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The Ubyssey Feb 12, 1976

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Array THS UBYSSEY
Vol. LVII, No. 51     VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 1976     <*Jl^>48     228-2301
McGeer decides to c
out
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BEING AWAY FROM HOME, but just during the day, doesn't seem to bother this young user of'^ariada
Goose Daycare Centre. She is one of 140 kids whose working parents place them in one of eight daycare
centres at UBC. But it's an expensive method of babysitting. (Story, P. 5.)
Res rent hikes to exceed 10.6%
By MARCUS GEE
Residence rent increases at UBC
next year will almost certainly
exceed the 10.6 per cent provincial
ceiling, UBC acting housing
director Michael Davis said
Wednesday.
"I would expect it (the increase)
to be above the rent controls. I
doubt it will be under 10.6 per
cent," he said.
Davis said he will disclose the
exact size of the rent increase next
Thursday. But the figure Davis
decides upon will have to go to the
UBC board of governors for approval.
Residence rent increases were
limited to 10.6 per cent last year
after rentalsman Barrie Clark
decided the Landlord and Tenant
Act covers UBC residences.
Davis said rising labor costs are
one of the main reasons he will
recommend a rent increase above
10.6 per cent. He said settlements
with the Association of University
and College Employees, local 1,
and the Canadian Union of Public
Employees, local 116, were higher
than housing administrators expected.
Rising operating costs are also a
factor making the rent increases
necessary, Davis said.
"I haven't seen any costs rising
less than 10 per cent," he said.
And Davis denies there ever was
a ruling that UBC residences come
under the 10.6 per cent rent increases ceiling. He said the ceiling
should not apply to residences
because the housing administration does not make a profit
on running them.
"There is nothing to say we will
be under the ceiling."
Last year the board of governors
applied for an exemption from the
10.6 per cent ceiling after then
housing  director   Les   Rohringer
recommended a rent increase of
18.6 per cent.
The government turned down the
request.
Rick Murray, student member of
the board of governors, who voted
with the majority on the board to
seek the exemption last year, said
he is not sure if the board should do
the same this year.
But   he   said   the   provincial
government definitely stated last
year that the ceiling does apply to '
UBC residences.
"I don't see how the university
can even contemplate going above
the guidelines," he said.
Gerald Algier, head of the Gage
Towers liaison committee, said
Wednesday he opposes any
residence rent increase above 10.6
per cent.
"I can't see why they (rent increases) should be higher than 10.6
per cent," he said. "We will
probably protest but we don't have
any power."
Protest still on
despite absence
Education minister Pat McGeer Wednesday cancelled a visit to
UBC less than 24 hours before he was to face a demonstration
against car insurance rate increases.
But Jim Bennett, executive assistant to McGeer, who is also
the minister responsible for the Insurance Corporation of B.C.,
said the student demonstration was not a factor in McGeer's
decision.
Student leaders quickly called McGeer "chickenshit" for his
decision and said he "doesn't have the nerve to show up."
Jake van der Kamp, president of the Alma Mater Society,
sponsors of the demonstration, said McGeer's cancellation
"shows a complete lack of spine" on the part of both McGeer and
the Social Credit government which McGeer represents.
"McGeer is a chicken   to   not
1.47 per cent
turnout in
SUS election
Only 54 of 3,667 science students
voted in their undergraduate
society elections Wednesday — a
turnout of 1.47 per cent.
And those 54 turned down a
proposed Science Undergraduate
Society fee levy of $1, while electing four SUS representatives to the
student representative assembly of
the Alma Mater Society.
Elected SUS reps are Anne
Katrichak (37 votes), Blake
Fleming (33), Aksel Hallin (28),
and Kerry Zoehner (23). Losers
Ross Berringer and Brent Tynan
polled 21 and20 votes respectively.
The new SUS executive, elected
by acclamation today, consists of
Bob Salkeld, president, Richard
Kirkham, vice-president, Heather
Miller, secretary-treasurer, Richard Wilczek, public relations officer, and Bruce Wozny, academics
co-ordinator.
Thirty-one students voted in
favor of the fee levy and 23 voted
against it. The AMS constitution
requires a two-thirds majority vote
in favor of fees before they can be
approved. In this case, 36 votes
were needed for the fee levy to
pass.
Salkeld said he was disappointed
with the outcome of the fee
referendum.
"It's crazy that people would
vote for reps but not for fees," he
said. "In effect by voting in SUS
reps they supported the SUS, but
by voting against the fee levy, they
voted against what sustains the
SUS."
Salkeld said he doesn't know how
the SUS could hold another
referendum for the fee levy. "We
spent $200 on ads for the election,"
he said. "We only have $20 left."
But the SUS is not dependent
upon the $1 fee levy for their funds
next year. The AMS will continue
for one more year to fund the
See page 8: OPTION
Portugal
Since people stopped shooting
each other in Portugal, the daily
press has more or less ignored
events in that country, blood being
the necessary ingredient for a
"good foreign news story."
But significant events are occurring in Portugal and Canadian
University Press correspondent
Art Moses reports on them on Page
7. today.
open the building because a few
students are coming out to
demonstrate against the ICBC
increases," he said.
Lake Sagaris, chairwoman of the
B.C. Student Federation, said she
was not surprised by McGeer's
action.
"We suspected that he wouldn't
have the nerve to show up," she
said. "It's an example of his total
disregard for how his actions affect
other people's lives."
And Phil Resnick, the UBC
political science professor who is a
co-founder of the Committee for a
Democratic University, co-
organizers of the demonstration,
said McGeer's cancellation was
"great."
"I think it's a moral victory since
we have scared him away. If he is
that chicken shit it shows he can't
face the music."
"A government which refuses to
meet the public has a lot to explain," he added.
And Alma Mater Society council
unanimously passed a motion
Wednesday condemning McGeer
for cancelling his appearance at
the Angus building.
McGeer was to open the new
McPhee Conference Centre adjoining the Henry Angus building.
The ceremony was to take place at
3:30 p.m. but was postponed to 5
p.m. to allow guests to attend the
afternoon funeral of H. R. MacMillan.
The student demonstration will
take place on schedule, but at a
different location than that advertised on posters around campus. And their target will not be
McGeer, but his stand-in, deputy
education minister Walter Hardwick.
Demonstrators will meet at 3
p.m. in the SUB conversation pit,
not in front of the Henry Angus
building.
They will listen to speeches and
be entertained by musicians before
marching to the Angus building at
5 p.m.
Bennett claimed McGeer was not
able to get to the ceremony
because of the 90-minute postponement. He said McGeer had to
be in "other meetings" at 5 p.m.
He did not say what those
meetings were or how McGeer
planned to get from UBC to Victoria for his 5 p.m. meetings if he
had attended the originally-
scheduled 3:30 ceremony.
Thursday's demonstration will
be followed Friday by a planned
boycott of classes at UBC.
