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The Ubyssey Sep 30, 1975

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 Phillips opposes rezoning
By MARK BUCK>SHON
Mayor Art Phillips; suggested
Monday students should be content
to live in spare rooms of single
family homeowners, without
cooking facilities. ' •»»-
He told an audience of ^tJBG;
commerce students he opposes the
idea of rezoning the Point Grey and
Dunbar areas to allow student
housing in self contained suites.
He said the city has no business
in student housing except to
publicize the "spare bedroom"
concept.
"Students can stay in private
homes as long as they have no
kitchen facilities," he said. "One
way we've helped is to publicize
the fact of the need — encouraging
homeowners to come forward if
they have a spare bedroom.
"Several thousand student
bedrooms were provided that
way," he said.
But   Phillips   said   he   doesn't
believe rezoning. to allow extra
*tud<jt}t/ suites will help because, if
the areas are rezoned, students
would be forced out by long term
tenants who aren't content with the
spare bedrooms.
.Iii a. speech to the generally
enthusiastic audience, Phillips
decried allegedly excessive
government controls on rent but
indicated controls to protect
private landowners are essential.
Phillips was a UBC commerce
student in the '50s.
He   indicated   about   the   only.
areas he would like to see multiple
family housing constructed in
Vancouver are in False Creek,
downtown and Champlain Heights.
"I don't believe in progress — if
that means carving up all single
family areas into multi-family
developments," he said in an interview.
Phillips said "all land properly
zoned may be built up in Vancouver" and suggested it may be
time to "call a halt" to the city's
growth.
The    mayor    described    the
provincial 10.6 per cent annual rent
hike ceiling as a "horrendous"
control.
"One of the most horrendous
regulations we've tied ourself with
in B.C. is rent control," he said.
"The idea behind rent control is
laudable — protection from rising
rents and protection from inflation.
"But it singles out a sector of
society (tenants). It holds back
inflation in society for this element
of population alone."
But in the interview Phillips
indicated he is in favor of singling
out another group of society —
owners of single family homes.
He said he opposed a move to
allow rezoning for the Penta
townhouse complex in the Dunbar
area because the rights of the
single-familly  ■   dwellers      in
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LVII, No. 10      VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 1975
,48      228-2301
SERENADING BLEEDERS, guitarist Mike Anonymous strums
instrument as Terri Kinchen checks out red stuff dripping from vein
of Anne-Marie Hepp, ed 5, during annual Red Cross blood drive in
—doug field photo
SUB Monday. Besides usual coke (soft drink), donors get_meal
vouchers to some of Vancouver's top restaurants. Undergraduate
faculty that bleeds most wins 25 cases of beer.
Plan makes NDU 'powerless satellite'
ByMARCUSGEE
Plans are going ahead to convert
Notre Dame University in Nelson
into a powerless satellite of B.C.'s
metropolitan universities despite
the opposition of NDU faculty and
students.
Students and faculty at the
privately-run Nelson campus
claim the provincial government's
plans to offer degree programs
from the three major coastal
universities at NDU will destroy its
role as an interior university.
NDU student president Andy
Shadrack said a student council
request that the university become
a publicly-run degree-granting
institution has been ignored.
"There has been some talk that
this university is not capable of
granting its own degrees. I don't
believe it," Shadrack said.
"If they (the education department) just want to transfer coastal
programs into the interior they are
making a big mistake. I don't want
to see us become a dumping
ground for courses they (coastal
universities) don't want."
Shadrack said he would like
NDU to continue as an alternative
to UBC, Simon Fraser University
and the University of Victoria.
He said if the metropolitan
universities simply transplant
their programs to Notre Dame the
university will cease to provide a
small university atmosphere and
serve the special interests of
students from the interior.
Controversy about NDU's future
began last spring when education
minister Eileen Dailly announced
the university's private charter
would be revoked.
Dailly then asked the B.C.
Universities Council to investigate
transforming NDU into a public
university and the council appointed UBC continuing education
head Walter Hardwick to work out
a model for the new institution.
Hardwick's model would have
NDU become a university society,
with the coastal universities as
amalgamated members.
Notre Dame faculty association
head Paul Micalles said the
adoption of Hardwick's model
would mean NDU students and
faculty would have no input into
courses to be offered at the new
university.
"The new institution would be
governed by the senates of other
universities. This would affect
students because they couldn't
have a say in the programs they
were offered.
"They would be crying in the
wind if they went to the senates of
other universities," he added.
Micalles said the new institution
could offer more to its students as
an autonomous, degree granting   universities forecast in Hardwick's
public university. model  would   detract   from   the
He said the dependence on other See page 3: DAILLY
PHILLIPS ... down on rent
controls.
surrounding homes' represent the
rights of Vancouver residents as a
whole.
(After a heated public meeting in
the summer, Phillips joined a
small majority of council members
and defeated the proposal to rezone
a Dunbar bushland area for
construction of 26 condominiums.)
"It became a sort of symbol,"
Phillips said.
He said if the symbol was
"carving up" single family neighborhoods for multiple-family
dwellings he would oppose it.
But he said the reason he voted
against the project was that it
would represent "spot-zoning" and
similar zoning could, in other
cases, lead to neighborhood
deterioration through block
busting.
He cited Kerrisdale as an
example where developers were
buying up single family homes and
allowing them to deteriorate with
the expectation the land would be
rezoned for apartment development.
He said council voted to stop the
changes by clamping down on
zoning, the blockbusting ended and
single family homes reverted to
their formerly satisfactory quality.
He cited a second example —
plans of a developer to tear down
homes on Pender St. for a commercial development.
See page 2: NO
AMS exec wants NUS changes
By RALPH MAURER
The Alma Mater Society executive won't support a
National Union of Students fee raise unless NUS
reorganizes to give regional student groups more
input, AMS president Jake van der Kamp said
Monday.
He said this is the substance of a NUS/B.C.
Students' Federation position paper which the
executive will present to council at its next meeting.
The position was reached at a meeting of Student
Unity party members Saturday. Six of the seven
current executive members belong to Student Unity.
"We want to see more regional input in NUS," said
van der Kamp Monday.
"The regional organizations, which are becoming
stronger, should have more say."
Several provinces and regions have recently formed student organizations of their own, including the
BCSF in B.C. and similar organizations in Ontario,
Alberta and the Atlantic provinces.
NUS is currently petitioning students across
Canada to increase their contributions to the
organization to $1 per student from 30 cents.
A fee increase would have to be passed in a student
referendum and council will decide whether a
referendum on the matter will be held.
Van der Kamp said he does not think council would
vote to have a referendum. The alternative for NUS
would be to collect 500 signatures on a petition asking
tor a referendum.
"I'd like to see any kind of hack round up 500
signatures for NUS," van der Kamp said.
"We don't think NUS is serving students out here
the way it should be," he said.
He said part of the problem with NUS is communication.
"They might be doing all kinds of work but there's
very little we're hearing about it," van der Kamp
said.
He said he personally wouldn't object to a $1 NUS
fee if regional organizations such as BCSF were given
more say in the organization.
As it stands the two organizations are completely
autonomous and, though they are both student lobbying groups with similar organization and aims,
they have no connections with one another.
He said a $1 fee request from BCSF would
probably have much more success than the NUS
request.
"I don't think they'd have any problems selling
BCSF," van der Kamp said.
BCSF members have said B.C. students will
probably be asked to contribute $1 per student next
academic year to finance the organization.
