UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Oct 8, 1976

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0126790.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0126790.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0126790-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0126790-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0126790-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0126790-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0126790-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0126790-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0126790-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0126790.ris

Full Text

Array THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LIX, No. 12
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, OCTOBER 8, 1976
228-2301
Students can't
fee hikes
rep
\n \lniii M.ili-i >n.
-lllili'Ml lllli'lll|ill'
- ill: n 11 ■ -i
l"l I'.l -I"**
!■: ■ ■ -1• It
I'M in mI.i..
I liri--- i-li
pi l-|i.:|i'i! Ii'
Mllilclll-
• ■!■■ report on
iin-nt     last
"■Iiiim.x   In.I inn   fee   in-
iii' iiii|ii'iiln-l  new AMS
i   |i;i\i-   r,ui-.->en said
■nd I In- n-purt, being
ihi- \M- :in<l the B.C.
i Yili-r.iiiuii.    shows
■ ■    •vfi.k   * i
students cannot afford an increase
in tuition because many students
were unemployed during the
summer and were unable to save
money.
"We can show that costs of such
things as books, food, transportation and housing have risen
very substantially in comparison
4 «*,.   ■**'
■*"->3rV/
^w^^
NOT EXACTLY vanguard of revolution, but these students did manage
to kill some time Thursday by flipping frisbees on SUB field. At left,
Eric McKean, arts 4, grimaces as he unloads throw; at right, Bill King,
— jon Stewart photos
dentistry 3, shows form. McKean and King were competing in frisbee
competition sponsored by intramurals. Yup; that's where your money
is going.
Chevron publishes despite suspension
WATERLOO, Ont. —Staff
members of the University of
Waterloo student newspaper put
out a paper today in defiance of the
university student federation's
suspension of the paper.
And the threat of more direct
confrontation between staffers of
The Chevron and the federation
has increased, as staff members
will . likely refuse to obey a
federation directive ordering them
to vacate the newspaper offices by
4:30 p.m. today.
Chevron news editor Henry Hess
told The Ubyssey in a telephone
interview Thursday the
federation's business manager
gave staff members an order
earlier in the day to vacate their
offices.
"We'll be deciding (today) at a
staff meeting what to do about it,"
said Hess. "It's unlikely we'll be
leaving voluntarily. If we are
forced out of the offices, we'll have
to try to find some place else to put
a paper out."
Chevron staff members have
occupied the newspaper offices
since the federation voted Sept. 30
to suspend publication for four
weeks after charges that a campus
group was taking over the paper.
"We're not sure how far the
federation is willing to go," said
Hess.
He said Chevron staff members
"are all sticking it out—in fact,
more people are coming in all the
time. The weekend before last
there were 35 people at a staff
meeting, there have been more at
every meeting held since. Seventy
people have been to our offices this
week and we've been getting more
every day."
The paper published today, the
Free Chevron, was paid for by
local   advertising,   Hess   said,
because the student federation
has frozen the Chevron's operating
budget.
Hess said Canadian University
Press has guaranteed the
production of two papers by
Chevron staffers with an offer to
absorb costs the staffers can't
cover through advertising.
And CUP has called a conference
of as many of its member papers
as possible at the University of
Waterloo Oct. 16 to discuss the
issue, Hess said.
But he criticized CUP's delay in
supporting the Chevron staff. "We
think they (CUP) could have cut it
off right away if they'd taken some
firm action when it started."
The controversy began Sept. 24,
when the federation executive
decided to suspend publication of
the paper, changed locks on its
office doors and called in campus
security guards to prevent staffers
from entering.
The executive decision was overruled by a special federation
meeting Sept. 27, but four days
later the federation reversed its
stand and suspended publication of
the Chevron.
"We don't know exactly what
they're going to do after the four
weeks," said Hess.
Rick Murray hassle not over,
student threatens court action
A UBC law student says he will
take the university administration
to court if necessary to remove
Rick Murray from the board of
governors.
Roger Schiffer, law 1, said
Thursday that according to the
Universities Act, Murray should
resign his position as student
representative on the board
because he is not a student.
Murray, a former engineering
student, insists on keeping his seat
on the board although he is
working full-time for the City of
Vancouver engineering department and is not taking any courses
at UBC.
But Schiffer said the Act explicitly prohibits a non-student
from representing students on the
board. An Alma Mater society
lawyer has made a similar interpretation of the act but the
student representative assembly
voted confidence in Murray
Wednesday.
Schiffer says he expected the
SRA to ask Murray to resign.
"I thought the SRA would take a
strong stand about this. To define
someone as a student who isn't a
student at all, especially in these
two most important positions
(student positions on the board), is
bullshit."
"They (the SRA) should be
fighting for students' rights, but if
they don't, maybe we should get
rid of them."
Schiffer said he will take his
interpretation of the Act to UBC
registrar Jack .Parnall and
demand an election be held to elect
a replacement to Murray.
If Parnall and the UBC administration refuse to hold an
election, Schiffer said he will ask
the courts to make a ruling about
his interpretation of the Act or
bring a case against the university
for something the board has done
while Murray was "illegally"
sitting as a member.
He said the courts could invalidate decisions of the board
where Murray cast the deciding
vote, because as a non-student,
Murray's vote is null.
This   action   would   force   the
administration to call an election
or see many of the board's
decisions" go down the drain,
Schiffer said.
If Murray stays on the board, a
precedent will be set that would
allow any non-student to fill the
position of student rep on the
board, he said
pay
rt
• II
to how much students have been
making and saving during the
summer," Theessen said.
He said the report, which won't
be finished until late October, also
shows students who were unemployed during the summer are
turning to government loans and
their parents for support.
And an increase in tuition fees
would discriminate against
students from lower income
families because many of these
families cannot afford to help pay
for their children's education, he
said.
The report also found women
students save only about half as
much during the summer as men,
so many women would have a
great deal of trouble paying higher
tuition fees.
Moe Sihota, AMS external affairs officer, said the AMS will use
the results of the probe to pressure
the provincial and federal
governments to expand their
student job programs.
"Hopefully, when the results are
presented to the government, we
can say that the unemployment
situation was horrendous, and now
you guys have all winter to come
up with a plan," Sihota said.
The AMS is getting the information for the unemployment
survey from questionaires printed
on the back of every UBC student's
authorization to register form.
Questionaires were also sent to
students who did not return to
school this year.
Sihota said the,UBC information
will be combined with the results of
similar surveys from every post
secondary institution in B.C. He
said the BCSF decided to launch
the province-wide surveys when it
learned in May the student employment situation for the summer
was going to be the worst in years.
The BCSF will present the
combined reports to the federal
and provincial governments.
But Sihota said federal officials
have indicated the government will
expand student job programs next
summer to keep summer unemployment down. Last summer
student unemployment in B.C.
stood at about 16 per cent, twice the
average for non-students.
Canada Manpower reported the
student unemployment rate last
summer was about the same as in
the summer of 1975 but wages for
post-secondary students were
down.
Despite indications of a
nationwide student unemployment
crisis the federal government
decided midway through the
summer to stop collecting
statistics
Rag shortage hits
shortage will hit
week, well-known
Fetish  said Thur-
A Ubyssey
campus next
expert Irving
sday.
He said the only issue being
published next week will appear
Wednesday but .the regular
Tuesday, Thursday and Friday
issues have been cancelled.
Fetish, president of
Amalgamated Consolidated Incorporated Ltd., blamed the
coming shortage on "a couple of
turkeys".
He said Tuesday's issue will be
cancelled because of Thanksgiving
Day and the Thursday and Friday
editions will be cancelled because
of No-Thanksgiving Day, the Oct.
14 day of protest.
"Ubyssey staffers will be supporting the protest, as will the
printers who print The Ubyssey,"
he said.
But he promised the Wednesday
Ubyssey would be a chock-a-block
full of goodies, including a series of
articles examining some aspects of
the la bor movement and the Oct. 14
protest.
Deadline for 'Tween
Classes, Hot Flashes and other
stuff for that edition is noon
Tuesday, he said. Page 2
THE
UBYSSEY
Friday, October 8,   1976
Wood
party
Like    wooden    sculpture   and
artifacts?
Well, there's a talk on just that
subject Wednesday, Oct. 20 at the
Vancouver Art Gallery, 1145 West
•Georgia. M. L. Florian of the
Canadian Conservation Institute
in Ottawa will illustrate her talk
with slides dealing with furniture,
wooden instruments and wood
carvings.
It's all sponsored by the Pacific
Hot flashes
Conservation   Centre of National
museums of Canada.
Blood
As of Thursday afternoon the
Red Cross blood donor clinic in
SUB was a long way from their
goal of 2,000 pints of blood, with
about 1,220 units extracted so far
from the shrivelled veins of UBC
students.
Nobody knows who is in line
for cases, of blood-building beer
yet, but we'll let you know as
soon as we do.