The AMS has asked students to
picket ICBC claim centres or join
the B.C. Federation of Labor-
sponsored ICBC protest rally in
Victoria, rather than attend
classes. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, February 12,  1976
Student activism taped
While post-secondary students
across Canada are becoming
organized in response to government cutbacks in education, a
Vancouver group is using electronic means to rally high school
students.
The group, headed by ex-student
activist Mike Goodman, is using a
recently completed video tape on
organizational attempts by B.C.
high school students over the past
six years.
Consisting mainly of interviews
with ex-student organizers, the 30
minute production, called The
Students' Voice, traces the growth
and decline of several active
organizations that have sprung up
since 1967. They include:
• the Inter-high Student Union
(1967-69), which argued for
community control over and access to school, removal of compulsory attendance and noncompetitive learning;
■ • The Oganookie Standard,
(1970-72), an inter-high school
newspaper continuously banned by
school boards for unacceptable
content such as birth control information. The paper was an attempt to overcome the near total
control school principals had over
posters, bulletins, PA systems and
school newspapers;
• the bill of rights movement
(1972-74), which drew up a basic
list of rights for students that was
ratified by 11 student councils;
• the B.C. Federation of
Students (norelation to the current
B.C. Student Federation), (1973-
74), which tried to initiate
discussion among student councils
on various issues affecting
students.
Goodman, who is one of the
producers of the film, says it
should have wide appeal. "It can
show the general public a lot about
the high school system," he says.
"It puts together a number of
students who articulate clearly
some of the grievances they have."
But, he says, a major function is
relating to students in high school
and university some lessons about
the organizational process.
' 'Students lack a sense of history,
as does any oppressed group such
as women, natives or the poor," he
says. "They are denied the experience of those who preceded
them in trying to change their
situation."
But the same obstacles that
students in the  tape  articulated
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may be around the corner for
Goodman's group in distributing —
control of information by
bureaucrats (school boards and
principals) who would rather keep
such information unavailable to
students.
During the two years in which
the tape was produced, Goodman
says no help was forthcoming from
any government department he
approached.
He says he hopes to have better
luck with the B.C. Media
Resources Board, which acts as an
audio-visual library for schools in
the province.
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THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
Physical plant 'efficiency' hit
By MARK BUCKSHON
Physical plant director Neville
Smith denied Wednesday
allegations of indecisiveness, incompetence and top-heavy administration in his department.
The charges were made by one of
seven dismissed technical employees.
But in responding to the charges
by an Office and Technical Employees Union member, Smith
admitted that several qualified
engineers are doing jobs in the
department that don't require
engineering qualifications.
And in defending the need to call
in engineering consultants at rates
as much as $45 an hour, Smith
admitted at least four physical
plant civil engineers in January
didn't have the expertise to decide
how to cut a new doorway in the
Hennings building.
In a letter to The Ubyssey, the
employee, who asked to remain
anonymous combined a bitter
personal attack against Smith with
examples of incompetence by the
department's engineers.
The letter was the latest in a
series of appeals for attention by
the OTEU members in the physical
plant design division, who will be
out of their jobs by the end of the
month.
On Wednesday, Smith reiterated
earlier administration statements
that the workers are being
dismissed because of budget
problems and a curtailment of new
campus building construction.
The employee noted "in
January, when an interior doorway
had to be cut into Hennings room
101, Smith had to send to Vancouver for professional help" as the
five civil engineers on staff failed
to make a decision."
Smith said the consultant, who
was paid $75 for about two hours
work, was called in because the
doorway could have created
problems for the structural
stability of the entire building and
nobody at UBC had the specialized
skills to solve the problem.
When asked if it is true there are
five qualified civil engineers in
physical plant, Smith said:
"There's just one job classified as
civil engineer."
"There's another job classified
as design engineer — in fact, he's
involved in structural studies. Now
those are the only two jobs which
are classified as that (civil
engineering) but it happens we
have other people who are civil
engineers."
Smith admitted that several of
the department's engineers (said
to be 14 by the employee) don't
need to be engineers to do their
jobs — especially those responsible
for supervising trades workers.
"Highly paid professional
engineers control a staff of office
girls, road sweeping and shrub
planting,"   the  employee   wrote.
Smith justified the use of
qualified engineers in the jobs by
saying "we have here a city, in
fact, and if you were to compare
the number of engineers we have to
a city of comparable size, now a
city with a population of 30,000
doesn't have the problems we
have."
Smith said physical plant has as
many as 600 supervised hourly
paid employees and said it is
reasonable that persons with
engineering qualifications could
hold the jobs.
But he said most of the supervisory jobs could be filled by non-
engineers. "We don't always
require engineering certification,"
he said.
Hoyles boils for exams
to rid people like Hoyles
By DOUG TODD
Entrance exams are a good way
to weed out people who are not
ready for university, according to
new student senator Susan Hoyles.
"High school students would
apply themselves more if they
knew there were exams," she said
in an interview recently.
"Some students start university
and quit at Christmas. If they had
tests at the end of high school,
they'd know whether they could
handle it."
Hoyles, agriculture 3, said she
wouldn't have been accepted into
university if there had been entrance exams. But she said that
she is glad she is here.
"Exams should test math and
English for all students. Everyone
needs a general overall
knowledge," she said.
Hoyles said she thinks students'
lack of literacy is a problem.
"The cleaning up of minds
should be done at high school.
There should be more concentrated essay writing."
When^ asked whether students
not intending to go to university
should get the same education in
high school, she said: "Even if
you're a real estate agent, you
have to write a report."
Hoyles, the agriculture senator
won by acclamation last month.
Hoyles said she was not in
sympahty with the December
strike by the Association of
University and College Employees. She is against any
strikers, she said.
But when asked whether she
thought workers had the right to
strike, she agreed that they did.
At one point Hoyles said "the
- workers are getting good wages for
doing nothing. When I go into the
library  there  are four   or   five
workers there not doing much."
She then said this was only how it
appeared to her.
Hoyles added she had heard that
there had been cutbacks in library
staffing and that they are now
understaffed.
But she said there is no reason
why students shouldn't have
crossed the picket lines.
"Students pay good money to
come to university. I wouldn't
honor picket lines because some
people want more money."
Hoyles had to have the tenure
decision process explained before
she could decide how many
students she thought should sit on
the tenure committees.
She decided that there should be
20 per cent representation by
students on the faculty committee,
in most departments the major
tenure decision making body. It is
usually made up of tenured
professors.
She is not sure what kind of influence students should have on the
committee. After a reporter further explained the issue she
decided that teachers should be
evaluated on a combination of their
teaching ability and the contribution they make to the field
they are in.
Elsewhere in the letter, the
employee said: "For $50 an hour
Smith employed an engineer to
check for water seepage affecting
Wreck Beach cliffs while at the
same time he authorized $1,400 to
be paid to another outside engineer
to design a sprinkler system to
pour thousands of gallons of water
on the new botanical gardens
directly above the ill-fated cliffs."