The federation is a lobbying group concerned
mainly with student housing, student aid and
elimination of sexual discrimination. Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 30,  1975
Says naturalist group
Cruel fur traps remain
after gov't promises
By TERRY DONALDSON
Federal and provincial
governments are not keeping their
promises to find an alternative to
Canada's cruel trapping methods,
the president of a Vancouver-based
naturalist organization says.
Bunty Clements, of the
Association for the Protection of
Fur Bearing Animals, says she
was happy when the Committee for
Humane Trapping was formed by
the two levels of government in
1973 to test and develop humane
traps.
"However, not one trap has been
tested in two years," she says. "In
fact their financial statement for
last year did not include any
money for trap testing."
But Don Robinson, assistant to
the director of the provincial fish
and wildlife branch, and member
of the committee, is optimistic that
the committee will soon produce
results.
"I have yet to see a committee
that couldn't work faster," he says.
"But the tempo is picking up."
Robinson dismisses Clements'
charges as a question of semantics.
He says that mechanical testing
has been carried out on three
traps, although full biological
testing is yet to be done.
However, Clements says these
tests were on traps that are
already in use and are known to be
inadequate.. "There are 56 new
designs for traps that are waiting
to be tested," she says.
The centre of the controversy is ,
the leg-hold trap, which has been
the main method of trapping since
Canada was opened up by the fur
traders three centuries ago.
Trappers, naturalists and
government officials all agree the
leg-hold trap is cruel.
Its method is simple. When an
animal steps on the trap, it
releases a strong steel spring that
holds the animal by its leg until
death occurs by other means.
For water animals, such as
beaver and muskrat, death comes
by drowning. If they are fortunate,
land animals such as mink and fox
die from a blow from the trapper's
club.
However, if the trapper does not
visit his line frequently — and the
majority of Canadian trappers
work part-time — death occurs by
predation, starvation, or freezing.
In the case of a hardy animal like
the lynx, the process of starvation
can take two or three weeks. Some
animals are able to escape by
severing their foot from their body
by chewing or wrenching.
Others die trying. The Canadian
Wildlife Service reports:
"The stomachs of (trapped)
Arctic foxes . . . often contain parts
of their own bodies. They may
swallow fragments of their own
teeth broken off in biting the trap
and sometimes part of a mangled
foot; almost every stomach contains some fox fur and a considerable number contains pieces
of skin, claws, or bits of bone."
The Ontario government has also
discovered that on the average, for
every desired animal that is
trapped, two and a half are caught
accidentally and discarded. These
include porcupines, skunks, owls,
and ducks.
Developing new trapping
methods requires money and
motivation. The money is there —
fur trading is still big business in
Canada. The 35,000 or so trappers
in Canada sell about three million
pelts annually.
According to Statistics Canada,
the value of fur sales in Canada for
1970-71 (latest available figures)
was $11 million.
One report estimates that the
total value of the industry, including the secondary level of
handling and exporting, is closer to
$100 million. According to the same
report, 85 per cent of Canada's raw
furs are exported to Europe and
Japan.
One of the largest buyers of raw
fur in B.C. is the Hudson's Bay
Company, a company that also
sells the leg-hold trap. A
spokesman for the Bay was critical
of the campaign to ban the trap.
"The issue is complicated," he
says. "You can't solve the problem
just by banning the trap. Different
traps are needed for different
purposes."
He says the company has
donated money for research on
better trapping methods, but says
that until something better is
produced, HBC will continue to sell
the trap.
Clements points out that there
are feasible alternatives, such as
the Conibear trap, which kills the
animal instantly by breaking its
spine. However, these need to be
perfected and tested before they
can be marketed, she says.
Robinson promises some
changes before the committee's
five year life span is up.
"It is doubtful that the idealists
will be satisfied," he says. "But
there will Be substantial improvements."
'No spot zoning'
From page 1
About 200 area residents and
supporters demonstrated against
the blockbusting Sunday.
"That kind of thing is very
harmful in a neighborhood," he
said. "I will not allow spot zoning."
But in the speech he referred to
the same protest group by saying
he opposed their demands for
demolition controls requiring
developers to have replacement
housing plans approved before
demolition takes place.
"I don't think they should be
doing things to tinker with
demolition controls — it is about
the same value as rent control," he
said.
Phillips also said he is annoyed
that housing construction is one
element of the proposed five-year
plan.
"I don't think this is the proper
role of the city government to be in
for the bankrolling of housing,"
referring to a $10 million dollar
part of the plan to provide "seed
money" for housing loans and
construction.
He said he wanted the Oct. 8
ballot to be divided into four units,
so voters could decide if they
wanted to lump housing construction with "essential services"
such as police station improvements and expanded parks.
ALMA    MAT E R    SOCIETY
HILLEL HOUSE
present
GENERAL
AAOSHEL DAYAN
SUB BALLROOM
Monday, October 6th, 12:30 p.m.
Tickets now available at A.M.S. Office
NO TICKETS AT THE DOOR
Students 50c Non-students $1.50
Attention All Students
NOTICE OF ELECTIONS
The following AMS Executive and Students' Council positions are now vacant:
1. AMS Internal Affairs
2. AMS External Affairs
3. AMS Ombudsperson
Nominations for the three AMS Positions will be received from 9:00 a.m. Wednesday October 1,
1975 until 12:00 noon Thursday October 9, 1975.
Nominations and eligibility forms can be obtained and shall be returned to the office of the AMS
Executive Secretary, Rm. 246, SUB. Election rules will be available at the above location also.
The election for all positions will be held Wednesday October 15, 1975.
Ellen Paul
AMS Secretary
SOFT    LENSES
$139.50
HARD
CONTACTS
$69 50
Locations
Van.-N.West.
Eye Examinations Arranged
For Information & Appointments
PUBLIC
CONTACT LENS CENTRE
1557 W. Broadway, Vancouver - 732-3636
552 Columbia St., New Westr. - 525-2818
FRAMES
as low as
$5-95
Glass lenses
start at
$y.00
per lens
hair studio inc.
UNISEX HAIRSTYLES
FOR APPOINTMENT
224-1922
5784 University (Next to Bank of Commerce)
An encore performance of the new
Cliff Jones musical about Marilyn Monroe
as part of International Music Day -
World Music Week, Wed. Oct. 1 at 8:03pm.
CBC RADIO Tuesday, September 30, 1975
THE       UBYSSEY
rage o
Law to start native program
By GREG EDWARDS
UBC's law schoolhas instituted a
special program for native
students in response to recommendations made by the Justice
Development Commission's
Native Task Force.
The special program includes a
special admissions policy of
recruiting native applicants and a
special tutoring program for
native students once they enter law
school.
Although the law school has
already accepted 10 native
students since 1973, the law faculty
has neither given final approval
nor formulated an exact policy for
the program.
However, the law school admissions committee has recommended its acceptance and the
program will be considered
Thursday for a final approval by
the law faculty.
Program co-ordinator Drew
Schroeder says the object of the
program "is to provide a
proportion of native lawyers in the
B.C. Bar equal to the proportion of
B.C.'s native population."
The underlying premise of the
school's special treatment of
native students is that Indians
have an extremely high rate of
legal problems, he says.
Schroeder said that although
B.C.'s native population comprises
only five per cent of B.C.'s total
population, 20 per cent of the inmates in federal prisons in B.C. are
natives, and 40 per cent of children
in the care of child welfare
authorities are native.
"Presumably, the people best
able to appreciate, and most interested in helping with the
problems of native people, are
native people themselves," he
said. Schroeder added it is ver>
difficult for even the most
promising native students to reach
law school.