The clinic is open today for the
iJx'x x i l
o*.
Tween classes
TODAY
UBC INTRAMURALS
Registration deadlines for men's
basketball, men's arts 20 race,
turkey trot for men and women,
noon, men's intramural office.
YOUNG PROGRESSIVE
CONSERVATIVES
General meeting, election of
officers, noon, SUB 213.
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Meeting, noon, International House.
CITR
CITR is attempting to form a news
and sports department, interested
individuals please show up, noon,
CITR newsroom.
SKYDIVING CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 213.
YOUNG SOCIALISTS
Forum on Oct. 14 protest on wage
controls, 8 p.m., 1208 Granville, $1
donation.
CHINESE STUDENTS'
ASSOCIATION
August moon party with the
Balladeers, 9 p.m., Graduate
Student Centre, admission $1.75
members, $2.75 non members.
SATURDAY
UBC SPORTS CAR CLUB
Car slalom. B-lot, 10 a.m.
UBC KARATE CLUB
„    Practice,   10   a.m..   Gym   E,   winter
sports centre.
CHINESE STUDENTS'
ASSOCIATION
Sports    night    for    members
7:30   p.m.,   Gym  A,   winter
centre.
VANCOUVER FOLK SONG
SOCIETY
Concert of traditional Celtic music
with the Boys of the Lough, 8 p.m.,
Queen Elizabeth Playhouse, 649
Cambie.
only,
sports
MONDAY
CSA & CVC
Cantonese   class,   noon,   Buch   316,
admission 25 cents for members, $i
for non-members.
UBC KUNG FU CLUB
Practice,    4:30    p.m.,    SUB    party
room.
ArAPAT/^
Traditional
Qieco-Roman Cuisine
Whole Wheat Pizzas
Whole Wheat
Spaghetti
Souvlaki
Moosaka
Kakimari
Game Hens
LUNCH
11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
DINNER
5:00 p.m. to 1:00 a.m.
CLOSED MONDAYS
733-6824
2222 W. 4th Van. B.C.
TUESDAY
COMMITTEE FOR A
DEMOCRATIC UNIVERSITY
Meeting  on  Oct.  14  protest, noon,
SUB 119.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 215.
PRANAYOGA CLUB
Exercise   and   meditation   class,   3
p.m., SUB 205.
VOC, SKI CLUB
Ski   swap   and   equipment   sale,   all
day, SUB 207-209.
WEDNESDAY     x
VARSITY OUTDOOR CLUB
General     meeting     with     parks
commissioner     Bowie    Keefer    on
endowment     lands,     noon,    Angus
104.
SIMS
Introductory lecture on
transcendental meditation, noon,
Bu. 313.
last time from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
in  SUB   207-209.  Come ,up and ,
bleedl 11
Job chance
If you're graduating in April,
and don't want to end up joining
the unemployed masses, here's a
chance for you.
Application forms for federal
government jobs will be available
until Oct. 14 at the student
placement office, Ponderosa
Annex F. Students from all
faculties are welcome to apply.
Interviews for the jobs will be
held in November.
Speakers
All groups on campus
interested in bringing speakers to
campus this year are being asked
to call the Alma Mater Society
speakers' committee for help. For
further information contact Fran
Watters at 733-3631 or drop a
note at Box '111 at the AMS
offices in SUB.
OCT. 20tti
IS HP. DAY
Auditions   *   Auditions  *   Auditions
A COLLIER'S FRIDAY NIGHT
by D. H. Lawrence
To be presented January 12—22
Directed by Jane Heyman
Drop by Room 207 - Frederick Wood Theatre
or phone 228-2678 for Audition appointment!
HELP YOURSELF
FREE SELF-HELP
WORKSHOPS TO
INCREASE YOUR SKILLS
WORKSHOP 1 -
WORKSHOP 2
WORKSHOP 3 -
EFFECTIVE STUDY HABITS
Four    one-hour    sessions    on
developing more efficient methods
of study.
"IMPROVING INTERPERSONAL
RELATIONS"
A workshop to explore attitudes
and feelings towards ourselves and
others.
RELAXATION WORKSHOP
A    workshop    to    help    reduce
tensions which may be manifested
as   exam   anxiety,   inability   to
concentrate, etc.   ■
These free programs are designed to help students
develop skills. All workshops commence the week of
October 19. Sign up NOW since lirrfited enrollment is
necessary.
The Office of The Student Services
Ponderosa A-   Annex "F"
SPONSORED BY THE OFFICE OF STUDENT SERVICES
CANDIA
pizza factory
1 228-9512 1   or    | 228-95131
4510 W. 10th Ave.
FAST FREE DELIVERY
Open 7 Days A Week, 4 p.m.-2 a.m.
Independent Optician''
Come in and experience good old-fashioned Service!!
U.F.0. SPECIAL       $24.95
Till Oct. 31/76 Plus Lenses
Christian Dior - Silhouette, & others 25% Off
44 Water St., Gastown    681-6626 ^
NOTICE OF ELECTIONS
Elections will be Held
To fill the following positions
within the Alma Mater Society:
2 SENATORS AT LARGE
Nominations for persons to fill these positions will
be accepted commencing Friday the 8th of October,
1976. The nomination period will close at 12:00
p.m., Friday the 15th of October, 1976.
Nomination forms and elections procedures are
available at the A.M.S. Business Office, Room 266,
S.U.B.
Additional information may be obtained from the
Chief Returning Officer, Room 232, S.U.B.,
telephone 228-5928.
BOB GOODWIN
Chief Returning Officer
AMS Elections
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES:   Campus - 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines 35c.
Commercial - 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional lines
50c. Additional days $2.25 and 45c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241, S.U.B., UBC, Vancouver.
5 — Coming Events
CUDJOE PRODUCTIONS presents Black
Heritage Music HI. featuring (Jazz,
Rhythm & Blues, Steel Band). The
Billy Taylor Ensemble, Soul Survivors Inc., and A Moment's Notice.
At the Peter Pan Hall, 1636 W. Broadway, Sunday, Oct. 10th, at 6:00 p.m.
14.50 per person.
FREESEE: CIVILISATION. Starting Oct.
13th. Every Wed., 12:35 p.m. SUB
Aud. Free film series.
International and Canadian
Folk Dancing Course
Taught in French for those who
want to practice their French and
meet a group of French-speaking
people. Wednesday evenings, 7-9
p.m., basement of St. Sacrement
Church, 3050 Heather, Vancouver.
For   more   Information:   173-3581.
10 — For Sale — Commercial
LARGEST SELECTION of prints and
posters in B.C. at THE GRIN BIN,
3209 W. Broadway, Vancouver, B.C.
738-2311 (opposite Super Value).
11 — For Sale — Private
'74 CRICKET HARDTOP, 4-spd., electric
defoger, AM/FM, silver blue, 13,000
miles. Urgent sale! $2250, includes
snows.  876-8215/253-6934 evenings.
DOUBLE DESK bookcase wall complex
for sale. Ideal for married students.
$100 or best offer. Call 266-6046.
ECONOLINE VAN, paneled, insulated,
shag, FM-8 track, reliable. $450 o.b.o.
Frank, 872-2869.
1959 AUSTIN CAMBRIAN. Good body.
Needs engine work.  Offers! 733-1081.
20 — Housing
I'M LOOKING FOR A mature student
(female preferred) to share my comfortable home. Please reply Box 40,
The Ubyssey.
30 - Jobs
STUDENT WANTED TO WORK approx.
12 hrs. per week. General office
duties, some typing. Inquire Publications office. Rm. 241-K SUB.
65 — Scandals
PERSON WHO TOOK Calculator from
open civil locker, please call phone
number on Calculator. I really need
it. Reward! N.Q.A.
85 — Typing
PROFESSIONAL typing on IBM correcting typewriter by experienced
secretary.   Reasonable.  224-1567.
EXPERIENCED ESSAY & thesis typing
from legible work. Phone 738-6829 —
10:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m.
99 — Miscellaneous
MEDICAL SCHOOLS Interior Mexico
now accepting applicants for 1977
terms. Contact R. W. Cary, P.O. Box
214313, Sacramento, CA. 95821. Phone
(916) 483-4587.
USE
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED
TO SELL - BUY
INFORM
Jr=Jr=ir=ur=ir=Jr=]r=Jr=Jr= Friday,  October  8,   1976
THE
UBYSSEY
Page 3
Employees paid during strike
Canadian University Press
Union staff workers for the
Simon Fraser Student Society who
have not crossed picket lines set up
by striking SFU maintenance
workers, have received regular
salaries for the duration or the
strike.
The workers, members of the
Service, Office and Retail Workers
Union of Canada, could receive up
to $5,000 for not working during the
month-long strike.
The payment of the SORWUC
workers appears to be the
deliberate result of action taken by
SFSS president Ross Powell.