Smith said the sprinkler system
was actually designed with the
runoff problem in mind, and
seepage would be controlled by
drain tiles which would conduct
excess sprinkler water into the
university's storm sewer system.
The letter began with a scathing
personal attack on Smith. The
employee     charged     Smith's
"previous experience of eight
years with a Toronto brewery
would appear to qualify him for a
position in the Pit" and pointed out
that Smith himself is not certified
as a professional engineer in B.C.
Smith said he doesn't need
professional certification because
he is performing an administrative
job.
"This is a real nasty letter," he
said in the interview, also attended
by Arnie Meyers, UBC's chief
public relations officer.
Smith declined comment on how
the letter would affect grievance
procedures of the seven workers
currently under way, but said he
was surprised at the intensity of
the letter.
Smith said the university has
offered to help the employees find
jobs in other parts of the university
or off campus.
"They haven't been responsive
to our offers," he said. "I'd be
willing to gp into town (Vancouver)
to speak to someone (to help find a
job)."
Smith said changes can be expected in the operation of his
department in future months and
other workers may lose their jobs
as new construction winds down.
He said the covered pool is the
only major new project under way
and other projects on campus are
nearly completed.
But Smith would not be specific
about the extent of the possible
layoffs or their effect on his
department's structure.
m\w
A GOOD QUESTION considering how fast everything else is going up in price, is raised by Joanne Clifton,
arts 2. Placard was intended for viewing by education minister Pat McGeer today, but not now.
Deans oppose student tenure reps
By CHRIS GAINOR
Student input into tenure
decisions is unlikely to increase if
the deans of UBC's faculties have
their way.
Five deans interviewed Wednesday by The Ubyssey said tenure
decisions should be left in the
hands of faculty and that students
should have only limited input.
At the moment, student input
into tenure decisions is limited to
course and teaching questionnaires handed out to students at the
end of a course. There is no
guarantee results are used in tenure decisions.
Education dean John Andrews
and commerce dean Noel Hall said
student committees in their
faculties advise tenure committees
on   the   teaching   abilities   of
professors being  considered  for
tenure.
Forestry dean Joseph Gardner
said he holds informal consultations with students, usually
students who are unhappy with
their prof's teaching abilities.
He said because forestry is a
small faculty, he often meets with
students who wish to discuss
teaching quality in their courses.
Gardner said "tenure decisions
are too important to be left to
students.
"Students are only here for six
months of the year and this could
endanger the faculty member," he
said. Other faculty members who
are at the university year round
are better able to judge a person's
teaching ability, he added.
Law dean Albert McClean said
Apathetic artsies hold election
Student apathy has struck again.
Only 206 of 6,500 arts students —
3.1 per cent — voted in Tuesday's
election of arts representatives for
the Alma Mater Society assembly.
Elected were Pam Willis, Pam
Edwards, Dave Jiles, Paul Sandhu
and Dave Van Blarcom. Only Van
Blarcom, current AMS vice-
president and author of the new
constitution, has had AMS council
experience.
The elected reps will be members of the student representative
assembly, which consists of
students on the senate and board of
governors and representatives of
each of the undergraduate society.
Despite some irregularities in
the election, none of the 10 candidates plan to challenge the
election results.
Defeated candidate Stuart
Lyster's name was not printed on
the ballots and poll officials filled
his name in on the ballots before
giving them to voters. However,
about 20 people had voted before
Lyster's name began to appear on
the ballots.
Current Arts Undergraduate
Society president Arlene Francis
said Tuesday some of the candidates spent more on their
campaigns than the $50 that is
allowed by the AMS constitution.
Only two polling stations were
open for the election.
Complete results are:
Van Blarcom, 103 votes.
Willis, 100.
Edwards, 84.
Jiles, 78.
Sandhu, 76.
Brian Ferstman, 69.
Lorelee Parker, 64.
Sharon LeBlanc, 56.
Michael Ewen, 42.
Lyster, 38.
he did not believe students should
be on tenure committees.
"Teaching is evaluated by
questionnaire and that's an appropriate input," he said.
But in the science faculty, tenure
procedures vary from department
to department, according to dean
George Volkoff.
"No one general rule works in all
departments," he said. "There is
no general standard."
He said representatives of
various departments in the faculty
have met to draft a general
procedure, but so far have failed to
agree on a procedure, he said.
"I think there should be student
input but not student representation," said Volkoff.
Andrews admitted that the
faculty has "not given any thought
to students on tenure committees
because it is against the
regulations of the university.
"To me the primary issue is
whether there is a rigorous
evaluation of teaching," Andrews
said.
And the education faculty, he
said, has set up a rigorous system
of teaching evaluation. A student
committee evaluates the teaching
of all profs up for tenure and
reports to the formal tenure
committee, he said.
The students carefully examine
the teaching abilities of profs and
the tenure committee gives the
recommendations a great deal of
weight, Andrews said.
Hall said a similar system is
employed in the commerce
faculty. Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, February 12,  1976
Disgusting
Politically, premier Bill Bennett is not stupid.
What better way to get rid of a turncoat who, after
drooling for power as a Liberal MLA, decides to swallow
what little is left of his pride and join the Social Credit party
he had assailed so often in the legislature?
When Pat McGeer was appointed education minister,
many people winced. But probably only Bennett knew what
would happen when he let McGeer loose on the Insurance
Corporation of B.C.
For not only has McGeer's power trip blown his mind, it
has also blown his chances of ever being respected as a
rational politician, not to mention head of a large
corporation.
In his zeal to adopt the Social Credit philosophy — money
matters more, make 'em pay — McGeer has turned ICBC into
a political screw, sticking it to all those people who, under
the NDP, had no choice but to accept low insurance rates,
which was to be subsidized, of course, by a gasoline tax.
(ICBC is $181 million in the hole, he says? Bullshit. A
deficit is not a debt. It stands for uncollected monies ICBC
expects to get plus the huge capital costs any corporation the
size of ICBC can expect to incur in its first few years of
operation.)
That's bad enough.
But now this neophyte Socred, in his headlong rush to the
political right, has discovered what happens when he lets his
knee jerk reactions get out of hand.
People got upset. So upset that, when they get a chance
to confront the person who is sticking it to them, they unite
to tell him what he can do with his right-wing policy.
For now, at least, that's all they'll do because, faced with
the prospect of confronting his angry constituents, McGeer
has decided to cop out, turn yellow, hide, retreat, show his
back.
Disgusting.
However, there is something else to consider. McGeer is
also the minister responsible for education in this province,
including UBC. He's been so busy trying to extricate himself
from his own ICBC mess, he hasn't had time to address
himself to education.
Considering his performance to date, that's probably a
good thing.
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/
wm^mmm-- mtmmm^mm&m.
nWKwwtwMmmm
"I just don'
and now he
t understand this McGeer fellow  . . . first he asks us to keep it raining till late Thursday,
wants us to switch to Central Standard Time!"