Currently, of B.C.'s 2,100 lawyers
only one is a native, he said.
He says a major problem is that
native students don't have contact
with the school.
Those who do consider law as a
career are discouraged from
taking "seven leisurely years at
university" when there is an
urgent need for them to immediately involve themselves with
native organizations, he added.
Schroeder said one native
graduate of the University of
Victoria was accepted to UBC's
law school this fall, but decided not
to attend because he was needed to
help the Stewart-Trembleur band
in their negotiations with B.C.
Railway.
He said the proposed special
admissions policy would allow
native applicants to be admitted to
law school with little or no
university background.
Native applicants would be
required to write the Law School
Admissions Test but "we would
never hold the LSAT results
against them."
"We are admitting a cultural
difference— the LSAT is aimed at
the white upper class. However, if
they (native applicants) do well in
the LSAT all the better for them,"
Schroeder said.
Schroeder said most of the native
people who have been admitted to
law school so far "have been very
mature students. We have to be
satisfied that they will be capable
of going through law school," he
added.
The students are selected after
completing an intensive two-month
pre-law course at the University of
Saskatchewan in Saskatoon.
Schroeder said: "The pre-law
course at Saskatoon has a dual
purpose — to allow the Saskatoon
teaching staff to assess the
student's aptitude for law, and to
allow the students to assess
themselves."
He said there are now five native
students in first year law.
Two of them have no university
background, but have been involved with businesses and native
organizations, he said.
Two others have partial
university backgrounds and extensive experience in
organizations such as the Native
Court Workers Society. The fifth
student has degrees in education
and social work, Schroeder said.
Schroeder said he and two third
year native students will tour
colleges and native groups in
January to inform prospective
native law applicants of the
program.
A brochure describing the
program has already been
distributed to native organizations
and community colleges
throughout the province, he added.
Schroeder says he expects the
program to continue until the
proportion   of   practising   native
lawyers equals the proportion of
native people in B.C.'s total
population — approximately 100
native lawyers.
Schroeder says he foresees
several difficulties in counselling
native college students who might
want immediate admission to law
school.
He says it may be hard to encourage students to complete full
degree programs before studying
law, so they would be better
lawyers in the long term, because
the students feel pressured to
finish school quickly in order to
help their native organizations.
Jovanovich thesis enrages English T.A
m
mr
Jovanovich polemie  .
raises ire of colleague
—doug field photos
MYSTERIOUS WALLPAPER consisting of copies of Thursday's Ubyssey appeared on
windows of Buchanan tower, home of English prof Stevan Jovanovich, whose polemic
on alleged problems of teaching alleged illiterates (who just happen to be non-white)
English aroused ire of one of his colleagues. Letter on Page 4 today details reaction of
one of the people who would be affected by policies and innuendos laid out in
Jovanovich's article.
Campus news briefs: housing, booze
Most students now have a place
to live but many are still hunting
for accommodations because their
current homes are  substandard.
"Some of the places I've seen are
absolutely disgusting," student
housing counsellor Jeff Hoskins
said Monday.
"Many landlords are ripping off
people."
Hoskins said the housing office in
SUB is receiving between 100 and
150 inquiries each day.
"Anyone who wants a room or
. roem and board can have it,"
Hoskins said. "But there's a
definite shortage of suites."
He said a survey in 1974 showed
that six per cent of UBC students
want a room or room and board,
but he said that one-third of all
housing listings are in those
categories.
Acting housing director Mike
Davis said Monday there are still
openings for 15 women in UBC
residences. He said 13 of the
openings are in Totem Park and
two are in Place Vanier.
The residence openings should
be filled within a week, he said.
Davis said he will meet Oct. 10
with student housing service
manager Dave Johnson to decide
Dailly won't comment on NDU
From page 1
academic standards of the institution.
The education department and
the Universities Council are aware
of the NDU faculty position,
Micalles said.
Shadrack and Micalles both said
they are alarmed by rumors the
new institution may only handle
third and fourth year courses.
Shadrack said the education
department is considering offering
most first and second year courses
at nearby Selkirk college.
Dailly said Monday she would
not comment about the NDU
transformation since negotiations
about the university's future are
still in progress.
Shadrack said the education
department is being too slow to
decide NDU's future structure.
"We have submitted briefs of our
position to the Universities Council
and we were promised a concrete
proposal by July. They will have to
hurry up and decide what is going
to be offered here because classes
are supposed to start next September," Shadrack said.
UBC administration president
Doug Kenny said Monday he
favors Hardwick's model for the
new institution.
Kenny said UBC is studying what
programs it should offer at the new
institution.
He added it would not be appropriate to comment on Micalles'
proposal of an autonomous
university because Dailly has
already said the Nelson campus
will offer courses from other
universities.
"I think the structural programs
are secondary or tertiary and the
programs offered are of prime
importance," Kenny said.
UBC economics professor Tony
Scott said Monday he is heading a
faculty of arts committee which is
exploring programs UBC could
offer at the Nelson campus.
Micalles said the education
department wants to review all
NDU's faculty to determine which
of them should stay at the Nelson
campus and which should leave.
Hardwick said "the policy
decision has been made" to make
Notre Dame a society for outside
courses.
"It is now in the hands of the
Universities Council and the three
universities to work out a society to
co-ordinate programs. I assume
the Notre Dame people will be
consulted," Hardwick added.
But Shadrack said NDU students
and faculty are not involved in any
of the NDU academic planning at
UBC, SFU or UVic.
whether the student housing office
will continue to operate beyond
that date.
The office will remain open if
there is still a need for it, he said.
*   *   *
The Lethe, UBC's quiet bar for
hard drinkers, hasn't opened this
year because details about its
operation haven't been ironed out
— but two Alma Mater Society
officials Monday gave different
reasons for the closure.
SUB general manager Bern
Grady said the bar is still closed
because the AMS hasn't yet
decided where to locate it this
year.
But AMS co-ordinator Lake
Sagaris called Grady's reasoning a
"pile of shit" and said the reason
the facility isn't open is because
the provincial government failed to
come through with a liquor licence.
Sagaris said the AMS had been
planning to open The Lethe in SUB
101, near the information booth
soon.
Grady said SUB 101, the location
last year is now considered too
small since it could seat only 30 to
40 people. He said the AMS has
been considering renovating SUB
213 and 215.
Grady said he is "going through
proper regulatory channels" to get
the Lethe licence, and that he had
to write Victoria to notify officials
of the proposed room chance.
Neither Grady or Sagaris could
say when the Lethe will actually
reopen.
The Lethe opened quietly last
year and was originally called the
AF, for lack of a better name,
signifying the fact that the place
was an alternate facility to the Pit.
However, a contest sponsored by
the AMS last year solicited new
names for the drinking facility and
the winner was the student who
submitted the name Lethe.
In Greek mythology, Lethe is the
River of Forgetfulness.
*    *    *
Politicos of all denominations
will be eligible for office space in
SUB, the building's management
committee decided Monday.
But the decision is academic for
this year anyway.
The committee voted to delete a
controversial section of the
proposed SUB management policy
which would exclude political
groups from having offices in SUB.
Alma Mater Society president
Jake van der Kamp said the
decision will have little effect
because every.office in SUB is now
occupied and will likely remain
that way until the end of the year.
The committee voted
unanimously to delete the section
from the proposed policy after
members of the Young Socialist
club lobbied against it. The
proposed policy will go before AMS
council for final approval at its
next meeting.
