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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Oct 5, 1971

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Array —dirk visser photo
Indian Week continues today at 12:30 p.m. in the SUB art gallery with Nishga speaker Alvin McKay. Throughout the day carvers, legend-tellers
and silversmiths will hold forth, also in the art gallery. In the SUB auditorium at 12:30 and 2:30 p.m. several films relating to the condition of
Canadian natives will be shown. Above are four of the Tse-shaht dancers who performed Monday.
Union boycotts for federal money
TORONTO (CUP) - Following the example of
Indian chiefs in northeastern Alberta, the Union of
Ontario Indians decided Friday to protest poor
living conditions by asking Ontario's 55,000 Indians
to keep their children out of school.
The union recognizes the school boycott as an
act of civil disobedience designed to gain the
attention — and money — of the federal
government.
Union president Fred Plain said the time for such
action by Indians is "long overdue". He said that
poor housing conditions, roads and schools for
Indians are "prevalent and exist in all parts of
Canada".
Indian treaty rights pertaining to hunting and
fishing have been violated by federal legislation, he
added.
Last week Indian chiefs in northeastern Alberta
ordered a school boycott to get better roads,
schools and living conditions.
Plain said the federal minister of* Indian affairs
and northern development, Jean Chretien, "is
insensitive in his position as minister of Indian
affairs to the Indian people and has deliberately
failed to meet his responsibilities in this regard".
He said Chretien declined to attend an all-chiefs
meeting on the government's responsibility to
Indians, scheduled at Cornwall October 9 and 10,
giving "no good reason".
Belltower boom boom balked
It's going to take an ad hoc student movement to
get Indian drum music played over the UBC
belltower.
AMS special events co-ordinator Julian Wake,
who is conducting a one-man crusade to have Indian
sundance music played through the belltower's
electronic apparatus, said Monday that he has made
the request in the hope of adding to Indian Week.
However, he said, ceremonies director Malcolm
McGregor has told him that too many students have
complained about the belltower being a disturbance.
Wake wanted the drum music played through the
belltower for 10 minutes a day through the rest of
the week.
However, he said he was told Friday that unless
students support more frequent playing from the
belltower, administration president Walter Gage is
reluctant to okay the drum music plan.
' .*£-. -"> ~-^m^.' >*<™*)ff "TUWl ?.T¥Bi5!ws
George Clutesi, author and former
leader of the Tse-shaht dancers,
speaking to students in the art
gallery Monday noon.
By LESLEY KRUEGER
Indians have experienced a
reawakening of interest in their
culture, author George Clutesi
said Monday.
"People lost sight of the
customs to such an extent they
were unknown to all but the old,"
said Clutesi, author of Son of
Raven, Son of Deer.
"Now we know we must
recapture our heritage to realize
our identity," he said.
Clutesi's speech in the SUB art
gallery opened Indian week which
is sponsored by the Alma Mater
Society's special events
committee.
He said he hoped the week
would awaken interest among all
students about the value of the
Indian culture.
"When the first white
missionaries came to our villages
they tried to stifle our customs,"
he said. "We followed their wishes
but recently we have seen they
were not right.
"Now it is difficult to bring
about a revival of our culture.
Only the old people know the
songs and rituals, and they have
been taught to be ashamed of
them," he said.
He said the clergy has brought
about ill feelings between many
Indian and Catholic people.
"It is strange there is such
feeling between these two peoples
because both are much involved
with ritual," Clutesi said.
After Clutesi's talk the
Tse-shaht dancers performed in
the SUB auditorium.
The dance group was first
formed in 1949 by Clutesi.
"Two people showed up at the
first meeting I called. But after
two years there were 54 in the
group," Clutesi said.
"We learned the dances from
the old ones."
The troupe is now led by
Bernelda Wheeler of the
Cree-Saultaux tribe in Manitoba.
"When Bernelda came here we
were amazed at the similarities
between our legends, and her
tribe's. After travelling further I
now know this similarity extends
through all of Canada," Clutesi
said.
The Tse-shaht troupe is
composed of five older women
who chant songs and a varying
number of girl dancers aged
between five and 12 years.
They perform old ceremonial
dances at different functions.
The only dances they may not
perform are the sacred ones
reserved for religious occasions.
Indian week functions
continue until Friday.
Schedules are posted
throughout the SUB building. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 5, 1971
Could it happen to you?
By KATHY HYDE
After three years on the island
of Borneo, Vancouver in 1971 is a
very freaky place.
The Canadian scene is radically
different from what it was when I
left in 1968.
Life styles - dress, hair, drugs
— are much freer and the big
issues such as pollution, Black
Power, Quebecois and Women's
Liberation   are   very   much   on
One UBC student's experience with
CUSO, and a chance to talk
to some others.
Whatever CUSO is or is not,
does or does not do, it was
through CUSO that I had a
tremendously enriching personal
experience where I developed an
acute awareness of other cultures,
other customs and the problems
of developing nations.
Other people had and will have
different experiences. Each has
her/his own story.
Maybe CUSO is for you,
maybe it isn't. Why not go to
CUSO Day at International House
on Tuesday and find out?
Acropol
RESTAURANT
.
Specializing in
Greek Dishes
Mon. to Thurs.
10 a.m. to 12
Fri. and Sat.
10 a.m. to 12
Sunday 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.
FULL FACILITIES
2946 W. Broadway 733-2412
LOS ANGELES FRCE PRESS
people's minds. A lot has
happened here.
But then, a lot happened to me
in Sabah, East Malaysia, too.
There were bad times and there
were good times.
I went overseas with the
Canadian University Service
Overseas to Sabah and was
assigned to teach English and the
methods of teaching English as a
second language at a teacher's
training college in Kota Kinabalu,
the capital city.
I was 20, fresh from UBC,
clutching an honors English
degree in literature in my
intellectual teeth.
I had never taught before, nor
had I ever taken an education
course, but the Sabahan
bureaucracy wanted me at the
college because they thought I
had an impressive degree.
The job was difficult, but
friends helped me out and the
students were very patient with
my mistakes.
Luckily, I learned from my
mistakes and few successes, and so
I feel I did some worthwhile
teaching while I was there.
I did other things like direct
plays, organize debates and edit
the college newssheet and
magazine, usually managing to
keep one step ahead of the
students.
For the third year of my stay
there I was not teaching but was
working, independent of CUSO,
with a photographer on a book
about the country.
The book, Portrait of Sabah,
will be 350 pages when published
and consists of photographs with
explanations, descriptions poetry,
quotations local ghost stories,
legends, head-hunting stories and
poems by local poets.
Even during the bad times
when I felt like getting on a plane
and coming home to a situation
where I knew what I was doing
(being a student at UBC), there
was always the beauty of the
country and its peoples keeping
me there.
R00BB
-  jetton
0    to
SPAGHETTI HOUSE LTD ■* w
4450 W. 10th Ave.
Hot Delicious Tasty Pizzas
- 22 DIFFERENT FLAVORS -
BARBECUED SPARERIBS
FREE DELIVERY - Right to Your Door
Phone 224-1720 - 224-6336
OPEN    FOR    LUNCH
HOURS - MON. To THURS. 11 a.ra to 3 a.ra
, FRI. & SAT. 11 a.m to 4 a.m. -SUNDAY4 p.m. to 2 a.m..