Letters
Pooh,
pooh
Tis a far, far better thing we do
than we have ever done before —
Dana Vogel's letter has moved us
to this confession.
We are male drivers, under 25,
drunk and so we do not (hie)
complain about our insurance —
it's cheap at the price, for it is we
who cause accidents by our fast
driving.
As for wreckless, we deny it
emphatically: we've caused more
wrecks than we can count! We are
killers, and that's a fact, not a
supposition. Not a preposition
(English 100 only), not an imposition (that's for gears), not an
accusation, not an acquisition (we
were born this way)!
We take issue with the statistics
of even such an obvious mental
giant as Dana (although perhaps
she was trying to be kind when she
said it) — we are responsible for
ALL the accidents, not just the
majority! Each of us drives down
Dana's street every night, cases of
beer in the back seat, knowing
we're having a hell of a good time
and looking for a better one!
We are ashamed of the way in
which we have despoiled the
names of females in our age
brackets, for the blame lies solely
with us.
But Dana has not castigated us
enough! No! We deserve to be
punished, too, for the thunder,
lightning, rain, inflation, unemployment, income taxes,
prohibition, inhibition, exhibition,
Angola, the Middle East, Ireland,
Watergate, the Olympics, the Sky
Shop affair, VD, Pat McGeer,
warts, body odor, post-nasal drip,
the common cold and the heartbreak of psoriasis!
There is not one of us who is not
guilty of these crimes and more.
We demand punishment! Whip us!
Beat   us!   Put   out   our   eyes!
Dismember us! Keelhaul us!
Castrate us! Take away our car
keys!
Hu Wallis,
science 3;
Richard Soo,
arts 2;
Colin Ensworth,
arts 2;
Richard Paul,
commerce 1.
Pooh II
Dana Vogel:
You say (Ubyssey letter, Feb.
10) that all male drivers under 25
should pay higher rates because
statistics say they should. I have
been driving for eight years with
no accidents.
Why should I subsidize these
drunken, wreckless drivers? Why
should I subsidize lower rates for
female drivers? "Oh," you say,
"but we don't get drunk and cause
accidents and that's also a fact."
How in hell do you stretch statistics
into being the absolute?
You state: "UBC male residence
occupants rip the phones right off
the walls and have telephones
beside their cribs."
Vogel, I do not have a telephone
nor do I have a crib. I am,
however, a UBC male residence
occupant. I see you are conducting
surveys for Statistics Canada
again. You are a sexist. That's a
FACT. Not a supposition, or an
accusation, but a fact.
Shame, shame. If I were you, I
would be ashamed too.
Wayne Sitarz
pharmacy 2
Scapino III
This will be Scapino III and, as
far as the undersigned is concerned, the final instalment.
I was reading Shakespeare and
Marlowe, and attending performances of Gilbert and Sullivan,
before Jeremy Ralph and Martin
Stead were ever born.   If  they
choose to pit their learning against
mine, all I need is 30 seconds'
notice.
Gilbert and Sullivan were
ridiculing the British establishment; Ouzounian was ridiculing a
nation. As for Shakespeare and
Marlowe, neither of them ever met
a Jew throughout his life. They
were echoing a general prejudice
that neither could verify. Yet
Shakespeare had sense enough to
know that the caricature was a
caricature, for Shylock speaks
some of the most moving lines in
The Merchant of Venice.
Ouzounian must know that Italians
are not as he portrays them; if he
does not,- let him meet a few.
The fact is that Italians have
been held up to ridicule in North
America since they were first
imported as cheap labor. Racial
slurs are not good, clean fun; they
are vicious and obscene.
Ouzounian was pandering to
prejudice, and the university was
providing him with a panderer's
podium. If Ralph and Stead are not
aware of this prejudice, then they
have not been living in North
America.
In conclusion, when I say Mr.
Ouzounian I mean Mr.; when I say
Messrs. Ralph and Stead, I mean
Messrs. What do you have against
those titles?
Leon Hurvitz
professor
Re your last paragraph. Style —
we like to be consistent—Staff.
Zanu
In reply to the letter from Ron
Joseph (Ubyssey Feb. 5), who
objects to $50 of Alma Mater
Society money going to a liberation
group which refuses to negotiate
with Ian Smith for majority rule in
Rhodesia, I shall begin by quoting
from The Ubyssey "Soapbox"
article of Jan. 29, which quotes
Michael Mawema of ZANU:
"(ZANU) indeed does not object
to negotiations because it did
participate in some negotiations
....  (But) at the moment, ZANU
is committed to fighting. ZANU
rejects unequivocally Nkomo's
discussions with Ian Smith.
(Joshua Nkomo leads a breakaway
faction from the African National
Council, and is currently engaged
in negotiations with Smith.)
"It rejects the entire theory that
in 1975, after almost 20 years of
negotiations, (when) Ian Smith
continues to say publicly every day
that he is not willing to give
majority rule to Nkomo, that he
can spend his time hobnobbing it
with the colonial and imperialist
masters of these people."
Ron Joseph says that he is "for
majority rule in Rhodesia and
South Africa." But given the absolute intransigence of the racist
minority regime, as demonstrated
over the past 20 years in
negotiations, real support for
majority rule now can only mean
support for the group which is
taking the only path left open to
majority rule — armed struggle.
The freedom fighters in Zimbabwe already have arms. The
AMS' $50 and the other donations
will aid the freedom fighters, and
people in concentration camps,
refugee camps and prisons.
The funds will provide for
rehabilitation of political prisoners
recently released, food, medicines,
clothing, legal defense, education,
welfare and transportation.
All students should be pleased
that their AMS gives its support to
the forces of progress in Zimbabwe.
David Fuller,
for the ad hoc ZANU
tour committee
The Ubyssey welcomes letters
from all readers.
Letters should be signed and
typed.,
Although an effort is made to
publish all letters received, The
Ubyssey reserves the right to edit
letters for reasons of brevity,
legality, grammar or taste.
Letters should be addressed to
the paper care of campus mail or
dropped off at The Ubyssey office,
SUB 241-K.
THE U8YSSEY
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 1976
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the AMS
or the university administration. Member, Canadian University
Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary
and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located in room
241K of the Student Union Building. Editorial departments,
228-2301; Sports, 228-2305; Advertising, 228-3977.
Editor: Gary Coull
And here we are folks for the second game of the Non-existent Hockey
League regular season. The crowd is hushed before the opening face off
here Dick, mainly because he is all alone in the stands and has no one to
talk to.
Taking the opening faceoff for the Austin B Brewins is Ralph Maurer and
for the Austin A Brewins Heather Walker. Oh and the puck is dropped,
Dick and Maurer wins the draw. He flips it over to Paisley Woodward up to
Doug  Rushton;  Rushton  shoooots!  Ohhh and  he fans on  that  drive and
But  David  "Nureyev" Wilkinson picks up the puck and streaks down the
ice on his knees; he winds up, he shoots. A canonating drive richochets 15
feet wide!