Young Socialist spokesperson
Monica Jones told the meeting her
group was against the policy
because they believed that all
political groups should have access
to SUB office space.
Jones added the Young Socialists
did not protest the policy for their
own gain but she said she hoped
they could get an office in SUB. rage 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 30, 1975
Autonomy for
Notre Dame
How would you like to go to university to take some
other institution's courses to get someone else's degree?
What's that? Why not go to the institution which
decides on the programs so you can be guaranteed input and
good teaching?
Ask Walter Hardwick.
He is UBC's new director of Continuing Education
(respected geographer and recently a city alderman) who was
appointed earlier this year to investigate how Notre Dame
University in Nelson could become a public university.
While the idea of turning it from a private to a public
institution eligible for government funding is not a bad idea,
Hardwick's proposal raises serious questions.
In short Walter wanted NDU to become a satellite of
B.C.'s three metropolitan universities currently in existence
(and cluttered around the coast area).
Both NDU faculty and students oppose the idea for
fear of losing all control over what they teach and learn.
Faculty have lots of contacts and just might be able to
get a word in edgewise. But what about the students? They
have little enough input into the university senates (where
academic decisions are made) now. Imagine the input when
you're hundreds of miles away from those making the
decisions.
Notre Dame University should be autonomous if the
government wants to force it from the private to the public
sector.
That means back to the drawing board if you please.
oooUJELL, 1 RWMil P\D ft" - AFTER RXJK 1&$S
MS RWES'S F00T5TE?So*>
Letters
'Illiterate'
hits back
Last week The Ubyssey
published an article by Stevan
Jovanovich on the need for some
type of test to weed out allegedly
illiterate students and either put
them into special English sections
or refuse them admittance to the
university.
Jovanovich, a lecturer in UBC's
English department, wrote the
article for the department's
composition newsletter, Compost.
The first letter below is a reply to
Jovanovich. The second letter is
aimed at English 100 TA Harry
Eastman [a pseudonym] who
attacked Jovanovich for his ideas.
Dear Mr. Jovanovich;
Although you probably don't
remember me, I do remember you,
not only because I was one of those
students you kicked out of your
Intersession class to a so-called
foreign students section, but also
because I was one of those
"illiterate students" who weren't
able to pronounce long English
names like yours.
However, I, an "illiterate
student," passed "the university
level English course" as a result of
considerate help from an English
teacher who had not been trained
to teach English as a second
language just as you hadn't, but
who was a little bit more open-
minded than you.
I was interested in the question
you raised in your argument,
"What are some obviously
illiterate students doing at
university level?" The answer is
quite simple: they are working
towards their desired degrees.
They, therefore, take English 100
to meet their degree requirement
despite their unwillingness, not to
mention considerable humiliation
from some instructors like you. I
assume a basic requirement for
being a teacher is to be responsible
for helping one's students attain a
certain level of knowledge, and not
to complain about his students'
inferiority.
It was very difficult for me to
convince myself that an intelligent
English teacher like you was not
aware of such a basic responsibility for being a teacher,
whereas even myself, an
"illiterate student," was.
One of your complaints was that
"UBC seemed strangely liberal"
in not requiring students to show
competence in the language of
university." Since I am, according
to your classification, linguistically deficient, I might have misunderstood your meaning of the
word "liberal."
According to my vocabulary,
however, UBC is not as liberal as
you consider it to be in that case.
Do you know that many excellent
foreign students have been and are
forced to study under very
restricted conditions only because
their English is not as good as
others?
Do you know that UBC hardly
recognizes credits obtained from
other universities where English is
not spoken? As a result of these
handicaps, many foreign students
are repeating courses which they
have already taken, and consequently spend more time than
other students to get desired
degrees. Well, I guess you should
have tried to get some information
before you had such a poorly informed statement in your paper.
Having been in the English
department for a long time, you
seem to have an illusion that a
university is a place to study
nothing but English when you
stated: "The student who is
granted three units for a pass in a
regular section has a significantly
different understanding of English
than the student (passed) in an
intensive section."
Well, what is the matter, then?
Don't they write the same exams
no matter what kind of section they
are in? And aren't their papers
marked according to the same
criteria?
How much English do you think a
student should know in order to get
a university degree? Must a
chemistry student have the same
understanding of "Hamlet" as a
student majoring in English? I
would like to inform you that to
most students, English is not as
really important as it is to you. A
command of English grammar and
sentence structure is really all they
need.
Lastly I suggest you try to be
open-minded like the teacher I had
last Intersession for the sake of
both many students and yourself.
Anyway, it's an honor for me, an
"illiterate student." to write a
letter in English to an intelligent
English teacher who is too smart to
teach students "below a certain
level."
Sunghwa Hong
science 2
THE UBYSSEY
SEPTEMBER 30, 1975
Published   Tuesdays,  Thursdays  and   Fridays throughout  the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the writer and not of the
AMS   or   the   university   administration.   Member,   Canadian.
University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly
commentary  and   review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are
located in room 241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial departments, 228-2301; Sports, 228-2305; advertising,
228-3977. Editor: Gary Coull
"Detente is heck," said Ralph Maurer arrogantly from behind a
stockpile of nuclear warheads. "Who can make any money nowadays?"
moaned Larry Hill, Patti-Reay Stahl, Doug Field and Peter Cummings.
"Try and make an honest buck these days. Sheesh. What am I gonna do
with all these heat-seeking missiles?" exclaimed Sucha Singh, Cedric Tetzel,
Tom Barnes, Heather Walker and Chris Gainor, back from a two-week
sabbatical, ahem, ahem. "Where's Henry Kissinger now that we need him?"
asked Gary Coull, Doug Rushton, Anne Wallace and Greg Edwards from
atop a pile of rusting nukes. "Hey, those are my warheads you're sitting
on, you assholes," said Len MacKave. "Oh yeah? Take that," said Terry
Donaldson pushing a little red button on the console before him. "Geez,"
said Mark Buckshon "for a minute there I thought I was gonna have to go
into electronic calculators and become a university philanthropist. "What
the heck is detente?" said Marcus Gee
Would things have turned out any differently had Sheila Bannerman
not shown up? That, alas, is a question for future historians to grapple
with.  .	
Tsk Tsk
Harry Eastman's rage seems to
distort his English.
For example, does "much more
brisk" mean "brisker?" And does
"able to neither read nor write"
mean "unable to read or write?"
Does "I can not but wonder"
mean "I wonder?" And so on.
Harry is a teaching assistant in
English. Heaven forbid!
Tony Warren
microbiology
Crud
Having read an article concerning the film Hearts and Minds
in the Friday issue of The Ubyssey,
I feel compelled to label it as 100
per cent crud.
Some film review.
The author completely misses
the central theme of this award-
winning documentary and comes
forth with (something) only a
somewhat vague surface view of
the general plot.
The film is described as being a
'presentation of almost every
conceivable opinion and attitude
that has been voiced about the war'
and is given the stigma of being 'an
anti-American propaganda flick.'
Hearts and Minds is certainly not
a presentation of opinion nor is it
an ti-American propagana. Rather,
the film, in it's social related
content, is a statement of fact.
It is surely hard for anyone,
regardless of political factors to
deny that millions of people were in
fact conscientiously mobilized and
manipulated furing the Vietnam
war on the strength of earlier indoctrination.
This is vividly portrayed in the
film.
How our film reviewer missed
this point can only be blamed on
popcorn. Hearts and Minds is not
propaganda. It is simply a
reflection of the vanity upon which
all imperialist wars are based.