Like others who have gone
there I came to love the country,
its peoples, its dancing, its
language, its customs.
I tried to gain an
understanding.
Although I failed because none
of us can fully understand, I tried
and listened and watched and
sometimes talked and often
listened and sympathized and
empathized and got angry at and
got angry with and understood a
little.
There I knew green rolling hills
beauty and warm brown skin
beauty and dense, decaying jungle
beauty and dancing or sombre
black eyed beauty and heavy
black hair beauty and stark rock
Kinabalu mountain beauty and
blue sea white sand beauty and
gentleness and tolerance and
patience and love and kindness
and hospitality.
And because Sabah is a part of
the world, not apart from it, all
there is not beautiful and good.
There is also ugliness, cruelty,
neglect, prejudice, injustice,
hatred and intolerance.
The country is growing up — a
very painful process.
It is, in a way, a beginning
country, as I was a beginning
teacher.
It is making mistakes, as I
made them.
There were many things there
that I, as a somewhat politically
naive Canadian, saw and judged as
undemocratic and unjust.
Like what? Well, like exam
results being fixed, and only
members of a certain religion
getting scholarships, and a friend's
husband being held in jail for two
years as a political detainee
without ever being charged, and
friends being forced to change
their religion if they wanted to
keep their jobs, and foreigners
being ordered to leave the country
within 24 hours even though
many of them had spent many
years there and had no country to
go back to, and everyone being
very aware of the secret police.
Many volunteers question their
purpose and their role, while
trying to do their job as required
by the country in which they are
serving to the best of their
abilities.
The whole CUSO bureaucratic
machine is one with many faults.
Many volunteers are aware of
this and are trying to halt this
process of bureaucratization.
TUXEDO
RENTAL & SALES
+ D.B. & S. B. Tuxedos
+ D. B. & S. B. White Coats
+ D. B. & S. B. Suits
+ COLORED SHIRTS
Parking at Rear
BLACK & LEE
Formal Wear Rentals
631 Howe 688-2481
today is
cuso DAY
until 9:00 p.m. at
international house
Special program at noon
free coffee and
10 kinds of tea
INTRODUCTION TO
CREATIVE ENGINEERING
Engineering and Photography
INSTRUCTOR:
MR. DENES DEVENYI, P.Eng., Special Lecturer in
Creative Photography, Assistant Director, Department of
Physical Plant and Planning, Simon Fraser University.
TIME:
Commencing SATURDAY, OCTOBER 9, 1971,
9:30-11:30 a.m., 10 sessions.
PLACE:
ROOM   214,   Henry  Angus  Building,  The  University  of
British Columbia.
FEE: $45.00.
COURSE OUTLINE:
Specific techniques will be discussed that will increase the
creative thinking and problem-solving ability of the student.
The course will also help graduate engineers and engineering
students to improve their powers to communicate through
the visual media. It will explore areas that are normally
beyond the engineer's education and experience. By doing
this it will lead engineers to a more creative approach to
their profession as well as to teach a greater awareness of
the world around them.
Lectures, classroom exercises and group discussions are part
of the program.
REGISTRATION:
As enrolment is limited to 25 persons, advance registration
is advised. Please contact:
ENGINEERING PROGRAMS
Centre for Continuing Education, UBC
228-2181 Tuesday, October 5, 1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
Trouble brewing in anthrosoc dept.
By ART SMOLENSKY
It's harvest time at the old
university. And when promotions
and tenure committees go out
into the field, and many a prof
comes a cropper.
Throughout the university,
departmental promotions and
tenure decisions are being made
this week. This is two weeks
earlier than normal because the
senior   appointments   committee
has complained of too little time
to consider departmental
recommendations in the past.
Students can expect to see the
usual crop of diligent researchers
sent   to   bloom   in   the  greener
pastures of associate
professordom. Those who flower
in the classroom can again expect
to have their petals trimmed.
Students   in   the   know   are
casting a concerned eye on events
in
several    arts
—david bowerman photo
NEW SEDGEWICK LIBRARY takes shape behind construction fence. Plan is to preserve former contours of the main mall area and build
the library completely underground. Meanwhile, those detours between Buchanan and the bookstore . . .
Bursaries delayed under new plan
By SANDISHREVE
Student bursary recipients got their money
at least two weeks late this year because of a
change in administration policy.
Shirley Magnusson, assistant to
administration president Walter Gage, told
The Ubyssey the delay resulted from
introduction of a new system under which
students were required to apply for both
bursaries and student loans on the same
application form.
Magnusson said some bursaries are still
being processed but all loans came through on
time.
Students were told in their bursary award
notice that all scholarships and bursaries are
being deducted from their fees by the finance
department this year.
Magnusson said in previous years students
collected their bursaries from the finance
office in two equal installments.
All recipients had to sign a check each term
and then most would hand them back to the
finance department to put toward their fees.
"This year's system is easier because only
those students who get amounts in excess of
their fees have to go to the finance office for
their cheques so line-ups are reduced."
She said that if students paid their fees
themselves they would receive the bursary
money in the same manner as last year.
"This year's system is designed to save time
and trouble for the students," she said.
However, Gordon Hilliker, arts 2,
discovered that 1% of his fees were paid.
He said he paid three-quarters of his fees at
registration with a provincial scholarship
coupon.
After informing the finance department of
this he later found that they overlooked the
fact and paid all of his fees from his other
bursaries.
When he went to collect his refund for the
extra amount he was told he would not
receive it until they were officially informed
that he had paid the amount at registration.
"I won't see any of my money until at
least the second week in October due to the
mix-up," he said.
Hilda Westerkamp, music 4, said she was
disappointed with the new procedure.
"I had to pay all my fees at once and now
have no money left over for books," she said
Monday.
Westerkamp said she received private and
government bursaries as well as a government
scholarship.
"Now I only have around $24 left out of
the $580 music fees," she said.
shaping    up
departments.
Ubyssey sources indicate that
one likely hot spot is the
anthropology and sociology
deparment.
Five professors there are up for
tenure: George Gray, Bob Ratner,
Robin Ridington, Ron Silvers and
Matthew Speier. If they don't get
it, they will be forced to leave the
university.
In the case of a couple of profs
with excellent publication and
teaching records, personal
antagonisms may play the decisive
role.
Concern is growing among
graduate students in the anthrosoc
department.
They have held two lengthy
meetings to discuss possible
courses of action. A flurry of
departmental memos seems to
have been the opening salvo.
"In the cases of some
professors, political considerations
will play a large part in the
decision. If these professors are
refused promotion, student action
will certainly be taken," arts
undergraduate society president
Portnuff said Monday.
The anthrosoc situation recalls
the furore which arose in early
1970 when two popular qualified
professors were denied tenure by
the English department.
The graduate students' concern
raises the question of whether a
similar situation could develop in
anthropology and sociology.
Escape now
Bookings can now be made for
charter Christmastime escape
flights to Toronto or London.
The return flight to Toronto,
leaving Dec. 20 and returning Jan.
4 will be $125. This represents a
reduction of about ten per cent
from last year's $139 fare.
The London flight, from Dec.
19 to Jan. 4, is $245.