Gregg Thompson quivering in goal was glad that drive was wide, Dick.
Look at this, Dick, Nancy Southam and Chris Gainor are having words in
the corner!  And Gainor is getting the best of it; he got a couple of good
punches in.
The benches are clearing and Matt King and Doug Field are in there laying
on  the  lumber.  Mark  Buckshon  has taken off his skate and is chasing Al
Peterson all over the ice. Marcus Gee is sparring with Jake van der Kamp
and Doug Todd and this has turned into an enormous donnybrook. Thursday,  February  12,  1976
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
Daycare centres:
who's responsible?
By HEATHER WALKER
Should the university be responsible for
providing daycare facilities for its students,
staff and faculty?
Right now the answer depends on what is
meant by "responsible".
Administration vice-president Erich Vogt
said Wednesday the university's responsibility was "a matter of public policy."
. In this case, the "public policy" is that
"the Universities Council has said that
education dollars are not to be spent on
daycare."
The Universities Council receives budget
proposals from the universities, which it
reviews and presents to the provincial
government. When the government decides
"how much money it wants to spend on all
universities, it tells the council, which then
allocates the funds to the provincial
universities.
Vogt said he thinks the university's
responsibility is limited to providing huts for
the daycare centres to operate in.
So far, the administration has provided
eight old army huts in Acadia Camp at the
south end of campus for use as daycare
facilities.
"We have provided the wartime shacks,
and we'd like to make more available,"
Vogt said.
He said the university should provide
"reasonable maintenance" for the
buildings. Maintenance money comes from
the university's general revenues, he said.
Vogt said he is "in favor of daycare,
but money for it should come from social
assistance programs, not from education
dollars."
UBC daycare co-ordinator Kristie
Shoolbraid said she was aware of the administration and Universities Council's
stand on daycare.
"I don't foresee any chance in that
situation," she said. "But the university is
responsible to the community, and it must
realize that this responsibility takes many
forms, including daycare.
"One day we may have to turn to the
university for financial aid, but it won't be
on a regular basis. I expect they will give us
something, maybe more money for building
maintenance, but no money for actual
daycare programs."
However, Shoolbraid said she was sympathetic to the administration's problems in
funding daycare.
"It could be an expense which could
snowball — it could mushroom into a large
conern and then might interfere with
something like housing."
Shoolbraid said daycare might receive
money in what she called a' 'translated form
— another building, or some more maintenance."
Shoolbraid and Vogt said the administration has provided another building
which will be used for daycare.
The building, hut 87 in Acadia was formerly used by the Mental Retardation Institute, and will provide space for 25 more
children. The children will be older than five
(pertacare). Schoolbraid said she hopes the
building would be ready by the end of this
summer.
"We'll have to have some money for
renovations on the building," Shoolbraid
said.
"We'll try to raise some and try to winkle
some out of the administration. It'll be a
one-shot deal, money for maintenance and
alterations."
UBC provides spaces for 148 pre-school
children so far. There are four centres for
children between 18 months to three years
old, and four children between three and
five years old.
Centres for children under three cost $160
per month and are licensed for 12 children.
Those for children over three cost $120 per
month and are licensed for 25 children.
That means UBC has accommodation for
148 children, but all these spaces are filled.
A UBC study to determine daycare needs
done last summer indicated that at least 125
more spaces are needed.
"We had a very poor response to the
survey," Shoolbraid said. "I'm sure that's
only a very conservative estimate.
"We have very steady requests. There's
150 to 200 people on the waiting lists."
Such a long waiting list obviously indicates a serious problem for parents who
want to attend university. If there's no room
in the daycare centres, what do you do?
Shoolbraid said the situation might be
helped by changing licensing regulations to
alio w family daycares to take more than two
children.
Family daycares are homes which are
licensed as daycare centres, but the person
in the home is only licensed to look after two
children besides her own.
"There are three daycare centres east of
campus which carry a number of UBC
people. These people should really be with
us."
Shoolbraid said she was interested in
starting a drop-in daycare centre on campus.
"People would be able to bring their kids
here for a few hours when they went to a
class or to the library," she said.
"But a problem with it is the location. You
can't have people taking a 25 mile walk out
to Acadia to leave there kids here."
Acadia Camp, where all UBC's daycare
DAYCARE KIDS . . . with supervisor Nancy Cole
4f-
—matt king photos
SUPERVISOR BILL STAMPS . .. looks after Kindercare
facilities are located, is a long way from the
centre of campus, where Shoolbraid
believes a drop-in centre would have to be
located to be effective.
She said she had no definite plans yet for
starting a drop-in centre, as she would have
to do another survey first to find out how
much need there is for such a facility.
Even if she proves that UBC needs a drop-
in centre, it will be very difficult to provide.
There are no funds set aside for daycare,
and although the university has given the
daycare centres the huts which they operate
from, it has never given them any outside of '
Acadia camp.
Daycare centres at UBC are all cooperatives. This means the parents help the
paid staff of the centre look after the
children during the day, and do janitorial
work at night. They are also the managers
of the centres, and most pay the employees
and act as treasurers and keep the books for
the centres.
"If the centres weren't co-operative the
cost of the under-three ones would go up to
$200 a month," she said.
The reason for this lies in licensing
regulations.
Centres for younger children are only
permitted to care for 12 children, and there
must be three adults present at all times.
UBC's under-three centres have two full-
time staff members each, so the parents act
as a third staff member. If the centres were
no longer co-operative, each centre would
have to hire one more full-time person.
Shoolbraid said the salary of the new
person would push daycare fees up substantially.
"Our supervisors earn $750 a month at
least, and one or two of them are over $800.
"So it would cost around $2200 a month to
pay three staff people, and parents' fees
come to about $1600 a month, so they would
have to be raised."
But she said the over-three centres could
become partially co-op instead of fully co-op
without raising the fees.
Licensing regulations for these centres
permit each one to care for 25 children with
three adults in attendance.
Each of the over-three centres have three
full-time staff, and as there are more
children in each centre, they can be paid
without any increase in the fees. Parents
would still manage the centres and do
janitorial duties.
But Shoolbraid justified co-op daycare on
other grounds. "Co-op daycare provides an
atmosphere closer to the home atmosphere,
and that is what I feel daycare should do,"
she said.
"It also is better for the parents because
more are involved in the program and know
what is happening to their children."
A spokeswoman for a non co-op off-
campus centre, Alma "Y", said it has kept
its rates down in spite of the absence of
parent help.
"We have to keep our rates down to $120 a
month," she said.
"The government subsidy only goes as
high as $120, so that's as high as we can go."
She said the staff at the centre had not had
a pay increase in 19 months, because the
fees have to remain stable.
The provincial government pays subsidies
for daycare up to $120 for children over
three and $160 for those under three, and any
centre which is operating mainly on money
from subsidies is not permitted to charge
any more than the maximum amount the
government will pay.