A parallel drawn between the
American and Viet Cong
revolutions did not go unmentioned
by our dubious film critic.
However, exactly what is mentioned fails to reach humble intellect.
We are given 'the major priority
of the American Revolution was to
draw a declaration of independence and a constitution so
that the people would be 'governed
by law and not by force.'
How's that for ambiguous. I see
little difference between law and
force since law is enforced by a
force or visa versa.
For those of us who viewed the
film objectively let me conclude by
stating that Hearts and Minds is a
portrait of social cancer. No
human society is immune to the
various  forms  of  indoctrination.
Indeed, we thrive on it in the
name of self-righteousness. Often
it is a means to an end. As portrayed in Hearts and Minds we
must not let our munanitarian ego
be bastardized through petty
jingoism.
Lome Rogers
science 2
P.S. My intentions in writing this
is not to offend the relevant film
reviewer — however Hearts and
Minds is more than just another
film. Some may view it as a form of
American self-justification.
Whatever the case may be it's
content must not be undermined by
ambiguous reviews on whatever.
The Ubyssey welcomes letters
from all readers.
Letters should be signed and
typed.
Pen names will be used when the
writer's real name is also included
for our information in the letter or
when valid reasons for anonymity
are given.
Although an effort is made to
publish all letters received, The
Ubyssey reserves the right to edit
letters for reasons of brevity,
legality, grammar or taste.
Letters should be addressed to
the paper care of campus mail or
dropped off at The Ubyssey office,
SUB 241-K. Tuesday, September 30, 1975
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
One of our fellow students received a form from the Vancouver police
dept. He had applied for a license to operate a business in the city.
The title of the form is Investigation re applicants for city license. This
is not an application. It is an investigation. Good. The city should protect
itself from unscrupulous persons; and who better than the police to investigate?
They want to know: what type of business will it be, where will it be
located, what is the name of the investigatee, where does he live etc.
They proceed to ask: does the investigatee have any experience at this
type of business, when and where was the investigatee born? How big he
is, how much does he weigh, what color are his eyes and hair, what is his
nationality? Has he been naturalized? When did he come to Canada?
When to Vancouver? Can he read English? Can he write English? What is
his present occupation? Is he married? Is he living with his wife? Does he
have any family?
Whether or not the responses to these questions would be self-
incriminating for discriminatory purposes we leave to greater thinkers
than "ourself" to judge. Certain data must be known about those who
intend to move our money from place to place: i.e. from our pockets to
their hands.
Perhaps some illiterate East Indian person who had learned how to sew
garments in prison might sneak through and find himself in business
without the ability to fill out a form, provided he can read it at all. The
form is not provided in French, (even CMHC has French on their forms.)
But we do not dispute these bits of investigation. We merely offer them to
our fellow students for their perusal should they be thinking of a career in
business.
Nor do we object when the investigatee is asked to give references. Has
there been any previous police record? Has there been any trouble with
the police? We find the word "trouble" to be a bit omnious if not redundant to "police " Nevertheless we let even this pass all but unnoticed.
We concern ourselves with the bottom half of the form only. The in-
vestigatee's information goes first to the "records office" then it finds its
way to the five below-mentioned squads, details, and bureaus of the city
police department.
The records office would check the above-submitted information where
they could verify the declared weight of say a "beautician" who wants to
move her shop into Vancouver from Moose Jaw, we wouldn't know.
From the records office, the form proceeds to the "liquor detail" for
any added tidbits like: the purchase of 10 cases of stout per month might
nullify a claim of slenderhood even on somebody who is six-eight.
Forward to the "gambling detail." Who they are and where do they go
for their information to substantiate or disclaim any of the above, is more
than we know. Unless it could have something to do with whether or not
the investigatee still resides with his wife?
From wherever the gambling detail is located, the investigatee's report
moves to the "morality detail." We refuse to exercise our imagination
here but we hope that our fellow students will take — whatever they do in
the gardens, bushes, and dorms, not to mention the professors offices, of
the campus — cube that quotient, then call it "licentiousness operative
downtown;" then we hope that they think carefully before embarking
upon any business venture.
The form moves onward to fingerprint bureau for any finishing touches
before it finally comes to rest at (where else) the warrant squad.
Wecan just about imagine the scene at the "warrant office" "Hey Jim,
another guy was crazy enough to fill out the form. Go pick him up! If he
told the truth, we've got him from 14 different directions at once. If he lied
to us it'll go all the worse for him."
The form has three lines for reference's information; but it has six lines
reserved for "comments by investigating officers." Let's be fair and say
that there should be at least six lines of space for six different investigative findings, after all, we are speaking of a human being who is,
supposedly, trying to put food on the table for his family, if he has one.
Those six lines will make or break the investigatee.
To us, the bottom line is the most fascinating of all in this curiosity
piece. It runs thus: ANY OBJECTIONS? Then there is a space for the
signature of the superintendent commanding the detective division. Who
is this man? He gets to make the final decision. What do we know about
him? Did this superintendent commanding the detectives fill out one of
these forms? Could he? What color are his eyes? Is he living with his
wife? Is he even married?
Before we break open an avocado and get it on, does anyone want to try
to find out what the investigatee's information is checked against, where
the files are kept, who gets to check up onthose who offer themselves?
Perhaps someone in the economics department could wonder out loud
"Is it sound economic policy to have the police encumber themselves with
having to decide who gets to run a business in our community?"
Fortunately Flake O' doesn't travel in these realms but a heavy handed
moralist thinker might not be able to resist accusing this document of
being a self-incriminating invasion of privacy; provided he stopped short
of calling it an outright declaration of RACISM!
Notebook fare:
"I've been spreading horseshit on my bread and it tastes better than
honey."
"Man, you need new honey."
F.O'.
NOTICE OF ELECTION
ARTS STUDENTS
This is a call for nominations for student representatives from the following
constituencies to participate in meetings and proceedings of the Faculty of Arts.
UNIVERSITIES ACT Section 40 (b). It should be noted that principles for student
participation in Faculty meetings approved by Senate, January 17, 1973, still apply.
CONSTITUENCIES
A. Combined major, honours and graduate students on campus in each of the following
departments and schools of the Faculty of Arts (listed below) to elect one of their
number (i.e. a total of 23):
(N.B. First and Second Year stidents do not vote in this category - see "B"
below)
1.
2.
3.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
ANTHROPOLOGY & SOCIOLOGY
ASIAN STUDIES (including Asian Area Studies,
Chinese, Japanese)
CLASSICS (including Classical Studies,
Greek, Latin
CREATIVE WRITING (including B.A., B.F.A. and
graduate programs)
ECONOMICS
ENGLISH
FINE ARTS
FRENCH
GEOGRAPHY
GERMAN
HTSPANIC& ITALIAN STUDIES (including
Romance Studies)
HISTORY (including History with International
Relations.)
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
HOME ECONOMICS
LIBRARIANSHIP
LINGUISTICS
MUSIC
PHILOSOPHY
POLITICAL SCIENCE (including
Political Science with International
Relations)
PSYCHOLOGY
RELIGIOUS STUDIES
SLAVONIC STUDIES (including
Russian and Slavonic Area Studies)
SOCIAL WORK
THEATRE
B.   Two Students from each of FI RST and SECOND YEAR:
1. First Year (including B.A., B.Mus. and B.H.E.)
2. Second Year (including B.A., B.Mus. B.H.E. and B.F.A.)
NOMINATIONS PROCEDURES
Nominations were opened Monday, September 8,  1975 by a notice circulated at
Registration.