Students, faculty and their
immediate families are eligible.
The service is provided by the
Alma Mater Society in
conjunction with Western Student
Services. Inquire at SUB 226 or
phone 228-2980.
a consumer columni
By ART SMOLENSKY
The following letter from Cal Deedman, arts 2, was
received Monday. Exposure is printing the letter rather
than running a story.
London Drugs president Sam Bass confirmed that
the cheque cashing policy reported below is indeed
correct.
"Essentially we want to know if the person has
money," Bass said Monday. ' 'A credit card is proof that
somewhere along the line, someone has checked out
whether or not the person has money."
Bass said he believes that most students have at least
two credit cards.
However 15 students in SUB Monday showed Bass
was wrong.
Eleven students had no cards at all and two students
each had one oil company credit card. Seven students
without cards said they just didn 't see the use of them.
One Ubyssey staffer who has a large assortment of
credit cards must have tried to cash a cheque at London
Drugs before.
His rationale for having so many cards: "I don't use
them, I just keep them for identification."
Last Friday night, my wife and I found out that
London Drugs, 665 West Broadway, does not think that
we are "stable people" because we do not possess at
least two credit cards.
Having been assured by a sales assistant that cheques
are acceptable, we took a number of items to the
check-out counter. The girl rang up S5.25, my wife
wrote a cheque for the amount and produced her
driver's licence, MSA card, and VCC student card (with
color photo) as ID. The girl told us that she could not
accept the cheque unless we could show her two credit
cards as ID. Since we prefer not to buy on credit, we
were unable to oblige.
We have never had any difficulty cashing cheques
before, so we were confident that an impasse could be
avoided by appealing to a higher authority. Eventually
this higher authority arrived in the person of a male
employee.
We blithely explained our position to him, but, to
our amazement, he reiterated what the girl had said. We
tried to reason with him: our cheques are personalized in
both our names, and I had all kinds of corroborative
ID myself, including a UBC library card bearing my own
photograph.
Our arguments failed to move him. He was
adamant: No credit cards? No cheques! His philosophy
was simple: "If people have established a line of credit,
it shows that they are stable people."
We told the man that we would not let the matter
rest, but he merely shrugged and unctiuously trotted out
the "company policy" line. Having been judged a poor
risk because we believe in making immediate payment
for our purchases, we left the store.
Does London Drugs realize that wallets containing a
driver's licence and several credit cards are lost or stolen
all too frequently? Presumably, with a minimal amount
of practice, any enterprising crook can produce a copy
of the loser's signature adequate enough to satisfy the
scrutiny of a store clerk.
I contacted the Vancouver Police Department and
spoke to a detective. He told me that stolen driver's
licences and credit cards are commonly offered as ID by
criminals cashing phoney cheques. He agreed that
because none of this documentation bears the owner's
picture, the criminal's task is made easier. Indeed, he
speculated that the advent of the new B.C. driver's
licence (bearing the licensee's photo) might make things
tougher for the bum cheque artists.
He intimated that, before accepting cheques, city
merchants might tend to demand the photographic
proof of identity which the new licences would make
readily available to a large number of people. Well,
London Drugs, is a university student's identity card any
easier to obtain, and hence, any less credible than a B.C.
driver's licence?
It is said that a picture is worth a thousand words; it
would appear that under certain circumstances, the
name of a large company stamped on a credit card is
worth a lot more than a mere picture. I find this kind of
inflation rather disturbing.
Got a gripe? Prices high, quality low? Drop a note
to EXPOSURE c/o The Ubyssey, SUB giving full details.
Exposes solicited. Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 5, 1971
Bad old days
Ahem.
It has been duly noted (no flies on us) that several
people who have written letters to The Ubyssey
entertain the notion that this newspaper is a human
government house organ.
Sorry to disappoint the letter scribblers' fringe, but
it's not so.
We've said it before, but here it is again: The
people who mold and control The Ubyssey are the
people who work on it. Which means any student who
takes the time to land in the office and do some work.
Our policy vis-a-vis the human government and the
AMS in general is the same this year as it was in the
past. That is, that student government projects,
accomplishments, ideas, are evaluated on the basis of
their merit.
To date, The Ubyssey has made positive
evaluations of the major human government projects —
some of which had appeared more than once as
proposals by past student governments but true to form,
never carried out.
Surely no one would argue against AMS support
for, or initiation of the women's studies course, the
co-op bookstore, poetry readings, a proposed
restaurant-pub area in SUB and a program of speakers.
As for the Amchitka border protest, UBC veterans
will recall that The Ubyssey supported a similar move
by Fraser Hodge's moderate-to-right-wing council in
1969.
However, we are not trying to gloss over current
actions of the human government by painting its
members as long-haired replicas of past councils. This is
a diffrrrnt group nnri it in mmpmrrl mninly nf tnrinli"t
But rather than hysterical cries of totalitarianism,
what any student government needs is honest debate
over its actions. This is what the newspaper is
Attempting to promote. ^	
It may be thai The IJtJyssityhias become tangled in
its own history of criticizing student governments. When
Ubyssey support is given to student government moves
and objectives, suspicion may result.
Especially in the students whom The Ubyssey, over
the years, has probably aided in converting into cynical
individualists.
But it must be reiterated that if The Ubyssey has
been more critical than complimentary of past student
governments, it was because past student governments
were more bad than good.
And it should also be emphasized that past student
governments had an open invitation from The Ubyssey
to write articles on their projects, accomplishments and
ideas.
Only on the rarest of occasions did they bother to
accept this invitation.
And as for the students, it is always disappointing
to hear endless criticism at a time when at least a few
people on campus are attempting to provide concrete
solutions, and then to carry these solutions into a plan
of action.
So . . . yes, we're keeping an eye on the human
government; and no, we're not a house organ, since
most members of The Ubyssey staff wouldn't work on a
student newspaper that fitted that description.
But in the meantime, we're also waiting for all
those cards and letters filled with progressive solutions
to come rolling in.
THE UBYSSEY
OCTOBER 5, 1971
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the writer and not of the AMS or the university administration.
Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a
weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located
in room 241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial departments, 228-2301, 228-2307; Page Friday, Sports,
228-2305; advertising, 228-3977.
Editor: Leslie Plommer
Dr. Konrat Schmaltz found that under the influence of Demon
Marihooney, Mike didn't pass the Buck. Eleanor didn't Boyle over and
Randy didn't Frith at the mouth as Stan scratched where he was Persky.
But two Mikes did draw Finlay little Quiggles on the John with a Twigg
when Tricia said there was nothing Moore to be done with Ian Lindsay's
name. John kept Kula than Andersen who was Oscar than Sandy but they
all Kassed about for the roach. Jan O'Brien offered tokin' resistance. Shane
McCune told Woodward to Berton his lip and swore that the inscrutable
Jinny Ladner had something Sandy up her Shreve. Paul Knox and Art
Smolensky found that Mike Sausages on grass.
The photogs were scared by the weed: Brett hid in his Garrett, Gary
Gruenke stepped into a Kellyphone Booth and David Nicholas
Smith-Bowerman Dirked into a Visser in the San Andreas fault. In the
snorts department, Ian was in a Cordy with Gord, who claims he just
Gibson a sensual hedgehog, although Kent Spencer much better. So don't
do it, kids; there's plenty of fun to be had with a bottle of Coke and a
sockhop.         _^^^_^__
"Do you think they were trying to tell us something?"