As most people who use daycare at UBC
are  subsidized,   it   is   doubtful   whether
daycare fees could go up.
There are obvious problems with daycare
at UBC, largely because of inadequate
space and the lack of readily-available new
space.
More space must be made available if the
facilities are to improve, and it must
logically come from the UBC administration, which has already admitted
its responsibility in providing space.
Daycare is as important to students at the
university as housing, and more important
to staff and faculty.
"Daycare is a service to the community,"
according to Shoolbraid.
And UBC is one of the largest communities in B.C., with a huge population of
faculty, students and staff. As a community,
the university has a duty to provide services
to its members.
0MP@lfH))
FROM  THE  WOBIOS  OLDEST DISTILLERY^/?
OLD BUSHMILLS
3=^7
IRISH WHISKEY
^nSHWNB^
ORIGINAL fejfi^     TO
GRANT Eilll    DISTIL
ieo8
BOTTLED ONLY BY (Vj
r%^m.llsD#^'
Down
the Irish*
Join the adventurous
clan that's discovering the
smooth, elegant, burnished,
emphatic flavour of fine
Old Bushmills.
... The people who created
Irish Whiskey back in 1608.
Pour Vli oz. of Old Bushmills
down over the rocks, swirl,
and then... down the Irish. Page 6
THE
UBYSSEY
 i	
Thursday, February  12,  1976
Open House
openings
UBC Open House needs
volunteers to act as guides,
telephone operators and
information booth operators.
Saturday   and  Sunday,   March   5
Hot flashes
and 6 are the Open House days, so
if you are interested, get in touch
with Michael Moran in SUB 125
or phone 228-5515.
Open House is UBC's tri-annual
back patting orgy, where people
from the real world are invited
out to see what a wonderfully
perfect place UBC supposedly is.
Cosmology
U.S. astronomer, Virginia
Trimble, will speak on the latest
in cosmology — the theory of the
origin and structure of the
universe. The lecture, sponsored
by the Vancouver Institute, takes
place 8:15 p.m. Saturday in the
instructional resources centre
lecture hall 2.
'Tween classes
TODAY
. INTER VARSITY
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
New IVCF general director Don
McLeod   speaks,   noon,  Chem  250.
PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS'
ASSOCIATION
Rod Wong on early experience and
animal  behavior, noon, Angus 223.
CHINESE CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Member testimonies, noon, SUB
205.
THE CENTRE COFFEEHOUSE
Folk guitarist Fred Booker, 8:30
p.m. to 1 a.m., Lutheran Campus
Centre.
CHARISMATIC CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Weekly fellowship meeting, 7:30
p.m., Lutheran Campus Centre
lounge.
FILMSOC
General meeting. Come meet the
C-West junta, noon, clubroom.
SKYDIVING CLUB
Weekend    jumping    —    first
students   please   note,   noon,
216G.
WOMEN'S OFFICE
Eve Zaremba, editor of
Privilege of Sex, on dilemmas in the
women's movement. Admission, 50
cents, 7:30 p.m., SUB 212.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
John Stewart on what makes a
good marriage partner, noon, SUB
212.
CYPRESS SNOWSHOE
AND CROSS-COUNTRY CLUB
General meeting, noon, Bu. 201.
LOCAL TALENT READING SERIES
Andrew Busza reads from his work,
noon,     Sedgewick     Library
orientation room.
FRIDAY
EL CIRCULO SPANISH CLUB
General     meeting,     no
annex 351A.
FEMINIST KARATE ASSOCIATION
Practice, 6:30  p.m., SUB 207/209
jump
SUB
The
CHINESE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Homecoming, with films,
performances, refreshments and
disco, 7 p.m. to 12 midnight, SUB
party room.
THE CENTRE COFFEEHOUSE
Folk Guitarist Fred Booker, 8:30
p.m. to 1 a.m., Lutheran Campus
Centre.
BAHA'I CLUB
Talk on mythology, noon, Gage
182.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY
Executive meeting. All welcome,
noon, War Memorial Gym 35.
SATURDAY
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Cross-country skiing party, $4 for
members, $6 for guests. Meet 9
a.m., Stanley Park bus terminal. To
register phone 224-1562.
TUESDAY
UBC SKI CLUB
General meeting, noon, Angus 104.
CHARISMATIC CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Prayer and sharing, noon, Lutheran
Campus Centre.
CUSO
Two     films     on     China,     noon,
MacMillan 158.
ECKANKAR
Introductory    lecture,   noon,   SUB
215.
WEDNESDAY
CLASSICS DEPARTMENT
David Campbell on Alcaeis in
particular and in general, noon, Bu.
202.
VOC
Film on the first ascent of the
north ridge of Nevado Alpamayo, 8
p.m., IRC 2.
CLASSICS CLUB
David Campbell on musicial
accompaniment of Greek poetry, 8
p.m., 4495 West Seventh.
CAMERA
REPAIRS
Our 12 specialists offer a
Comprehensive Repair
Service for all Cameras,
Projectors and Photographic
Equipment.
• FREE ESTIMATES
a Guaranteed Repairs
WESTERN CAMERA
SERVICE LTD.
HELP YOURSELF
TO HIGHER GRADES
LARGEST SELECTION IN B.C. OF
* COLES NOTES
100 Titles
* MONARCH NOTES
300 Titles
*SCHAUMS OUTLINES
60 Titles
* COLLEGE NOTES
50 titles
All available from
George & Berny's
VOLKSWAGEN
REPAIRS
COMPLETE SERVICE BY
FACTORY-TRAINED
MECHANICS
FULLY GUARANTEED
AT REASONABLE RATES
  JVancouver. B.C.
4393 W. 10th Ave.
rmmm
C/L)   ■ ■ ■ sempre bella
731-8644
2125 W. 10th at Arbutus
Cleansing Products — Tonics — Nourishing Creams, Vitamin C,
Vitamin F — Protective Creams — Special Products for the Face.
Products for the Body & Famous Zasmin make-up products.
ELIO cf DOME
First Lady Coiffures -Tenth A\enue Ltd.
Vancouver Resources Board
HAVE YOU GOT ROOM FOR ONE MORE?
Foster Homes Are Needed in Vancouver for
Children Aged 0 - 19 Years
An Informational Foster Parent Meeting
for the West Side of Vancouver will be held:
7:30 p.m., Wednesday, February 18th at
No. 206, 3540 West 41st Avenue
For More Information, Call Vancouver Resources Board at
733-8111
Physical Education
Undergraduate Society
NOTICE OF ELECTIONS
Nominations will be accepted for Physical Education
Undergraduate Society Executive including: —
PRESIDENT
TREASURER
VICE-PRESIDENT
SECRETARY
YEAR REPS (4)
SOCIAL COORDINATOR
PUBLICITY
Forms available in Room 301 War Memorial Gym and
nominations will be closed on Feb. 20, 1976 at 1:00.