Each nomination must:    — be in the format of the blank nomination form.
- indicate the constituency (e.g. A. 23 or B. 2)
— be supported by the identifiable signatures, student
numbers, year and faculty, of FIVE members of THE
SAME CONSTITUENCY.
- carry the signature, student number, year and Faculty
of the nominee, indicating the nominee's willingness
to run for election.
— telephone number and address of the nominee.
CLOSE OF NOMINATIONS: NOMINATIONS MUST BE IN THE HANDS OF THE
REGISTRAR NOT LATER THAN 4:30 P.M. ON FRIDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1975.
INFORMATION
For the purpose of this election Arts students in Third and Fourth Years and in Graduate programs of
the Faculty of Arts who are not registered in association with any particular Department or School of
the Faculty should contact the Registrar's Secretary (228-6338) in order to determine if it is possible
for them to be included in a constituency.
The term of office for those elected now will be from the date of the election until replaced. There
will be an election for the 1976-77 academic year in October 1976.
Students may only participate in the election in their own constituency.
Names of candidates will be listed in The Ubyssey after the close of nominations.
In those constituencies in which the number of candidates nominated exceeds the number of
vacancies elections will be held on Thursday, October 23, 1975 between the hours of 10:00 a.m. and
4:00 p.m. The location of polling stations will be announced at the time the candidates are listed.
Constituency lists for 'A' categories are available in the departments concerned and for 'B' categories
in the Sedgewick Library.
Blank nomination forms may be obtained from the Registrar's Secretary, Room 258, General Services
Administration Building. Page 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 30,  1975
Of rocks
and Kfinck
UBC is rapidly approaching
retirement age.
Today marks the 60th
anniversary of the first day o-f
UBC lectures, though most of the
campus 60 years ago was still
forest and the lectures were held
in buildings on the present site of
the Vancouver General  Hospital.
And now, surviving members
of the classes of 1916-1920 will
attend , a reunion today,
highlighted  by dedication of the
Hot flashes
Fairview grove and unveiling of
the Leonards. Klinck stone.
The grove was the site of the
first on-campus residence — a tent
occupied by Klinck, then dean of
agriculture who supervised
preparation of the agriculture
research fields.
Klinck later became second
president of UBC.
The dedication and sod
turning   are   slated    for   3   p.m.
today.
India
Narindar   Kelly   will    be   on
campus Wednesday to speak
about current problems in India.
Kelly will lecture on early
death among female children in
India — a matter of wantedness, at
noon in Buchanan 102.
She will also give a seminar on
historical demography and the
population problems in India at
3:30 p.m. in the Buchanan
penthouse.
Kelly studied economics and
geography at the University of
Punjab, and is now working on
her doctorate at the University of
Pennsylvania.
'Tween classes
TODAY
GAY WOMEN
First  meeting,  noon,  SUB 224, off
women's office.
CHARISMATIC CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Prayer and sharing, noon,
conference centre, Lutheran
campus centre.
UBC KAYAK AND CANOE CLUB
General   meeting,   noon,   SUB  205.
UBC SKI TEAM
First training session, 5:30-7 p.m.,
winter sports centre, gym E.
PRE-MED SOC
Dr. Szasz speaks on
interprofessional medicine, noon,
IRC-tecture hall 1.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Dinner at 6:30 p.m., round the
table discussion of the creed by
Fred Schmidt, Lutheran campus
centre.
DANCE CLUB
Another   year  of ballroom  dancing
begins     as     the     club     gives     its
professional     lessons    --    learn    to*
bump,  hustle, jive.  To join,  phone
Rob at 224-6321.
GERMAN CLUB
General meeting and plans for wine
and cheese party, 7 p.m.,
International House.
MY JONG KUNG FU CLUB
Practice and registration, 4:30-6:30
p.m., SUB ballroom.
WEDNESDAY
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
Weekly   testimony   meeting,   noon,
SUB 212,
CYCLING TEAM
Organizational meeting, for any
cyclists interested in cycle racing,
noon, War Memorial gym 211.
PAKSING FUTGA
KUNG FU CLUB
Practice,    new   members   welcome,
4:30-6:30 p.m., SUB party room or
ballroom.
ECKANKAR
Introductory    lecture,    noon,   SUB
113.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Orientation  night,  7:30  p.m., SUB
211.
NEWMAN CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 105B.
WUSC
Organizational meeting, noon,
Bu. Tower 1126^
THURSDAY
UBC SKI TEAM
Training session, interested people
please come out, 6-7 p.m., winter
sports centre, gym E.
MY JONG KUNG FU CLUB
Practice and registration, all
welcome, 5-7 p.m., Place Vanier
ballroom.
CHARISMATIC CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Get-acquainted dinner featuring
Bernice Gerard, 5:30 p.m.,
Lutheran campus centre.
INTEGRITY MEETING
General meeting, guest speaker,
noon,     Bu. 232.
FILM SOC
General meeting and film preview,
noon, SUB 247.
PRE-DENTAL SOC
Wine and cheese party for
members, 8 p.m., SUB 205.
I VCF
Psych prof Gord Neufeld tells how
"we have been deceived" relating to
self-worth, noon,  Bu. 100.
COMMITTEE TO OPPOSE
MOSHE DAYAN'S VISIT
Speaker on Plo, against Zionism and
Moshe Dayan, also film on
Palestinian people, noon, Buch.
102.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Philosophy's Grace Dick speaks on
"Death by a 1,000 qualifications —
does  God  die it?" noon, SUB 212.
ALPHA OMEGA
General   meeting,   noon,   SUB  215.
MUSSOC
Pre-audition meeting, noon, Old
Auditorium.
CHINESE CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Talk by Pinnock — "Does faith
need reason?" noon, SUB 205.
SUBFILSOC presents
TV & STEREO
RENTALS
ROYCES
1467 Johnston Rd.,
White Rock, B.C.
531-3028
idqderelM
Liberty
Tan unexpected love story I
Thurs/Sun 7:00
Fri/Sat 7:00/9:30
SUB AUDITORIUM
75c & AMS Card
CHARISMATIC CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
GET-ACQUAINTED DINNER
featuring
BERNICE GERARD
OPEN-LINER CJOR & U.B.C. CHAPLAIN
5:30 p.m., Thurs., Oct. 2
LUTHERAN CAMPUS CENTRE
THOSE PLANNING TO ATTEND, OR FOR INFO PHONE 263-8219
L
"IM THE SPIRIT OF LOVE"
is an integrated study-guide prepared by the training task force of
the Vancouver Reachout. The curriculum consists of 7 study-
lectures on   one-to-one  discipleship,   Christian  community, and
the gifts of the Spirit.
-i
7 teaching sessions based on this curriculum will be presented to
the Christian community on campus by local pastoral leaders.
The studies will be held in S.U.B. Auditorium at 12:30 p.m. on
consecutive weeks, beginning on Wednesday, October 1.
This opportunity for prayer, fellowship, and study is sponsored by:
Campus Crusade for Christ, Charismatic Christian Fellowship, Chinese
Christian Fellowship, Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship, Navigators, Regent
College, and Vancouver Reachout. All Christians on campus are invited to
attend.
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES:   Campus - 3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional lines 25c
Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $1.80; additional lines
40c. Additional days Si.50 & 35c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241, S.U.B., UBC, Van. 8, B.C.
5 — Coming Events
FUN AUCTION!