Letters
Yoker
I read with interest, the
breaking of our native B.C. egg
throwing record by three
agriculture students. Mr. Coffin,
currently touring Europe on
behalf of "The Vancouver
Chicken Society", will be back in
time to join with me in accepting
the challenge of the
aforementioned students before
embarking on a similar goodwill
mission to South America.
It is our aim to smash the local
record beyond recognition, at the
same time threatening the world
record of 275 feet set in Rhodesia
last month.
Please fill in further details of
the challenge and any local
ground rules.
D. W. Colley
2777 E 48th
We're not up on the details,
but interested aggies reading your
letter will no doubt be in touch.
Planaria
Whenever a new issue of The
Ubyssey comes out, I immediately
turn:
(l)to the editorial page;
(2)on to the editorial cartoon.
It has been my experience that
the cartoons are consistently of
exceptionally high quality.
And so it was with a deep sense
of shock that I saw today's
cartoon (above).
I just can't seem to be able to
figure it out. Can you explain it
for me?
Thanx.
Hairy Planaria
We don't understand the
cartoon either, but we have
learned not to question the
brilliant genius of John Kula, who
does have an analysis of this
cartoon — which we forget. Sorry.
Bitch
Since I've come to UBC I've
managed to peruse all the issues of
The Ubyssey. And I've come up
with a conclusion.
If you've read one you've read
them all.
The bulk of your paper is
nothing more than a "bitching
forum" where you bitch about
the administration, bitch about
food, bitch about certain faculty
members, bitch, bitch, bitch. But
hark! There's one thing you don't
bitch about and that is His Royal
Highness Steve Garrod and his
Huns (I mean, human
government).
The Ubyssey literally kisses
human government's ass!!
Seeing as this makes The
Ubyssey a puppet of the human
government I suggest that you
practise hard. If you're going to
be a puppet, be a good one.
You're so anti-establishment
and pro-human I government that
your newspaper is more like the
Communist Manifesto than an
impartial newspaper.
C'mon, get off your fat asses,
give your mouths a rest and let's
see some worthwhile issues.
You're at UBC supposedly to get
an education. Let's see how
educated you are. You've already
shown us your ignorance.
A Freshman
Merit
I was handing out course cards
during registration week and the
faces of many disappointed
students had already shown me
the unfairness of the procedure.
In my naivety, however, I thought
that the selection of when people
registered had been done at
random or even by alphabetical
order.
I was appalled to see, in the
Sept. 23 Ubyssey, that the system
is based on supposed merit.
All   courses   are   not  created Tuesday, October 5, 1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
equal and students know it. So
the "good" students choose the
best courses and the best profs.
What happens to the not so good
students? They have to register in
courses which do not interest
them because those they wanted
are filled up. They must listen all
year to some boring prof that the
"good" students stayed clear of.
By its registration procedure
the administration is insuring that
students who were given poor
grades last year will do even worse
this year. And there goes another
vicious circle.
Why not set a number of
course cards aside for each day of
registration and give everyone an
equal chance of getting course
she/he wants.
Aline Smolensky
Grad. Stud. 7
Brimstone
Whatever happened to Steve
Garrod's promise as printed in the
UBC (sic) that he made at the
time of his election to the post of
AMS president, that he would call
an election in October of 1971 to
let the student body decide
whether or not human
government should continue in
office?
So far I have not seen or heard
any indication that Garrod's
promise will be kept.
Perhaps the "human"
government is aware that a large
percentage of students at this
university are sickened by the
puerile antics of the AMS
president and his partners in
crime; thus they won't lay their
careers so to speak, on the line,
and to hell with their promises.
Re the protest border closure
— is this fatuous procedure to
take place at regular intervals like
Hallowe'en?
The cutting of funds to
support extramural sports, only to
spend over $1,000.00 on
transportation of an extremely
small minority of students to the
border escapade, strikes me as
very gross indeed. It also makes
one wonder at the priorities of the
"human" government.
Garrod's display during the
visit of the royal family and
particularly his behavior aboard
the royal yacht Britannia only
emphasized his child-like attitude
and reminded me forceably of
kindergarten youngsters yelling:
"It's my turn now!"
I also dislike bringing party
politics into an educational
institution, which is exactly what
Garrod and the human
government have done. When
Steve Garrod at first ballot, failed
to win the election, but the
remainder of his "human"
executive did, what did those that
were elected do?
Tfcnsar
we sell
handmade things
by local craftsmen.
2002 w. 4m. avenue
Letters
The cried and said, 'If Stevie
doesn't  become  President,  then
we will all resign!' Talk about
being a bunch of babies!!!! It also
makes one wonder about their
actual sincerity to hold those
positions for the good of the
student body or whether they
wanted the positions so that they
could work against the
"establishment".
So far the "human"
government has done nothing that
the rest of the students at large
can say with pride, 'look what
OUR university has done!' Instead
they are having to defend the likes
of Steve Garrod and hanging their
heads in shame!
I hope you are proud Mr.
Garrod for making a complete and
utter fool of yourself and the
university.
My dictionary tells me that the
word 'human' means "in the
manner of man" or "consisting of
men".
Ian R. Whiting
Science 2
As reported- in the Oct. 1
Ubyssey, the human government
referendum on whether its
members stay in office is slated
for Oct. 27.
Radicals
So you're lamenting the fact
that so few students turned up at
the Amchitka protest.
One of the Always Mouthing
Shit brass blamed "the nature of
the educational institution". That
nature is, in case you didn't know,
more in favor of education than
missing classes and sitting under
the Peace Arch.
Instead of prancing off to the
border and whimpering "ban the
bomb" you radicals should work
more constructively to foster
world sister and brotherhood.
You can start by imprisoning
greasers.
An arts straight
Elections
Nominations are now open for
two positions as AMS
representatives from the arts
undergraduate society.
Nominations close 12:30, October
15. Elections will be held October
22. Nomination forms may be
picked up at the arts office, Bu.
107. This is an official
announcement.
Colin Portnuff
Pres.,AUS
Piggery
I wish to add my shrill voice in
concert with those sagely
conservative forces in our midst
who oppose the current vogue of
small teaching units, discussion
groups and increased student
participation in learning at UBC.
Beautiful
clothes.
for
beautiful
people
LE CHATEAU
"Is Where It's happening"
776 Granville 687-2701
I am aware of the arguments in
support of this trend, as no doubt
you are. Mealy-mouthed liberals
abound.
However. Today I was
confined for an hour in a small
room     with     an     egotistical,
self-centred    bourgeois    pig,
loudmouth   fraternity   fart   who
lives in the British Properties (he
announced modestly) and whose
gleaming white teeth ran rampant
over the sensibilities of a dozen
others, including the hapless T.A.
A student. Worse than the
worst professor in that his only
contact with the subject matter
was anal.
I cannot identify this moron
by name for.it would be libelous,
but I can tell you his eyes are
unnaturally close togther.
Name withheld
for anonymity are given"?
C.R.Castaldi
Bloomfield, Conn.
