the rope descent. Either the
deer that populate the island are
smart enough to avoid traversing a
steep cliff perched over the ocean,
or they're more light footed than
I am.
I started to question my
decision to travel alone after my
first few slips and slides on the
damp moss, but upon arriving at
a clearing that stood above the
ocean and revelling in the solitude
ofthe unobstructed sunset, all of
my apprehension melted away. I
was tempted to continue the hike
with what daylight I had left and
try to make it over the fallen logs
and steep drops to the low point
ofthe cliff, where last year we'd
spent some time chatting with
an otter. But when I started off, I
realized that my view wouldn't get
better than this, and that though
continuing the hike and trying to
not fall off a cliff was an exhilarating prospect, so was staying and
appreciating the serenity.
I sat on the moss and took in the
last warmth of the sun, watching the ocean and the trees and
late-season wild strawberries that
dotted the ground around me.
When the sun was on the verge
of sinking below the horizon I
started back, the climb up proving
considerably easier than down.
Disc golf
While one member of our group
was off gallivanting God-knows-
where, most of us were taking
advantage of Pender's main attraction: a 27-hole disc golf course.
The course is a combination of two
ofthe most laid-back activities —
walking through the woods and
throwing a Frisbee. The game is
simple — throw the Frisbee, walk
to it, and throw it again until you
get the disc into a chained basket
or hit a metal pole. Keeping score
is optional.
At the start ofthe free course
is a small wooden clubhouse consisting of a bit of shelter, a picnic
bench and some extra discs for
people who didn't bring their own.
The holes start off easy and
get progressively harder. They
range from short 30-metre putts
through an opening in the forest
to 200-metre-plus lumberjacking
expeditions. The most difficult
holes feature steep slopes that,
with one wrong throw, put you
200 metres further away the basket straight down a rocky hill.
Despite some ofthe harder
holes, the course remains as relaxed as the rest ofthe island. It's
a good balance of walking wooded
paths and climbing rocky slopes.
Drinking is optional, but encour
aged on the course. The trash
bins every few holes are actually
recycling bins for empties.
Though the course is made up
mostly of par threes we played
them as par fours to make up for
our lack of skills and allow for a
few beers on the course. If golf is
a good walk spoiled, Pender disc
golf is a good hike made even better — with Frisbees and beer.
Wrapping up
Regardless of what you choose
to do on Pender Island, you
can be sure the views will be
=HOTOWIFFMCDONAFDffHE UBYSSEY
spectacular everywhere you go.
Whether you're out climbing its
cliffs, slacklining in the thick
forest or just strolling by the
coast and snapping photos of the
landscapes, Pender will make
you feel like you're in another
world. Its serenity and unreal
natural beauty is the perfect
weekend getaway with friends.
If you've got the means to rent
out a seven-bedroom mansion
with separate meditation cabin
and two love-shacks on the road
between, The Ubyssey highly
recommends it. Xi
sl:
ECDM':
MASTER
DIGITAL
MEDIA
► Industry-Focused Program
► Startup Business Support
► 4 Major Canadian Universities
► Competitive Scholarship Opportunities
|OmTHENEXTONUNEWEB,NARNOV28th
thecdm.ca/webmars
NTRE FOR
DIGITAL MEDIA
a collaboration between
thecdm.ca 12    |    GAMES    |    THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 20,2014
Photo of the Day
Minimalist photography of intricate architecture.
ISI
)arjunhair
1
2
3
*
S
6
7
8
"
-
11
12
13
14
"
"
17
,.
"
20
21
25
22
23
■ 24
2G
27
2S
29
30
31
32
33
■ 34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
■ 42
43
44
45
46
53
54
47
51
52
43
43
55
56
57
SO
1
1
SS
"
GO
"
62
'
"
65
EG
"
6
3
2
7
2
4
1
7
5
7
6
5
6
8
5
2
1
4
5
8
3
7
2
9
4
7
5
1
6
9
8
2
3
6
2
9
8
7
3
4
5
1
3
1
8
5
4
2
7
9
6
9
5
6
4
1
7
2
3
8
2
4
3
9
8
5
1
6
7
1
8
7
2
3
6
9
4
5
5
6
4
7
9
1
3
8
2
7
9
2
3
5
8
6
1
4
8
3
1
6
2
4
5
7
9
NOV17 ANSWERS
's
'c
*A
"l
V
1
'»
D
*A
'k
1
A
w
L
s
0
R
E
K
c
1
N
E
E
R
0
O
N
0
T
W
I
T
H
s
T
A | N
D
1
N
C
S
s
5 If
0
1
c
E l«
B
A
T
E
lo
A
F
s 1 |e
D
u 1
c
I
R
C
U
m|n
A
V
1
C \A
T
E
D
0
D
C
Y |   |[
L
E
A He.
O
D
E
L
L
S H   F
u
c
A
R Ir.
E
R
N
S
I
E ll
0
N
E |   Hm
A
L
T
A
I
N
d r'
S
c
0
V 1*1
R
A
B
L
E
B"s
T
A | If
E
R
r|
A
D
0
R
E Ic
u
E
S
s In
E
D
D
E
P
A
R |*T
M
E
N
T
A
L
1
Z
E
A
L
A
E
w
E
L
T
1
•L
1
B
R
A
Y
E
L
L
0
N
E
s
"A
s
S
A
D
COURTESYBESTCROSSWORDS.COM
33- Les -Unis
ACROSS
34-Sandwich shop
36-Scot's refusal
1-Antitoxins
37-Safety device
5-Dated
38-Medicine
10-Sgts.,e.g.
39-Part of ETA
14-Tons
40-Mine find
15-Son of Abraham
41-Corrosion
16- Grey, tea type
42-Singer Lopez
17-Shout in derision
44- Rhinoplasty
18-Capital of Japan
47-Small valley
19-"Judith" composer
48-Tense
20- Simulating real life
49-Author Deighton
22-Of little width
50-Stem
24- "The Simpsons" bartender
53- Unpoetic characteristic
25-Acting part
58- even keel
26-Apathy
59- Great Lakes tribesmen
29-Hug
61-Dry watercourse
COURTESYKRAZYDAD.COM
-JOV17 ANSWERS
62- Longfellow's bell town
public wealth
42-Some digits
63-Wash lightly
10-Closer
43- Deserter
64- I've Got in Kalamazoo
11-SingerVikki
45-Cultural
65-It may be compact
12- Yes ?
46- alai
66-Tiffs
13-Killed
47-Shuts
67-Symbol of slavery
21- "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes"
50-Highway
author
51- Word that can precede war.
DOWN
23-Liturgical vestment
bioticand climax
25- Ignited again
52- Limos, hatchbacks, and
1-Satirist Mort
26-Mortise insert
coupes
2- "The Time Machine" people
27- Alamogordo's county
53- colada
3-lt'soveryour head
28-Gives a 9.8, say
54-Breather
4-Try
30-For want of	
55-"Othello" villain
5-One who feels bad
31-Chili con __
56-Minn. neighbour
6- "Dilbert" intern
32- Strange and mysterious
57-Eight furlongs
7-Japanese rice wine
34-Distrust
60-Tear
8-Speak
35- Nav. officer
9- Pert, to the management of
38-Pants

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0126800/manifest

Comment

Related Items