According to the student
society's contract with SORWUC
"any day on which the office is
Professors
nix support
for protest
Bv TERRY GLAVIN
Canadian University Press
The Douglas College faculty
association Wednesday overwhelmingly defeated a resolution
calling for support of the Oct. 14
national work stoppage.
The vote took place at the
association's annual general
meeting at the New Westminster
campus of the college.
Douglas College is the sixth
college in B.C. whose faculty have
refused to support. the day of
protest, and according to Mary
Robinson, B.C. College Faculties
Federation president, only Northwest College in Terrace has
offered public support for the day.
The resolution was put to the
association for acceptance by John
Patterson, CFF director for
Douglas College. The resolution
was first adopted by the annual
meeting of the CFF in May, at
which Patterson said there was a
"feeling of unrest" and a sense of
"being at a crossroads".
One instructor at the meeting
said he opposed the proposal to
"withdraw services" because "it's
not only illegal, but an immoral
act, and it's just plain silly."
The same man added the main
reason he opposed the resolution
was because of what it would mean
to students.
Sociology instructor Nick
Mansfield said the overall apathy
of the public towards Oct. 14 indicates that "Canadians are a
bunch of chickenshits".
Mansfield said refusal to support
the work stoppage is "tacit approval of the anti-inflation board."
He said he considers the AIB the
latest in the "growing disasters of
the Trudeau government".
He said if the Douglas College
faculty did not support the strike,
instructors should "donate the
day's wages to their favorite
political pressure group, party or
arsenal."
Roger Elmes, liberal arts instructor and former faculty
association president, supported
the resolution, but disagreed with
Mansfield. "There is no
democracy in Canada," he said.
"Democracy is a myth," Elmes
said. He said that though he agrees
with the day of protest, he
disagreed with supporting the
Canadian Labor Congress because
he opposes big business, big
government and big labor groups.
The most outspoken of the anti-
resolutionists was an instructor
who admitted voting for the
Trudeau government, though he
conceded the government has
made serious mistakes.
"I voted for the present administration, but I'll be damned if I
get off this boat and climb on with
Joe Morris," he said.
"Scab, or no scab, I'll be at work
on the fourteenth," he said. His
statement was greeted with loud
applause.
officially closed, other than a
Saturday, Sunday or designated
holiday, shall be recognized as a
paid holiday for all employees."
Powell, then acting SFSS
president, told the three SORWUC
office workers the day before the
strike began Sept. 8 that the office
would be closed for the duration of
the strike.
Powell said Thursday "Nobody
could take responsibility for the
office as of the beginning of the
strike so I closed it, and in closing
it, designated it an official
holiday."
Powell said he closed the office
for "security reasons".
Doug Brooks, SORWUC shop
steward, said Thursday Powell
definitely understood the implications of informing the union
that the office would be closed.
"Powell stuck his neck on the
line to do a group of people a
favor," said Brooks?
SORWUC's strike fund is
practically non-existent, Brooks
said. He said he thinks it would be
hard to justify the staff being paid.
According    to    Brooks,    Pat
Barter, student society office coordinator, stressed to Powell the
implications of his decision,
making clear that SORWUC would
honor the picket line regardless of
pay. She also told Powell that
everyone was expecting a long
strike.
SFSS vice-president Rob Laurer
said Thursday he thinks Powell's
decision is "an unfortunate
blunder".
Laurer said that if Powell had
not designated the closing of the
office as an office holiday, but
instead had not taken any action,
the staff would not have been paid.
Council was first informed of
Powell's action when Barter told
SFSS treasurer Al Frydenlund
Sept. 30 that SORWUC workers
were being paid.
Powell, while admitting this
should have been brought to the
attention of new councillors, said
he had not thought to tell anyone
because he had been busy with his
election and classes.
Blood drive short
By 4 p.m. today the Red Cross hopes to have collected 2,000 pints of
blood from UBC students in their fall clinic.
But as of Thursday afternoon, only 1,200 pints had been bled, a pretty
sad statistic when one considers the fact that there are 30,000 people here
every day.
The clinic concludes today in SUB 207-209, and as an added inducement
to donate, the engineering undergraduate society will give away beer to
the faculties with the highest number and highest percentage of students
donating.
If the Red Cross reaches their goal, it will handle B.C. hospitals'
demand for blood for one week. They're expecting a heavy weekend.
"The new council did not stop to
consider what was happening to
the office," said Powell.
Powell said there was a notice
posted outside the office on the first
day of the strike saying: "Office
closed due to strike."
He agreed however, that the
notice was ambiguous, and could
have been interpreted as simply
that SORWUC was honoring the
picket line.
At Wednesday's council meeting,
a motion was passed to officially
open the SFSS general office immediately. After the meeting
Laurer informed the union the
office was now open.
Frydenlund was unsure of the
exact amount paid to the three
SORWUC office workers during
the month-long strike but guessed
it was about $2,500.
According to the SFSS constitution, the three other SORWUC
members, the bookstore manager,
theatre manager and student union
fieldworker, are also being paid,
but Frydenlund could not confirm
this.
Nessie hunter
joins UBC dive
A UBC physiology prof will lead
an expedition into the Gulf Islands
this weekend in search of shipwrecks, and one member of his
group will be a well-known searcher for the Loch Ness monster.
Jim McLarnon and about 20
members of the Underwater Ar-
cheological Society of B.C. will be
searching off Mayne Island for the
wreckage of the tramp steamer,
the Zephyr, which sank in 1868.
EDGERTON
. . . sought Nessie
Included in the group will be
leading U.S. scientist Harold
Edgerton of the Massachusetts
Institute of Technology.
Edgerton, a visiting lecturer at
UBC on a Cecil Green fellowship,
spent last summer at Scotland's
Loch Ness where his innovative
underwater photography
techniques were used in attempting to photograph the
mythical Loch Ness monster.
In 1971, underwater photographs
using Edgerton's stroboscopic
camera showed what Nessie fans
said may have been a large fin
about three to four feet across and
eight feet long swimming in the
Loch.
Edgerton has worked with
Jacques Cousteau and the National
Geographic Society. McLarnon
said Edgerton and his equipment
will be invaluable to the Mayne
Island dive.
The purpose of the underwater
archeological society, which was
begun about a year ago with the
helpof UBC's centre for continuing
education, is to preserve the
maritime history of B.C. with
salvaged artifacts and films of
excavations.
"It is not a diving club,"
McLarnon said, "but anyone with
archeological or conservational
interests can join."
The finds, if any, will be turned
into a maritime museum, he said.
The society is working on a $7,000
Canada Council Grant on this
venture and stands to make no
profit though the Zephyr was said
to be hauling valuable commercial
products from Victoria to Nanaimo
when it ran aground and sank.
"The fact that it is a noncommercial venture was one of the
reasons we got professor Edgerton," said McLarnon. "Vancouver-
based salvaging operators would
have wanted a percentage of the
finds but Edgerton's participation
is strictly scientific."
The expedition will set out
Friday and will work through until
Monday, McLarnon said and,
depending on their luck, the party
may move on to a second shipwreck located near Galiano Island.
The second site is a sunken one
side paddlewheel steamship
believed lost about 100 years ago.
The search procedures will be
photographed by both the diving
party and a crew from BCTV.
"It's the first time anyone has
looked for something in these
particular areas. As far as we
know, the wrecks are untouched,"
McLarnon said.
But Edgerton said Thursday
during a news conference that
treasurehunts using his equipment
have almost always been failures.
"It would almost be a miracle to
find anything in a large body of
water, even using sonar. Someone
once proposed to me to search for
the Titanic but the odds were
against it and I declined,"
Edgerton said.
McLarnon said this weekend's
clive sites have been surveyed and
researched and he expects success.
mike miller photo
BODY OUTLINE
by Lasserre
UBC corpse outlines—whodunit?
A group of Vancouver artists is conducting a mock
investigation into the mysterious appearance of
painted outlines of dead bodies at UBC and downtown.
The outlines of prone human figures painted in
white started appearing on city sidewalks during the
summer and often bore red blotches and the word
Dead.
The Downtown Art Detective Agency, a group of
artists modelled after the European Dada art
movement of the 1920s and 1930s, say the outlines are
the work of a "harmless psychopath."
One of the central ideas of the Dada art movementJ
was to make art out of things not normally considered
art objects, but a spokesman for Vancouver's DADA
said the group has nothing to do with the appearance
of the painted bodies.
A man calling himself Dick Traceit—he insisted
that was his real name—told The Ubyssey the man
who painted the outlines is a former DADA member
named Mr. Reee.
Traceit said Reee painted the outlines to create the
impression that murders have occurred at the site of
each body silhouette. Reee intended to make the
public think a mass murderer is at loose, Traceit
said.