Cavity
Sucker
Go jam a highspeed drill up
your bum, mate. You're just
another fucking hysterical pig,
living in some pig Yankee-country
with your gouging dental practice.
You got a cavity in your brain.
What the fuck do you know about
what's going on at ol' Dinosaur
U.? Shove that fake anonymous
bullshit. Behind that polite talk
you pretend to I smell a vicious
sadist.
A GUTSY MODERATE
The Ubyssey welcomes letters
from all readers.
Letters should be signed and, if
possible, typed.
Although an effort is made to
publish all letters received, The
Ubyssey reserves the right to edit
letters for reasons of brevity,
legality, grammar or taste.
PUBLIC NOTICE:
The SPCE (Society for the
Prevention of Cruelty to the
Establishment) will meet on
Tuesdays at Corky's to discuss
this    raging    social    dilemma.
Phone  for  membership cards.
731-4717
Appointment    not    necessary   but
helpful. Bring your own comb.
3644 W. 4th Ave.
\      Psychology Club presents     :•
i "Frontiers Of The MinH
p. »J
I WEDNESDAY. 12:30 p.m. \
\ IN ANGUS 110
■: NEW MEMBERS §
•: ENCOURAGED TO ATTEND =:
A Memorial Mass for
PROF.
FRANK MARZARI
will be held
in St. Mark's Chapel
Wednesday,
6 October - 12.30 p.m.
While visiting UBC for a
postgraduate course in dentistry, I
picked up the Sept. 17 issue of
The Ubyssey and noted an item in
the letters column entitled
"Fuck!", and signed "A
Moderate".
What a beautiful example of
the writer paying homage to
another decadent middle-class
activity — the unsigned letter to
the editor. And The Ubyssey
sanctions the action by printing it.
A clear example of either a gutless
writer or a gutless newspaper, or
both.
It seems to me that all the
English professor the Moderate
mentioned was trying to point out
was how to spot a phoney. What
is the difference in phoniness
between the plagiarist, the
unsigned letter to the editor, and
a newspaper which withholds the
writer's name "when valid reasons
Mr. Norman Cousins
Mr. Norman Cousins, editor of the Saturday Review and one of
the most influential voices in contemporary journalism, will speak
twice at UBC on WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 6. He will speak at
12:30 P.M. in the FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE on "An
Environment for Survival" and at 8 PM. in the lounge of TOTEM
PARK RESIDENCES on "Planetary Management." Admission to
both lectures, sponsored by the Vancouver Sun Lectureships and
the Leon and Thea Koerner Foundation, is free.
THIS COUPON WILL SAVE YOU
*2.00
ON YOUR HAIRSTYLE
*2
• OO
$a
•oo
Includes: Razor Cut,
Shampoo, Style,
Free Hair Conditioning
CAMPUS   HAIRSTYLING     Conveniently Located in
Lower Student Union Building
Two professional stylists to serve you!
r
FOR PREFERRED RISKS ONLY
It Pays to Shop for Car Insurance
YOU CAN SAVE MONEY ON CAR INSURANCE AT WESTCO
OO
o
o
INSURANCE   COMPANY
HEAD OFFICE: 1927 WEST BROADWAY, VANCOUVER 9. BRITISH COLUMBIA
FAST CLAIM SERVICE
FILL IN AND RETURN THIS COUPON TODAY OR PHONE IN THE DETAILS TODAY
FOR WRITTEN QUOTATION, NO OBLIGATION. NO SALESMAN WILL CALL.
MAIL THIS COUPON FOR OUR LOW RATES ON YOUR AUTOMOBILE
Name	
Residence
Address	
(Please Print)
City. -   Prov..
Phone: Home Office	
Occupation           	
Age ....     Married n Divorced □      Male □
Separated Q  Never Married n Female □
Date first licensed to drive	
Have you or any member of your household been involved
in any accident in the past five years?
Yes Q No D (If "yes" provide details on a separate sheet).
In the last five years has your
license been suspended?	
Are you now insured?  	
Date current policy expires	
This  coupon   is  designed  solely  to  enable  non-policy
holders'to obtain an application and rates for their cars.
Year of automobile	
Make of automobile 	
No. of cylinders 	
Horsepower   	
Model (Impala, Dart, etc.)	
2/4 dr-sedan, s/w, h/t, conv.
Days per week driven to
work, train or bus depot,
or fringe parking area	
One way driving distance	
Is car used in business
(except to and from work)?
Car No. 1
- Days
..Miles.
Yes D No D
Car No. 2
Days
. Miles
Yes n No Q
Give number and dates
of traffic convictions
in last 5 years.
LIST INFORMATION ON ALL ADDITIONAL DRIVERS
Age
Male or
Female
Relation
To You
Years
Licensed
Married
or Single
% of Use
Car #2
FPR UBC 32 Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 5, 1971
CI ACCIC
ULA))lr
mmjmmmm
Rates: Campus - 3 tines, 1' 4mf $1.00; 3 days $2UJ%
Commercial  - 3 lines,   1   day $1.25;  addrHoMt
line* 30<; 4 days price o* 3.
Classified ads are *»< accepted 6y tefaiitnatie entf isre
In advance. Deadline ia tl:M turn,ttm day boftm-..
Publications Offce, Room %*t S.U.B* 0VC> Iftifc 8,
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Greetings
12
Lost & Found
13
LOST LADIES' WATCH NEAR
Hebb, Hennings bldgs. Sept. 13.
Black strap. Diamonds around
face. Reward. 261-3517.	
LOST GOLD PENDANT WATCH
from chain, Sept. 15. Reward,
please Contact Cathy 299-4980.
I'KRSON WHO PICKED UP OR-
ange looseleaf binder last Wednesday in bookstore please return.
Important!   Georgina.   738-1890.
Rides & Car Pools
14
WHY BUM A RIDE? SEE THE
Wheeler Dealer at the Cycle Center, 2320 W. 4th, 731-5531.
Special Notices
15
DISCOUNT ON STEREOS — SAVE
dollars! Example: tuner-amplifier
automatic turntable, 2 speakers,
regular $199.00 your cost $125.00.
2-year parts guarantee. Carry
Sony, Sansui, Dual, Akai. A.G.S.,
Warfdale. Phone 732-6769 for sav-
ings,	
VANCOUVER SCHOOL OF THEO-
logy's Choir of Sacred Music.
Starting: Wednesday, Oct. 6—6:30
to 8:30 p.m. Place: Chapel of The
Epiphany, Vancouver School of
Theology, 6050 Chancellor Blvd.
Don Forbes, director. Men and women welcome. Sopranos and Altos
especially needed.
UBC BARBER SHOP — OPEN 6
days a week. Hairstyling by Dini
& Richard, 5736 University Blvd.
FOLK SONG" SOCIETY GENERAL
meeting, Thursday, October 7. 12:30
SUB, Room 125. New members
welcome!	
THE GRIN BIN HAS THE LAR-
gest selection in Canada of posters and pop art. Also Jokes. Gifts
and 24" x 36" photo blowups from
your own prints and negatives.
Enquiries welcome at the Grin
Bin. 3209 W. Broadway across
from the Liquor Store. Call 738-
2311.	