WEST POINT GREY
UNITED CHURCH
4595 West 8th Ave., Vancouver
OCTOBER 4 — 1:00 P.M.
Furniture, Electrical Appliances,
T.V., Sports & Camping Equipment, Hand-made Quilts, Home
Baking. Refreshments available
and babysitting provided.
EVERYONE IS WELCOME!
15 — Found
MICHAEL MARTIN please contact
Elena Jamal, 228-2878. I have your
wallet.
FOUND   ON    HIGHBERG   STREET.   One
copy   of   Issues   in   Canadian   Public
Policies. E. Mornin, Buch. Towers 206.
10 — For Sale — Commercial
BARGAIN OF THE WEEK! At Bargain
Boutique. Coats, Furs & Fabrics from
$5.00. 4860 McKenzie & 33rd. 263-7812
CALCULATORS AT DISCOUNT PRICES,
for Science and Engineering students.
For information, write: Educational
Products Unlimited, Box 585-CA46,
Station A Montreal. No obligation!
"HOW    TO    CHOOSE    YOUR    BOOZE."
Best-selling paperback book on how
to get best values in buying beer,
wine, and liquor. Pays for itself on
your next liquor purchase. Only $1.50.
Saltaire Publishing Ltd., Box 2003,
Sidney, B.C.
HOW   TO   ESCAPE   THE   RAT   RACE!"
Helps you choose a career and lifestyle where you can be really happy.
Only $1.25. Saltaire Publishing Ltd.,
Box 2003, Sidney, B.C.
20 — Housing
FREE ROOM, UPSTAIRS, large bright,
for responsible studious student
(graduate preferred) in lovely home
near 25th & Granville, private bath,
no cooking. 224-6090.
25
Instruction
30 - Jobs
ENJOY VANCOUVER
NIGHT LIFE
AND SAVE!
Send for entertainment pack of 25
money-savers. Includes 8 restaurants,
9 nite clubs, many other attractions.
Save as much as half of your dining
& entertainment costs — some freebies too! The perfect way to enjoy
Vancouver on a budget. Send $3.50
& tax to Roadrunner Advertising,
Dept. B, 9—1035 Richards St., Van.
V6B 3E4. Your money cheerfully
refunded if not totally satisfied.
PART-TIME, SALES ORIENTED to sell
and demonstrate cosmetics. Phone
after 5 p.m., 946-9634.
EARN $20.00 for lying on a bed in a
dark room for 24 hours. Psychology
study. Come to Room 13, basement,
Henry Angus, Wed., Oct. 1, 12:30. See
Dari Rawk.
SOMEONE     TO     DO     HOUSEWORK    —
Cleaning,    vacuuming.    2   days   per
month, $50. Call 738-8212 or 261-8044.
HOSTESS WANTED for Leisure Club.
Part-time, work days and nights.
Phone  681-9816  for   appointment.
35 - Lost
SR-50 CALCULATOR last Thursday
afternoon by The Barn. I will pay $10
for recovery. Phone John, 224-3444.
I need it!
WOMEN'S RED WALLET containing all
i.D. Lost near Pit, Friday, Sept. 26.
Must be found. Reward offered. Phone
224-9762 or 224-9614. Ask for Carolynn.
40 — Messages
60 - Rides
11 — For Sale — Private
'65 V.W. BEETLE. Engine needs work,
$100 o.b.o. Phone 731-8442 after 6:00
P.M.
1964 V.W., BAJA style back end, rebuilt 36 h.p. engine, mechanically
sound. Cute $550. 224-4533.
PENTAX ES II. fl.8, SMCT 135mm, f3.5,
28mm f3.5, plus access., all excel,
cond. All for $450. Phone 253-8060
after 6.
1966 VW FOR SALE. Good engine, city
tested. Phone 228-3935 (or 921-9631
after 7 p.m.)
IF YOU NEED AN EARLY RIDE from
North Burnaby, Mon., Tues., Wed. &
Fri.  Phone Michael at 298-9890.
85 —Typing
EFFICIENT    ELECTRIC    TYPING,    my
home. Essays, thesis, etc. Neat accurate work. Reasonable rates —
263-5317.
90 - Wanted
BABY   SITTING,  my  home.  West  10th
Ave. 224-4783.
ONE    MECHANICAL    ENGINEER,    un-
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UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED
TO SELL - BUY
INFORM Tuesday, September 30, 1975
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 7
Thunderbirds club Dinosaurs
By TOM BARNES
The football Thunderbirds extended their home winning streak
to three games with an exciting 17-
15 victory over the previously
undefeated University of Calgary
Dinosaurs at Thunderbird Stadium
Saturday afternoon.
Just less than 2,000 fans, a record
number to witness a football game
at the stadium, were on hand to
watch Gary Metz finish off the
storybook victory with a 32-yard
field goal with but three seconds
left in the fourth quarter.
By no means could it be said that
the 'Birds were winners by fluke as
they had consistently bottled up the
potent Dino attack all afternoon. At
the same time with their two big
offensive guns, quarterback Dan
Smith and fullback Gord Penn,
seeing but sparse action the 'Birds
were able to control the ball during
most of the game.
Smith was nursing a sore back
and Penn a bruised knee. Coach
Frank Smith elected to play it safe
and not use either, unless it
became absolutely necessary, for
fear of exposing the pair to serious
injury.
Backup quarterback Greg
Gardner proved himself extremely
competent at running the team,
coming up with an exceptional first
half. Gardner engineered a good
passing attack and ran the options
and counter options well, as he led
UBC to two second-period touchdowns.
During the first period UBC
controlled the ball by running
Bernie Crump up the middle and
hitting Evan Jones with crisp
passes in tight situations.
Late in the opening quarter
Gardner used Crump and Mike
McLeod to balance some fine
passing to Jones as the 'Birds
drove deep into Dino territory.
On the first play of the second
period, Crump dived over the goal
line to cap off the drive. Metz hit
with the convert and UBC led 7-0.
Later in the same period Gardner once again employed Crump
and McLeod to offset some sharp
passing to Jones and Chris Davies
to put together a scoring drive. The
touchdown was scored on a play
that Calgary middle linebacker
will remember for a while. In a
valiant effort to knock Gardner's
pass down he wound up deflecting
it into the waiting hands of Davies
deep in the end zone. Once again
Metz converted and UBC took a 14-
0 lead into the dressing room at
half time.
Both defences came on strong in
the third quarter as neither team
was, able to sustain a drive.
In the fourth quarter Calgary
quarterback Greg Watson put
running back Rick Kellet to use
where Dino star Dan Diduck was
failing. Throughout the game the
'Bird defence had been stopping
Diduck cold. With their attention so
occupied Kellet was able to run
well.
With Kellet as the keystone the
Dinos marched up field. Watson
finished the drive with a good pass
to Larry Leatham for a touchdown.
With the score 14-6 Marshal
MacLeod burst through the
Calgary line to block a potentially
important convert attempt.
UBC was unable to do much with
the ball and Calgary got it back
after three plays. Watson once
again fashioned a drive deep into
UBC territory. This time he
finished it off by sprinting past the
outstretched arms of cornerback
Ken Heise for the major score.
With the score 14-12 the Dinos
were forced to go for the two-point
convert. Watson took advantage of
left side cornerback Al Chorney
tripping and hit Shane Wylie with a
Calgary backfield when Mike
MacKay-Dunn hit Watson and
popped the ball loose. Dave
Pearcey fell on it and UBC was
alive once more.