The body outlines resemble the chalk outlines
police make at the scene of a death, delineating the
position of the victim on the ground.
Reee has launched similar outline painting campaigns in San Francisco, Portland and Seattle,
Traceit said.
DADA is circulating posters about Reee and the
appearance of the outlines as part of its "investigation", Traceit said.
The posters, some of which can be found on campus
billboards, are not intended to help capture Reee but
only "to allow people to stop, notice and think", he
said.
Traceit said the posters are a joke,, intended to
imitate the format of police wanted posters. Page 4
THE        UBYSSEY
Friday,   October  8,   1976
Press meets Waterloo
In case you're wondering
why The Ubyssey has been
running a few stories about
the fate of The Chevron,
student paper at the
University of Waterloo, on
pages 1 and 3 lately, here's
why.
The suspension of The
Chevron by the Waterloo
student federation is appalling
— almost unbelievable. It's an
incredibly flagrant violation
of every unwritten rule about
the freedom of the press.
The ideal of a free press is
not simply a meaningless
cliche — there are reasons
why the press must be free
from interference.
The role of a paper is to
inform, to investigate and to
present its readers with some
sort of analysis or editorial
direction. To be critical — to
look at what is going on
around it and speak out
when something is wrong and
needs to be criticized.
If there'is nothing which
can at least attempt to
provide some criticism . of
what is going on, wrongs can
go unchecked. Suggestions
that could have improved
situations are lost. Actions
are not questioned.
That all leads to a terribly
one-sided way of doing
things. People aren't all that
concerned     about    the
consequences or morality of
their actions if they know
there's nothing watching
them.
Undoubtedly, all kinds of
horrow shows have been
prevented by the presence of
a press which is on the alert,
which is continually
watching, evaluating,
criticizing.
It looks like the Waterloo
student council wants to
ignore all that and start
things all over by different
rules. Staffers on The
Chevron say the student
council wants to begin a new
student paper at the
university — a student paper
that would echo the every
word of the student
federation.
And that's not a student
paper. That's what we in the
business call a house organ.
And though there's nothing
wrong with any group
beginning its own house
organ, such a publication
should never, and can never,
take the place of an
independent critical
newspaper.
We    suggest,    humbly,
that    if    our    Alma    Mater
Society    by    chance   agrees
with   us   on   this   particular
issue,   they   put   together   a
letter to the student council
at    Waterloo    saying    so.
Chances are those people will
listen   to   the   AMS   before
they listen to a student paper
— as their actions show.
Letters
I am not,
never will...
Please get it straight that I am
not, repeat not, running for senate,
nor did I resign as president of the
student representative assembly to
run for senate, much as it will pain
me to see two gears elected.
I resigned in order to show that
decentralization can work, if only
students reps will take the time to
inform themselves and their
constituents of the issues. You
know, to show a little leadership.
Furthermore, please realize that
your Thursday editorial on fence-
sitting was far more telling of the
depths to which the paper has sunk
than is your ugly logo or lack of
Pango Pango fillers.
You would find more than
enough issues to fill your paper if
you only had the political insight
and journalistic competence to
investigate the administration.
Where is the investigative
wizardry of a Denise Chong? It's
time you folks got to work.
Dave Van Blarcom
arts rep
student representative assembly
Oscars, pis.
I would like to offer my sincere
and honest congratulations to Rick
Murray for his performance at
Wednesday night's council
meeting.
Clearly, Rick deserves an
academy awardfor the way he won
over the hearts' and minds of a
majority.of council members.
Rick was probably referring to
myself and a number of others on
council in his letter when he says:
"I feel that the entire question of
whether or not I should resign is
being rather tenaciously pursued
by a small group for what I can
only assume to be personal
reasons."
Obviously, it was for personal
reasons also, that a majority of
council members voted in confidence of Rick.
I say that because it cannot be
due to his record as a "student
representative" on the board.
I like Rick Murray as a person,
but as far as political view go, he is
a reactionary. His contention that
he represents students on campus
is not only false, but impossible.
Please tell me how anyone
working in an office in downtown
Vancouver can' truly represent the
needs of 23,000 students. No one
can, and it is false and misleading
for any elected representative to
assert that he or she can and does.
Naturally, most people will feel
that "too much" has been made of
this issue already.
My concern is that the Alma
Mater Society has taken a very
irresponsible position in not
demanding Rick's resignation.
At a time when students are a
battling for credibility with the
UBC administration and provincial
government it does our case little
good to vote confidence in one
person (who is not a student) and
then set up a policy to make sure
that non-students will never again
be allowed to represent students on
the board.
At least that's the way I see it.
Dave Jiles
arts rep
student representative assembly
Pam's back
After much encouragement and
support from various council
members, from members of the
women's committee and from the
Dean of Women's Office, I have
decided to keep my seat on the
student representative assembly.
The position that some members
of the SRA took concerning the
women's committee indicates an
ignorance of the rather obvious
issues surrounding women and/or
an unwillingness to take off the
blinkers and think about these
issues and discuss them in a
reasonable and mature manner
that these misguided individuals
share.
I do not apologize for my
behaviour of Sept. 30.
Given the situation, my action,
although emotional, was completely in order.
At that time I did not want my
name to be associated with such an
irresponsible, discriminatory and
immature body.
Upon reconsidering, I have
realized that, should I resign, the
SRA will lose a responsible,
reasonable and mature council
member. I'm staying on.
Pam Willis
arts rep
student representative assembly
Liquor 2
According to Thursday's
Ubyssey, the SUB pizza parlor has
turned out to be "a bit of a flop"
financially.
Things are so bad that the place
isn't breaking even, eh?
Since SUB is the only pizza place
I can think of that demands its
patrons be of legal age, its
management's complaints are
pretty hard to take seriously,
Right now, if you can't produce
identification at the door they
won't let you in.
Wouldn't it be just as easy (and
more lucrative financially) to
check identification at the bar but
allow the great unwashed (frosh)
access to the pizza itself?
Surely the local liquor laws
would allow this one campus, since
they do everywhere else.
If they do, and SUB refuses to
change policy, then that amounts
to        discrimination. Such
THE UBYSSEY
OCTOBER 8, 1976
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the AMS
or the university administration. Member, Canadian University
Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary
and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located in room
241K of the Student Union Building. Editorial departments,
228-2301; Sports, 228-2305; Advertising, 228-3977.
Co-Editors: Sue Vohanka, Ralph Maurer
Fuck. Now how in hell am I supposed to write a goddamned literate
masthead in this tiny space with 37 names? Buy a microscopic typesetter?
Or how about an Irish Setter, yuck yuck yuck. Well, Steve Howard, Sue
Vohanka, Ralph Maurer, Marcus Gee, Heather Walker, Dave Wilkinson,
Chris Gainor, Jan Nicol, Deb van der Gracht, Matt King and Geoff
Wheelright worked on Jerry Eberts, Charlie Micallef, Mike Miller, Jon
Stewart, Joanna Moss, Tom Barnes, Brad Nelson, Kathy Ford, Gord
Robertson, Amanda King, Vicki Booth, Paul Vanderham and Doug
Rushton. Phew. Thirteen names left. Well, Merrilee Robson, David Morton,
Doug Field, Candy Matwiv, Ian Morton, and Greg Strong worked over
Maureen Lundell, Bruce Baugh, Richard Currie, Guy Robertson, Shane
McCube and Deryl Mogg. Well, that's 36. Oh yes, and Deryl Mogg.
Goddamnit, I'm finally finished. So there, Malcolm.
discrimination may be necessary
(at least legally) in the Pit, but
applied upstairs, it is stupid and
petty.
Frosh don't live by bag lunches,
chocolate bars and shitty cafeteria
food alone, you guys!
Rich Berror
arts 1
Liquor 3
I am writing in support of Greg
Olsen's letter (Oct. 5 issue) in
which he expresses his opposition
to the exclusive nature of the many
liquor oriented activities held on
campus.
It seems unfair that any student
should be excluded from an activity because of age. This is
clearly discriminatory.
I wish to point out, however, that
there are a small number of social
activities that are open to underage students.
One possibility is the Centre
Coffee House held every Friday at
8:30 p.m. at the Lutheran Campus
Centre.
I have found the Coffee House to
have a friendly and relaxed atmosphere as well as some excellent musical entertainment.
It is, at least, one possibility open
to minors who are looking for
weekend social activity.
Peter Collins
arts 1
The Ubyssey welcomes letters
from all readers.
Although an effort is made to
publish all letters received, The
Ubyssey reserves the right to edit
letters for reasons of brevity,
legality, grammar or taste.
Letters should be addressed to
the paper care of campus mail or
dropped off at The Ubyssey office,
SUB 241-K. Friday,  October  8,   1976
THE
UBYSSEY
Page 5
By Nelson faculty, students
Winegard report denounced
By NICK SMIRNOW
Canadian University Press
NELSON—It stinks.