THE ITBO MUSICAL THEATRE
Society is looking for a production
photographer. Please contact us in
SUB 237 or phone 3040.	
EXCELLENT R & R, BLUES
DANCE BANT) for Parties—Group
—Ambleside.   Phone   985-5713,   988-
1973. 985-7963.
Wanted—Information 17
Wanted—Miscellaneous 18
WANTED — BY VICTORIA SYM-
phony violinist, good bow — up to
$150. write Box 834 Totem  Park.
Typing 40
TEDIOUS TASKS — PROFESSION-
al typing. IBM Selectric — Days,
Evenings, Weekends. Phone Shari
at 738-8745 — Reasonable prices.
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING —
my home, essays, thesis, etc. Neat,
accurate work. Reasonable rates.
Phone 263-5317.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
HEADS WANTED. SHORT HOURS,
good pay. Apply 4023 Macdonald.
3-5  p.m.,  Wed.,   Thurs..  Fri.  only.
DEAF-MUTE PARAPLEGIC RE-
quires student to live in his home
to do light cooking and housekeeping in exchange for free room
and board. Interested persons
please call 261-1335. 9:00 a.m.-5:00
p.m.  Monday to Friday.
Work Wanted
52
BINDING. ALL TYPES OF MAGA-
zines, booklets, etc.. permanently
bound. Send for full details, cloth
samples and quotations to: Centennial Bookbinding, P.O. Box 130.
North Vancouver, B.C.
INSTRUCTION &
SCHOOLS
Music Instruction
61
Special Classes
62
CHILDREN'S CREATIVE ART
classes. Child art centre, Acadia
Road south. Monday, 3:30-5:00
p.m. October to March. Thursday,
3:30-5:00 p.m. October to March.
Feeg for full session $8.00. Information & registration, phone 228-
5351.
GERMAN TUITION AND TRANS-
lations phone 224-7197. Ask for
Gerhard.
64
Tutors—Wanted
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
I960 VAIIXHALL SEDAN $150.00.
Passed Motor Vehicle Inspection.
Telephone  274-1621   to  view.
Automobiles—Wanted
22
Automobiles—Parts
23
Automobiles—Repairs
24
CAR REPAIRS TO
VOLVO,MERCEDES
PdRSCHE, VOLKSWAGEN
* Factory trained mechanics
* Fully Guaranteed Work
* Reasonable Rates
P.S. We also now repair
Datsun, Toyota, & Mazda Cars
SALES AND SERVICE
8914 Oak St. 263-8121
135 FOOT MINESWEEPER HULL
with superstructure, $4700, view
at 286 North Airport Rd.. Rich-
mond.	
VOLUME — SHAKESPEARE FOR
sale. 8 editions. Pictorials, hard
cover. (Good condition). Telephone
731-2596  (after 5 p.m.)	
FOR SALE SONY TC-355 STEREO
tape deck, three heads/sound on
sound. $200. Phone 736-6809.	
HEAD MASTERS BRAND NEW
top surfaces 210 cm. $75 phont-
Dave  Turner 738-8813.	
ANSCOM AT1C SLIDE PROJEC-
tor ($50.00) 23 slide trays ($8.00).
Call 688-8822 after 8 p.m.
BUDDHIST BOOKS
for further information  and
free   catalogue
Write   to:
THE BUDDHIST BOOKSTORE
1710 Octavia  Street
San Francisco, Calif.. 94109
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
SINGLE ROOM FOR MAN. AVATL-
ablc now! Private entrance, phone,
cafe,    near   gates,   comfortable
very quiet. 224-7623.	
SPACIOUS SLEEPING ROOMS FOR
2 people: private entrance & baths:
1% blocks from gates. $40.00 each
-'24-6389.	
T'M TIRED OF LOOKING AT
Dumps! Would like two girls to
help me find a nice airy suite.
Call   Klizabeth  at  732-5814  after  5.
Room & Board
82
Motorcycles^
25
BUSINESS
SERVICES
Art Services
31
Beauty Parlors
31A
UBC    BEAUTY   SALON.    WIGS   &
Hairpieces cleaned & styled. Prof,
service  —   low   prices.   5736   Univ.
Blvd. 228-8942.
Photography
35
<tlje Hensi anb gutter
ikj       Cameras!
m
3010 W.  BDWY.
736-7833
Cross-screen (Star)
Filter  $3.15-$3.92
Sakulite S-2
ELECTRONIC FLASH
SPECIAL $10.00
Kodachrome II guide number  25
Full selection of 3, 5, and 6
image lenses.
Rip-offs NOT our Specialty!
INSTANT BLO-UP, 8x10, $1.00;
16x20, $3.00. film processing, proofing, while you wait. 4472 W. 10th
Ave. 224-1732.
ROOM AND BOARD $110 MO.
Males. Excellent food, colour TV.
Sauna, 5785 Agronomy Road
Phone 224-9684.	
ROOM AND BOARD OR MEAL
passes available on campus. Phone
Mike at 224-9866. between 5:30 &
6:30.	
BUS.-WOMAN OR SEN. STUDENT
to live with elderly lady. Req'd. to
cook evening meals. Near UBC in
W. Pt. Grey. 224-6364.
Furn. Apts.
83
2 ROOM SUITE. $45 SINGLE. $65
double. Dunbar and 26th. Non-
smoker. Phone 738-5448.	
MALE STUDENT. SHARE APPT.
suite, 2 bedrooms: $67.50 plus %
phone, plus % hydro. Phone Ron.
731-0316. 10 min. bus, to UBC.
MATURE MALE STUDENT TO
share 2 bedroom apt. in Kits. $61
per mo. inclusive. Leave message
at 274-3542.
Unf. Apts.
84
STUDENT SPECIAL
:>  Rooms of Furniture
From $199.95
HOUSE OF GROUPS
1278 Granville
Day 687-5043 Eve. 277-9247
Houses—Furn. & Unfurn.
86
FEMALE GRAD OR SENIOR STU-
dent wanted to share 2 bedroom
house  nr.  campus $70.00.   228-9504.
'Tween classes
TUESDAY
NEWMAN CLUB
Dinner-meeting,   St.   Mark's  dining
room, 5:30 p.m.
UBC ANTI-WAR COMMITTEE
General planning meeting, SUB 119,
12:30 p.m.
PRE-MED SOCIETY
General     discussion,    speaker    Dr.
Szasz, 201 Wesbrook, 12:30 p.m.
UBC SAILING CLUB
General Meeting, Buch. 206, 12:30
p.m.
ITALIAN CLUB
"Serata      Italiana"     with      Italian
Consulate, I. H. Stage, 6 p.m.
WEDNESDAY
CHINESE CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Workshop, SUB 211, 12:30 p.m.
WAFFLE
Preliminary     meeting,    SUB    215,
12:30 p.m.
GERMAN CLUB
Slides, I.H. 402, 12:30 p.m.
VARSITY OUTDOOR CLUB
Plan for long weekend, Angus 104,
Noon.
ANG-UNITED CAMPUS MINISTRY
Informal      supper,     5:30      p.m.,
academic planners Seaton-Collins, 7
p.m., Lutheran Campus Centre.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Dr. Berger: The difficulties involved
with    genetic    modifications,   SUB
111,  8:30  a.m.