The election will be held on Monday, Feb. 23, 1976.
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES:   Campus - 3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional lines 25c.
Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $1.80; additional lines
40c. Additional days $1.50 & 35c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241, S.U.B., UBC, Van. 8, B.C.
5 — Coming Events
"CONSORT WITH the followers of all
religions in a spirit of friendliness
and fellowship."—Baha'u'llah. Informal discussions on the Baha'i Faith
every Tuesday night at 5606 Presidents' Row. Phone 224-7257.
11 — For Sale — Private
J40Z 71 white tape $54,000 miles, very
sharp, $2900. Camero 72 metallic
green, 37,000 miles, auto, well kept,
$3000. Own two cars, must sell one.
Best   offer   takes.   321-0656.
CHEMISTRY JOURNALS 13 years eacl
JACS and JOC plus misc. 150.0 o.b.o.
Phone 980-7195.
'59 FORD 2-dr. sedan 6 cyl., automatic,   '
radio, runs well.  Call Dave, 224-9864.
CHEAP INSURANCE, '65 Chev. V8,
good condition. Phone Paul, 266-8026
after 6 p.m.
50 - Rentals
ATTRACTIVE SEMINAR ROOMS to rent
— blackboards and screens. Free use
of projectors. 228-5031.
60 - Rides
65 — Scandals
15 — Found
FOUND: YOUNG MALE TABBY CAT,
near   Angus   Building  Monday  night.
Clean   and  Friendly.   Brian,   266-9575.
20 — Housing
GRADUATE STUDENT wishes to sublet apartment/small house from mid-
May till mid-June. Call Alan KcKin-
non at 224-9720 after 7 p.m.
25 — Instruction
30 — Jobs
35 — Lost
LOST FRIDAY afternoon, one pair
children's prescription mirrored sunglasses on campus. Reward. Ph. 228-
1161.
LADY'S GOLD WRISTWATCH, Tues.,
Feb. 10 between B-Lot and Buchanan.
Reward offered. Phone 987-3387 anytime.
40 — Messages
SPECIAL NITE-TIME TAPING of Dr.
Bundolo this Wed., Feb. 11, 7:30,
SUB Theatre. It's Free!
SUBFILMSOC "offers": "The Godfather
Part II". Showtimes, Thur./Sun., 7:00;
Fri.-Sat, 6:00 & 9:30 in SUB Aud.
Please bring 75c, AMS card and two
bottles of tranquilizers, plus Italian
accent for your protection.
TO CELERBRATE her twentieth birthday, Sharon Lees, "The Sexy Thing",
will be taking all her friends to The
Pit on Friday. We love you Sharon
Jeff.Thom, Kim-Anne, Luc-Sue, Rich
Oak, Reg-San.
70 — Services
EXPERIENCED MATH TUTOR will
coach 1st year. Calculus, etc. Evenings. Individual instruction on a
one-to-one basis. Phone: 733-3644. 10
a.m. to 3 p.m. daily.
CUSTOM CABINETRY & woodworking.
Renovations, additions, new contraction done anywhere. Guranteed work,
free   estimates.   689-3384.
80 — Tutoring
TUTORING 1st 2nd years* Engineering
subjects, also Chemistry, Maths,
Physics,   German.   263-7521,   5-6   p.m.
85 — Typing
EFFICIENT    ELECTRIC    TYPING,    my
home. Essays, thesis, etc. Neat accurate work. Reasonable rates —
263-5317.
FAST,    EFFICIENT    TYPING.    Essays,
thesis,  manuscriptts.   266-5053.
99 — Miscellaneous
4554 W. 10th
224-5
Use Ubyssey Classified
TO SELL - BUY - INFORM
The U.B.C. Campus
MARKET PLACE Thursday,  February  12,  1976
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
Iii Portugal, still on the sidelines . .
Fascists don't give up easy
Moses is a former president of
Canadian University Press, the
national newsservice to which The
Ubyssey belongs. He is currently
travelling in Portugal and has
submitted this report.
By ART MOSES
EVORA — Portugal's south-
central Alentejo region is where
the country's deepest social
revolution has occurred since the
fall of fascism in April, 1974.
Here, thousands of rural farm
workers now control the gigantic
.estates formerly owned by Portugal's grand seigneurs — the
^absentee "latifundiarios" — who
paid their workers starvation
wages while neglecting their land.
For the lives of the poor rural
population the improvement has
been immeasurable. But as Portugal continues its steady move to
the right, the latifundiarios are
poised to return.
"The land to those who work it"
was the rallying call during the
wave of land occupations that
began sweeping Alentejo late last
winter.
The province is dominated by the
huge estates — Portugal's
'granary. The major crop is wheat,
followed by oats, corn and barley,
along with olives, cork, tomatoes,
sunflowers, oranges and beef
cattle.
Portugal's new military rulers
wanted to humble the latifun-
jdiarios who had been strong
supporters of the old fascist
regime. But the government's
proposed agrarian reform was too
timid for the rural poor. Years of
bitter struggle had given them
strong organizational potential and
political awareness.
Encouraged by the Communist
party, which enjoys solid majority
support amongst Alentejo farm
workers, they began declaring the
estates theirs. They invited the
people who managed the
• latifundiarios' affairs to join them
as fellow workers. Many did.
Others left.
. Faced with the massive occupation movement, the government acquiesced and began
recognizing the workers' right to
their land. The latifundiarios could
only withdraw and wait for the
political winds to change.
Now Portugal's farm workers
control about 1,000,000 hectares
(about 4,000 square miles) mostly
in Alentejo. The province's key
districts of Evora and Beja have
between 70 and 80 per cent of the
land occupied. The rest belongs to
small and medium-sized farmers
who are divided in their support for
the workers.
(Elsewhere in Portugal, right-
wing   forces,   backed   by   the
Take a  f PEEK
Then   SEE IT ALL
in the
SUB THEATRE- 12:30-1:30
TODAY & FRIDAY
latifundiarios, have mobilized
thousands of private farmers
against the agrarian reform. They
are pressing the government to
"disoccupy" the land. These
farmers are predominantly from
the north and centre of Portugal
where most land holdings are
small.)
The Alentejo workers have
organized the estates into
democratically-controlled cooperatives that have managed to
improve crop production and
working conditions remarkably in
only a few months.
"Just before the occupations, the
workers were making 90 escudos a
day (about $3.50) and only when
there was work for us," said
Francisco Mendez, a worker at the
22nd of July Co-operative just
outside Evora, Alentejo's largest
city about 140 kilometres southeast of Lisbon. "Now we make
5,400 escudos a month (about $205),
which isn't enough, but it's more
than double what we were getting
before.
"Before it was seven days a
week when we worked; now there's
no working on Saturday afternoons
and Sundays, and soon no working
Saturdays at all. The co-operative
pays us when we are sick and we
get 18 days holidays with pay a
year," he continued. (In 1964 the
workers won the 8-hour day after a
bitter strike, brutally repressed by
the old regime.)