That's the typical response from
Nelson's Notre Dame University to
the Winegard report on university
education in the B.C. interior.
Of course, public statements are
more polite.
But the only major Winegard
recommendation not condemned is
the proposal for four interior
university centres.
Key Winegard proposals that
have been denounced include:
• the administration of the four
centres by a "mother" university
< Simon Fraser University, 400
miles west of Nelson);
• funding of only $6.1 million per
year to be split among the four
centres;
• and the report's straightforward claim that NDU cannot
continue to grant its own degrees.
Both the Notre Dame student
union and faculty association
condemned the report for failing to
meet the needs of people in the B.C.
interior.
And the NDU board of governors
said in late September it could not
accept the recommendations and
will try to work out an alternative
plan in conjunction with Selkirk
College. Selkirk is the region's
community college in Castlegar, 30
miles away.
Selkirk administration president
Mitch Anderson, however, does not
want to comment until NDU
presents a concrete proposal.
"We feel the small scale of
operation proposed by Winegard in
the Kootenays is not going to
work," NDU's administration
president Rowland Grant told the
Nelson Daily News.
Money short
A recent faculty brief makes the
same charge: inadequate funding
and staffing.
The Winegard proposal for the
first five years is $6.1 million per
year to be split among four centres
(Nelson, Kelowna, Kamloops and
Prince George) and $1 million per
year for the administrative centre
in Vernon. Only 10 full-time
equivalent faculty were proposed
for each centre.
This is only three per cent of the
estimated 1981 expenditures on
B.C. post secondary education, the
faculty brief said.
Student union president Terry
Peterson agrees: "Ten FTE
faculty works out to about 30
courses. Last year we had 60 and
could barely offer a degree.
"It's 'ludicrous to think the
money will be enough," Peterson
says. "The community colleges
are already filled with first and
second year students. They certainly won't be able to hold third
and fourth years as well."
NDU, for example, needed $2.1
million last year for a severely
limited operating budget, he said.
Winegard's $7.1 million would give
each centre only $1.8 million for
capital and operating budgets.
Both the NDU student union and
the faculty association claim the
BLACK & LEE
TUX SHOP
NOW AT
1110 Seymour St.
688-2481
recommendations nullify the intent
of the report.
"They claim to study the needs
of the Interior and then they
recommend an inadequate
solution," Peterson says.
"Equalization of educational
opportunity for communities...in
the interior will not come overnight," the faculty brief comments
wryly, "but at the funding levels
suggested by Winegard, it might
take a full generation."
Peterson points to a student
union survey this summer of 500
high school students in the-
Kootenays. It showed many intend
to go to B.C.'s Lower Mainland
because of a lack of programs in
the interior.
But instead of expanding
university education in the interior
the government is reducing it, he
says.
Notre Dame was forced to drop
degrees in physics, chemistry,
math, philosophy, political science
and languages, release half its 46
faculty members and eliminate
first and second year programs
entirely this year.
NDU's enrolment has declined
from 1,000 students in 1971-72 to
about 300 this year, many of whom
are part time.
To   think   the   NDU   recom
mendations will increase
educational opportunity in the
interior with only 40 FTE faculty is
"a cruel hoax", the faculty brief
says.
Winegard's plan to give
jurisdiction of the interior
university centres to SFU is not
popular at NDU.
Tokenism
The four reps from the interior
that Winegard would add to the
SFU board of governors are only
"a nice attempt at token
representation," according to
Peterson.
Grant thinks "relationships with
other universities are unnecessary, as NDU has been
granting degrees for a number of
years'."
Peterson also disagrees with
Winegard's argument that
credibility of interior degrees will
be lower if the centres aren't attached to a coast university.
NDU degrees have been accepted across Canada, he says.
Given adequate money, NDU could
co-ordinate four campuses as well
as SFU, he adds.
"While SFU's experience with
two extension programs in
Kelowna is often referred to,"
Peterson   says,   "NDU's   per-
UBC
READING, WRITING
AND STUDY SKILLS CENTRE
TIME IS RUNNING OUT!
The University of British Columbia Reading, Writing, and Study
Skills Centre is offering a number of non-credit (18-20 hour)
courses in reading improvement, writing improvement and study
skills development commencing the week of October 18, 1976.
Classes last for six weeks and meet in Mechanical Engineering
Annex A.
The fee is $35 per course for students. For others the fee is $70.
Reading Improvement
Section
3
5
6
Days and Times
M        7-10 p.m.
Tu.      '7-10 p.m.
M,W   4:30-6:30
Class Starts
Oct. 18
Oct. 19
Oct. 18(5 wks.)
Writing Improvement
5
6
M        7-10 p.m.
Th      7-10 p.m.
Oct. 18
Oct. 21
Study Skills
1
M, T, Th 12:30-1
30
Oct. 18
FOR REGISTRATION INFORMATION CALL 228-2181, LOC.
245. PREREGISTRATION IS REQUIRED FOR ALL CLASSES.
formance in the Kootenays is
ignored." (NDU offers two degree
completion programs in conjunction with East Kootenay
Community College in Cranbrook.)
Winegard implicitly recognizes
the quality of NDU teaching and
degrees by recommending that as
many NDU faculty as possible be
rehired by his proposed Nelson
university centre, Peterson says.
Perhaps the clearest statement
in the Winegard report is the
categorical rejection of the continued existence of NDU as a
degree-granting institution.
NDU   viable
Winegard contends the small
university is a thing of the past and
that a large population base is
necessary for a viable university.
"We just can't accept those
statements," Grant says.
The report's straightforward
rejection of continued university
status for NDU is superficial and
not  documented,   says  Peterson.
Statistics compiled by the NDU
dean of studies show eight
Canadian universities with fewer
than 3,000 students and three with
less than 1,000.
Winegard's arguments are based
on    population    clusters    and
projected growth rates.
"This is a self-fulfilling
prophecy, and ignores the fact that
population growth responds to
human decisions," Peterson
charges.
"If you feed money into an area
to improve services, the population
will tend to grow," he says.
"That's what's been happening to
the Okanagan."
Under Winegard's proposed
budgeting, the depressed
Kootenays would receive less
money for university education
than it has in the past ($1.3 million
compared to $1.8 million last
year).
The Okanagan-Kamloops area,
already booming, would receive
$3.1 million for university centres
in Kelowna and Kamloops and
another $1.1 million for the administrative centre in Vernon.
That's on top of $12.4 million
granted to Okanagan College in
late September, with more money
pending for construction of
Okanagan College facilities in
Vernon.
B.C. premier Bill Bennett is from
the Okanagan. No cabinet
ministers are from the Kootenays.
SOUTH AFRICA
What are the possibilities for peaceful change in South Africa?
What does the future hold for South Africa in terms of relations
with its northern neighbours? Next week, Mr. Harry Schwarz, a
member of Parliament for South Africa, will visit the University
of British Columbia as a Dal Grauer Memorial Lecturer to discuss
these and other questions. A brilliant barrister, Mr. Schwarz has
been involved in local and national politics in South Africa as a
member of the United Party and the Reform Party. Currently, he
sits in Parliament as a member of the Progressive Reform Party,
which advocates dramatic reform of apartheid policies and rapid
improvement of black-white relations in South Africa. His public
lectures are listed below.
TUESDAY. OCTOBER 12
"THE POSSIBILITIES FOR PEACEFUL CHANGE IN
SOUTH AFRICA." Totem Park Residence, University
of B.C. 8:15 p.m.
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 14
"SOUTH AFRICA AND ITS NORTHERN
NEIGHBOURS: EXISTING AND FUTURE
RELATIONS." Room 106, Buchanan Building,
University of B.C. 12:30 p.m.
SATURDAY,OCTOBER 16
"POLITICS AND SOCIAL CHANGE IN SOUTH
AFRICA: THE ROLE OF MULTI-NATIONAL
CORPORATIONS."- Lecture Hall 2, Woodward
Instructional Resources Centre, University of B.C. A
Vancouver Institute Lecture. 8:15 p.m.
ADMISSION TO ALL LECTURES IS FREE Page 6
THE
UBYSSEY
Friday,  October  8,   1976
/7
N
m
KLIPSCH • TECHNICS • DYNACO  • TANNOY • NAKAMICHI   • JBL • MARANTZ   • KLH  • PIONEER • DUAL • WHARFEDALE   • KLIPSCH <
RHODES   Presents
... marantz components for people
who thought they couldn't afford
marantz.
Marantz 2215B
AM/FM
STEREO RECEIVER
15 watts minimum RMS
per channel, at 8 ohms,
from 40 Hz to 20 kHz,
with no more than 0.8%
total harmonic distortion,
both channels driven.