CIRCLE  "K"
General  Meeting, SUB   115,   12:30
p.m.
ITALIAN CLUB
Short film on opera "La Traviata",
I.H. Upper Lounge, 12:30 p.m.
THURSDAY
CHINESE CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Speaker   Tom   Fowler,   SUB   215,
12:30 p.m.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Guaranteed    annual    income,    SUB
111, 8:30 a.m.
UBC   SKYDIVING   CLUB
General   meeting,  SUB  205,   12:30
p.m.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Hesse   —   pyschology   of   puberty,
SUB 111, 3:30 p.m.
CAMPUS CAVALIERS
Callers    welcome,    SUB    207-209,
12:30-2:30 p.m.
UNEMPLOYED TEACHERS
Explanation of teaching situation in
B.C. Educ. 100, 12:30 p.m.
NON-FACULTY TEACHERS* UNION
Elections,   graduate   student  centre
main dining room, 8 p.m.
FOLK SOC
New  members welcome, SUB 125,
12:30 p.m.
AYN RAND SOCIETY
Like-minded please come, SUB 130,
12:30 p.m.
FINE ARTS
Films and slides, Lasr. 104,
12:30-2:30 p.m.
FRIDAY
FRENCH CLUB —
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
General meeting, everyone
welcome. Have your lunch and
speak French, I.H. upstairs lounge,
12:30 p.m.
FROM
■f||g5B.R.C., FALCON,
f«f      PREMIER, MONSHEE
WHEELER DEALER
CYCLE CENTER LTD.
2320 W. 4th 731-5531
PUBLIC ENEMY
K
You know who the premier is,
don't you? He's a pusher of misery
and death ... a destroyer of lives.
When the premier's finally got you hooked
on Social Credit, you're his slave for life.
The more you're addicted
the more he'll profit. He isn't
in business for your health but
for the money his capitalist
supporters can make off you.
So when he tries to push Social Credit
at you, turn your back on him.
Turn him out of office.
Don't become a mark for the premier.
The risks you take aren't worth the highways.
For less bullshit, ignore Socred propaganda. Tuesday, October 5,  1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
WEEKEND WORKSHOP
UBC Campus, Oct. 9 & 1 0,
Nov. 13 & 14
BEING INSIDE-OUT
TOGETHER
contacting and mobilizing
the body energy
LynnSereda ph. 731-0773
Genetics swamps commerce
ESCAPE
Into the
UNDERWATER WORLD
S
of
By DAVID SUZUKI
Genetics sports writer
Coming out of excellent
pre-season sessions in the PIT,
Genetics     (Science     I Id)
1
D
CUBA GIVING
At the
NORTH VAN RECREATION CENTER
All Equipment Supplied - 6 Wk. Course $40.00
NAUI Certification
I nformation Phone NEXT COURSE STARTS:
Greg Kocher at 733-5809     Wednesday, Oct. 6 at 7:30
steamrollered Commerce 20-3 in
its first test of the intramural
football schedule. Its solid depth
provided by its two substitutes
showed in its defensive power and
offensive versatility.
The Genetics seven were
anchored by a front wall averaging
5'6" and 245 lbs. Ends Glue-tip
Mallors and Sneaky Jim
galvanized the crowd of three >
spectators with dazzling catches.
The punishing blocks of backs
Chief Poodry and Granite
Andrews kept aging quarterback
Plasticknees Suzuki's uniform
clean. He completed 16 of 22
passes for three touchdowns, one
a 60 yard bomb to Andrews.
The Fly-Pushers engineered
two long marches the length of
the field on a dazzling mixture of
crisp short passes and clever
quarterback run-pass options.
SPORTS
'Birds in first place
The UBC men's field hockey
team made it three victories in
three starts Saturday by defeating
Pitt Meadows 1-0.
This puts the Thunderbirds in
first place with six points.
The game was played on a
soggy slow field under drizzling
rain which made it difficult for
both teams to put forth a good
game.
At the end of the first half the
score was 0-0 with the Birds
carrying the majority of the play.
But with the field conditions, and
Pitt Meadows being primarily a
defensive team, it was hard to
make an effective play.
The second half was a different
story with play being carried from
PUBLIC ENEMY
NUMBER ONE!
You know who a drug pusher is,
don't you? He's a peddler of misery
and death ... a destroyer of lives.
When a pusher's finally got you hooked
on drugs, you're his slave for life.
The more you're addicted
the more he'll profit. He isn't
in business for your health but
for the money he can make from you.
So when he tries to push you on to
drugs, turn your back on him.
Turn him in.
Don't become a mark for the pusher.
The risks you take aren't worth the trip.
For more information, mail this coupon:
Government of British Columbia
Council on Drugs, Alcohol, and Tobacco
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, British Columbia
Please send a free copy of 'GET IT STRAIGHT
some facts about drug abuse."
Name	
Address _
GOVERNMENT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
COUNCIL ON DRUGS, ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO
Hon. D.L. Brothers, Q.C., Minister of Education-Chairman
one end to the other, calling on
the UBC goalie, Ian Cordey, to
make some critical saves.
But late in the second half Al
Hobkirk managed to push one by
the Pitt Meadows goalie making
the score 1-0.
It was Hobkirk's third goal in
two games, and the third straight
shutout for goal keeper Ian
Cordey, thus keeping UBC in first
place.
The second division Braves
played against the more skilled
Occationals and consequently
were easily defeated 4-0.
More players are still needed
and anyone interested can call
Rich Miller at 987-3917 for
information.
Intramurals
MEN
BADMINTON
Competitors with surnames
A-M will compete Mondays
7:30-10 p.m. and N-Z, Wednesdays 7-10 p.m. Games are at
War Memorial Gym, September
28 to October 18.
Consult the ladder outside
the Intramural office for
competition.
TENNIS
Results must be recorded
immediately after the game.
Place results in 'Games Result'
box outside the Intramural
office, room 308 War Memorial
Gym. Games must be played on
UBC courts only.
HELP
Due to the tremendous
number of football teams (60),
more referees are needed. Drop
by the Intramual office and sign
up today.
MANAGERS
Meeting tonight, 7 p.m., SUB
council chambers.
TURKEY TROT
What the hell is a turkey
trot? Are there any chicks in it,
or just old turkeys?
Would you believe the
winner gets to keep and eat a
young wholesome bird. Of
course only after he has run a
3</2 mile cross-country route.
The first and second place
teams each get a turkey. The
race starts Thursday at noon.
WOMEN
BADMINTON
This is the last week for
ladder competition. Quarter
finals will be held October 12 in
gym A, and October 13 in the
Memorial Gym. Contact your
managers to find out when you
play.
SWIMMING
Entry     deadline     is    today.
Preliminary heats start Thursday
in Empire pool.
VOLLEYBALL
Because     of     the     holiday,
volleyball   is cancelled  October
11-15. Play resumes on October
18.
MANAGERS
There is a meeting on Friday
in room 211 Memorial Gym.
NEW YORK
FORMAL WEAR
All the latest styles in Tuxedos
— Dinner Jackets —
Suits inc. Edwardian style.
Dinner Jackets in all  styles and a
large variety of colors. Flair Pants,
Lace Dickeys, etc.