Defensively UBC was superb.
The secondary has been called
suspect, but, led by Ten Hon Chou,
Chorney and Heise, they held the
best passing attack in the league to
106 yards.
But the big story for UBC was the -
lines. Both offensively and
defensively the linemen put
together the most complete game a
UBC team has played in over a
decade. The offensive line was
giving the passers time to throw
and opening holes big enough to
drive through for the runners.
The defensive line, led by Booy
and John Turecki, was stopping the
Dinos cold. Watson seldom had
time to set up and throw properly
and the running game was
throttled, collecting but 124 yards.
It was a good, well-balanced
team effort, the kind that is going
to win a few more games this
season. It was the kind of game
that will not only put 2,000 people in
the stands, but will soon fill the
stadium up altogether.
The kicking game was yet
another high point for the 'Birds.
Dan Smith constantly put the Dinos
in poor position with good punts.
The UBC teams showed good down
field pursuit completely bottling
up the Calgary runners. But it was
Wasilenko who was the real
highlight in this department. He
piled up 126 yards on punt and
kickoff returns.
The win moves UBC into a
second-place tie with the Dinos,
each has a record of two wins and
one loss. The University of
Saskatchewan Huskies hold down
first place. Their 43-0 win over the
University of Manitoba Bisons
moves their record to 3-1.
As a result of last week's play the
standings now look like this:
GP W L F A Pts.
Sask. 4 3 1 126 57 6
UBC 3 2 1 72 65 4
Calgary 3 2 1 69 55 4
Alberta 3 i 2 51 66 2
Man.      3      n    3       17     92    0
PLOWING THROUGH CALGARY DEFENSE
sweet revenge.
—s'ucha singh photo
'Birds make way to
pass deep in the end zone to tie the
score 14-14.
Disaster struck for the 'Birds
when the ball popped loose from
Vic. Wasilenko on the kickoff
return. Calgary took over on the
UBC 36-yard line. The UBC
defence held strong and the Dino's
Don Siler came in for his third field
goal attempt of the day. Like the
previous two this one was wide,
however this time Wasilenko
couldn't run the ball out of the end
zone and Calgary took a 15-14 lead.
Coach Smith set quarterback
Smith and Penn into the game with
less than a minute remaining.
Smith's passing and Penn's running combined for three first
downs but then three in-
completions killed the drive, and
with it UBC's hopes disappeared.
All Calgary had to do was fall on
the ball to-kill the last 42 seconds of
the game. But on the next play the
'Birds   caused   a   fumble   in   the
Smith took over and with short
passes to Wasilenko and a run by
Penn moved the ball into position
for Metz. Metz kicked the ball
cleanly through the posts but the
play was ruled dead as it was held
the 'Birds had taken up too much
time. Undismayed Metz promptly
kicked the field goal again. Then
mayhem broke out in the stands,
for the first time in many, many
games.
It cannot be denied that UBC is -
now a force to be reckoned with.
Without their two big guns the
offence churned out 370 yards.
Gardner was good on 10 of 15
passes, and Jones and Davies
proved that there was a full
complement of competent
receivers on the squad.
While without Penn the ground
game was not strong it was also not
without its bright spots. Crump
scored his third touchdown in as
many games, and Garner himself
picked up 42 yards on keeper plays.
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1897 BURRARD    731*8171 •© Page 8
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 30, 1975
Berton calls for gov't film cash
By RALPH MAURER
The Canadian government must
subsidize Canadian film makers
and establish a quota system if the
country is to have a film industry
of its own, author and historian
Pierre Berton said Saturday.
"Canada has to have a subsidized movie industry, there's no
doubt about it," he said.
"Every country with a movie
industry except the United States,
has had (a) a quota system, and
(b) government subsidies."
He said, however, that Canada's
developing television industry is
helping to offset the lack of a large
film industry.
Berton had earlier told the
crowd, which overflowed from
lecture hall 2 in the Instructional
Resources Centre, the best thing
that has happened to American
films about Canada is that
Hollywood has stopped making
them.
"The best thing I can say, and
the most interesting thing I can say
is that Hollywood has stopped
making them," he said.
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ECKANKAR
The Path of Total Awareness
"Spirituality cannot be taught, but
caught . . . Therefore man's first
duty is to know himself. We can
worship any God we wish, but our
first duty according to all
metaphysical and spiritualteachings
is to find out who, and what, we
are ourselves."
How does ECKANKAR compare
with other paths?
INTRODUCTORY LECTURE
Wednesday, Oct. 1 at 12:30
in S.U.B. 113
Jazz at UBC
LIONS GATE
JAZZBAND
UBC Graduate Centre
Friday October 3rd.
900'tillOO.
Admission $150
Refreshments
Traditional Jazz Music
for dancing and listening.
"That leaves the Canadian
image, personality and identity in
our own hands," Berton said.
Berton's talk revolved around
the distorted image the American
film industry has given us of
Canada's history, coincidentally
the central theme of his just-
published Hollywood's Canada
($10.95 cloth).
"American film industry
assumed the Canadian experience
on the frontier was identical to the
American experience, or at least
with their mythology," he said.
"But you can't blame Hollywood
for not knowing this. They didn't
come up here."
He said this tendency was
supported by the Canadian press,
"who didn't realize the difference
between Canadian and American
history."
"We accepted (American films)
uncritically as a nation," he said.
"It has made it very difficult to
have an image of ourselves."
As a result, he said, Canadian
filmgoers got the American wild
west,   complete  with   guns,   lyn-
chings and violence, when, they
went to see films about Canada.
In fact, he said, the over-riding
feature of the Canadian frontier
was the lawfulness.
He cited a 1954 film by Cecil de
Mille called The Far Country, in
which James Stewart is appointed
marshal of Dawson City by the
grateful populace and
singlehandedly brings law and
order to the Klondike.
"The interesting thing is that the
law came ahead of the settlers.
There were 200 soldiers (in the
Klondike), all to stop people like
James Stewart from carrying
guns."
He said another film, the North
West Mounted Police, depicts the
quelling of the Red River uprising.
In that film, Berton said, the Indians were given the machine gun
while in fact the police had it.
That film "turned Canadian
history inside out," said Berton.
He said it "libelled the Metis
nation and made a fool of Louis
Riel."
"As a result, we didn't get a
mythology based on our own
history," he added.
"We have to have a common
mythology," he said. "Mythology
gets people interes'ted in history.
"You've got to have larger than
life people in your past and
present," he said.
He said the most important way
to educate Canadians about their
culture is through the mass media.
"How can we educate ignorant
Canadians about their history?
More courses at university, more
courses in high school, but really
■ the most effective way is through
the mass media," he said.
"I don't think we should restrain
the influence of American culture
in Canada — I think we should
build up our own."
He said Canadians haven't "had
a sense of community because we
haven't had a powerful mass
media."
Berton's talk was sponsored by
the Vancouver Institute.
LATE PAYMENT OF FEES
A late payment fee of $25.00 additional to all other fees will be assessed if
payment of the first instalment is not made on or before September 19.
Refund of this fee will be considered only on the basis of a medical
certificate covering illness or on evidence of domestic affliction. If fees are
not paid in full by October 3, 1975, registration will be cancelled and the
student concerned excluded from classes.
If a student whose registration has been cancelled for non-payment of fees
applies for reinstatement and the application is approved by the Registrar,
the student will be required to pay a reinstatement fee of $25.00, the late
fee of $25.00, and all other outstanding fees before being permitted to
resume classes.
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