Suggested List
$26995
SPECIFICATIONS
Rated Power Output, Minimum Continuous
Watts Per Channel, Both Channels Driven
Power Band
Total Harmonic Distortion
Load Impedance, ohms
I.M. Distortion (I.H.F. Method, 60Hz & 7kHz
mixed 4 to 1 at Rated Power Output)
2225
25
20Hz to 20kHz
0.25%
8
0.5%
40H:
2215R
15
to 20kHz
0.8%
0.9%
Marantz 2225
AM/FM STEREO
RECEIVER
25 watts minimum RMS
per channel, at 8 ohms,
from 20 Hz to 20 kHz,
with no more than 0.5%
total harmonic distortion,
both channels driven.
Suggested List
$39900
m
Marantz Model 2015
AM/FM
STEREO RECEIVER
15 watts minimum RMS per channel, at 8
ohms, from 40 Hz to 20 kHz, with no more
than  0.9% total  harmonic distortion,  with
both channels driven
(Shown    with    optional    WC-10    walnut
cabinet)
SUPER PRICE  *169°°
Limited Quantities
for the button pusher, the totally
automatic 6200 marantz turntable,
it's auto everything, auto start,
auto return and shutoff. auto repeat
for the budget minded perfectionist,
the marantz 6100 turntable with
auto return and shutoff. high on
performance, easy on the pocketbook
Marantz-6200
Suggested List
$23995
SPECIFICATIONS:
6200
6100
Speeds
33 & 45 RPM
33 & 45 RPM
Wow& Flutter
.06% (WRMSl
.08%IWRMS)
Rumble
-60 dB DIN
-60 dB DIN
Speed Control Range
+ 3%
Effective Tone Arm
8.26 in.; 210 mm.
8.38 in.; 213 mm.
Length
Overhang
0.43 in.; 11 mm.
0.43 in.; 11 mm.
Tracking Force
0 4 grams
0-4 grams
Anti Skating Force
.5 3 grams
.5 4 grams
Marantz
6100
,■**#/
talk to the experts*
Suggested List
$159
95
CO
CANADA'S LEADING
STEREO CENTRE
2699 W. Broadway
733-5914
"The Finest For Less" j'3-,'^';.. :
hfifc.'- '*»'*%"'   ~«»»«y matwiv photo Cliff hanging art; Mm
Page Friday, 2
THE        UBYSSEY
Friday, October 8,  1976 earn of Anthropology
There are three things to observe and
examine at UBC's new Museum of Anthropology: the collection, the architecture
and the visitors. You should visit the
Museum several times to understand these
things tully. I advise you to get a membership. This costs money, which most of us
do not have, but a membership is valuable
enough to justify armed robbery. Anthropology and Sociology students should
sell their texts for the necessary cash, since
the museum exhibits can teach them more
about Culture and Society than any jargon-
filled tome. Those who have a spouse and
twelve children at home and who cannot in
any way raise the money will be happy to
know that, on Tuesdays, admission is free.
Next Tuesday, drag yourself away from
those Coles notes and come on down. For
once you will not be wasting your time on
campus.
The first thing you should examine is the
collection. Do you remember learning about
Indians in Grade Four Social Studies'.' Do
you remember how bored you were with
cutting totem poles out of egg cartons? Have
you forgotten how John Wayne used to act
like an engineer every time he entered an
Indian camp'' Put aside those odd parts of
your education when you visit the museum.
You will realize how ridiculous they are.
You will see that the Indians were concerned with things apart from holding off
John Wayne and his Hollywood cohorts.
Throw  away any  ideas  you  have  about
"primitive art," since the Native artists
were not so primitive. I was tempted to
place under several of the carvings a small
sign with the caption "This is a Picasso —
Do Not Touch." I am certain that most of the
Fine Arts gang in our midst would not see
anything strange or incongruous.
The Museum of Anthropology comprises
I more than Indian artifacts. There is a small
but fascinating collection of African, South
American and Oriental goodies. When
-viewing these, take your time and stop
worrying about your Economics essay. Do
not run to the artifact catalogues to find out
about every single bit or piece. Many of the
artifacts have obvious functions, such as
those funny little pipes from North Africa.
The Bantu tribesmen threw their hunting
spears at either prey or enemies; they did
not peel grapes with them. Leave the
catalogues alone until you have viewed the
whole exhibition.
The next thing you should scrutinize is the
museum structure itself. For once, a
building on campus does not threaten,
disgust or perplex. Compare Erikson's
structure with that armoured vehicle
storage depot known as SUB or the underground disco that is Sedgewick Library,
and you will see what I mean. You will be
comfortable in the museum. The ceilings
are high, but they will not overawe you. The
air is as pure as the Pit's air conditioned
atmosphere but does not smell of stale suds
or urine. The place does not resemble a
fortress or office block, so you will not find
yourself cursing concrete.
Generally the displays are open and uncluttered, which might disappoint some
people. There are those who feel that a good
museum display should be as crammed and
PhotOS by:   Doug Field,
Geof Wheelwright
Story by:   Guy Robertson
cramped as a junk store. They will say that
the mask collection should be stuck on one
wall instead of dozens. This would lessen the
desired effect of the masks and the larger
carvings, since you must walk around a
totem pole in order to appreciate it. The
allotment of a few square feet for the
average mask is not a waste, because the
observer should not have his peripheral
view filled with the colours and shapes of
neighbouring masks.
Lastly, you should observe the visitors.
There are many types. You will see the
elderly lady who cannot stop imagining how
nice that ancient Chinese vase would look on
her mantelpiece. Then there is the lonesome
young wife who comes to the museum alone
because she cannot drag her husband away
from the television or the bar. Old'couples
(the husband recently retired and already
sick of golf) walk gently through the halls,
amazed by each tiny piece. They argue at
length on the identity and purpose of
everything they see:
He: "They carved those totem things,
then they danced around them."
She: "All right dear. But it doesn't say
that in the guide book."
Then there are the small and screaming
children, who tackle everything. There is
nothing wrong with playing hide-and-seek or
tag around the totem poles. What worries
me is the child who admires the Fonz a little
too much for everybody's good. It is easy
and painful to imagine young Johnny Doe
skipping through the mask or pole collection
with a pen-knife. With this he plans to make
a few carvings of his own. I suppose most
will call me an alarmist, but I shall not be
surprised to see "Susie Jones does it" cut
into some sacred sculpture or another
before long. To place full-time attendants in
every gallery would be expensive, of course,
and there is probably no money to pay them.
Yet many of the relics in the Museum of
Man are invaluable arid cannot be replaced.
Obviously they are worth more than casual
attention.
Occasionally something pops up on
campus that is amusing and interesting.
Canadian poets such as George Bowering
and Irving Layton come to display their
stupidity and chauvinism. B.F. Skinner
visits us to extol the virtues of caged
children. Great Politicians mumble for an
hour or so in the SUB Ballroom, while small
bands of unknown virtuosos toot and strum
outside. These are transient events of no
import. The Museum of Anthropology is
here to stay, however, and worth far more
than any of these other forms of cheap
campus entertainment — even Dr. Bundolo.
Friday, October 8,  1976
THE        UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 3 Ite. W?;***t- Kh,< .>.\ -' oH shou?
FLOWERS FOR MOORE ... realistic art
Realists revel
By MAUREEN LUNDELL
One of the most exciting visual
experiences is presently at the
Centennial Museum in the
Planetarium. The Rothmans'
travelling art exhibit, Aspects of
Realism, is for people like myself
who dislike most modern art.
On entering the exhibit one reads
a plaque that says, "Realism is the
attitude of precise observations.
The artists are relentless in their
pursuit of finish and refinement of
craftsmanship ... (Detail is) there
to be seen as no photo could reveal
it. The subjects are bathed in light
which provides the maximum
revelation of detail whether distant
or close at hand."
The first picture in the exhibit
proves this definition of realism to
be an understatement. Silverware
for S.F. by Don Eddy shows a
fantastic mass of light and colour
reflected off a hundred pieces of
silverware. The colours and details
are so clear and precise that the
picture is overwhelming. It portrays more than reality. This small
slice of reality is a frozen mass of
glittering reflections.
The rest of the show proved to be
just as fascinating as the first
picture.
A huge painting of packaged
cauliflower in a grocery store was
complete down to the tiniest
printing on the packages.
In the large picture Flowers for
Moore you can see the pores and
tiny veins in the skin of the face. In
the centre of the room there is a
woman asleep on a bed, naked
except for the blankets covering
her legs. She is perfectly life-like
down to each strand of hair and the
bluish veins running under her
skin.
One of the more unusual paintings in the exhibit is Hans
Wiederkehr, by Margrit Jaeggli, a
life sized painting of a naked man.
He looks very personable and very
real. The unusual thing about this
picture is that it is painted on a
mirror. I was a bit surprised to see
my own reflection moving back
and forth behind the man.
Another unusual but very
realistic painting is Water Drops
by Tschang Yeul Kim. A huge
canvas is completely covered with
small shiny perfect water droplets
that dissolve only upon very close
inspection.