SPECIAL STUDENT RATES
Rent The Best For Less
4397 W. 10th 224-0034
D,
HAIR IS BEAUTIFUL
AT
The
Witt
SPECIALIZING IN:
SHAG CUTS SHAPING
For appointments phone:
BERNARD 224-5540
UNIVERSITY SQUARE Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 5, 1971
'Control is the essential daycare problem'
By HELEN HOSSIE
The problems of providing adequate day care for
children were presented in a brief endorsed Wednesday
by the Alma Mater Society.
Authors of the brief, prepared under the auspices of
the Vancouver Co-operative Child Care and Day Care
Study on an Opportunities for Youth project, examine
the problems posed by the perpetuation of the family
day care centre and suggest some alternatives for the
future.
The problem, essentially, is one of control. Existing
facilities are controlled by a governmental bureaucracy
in the form of the Community Care Facilities Board.
It is in the financial and ideological interest of this
board to perpetuate family day care centres, said the
report.
Ideologically, there is a myth perpetuated in our
society that children get more individual attention in a
private home.
The authors point out that this is often not the case,
as the mother of the house is occupied with her own
domestic and maternal duties. In most cases, the
children receive nothing more than "babysitting" care.
The pressures and work involved in trying to cope
with a large group of children in a single home preclude
any attempts at satisfying the child's total development
needs, said the report.
Financially, the government benefits in that the
relative isolation of the day care mothers and their lack
of organization keeps them from fully comprehending
the provincial subsidy system through which they are
paid.
"If these workers do not understand how they are
being paid, they can hardly understand how they might
—kelly booth photo
COME WITH ME through the hallways of your coffee pot ... oh well, who knows what Susan Toogood, arts 3, was
thinking when photographer Kelly Booth snapped her on the second floor of the Heavy Anguish building . . .
Survival centre organized
A survival centre for residents of Vancouver's
Strathcona district has been set up by the Partisan Party.
A spokesman for the party said the new centre will
help people to organize their own local committee to deal
with community problems ranging from cultural events to
Legalize abortion,
say campus women
More than 100 women met over the weekend in SUB
to launch a campaign calling for the immediate repeal of
all abortion laws in Canada.
Discussion centred on the fact that the present law
makes abortion a crime but that women need and will
choose to have abortions.
"We do not want to dictate to women but we think
every woman has the right to choose whether she will
have an abortion," said Sharon Harger, executive secretary
of the B.C. women for the abortion law repeal coalition.
She said all sections of the criminal code which deal
with abortions must be removed.
The importance of the upcoming day of protest in
the United States planned for Nov. 20 cannot be stressed
enough, said Mary Jean Suelzle, first president of the
Berkeley chapter of the national organization of women.
Women at the conference launched a nation-wide
petition campaign which focuses on the private members'
bills before parliament calling for the removal of abortion
from the criminal code.
Initial plans were also made for a massive and
peaceful protest march and rally to be held in Vancouver
and in other cities across Canada to coincide with the U.S.
day of protest.
UBC women interested in working on the campaign
will meet Friday noon in SUB 210.
community control of police.
"It's a residential house with a library and
community access files with things like birth control
information, tenants' rights, legal, medical and dental aid,
where clinics are, daycare — it's availability, basically," he
said.
The centre at 666 Keefer will try to help the people
of other areas as well, he said.
"It will be education by involving people in projects
that are meeting their own needs and bettering their own
life in the community," the spokesman said. "The most
important education is showing people they can control
their own lives.
"Once you've done that the political things become
more apparent," he said.
"It's a place where we can teach and learn from each
other through films, classes and rapping, a place out of
which we can organize together around the problems in
our own areas," he said.
A benefit for the centre will be held Thursday at 8
p.m. in the Fishermen's Hall, 138 East Cordova, with the
bands Flashpan, Lion's Gate Jazz Band and Pom Ky Two.
Speakeasy returns
Speakeasy is back again for the third consecutive
year.
The student-run information and sympathy centre is
ready to help you with your problems.
Speakeasy has 47 trained counsellors and 34
information workers.
There are also several researchers who locate
information on housing, medical aid, immigration and
other issues.
Speakeasy is open from 9:30 a.m. Monday to
Thursday, and from 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Friday in SUB
100.
The telephone numbers are 228-3700 and 228-4557.
go about improving their very inadequate incomes," said
the report.
Parents' dissatisfaction with the family day care
system is evident when one considers the high rate of
turnover in these homes and the 28 per cent vacancy
rate.
Generally, the report's proposals for change involve
the improvement of family day care centres plus the
encouragement of alternative forms of child care.
These improvements all necessitate a shifting of
control to make day care a more democratic, flexible
service.
For example, the report proposes "citizens groups'
representatives be included as a matter of course in all
boards with decision making power on day care, that
public hearings in convenient locations be held at all
points in the decision-making process, and that there be
established licensing appeal boards, including citizen's
representatives to whom persons or groups whose
applications have been denied may have public
recourse."
Secondly, the report suggests that family day care
workers form an autonomous union. It is also suggested
that they form neighborhood groups with the
assistance of an academically trained co-ordinator to
enable them to utilize, through rotation, common sets of
equipment and supplies.
Thirdly, the report suggests that the government
should help, through subisidies, the creation of parent
co-operatives "and that they be free to operate in a way
judged best by the parents consistent with minimal
health and safety regulations."
The report also recommends the operation of group
day care centres be extended to include children under
three years of age, with regulations for such groups
established by citizens' group representatives.
It is hoped that these reforms would have the
general effect of decentralizing decision making and
putting control of the day care centres in the hands of
the people most concerned, said the report.
Student society
put into limbo
MONTREAL (CUP) - The student association of Sir
George Willians University had its constitution suspended
indefinitely and was placed under trusteeship by the
university's board of governors Friday.
The board intervened after presidents of four
student-faculty associations and the student ombudsman
appealed to them that "the student association has
reached the point where it cannot function".
The association presently lacks a president and three
of its five vice-presidents.
University principal John O'Brien appointed a board
of trustees Friday, consisting of three students, a lawyer,
and a chartered accountant, who are mandated to hold a
referendum to determine whether students want an
association.
If the students vote the student association out of
existence, the board of governors has promised to "make
appropriate arrangements for the continuation of the
operations of the faculty associations and student clubs".
Concert cancelled
The Pauline Julien concert scheduled for Oct. 21 has
been cancelled.
The AMS special events committee, which planned
the concert by the Quebecois singer, announced Monday
that the concert has been cancelled due to poor ticket
sales.
People holding tickets for the concert are asked to
return them to the place of purchase for a refund.
Feelthy postcards?
It appears art takes many forms — including
postcards.
The UBC fine arts gallery, located beneath the main
library, will present the Image Bank Postcard Show Oct.
13-30 it was announced Thursday.
The exhibition consists of more than 4,000
commercial picture postcards and original photographs
from all parts of the world.
This will be the bank's first exhibition.
The Image Bank, established last year, is run by
Vancouver artists Michael Morris, Vincent Tarasov and
Gary Lee-Nova.
The bank collects the postcards sent to it by artists,
as well as junk mail.
The exhibition is being circulated across Canada by
the National Gallery of Canada.

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