Most important, the cooperatives have virtually
eliminated rural unemployment.
In some areas, workers complain
of a serious labor shortage.
The Alentejanos have returned
to their native communities after
spending years as emigrant workers in Northern Europe.
That is because the latifundiarios never bothered to fully
utilize their land. Vast sections
remained uncultivated; they
preferred investing in urban real
estate and sure-bet tourist
operations to the uncertainties of
trying to improve land productivity in southern Portugal's less
than perfect soil conditions.
They owned so much land — a
medium sized estate would be 13
square miles — they received
sufficient income from limited
operations and from money
received from peasants who rented
small plots. Careful investment in
fertilizers, irrigation and other
improvements was unnecessary to
support their lavish urban
lifestyles.
Agricultural experts agree
Portugal could become a major
exporter  of wheat   and   other
Alentejo grains, given
technological improvements. But
last year Portugal, even now one of
Europe's largest grain producers,
imported much of its
requirements.
"The latifundiarios didn't care
about improving the land," one
worker said. "They used the best
soil and left the rest uncultivated."
The system meant chronic underemployment. Few jobs were
available outside of seeding and
harvesting times.
On the 22nd of July Co-operative,
56 men and women are now employed full-time compared to 25
with uncertain job security before
the occupation. This winter the
workers have been going all-out to
collect the full olive harvest, rarely
attempted  by  the  latifundiarios.
"They used two or three women
to pick the olives off the ground
after the rain had knocked them
down," another 22nd of July
worker said in disgust. "The rest
they left to rot."
This winter, about 20 workers
have been in the olive grove since
early November. Male workers hit
the trees with wooden poles, while
women workers — who still do not
earn as much as the men — collect
the olives from the ground. The
collection is thorough with every
tree — some 2,000 at the 22nd of
July Co-operative.
Much of the crop is used for olive
oil, manufactured in a factory the
22nd of July workers occupied just
after taking over their estate. The
oil — basic in Portuguese cuisine —
is even more vital in the simple
Alentejo country diet of bread and
oil-based soups, rice and some
meat from the workers' own herd.
(The workers are allowed to keep
their own animals and gardens, but
only if all the workers agree that
the private activity won't interfere
with the co-operative's work.)
Most significantly, the workers
have just managed a staggering
increase in the amount of wheat
sown for next year, after collecting
a record harvest during the
summer.
Some observers attribute the
record harvest to particularly good
weather, but the increased
seedings — also corn, oats and
barley — can only be attributed to
the  feeling   that   "now   we   are
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working  for  ourselves",   in   the
words of one laborer.
Some co-operatives have
doubled their wheat seedings;
others have increased the amount
of cultivated land as much as 50
per cent. Overall in Alentejo, seven
per cent more land is under
cultivation this year than last.
But the workers face serious
problems.
Many co-operatives suffered
ruinous sabotage when the
latifundiarios, anticipating occupations, sold all livestock, crop
stockpiles, and farm machinery to
foreign buyers.
Now livestock herds are small;
meat is in short supply. The
workers must gradually rebuild
the herds and cannot, slaughter as
many animals as before.
As Portugal continues its shift to
the right, agriculture minister
officials who support the agrarian
reform are being replaced by more
conservative bureaucrats.
Credits to the co-operatives,
never given generously, are now
even harder to get. Thus the
equipment, seeds, livestock and
fertilizer needed to really develop
Alentejo's agricultural potential,
are being denied the workers.
Meanwhile, in Portugal's more
populous north and centre rural
areas, the right-wing political
parties are supporting the massive
protest campaign against the cooperatives.
An organization called "confederation of small and medium-
sized farmers" has held several
large rallies, attended by many
former latifundiarios, in which
farmers demanded an end to the
occupations.
Some foreign journalists have
been physically attacked at these
rallies by people alleging they
were communist spies.
Although few small landowners
have lost land to the workers, the
conservative forces have apparently convinced many poor
peasants they could lose theirs.
The campaign is similar to last
summer's anti-communist
hysteria fomented by the Catholic
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THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday, February 12,  1976
Shift to right continues
From page 7
church and local power brokers in
the north.
The confederation was initiated
the night of Nov. 24 when farmers
blocked all roads north of Lisbon,
just before Portugal's military
authorities moved conservative
troops to the capital to disarm its
leftist regiments.
The events of Nov. 25, which the
government called an attempted
leftist coup, have swung Portuguese politics sharply to the right.
But when the confederation tried
Option exists
From page 1
undergraduate societies on a per
capita basis, and the SUS will get
$1,000.
After next year most undergraduate societies must levy
fees from their members to finance
their own budgets. Smaller undergraduate societies have the
option, under the new constitution,
not to become independent sub-
societies of the AMS and remain
fully dependent upon the AMS for
their funds.
Thus, if the members of any
undergraduate society voted next
year to reject a fee levy, they
would in effect kill their undergraduate societies by cutting
off its funds.
to hold a rally in Alentejo on
Jan. 3, the co-operative workers
showed up in force, along with
many small farmers who supported them.
After unsuccessfully appealing
for military intervention to
disperse the workers, the confederation leaders left. The
workers and farmers held their
own meeting which strongly endorsed the agrarian reform.
The government has responded
by virtually limiting the reform to
southern Portugal, and leaving the
door open for the return of some 70
per cent of the occupied land there.
There are also indications the
government plans to interfere in
workers' decisions on the cooperatives. The government has
declared the co-operatives national
property.
The new regulations probably
mean the end of several cooperatives scattered through
northern Portugal. Here the
Communist party, which agreed to
the new policy, has limited influence. But it is unlikely the
government will move too harshly
against the Alentejo revolution, at
least not yet.
In a speech in Beja City Jan. 18,
Communist party leader Alvaro
Cunhal appealed to co-operative
workers to help solve differences
with Alentejo's small and medium-
sized farmers.
Many co-operatives already
have working arrangements with
them, sharing equipment, leasing
land and giving other assistance.
Cunhal has made it clear his
party, which retains a tremendous
ability to mobilize thousands of
workers throughout Portugal, will
not tolerate any return of the
latifundiarios. However, the
Communists so far have offered
little more than verbal protests
against the degenerating political
situation — the release of former
fascist police agents, the killing of
demonstrators by regular police
forces, the purges of leftists from
the news media and the continued
imprisonment of leftist military
figures.
But agrarian reform is basic to
the party's program and it is
unlikely to betray the hopes of its
traditional   Alentejo   supporters.
Travelling through Alentejo now,
an outsider finds it hard to miss the
all-pervasive feeling of hope and
purpose when meeting these
people long accustomed to bitter
despair.
But it is also hard to miss the
scores of Mercedes Benz' prowling
the highways and the larger towns
— reminders that although the old
exploiting class has been removed
and replaced, it is still waiting
eagerly on the sidelines.
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