The Canadian content of this
exhibition is impressive. There are
works by Pratt, Danby, Colville
and Forrestall. Colville's Horse
and Train is perfect down to each
hair on the horse's side, each blade
of grass and each tiny stone. The
picture is realistic but yet has a
beautiful ethereal quality. Mary
Pratt's Cod Fillets on Tinfoil looks
exactly like a photograph. Neither
brush strokes nor unusual effects
are present to give away the fact
that it is a painting. The use of
colour makes you aware of things
that   no   camera   could.   The
Canadian works are based more on
rural themes than the American
works which are filled with
flashing chrome and neon lights.
This exhibition includes eighty-
one works by seventy-two artists
from a total of eleven countries.
Aspects of Realism will continue to
October 17.
CINEMAWEST
LITERARY SERIES
"BUY NOW, SEE LATER"
1. Thurs., Oct. 14 12:30 & 6:00
Old Aud. — Pygmalion
2. Thurs., Oct. 28 12:30 & 6:00
old Aud. — Wuthering Heights
3. January  A Midsummer Night's
Dream
4. January   Othello
$2.50 SERIES PASS AVAILABLE AT A. M. S.
BUSINESS OFFICE, BUTO 397 & SUB 247.
The Room Shakers
HEAR THE INCREDIBLE
TANNOY
The Name Says It All
Chevoit
Devon
PERSONALIZED  SOUND
578 Seymour     684-2107
WE DELIVER
Frequently Suggestive
R. McDonald, B.C. Dir.
ENGLISH SUB-TITLES
SHOWS AT
7:30 - 9:30
Dunbar
J24-7251
DUNBAR at 30th
Park
THE
FUNNIEST FILM
OF 1985
Shows: 7:30, 9:30
Coarse and suggestive 	
WDo:ia,TBhCOUDir.        Spring CHEVY CHASE "?7™t'W*
Liza Minnelli • Ingrid Bergman
eAcMatter of ^Timej.
Shows at 12:15, 2, 3:55, 5:55, 7:50, 9:55
Sunday  2:10,3:55,5:55,7:50,9:55
Vogue
918 GRANVILLE
685-5434
"CAR WASH':....where, between the
hours of 9 and 5 anything can happen...
and usually does!
imWASfGuest Stars fraiklp Aja|e- frergeCarlii
Priiessirlnii Corey * hfai lixea - ARtosio Farias • Lorraiie Sari
lack leboe • Clarence lise • Ike Fainter Sisters -lichari Praor'
MATURE
Shows at 12:20, 2:10, 4:10, 6:10, 7:50, 10
Sunday at 2:10, 4:10, 6:10, 7:50, 10
Coronet
ISl   GRANVILLE
6S5-6S2S
...like Hitchcock at general
the top Of his form."   Rex Reed  New York Daily News
CLIFF ROBERTSON
GENEVIEVE BUJOLD	
Shows at 12:05, 1:45, 3:45, 5:40,' 7:30, 9:30 S51 CRANVILLE
Sunday at 2, 3:45, 5:40, 7:30, 9:30 61S-6S2S
"A GRIPPING, BRUTALLY VIOLENT
AND SOMETIMES BEAUTIFUL FILM.
NOIRET IS PERFECT." Newsday
THE OLD GUN (LE VIEUX FUSIL) VStSitU
English Sub-Titles Frequent Brutal Violence       'A4".?.73.??
Shows at 7:30-9:30
R. McDonald, B.C. Dir. 4375 W. 10th
Page Friday, 4
THE
UBYSSEY
Friday,  October  8,   197< {theatre
Cat's realism is hot stuff
By IAN MORTON
Lift up that mosquito netting from your
face. Take a deep breath of that thick, rich
Mississippi air and scan the cotton fields
stretching lazily before you — all "twenty-
eight thousand acres of the richest land this
side of the valley Nile."
Now snap out of it, and realize that you are
sitting in the cramped old Arts Club Theatre
in chilly old Vancouver. In fact, what you
are scanning is the opening production of a
new theatre season and not, as hoped, cotton
fields. If the shock isn't too much for you,
lean back and enjoy the show.
Cat On A Hot Tin Roof
Starring Susan   Wright,   Winston Rekert,
Owen Foran
At the Arts Club, 1181 Seymour
Until at least October 31
In this crisp presentation of Tennessee
William's Cat On A Hot Tin Roof reality is
vividly depicted on stage. As well as to the
actors, much of the credit for this lassooing
of reality must go to names like Alison
Green, the Set Designer, Marsha Sibthorpe,
Lighting, and especially Director Bill
Millerd.
It is surprising to see how well the Arts
Club succeeds with this show, considering
how foreign a Deep South setting is to that
organization. Recently their forte seems to
have been rather light English comedies.
However, to be as ambitious as to suddenly
take on such a serious, complex play as this,
and do it well, is indeed a tribute to their
versatility.
Of the nine actors in Cat, only four are
worth mentioning, but those four carry the
play so capably that it becomes hard to even
recall the other five less competent actors.
Susan Wright  plays Maggie,  the Cat,
REKERT, FORAN, WRIGHT . . . meat of the play
—glen erikson photo
whose drunken husband causes her to
become a woman "consumed with envy and
eatin' up with longing". Maggie is determined to win back her husband's affections,
determined as a cat on a hot tin roof. Actress
Wright presents this dynamic role with a
splendid mix of dignity and passion.
She literally owns the first act when she
first tries to reach her husband, Brick. The
energy she builds to a crescendo in that first
act unfortunately cannot but help to let down
further on in the play,  but that is understandable after such a taxing first act.
Winston Rekert, as her husband Brick
Pollit, works just the opposite way.  His
energetic peak must meet the play's climax
at the very end, and it does. Brick maintains
a mysterious hateful aspect in his character
through most of the first two acts. We are
kept from knowing his secret by his continuous  drinking  which he does   until  a
"click" in his head makes him peaceful.
He is an intriguing character, made all the
more intriguing when his secret is made
known. In a fierce confrontation with his
father, Big Daddy, he tells of his "disgust
with mendacity" which is all around him,
and how he felt responsible for the death of
his closest friend. Big Daddy is then able to
illuminate the real source of Brick's
discomfort when he says:
"This disgust with mendacity is disgust
with yourself. You! — dug the grave of your
friend and kicked him in it."
At this point, Brick seems nakedly
revealed for once. But his reaction, dulled
hopelessly by alcohol, does not positively
stimulate him on.
"I'm no better than the others, in some
ways worse because I'm alive. Maybe it's
alive that makes them lie, and being almost
not alive makes me sort of accidentally
truthful..." Rekert is blisteringly convincing
through this episode.
He works, at first, quietly but with an
evident inner strength and later fiercely to
make his performance such an excellently
controlled one. Persecuted by his mendacious family, and crippled by his last
attempt at escape from it (broken ankle),
Rekert astutely equals Owen Foran's Big
Daddy role in powerful effect, with his
controlled portrayal.
Foran, with a superb make-up job, is the
power figure of the play; the success Brick
will never be, but who is as much a pathetic
victim to the lying ways of those around him
as his son. At first, when certain he did not
have cancer, Foran's optimism and hope for
a new beginning is richly acted.
"Nothing is wrong with me but a spastic
colon — made spastic, I guess, by disgust!
By all the goddam lies and liars I have had
to put up with, and all the goddam hypocrisy
that I lived with all these forty years. Now
things are going to be different ..."
When he realizes that he has once again
been lied to, Big Daddy is defeated and
bitter. It is not a spastic colon but malignant
cancer.
"CHRIST DAMN! ALL LYING SONS OF
— LYING BITCHES! ALL LIARS ALL
LIARS, ALL LYING, LYING LIARS!
LYING, DYING LIARS!"
These lines, as Owen Foran bitterly
wheezes them, rattle every chair in the
audience, as well as every bone in the
audience.
These three characters really do provide
most of the meat to the play. Jackson Davies
as Gooper, in a minor role, also provides
taste to the cast, but the remaining five, I'm
afraid, could be toned down substantially.
The result is that the audience lives with
them, in their cancerous reality. The
Mississippi mud air, the sweat cooling on
fanned foreheads, the mendacity of a perverted world, are all in shocking colour.
But Wright, Rekert and Foran are what
Cat On A Hot. Tin Roof are all about — the
individuals fighting for truth — and they do
Tennessee Williams an honour with their
playing. They expand the Mississippi Delta
beyond the boundaries of the stage and right
up to the last row at the back of the theatre.
Paramount Pictures presents
ROBERT EVANS - SIDNEY BECKERMAN proauoion
a JOHN SCHLESINCER film
DUSTIN HOFFMAN
LAURENCE OLIVIER ROY SCHEIDER
WILLIAM DEVANE MARTHE KELLER
•msmiiii^viiie
Warning: violence & coarse language
throughout.
—R.W. McDonald B.C. Dir.
12:50,3:00,5:20,7:40    10:00
Sun from 3:00
THE PERFECT RENTAL FOR
YOUR LAST VACATION.
^Warning: Frequent gory scenes!
  *k.        R.W. McDonald B.C. Dir. I
■*■"*■  * — PE A RMS INC w :. r :„ D»N CURTIS
KAREN BLACK OUVER REED ."BURNT OFFERINGS"    , BURGESS MEREDITH EILEEN HECKART
7:30, 9:30
I 1737"cOrTIOX Matinee Sat-- Sun- & Mon.  2:00 ]
1^55551^294 2991 LOTae.eel7D:rorn'
EiiiakUfcJttaaUUlillJ broadwayE.of boundary     showtime 8:00
SPECIAL STUDENT RATES AND PERFORMANCES
as low as $11.25 for the Season.
(H THE
PLAYHOUSE
THEATRE CENTRE
OF B. C
'' The most innovative theatre in Western Canada''
Jamie Portman— Calgary Herald
OUTSTANDING 76/77 SEASON
ACT NOW AND SAVE 10%
MAIN STAGE SERIES
COMEDY-  TARTUFFE   -Nov.8-27
NEW SERIES
TOPICAL TALE- Oct. 18-Oct. 30
ADVENTURE- —Dec 13-30 DIRTY   LINEN
THE COUNT OF MONTE CRISTO   parody-    THE BLUES -Jan. 10-22
TRAGEDY- KING LEAR — Jan. 31-Feb. 1    DOCUMENTARY-   THE   . — Mar. 21-Apr. 2
DAZZLEMENT-TRAVESTIES - Mar 7-26     SOUND °F DISTANT THUNDER
AN AMUSEMENT - _ Mav2-14
fantasy- CAMINO REAL-Apr. 11-30 72 yNDER THE O
6 CANADIAN PREMIERES
2 WORLD PREMIERES
INTERNATIONAL DIRECTORS
FIRST-RATE CANADIAN ACTORS AND MORE	
3 EASY WAYS TO SUBSCRIBE-
Telephone    - VANCOUVER TICKET CENTRE 683-3255 and charge to Eatons account
Mail     - Call 684-5361 for information and brochure
In Person    -Vancouver Ticket Centre- 630 Hamilton St., Vancouver, B.C.
Friday,  October  8,   1976
THE
UBYSSEY
Page Fiickjy, £ PF    INTERV>
Earle Birney, noted Canadian poet and novelist,
gave a reading of his poetry Sept. 30 at UBC.
PF staffers Merrilee Bobson and Greg Strong
were later able to interview him.
PF: I read that you once described
yourself as a Sunday poet. And you thought
that maybe poetry was a short way of
writing down what might take a novel to
express. I wondered how you consider
yourself now.    .
Birney: Well, when I called myself a
Sunday poet it was because I certainly never
had enough time the other six days of the
week to write at all, when I was teaching full
time — here or in other universities. And I.
think I called myself a summer novelist
because you got enough of a break in the
summer. It wasn't so much that I felt that a
novel was just a blown-up poem, or a poem a
condensed novel, but it was just that there
wasn't enough time.
And in fact, if I had been doing my
teaching jobs to the fullness of my own
standards I wouldn't have had time to write
poems on Sundays for quite a number of
years because when I came to this
university in 1946 to teach full time (I taught
before the war in the summer schools here)
I found that I was supposed to teach Chaucer
and Anglo-Saxon and first year, second year
English, sometimes third year, and a
graduate course. And at that time there was
a totally inadequate library. A lot of the
basic books for teaching Chaucer and Anglo-
Saxon were non-existent.
PF: We're the generation that has grown
up reading your poems and we've been
taught them as well — and I was wondering
what sort of Canadian experience comes
across in your poetry? There's a sort of
landscape, a sort of feeling that comes
across in some of your poems, in, let's say,
Bushed.
Birney: Well, I don't know. That's for you
people to decide what you think the
Canadian experience is or landscape. It's all
there in the poems so whatever it is ... I
don't write poems just to write about the
Canadian landscape. I may have started to
'do something like that when I first started to
write poems because I didn't know what to
write about. I was writing more to see if I
could write when I was a kid and the only
models I had were the second-rate 19th
century poems which were in our readers.
Some of them were actually first-rate poems
When I was a kid
the only models
I had were the
second-rate 19th
century poems
which were in
our readers.
but several hundred years old — Gray's
Elegy, this kind of thing.
I suppose when I first started writing
poetry was when I had just come out of high
school. I was like a lot of other people who
start writing poems around 16. You want to
write because you like words and you like
rhythms and you want to write a poem but
you don't know what to say, or even if you do
know what you want to say you don't know
what form, because you haven't learned
much about poems and what you do is
imitate poems of other writers. Until you
begin to see that, "no I don't want that;
that's limiting," and you want to change the
form and that's when you get into
developing your own voice.
I don't know whether that's answering the
question. Some people develop much faster
than others. I developed very slowly as a
writer because I went into doing other things
in my younger years. I didn't try to be a
writer, except as a critic.
I started out wanting to be a journalist and
this was, I suppose, why I went into the
^oVBS*"
BIRNEY . . . it's all there in the poems
—matt king photo
Ubyssey as a freshman reporter and stuck
with the Ubyssey through my four years
here. The summer between my being one of
the associate editors and then being the
editor-in-chief was the summer in which I
did, for the first time, professional journalism.
I edited the Point Grey Gazette which was
at that time a fairly large throwaway. Officially there was a subscription and it was
up on the masthead and every once in a
while some naive person would come into
the editorial office and take out a subscription. We'd always take their money but
they would have got the paper anyway
because it was thrown to every door in the
municipality of Point Grey (which at that
time was separate from Vancouver) and the
paper was owned by the reeve of the
municipality.
There was an extraordinary number of
paving contractors advertising in the paper
and so it was very prosperous. It was
prosperous partly because I was writing the
ads for these contractors and local merchants because they didn't particularly
want to advertise and they didn't know how
to write an ad but they had to have one
because otherwise they weren't going to get
favors out of the reeve, who owned the
paper. It was as simple as that. The paving
contracts never went to someone who wasn't
advertising in the newspaper. And so I
began to see that there was a certain kind of
journalism that wasn't as clean-handed as
I'd hoped journalism was.
Then things developed which were of even
a more sinister nature. There was a murder
and a kidnapping and a giant coverup by the
Point Grey police, which was finally uncovered when most of them were arrested
by the downtown police, with the help of the
Mounties. The kidnapping had been, in fact,
conducted by the Point Grey police, who had
kidnapped an innocent Chinese houseboy
who couldn't speak any English and there
was evidence that he had been tortured, in
order that he should confess to the rape and
murder of.Janet Smith, who was a servant
in a house in Shaughnessy.
This had happened to her at a party. She
was in the basement ironing and somebody
came into the basement and  there was
evidence of a considerable struggle. There
was a lot of coverup. There were burns from
the iron on her body, which was fully
clothed, and the clothes were not burned — a
lot of weird evidence like that.
And then there was a gradual filtering
down from the newspaper people downtown
and I'd pick up snippets from them as to who
the real murderer was and the whole nasty
business.
But it never got in the newspapers and it
hasn't to this day. And the man who was the
murderer killed himself a year or so later
and was buried. But it involved families of
money and prestige in British Columbia.
So I decided that I was not interested in
being a journalist in British Columbia.
PF: How do you, personally, set about
writing a poem? What are your writing
habits? Do you work from inspiration or do
vou sit down to write a certain amount every
day?
Birney: Oh I certainly wouldn't sit down
to write a certain amount of poetry every
day. I write a poem when I feel like it, if I
have the time. Otherwise, I just push it aside
and generally forget about. If it's a short
poem I may actually get it finished —
finished in the sense that I know what the
beginning and the end are — and then it
might stick around for weeks, months, years
before I do anything else with it.
The thing is that I don't regard myself as a
poet but as a writer and sometimes I get
involved in things which are complicated
enough so that I don't want to do anything
else; I just want to go right through and
finish it. But life is very complex and it's not
easy to get a lot of time free from everything
else. I could say, for example, that my first
novel was written in four months, except
that I had thought out my characters and
even had a kind of chapter-scene outline that
I'd written in the month of September before
going back to school in 1947.
All winter I didn't have time to write
anything else except things in the margins
of students' essays, and to read and to look
through bibliographies and order books for
the library, and go to masses of stupid
committees and the junk that impedes the
normal lives of professors and, to some
extent, the students too.
I hear that in Victoria they've just appointed a committee on committees. Do you
have one here? A committee on committees
— and I suppose they have an investigative
committee too, to investigate the committee
on committees. Well, we had almost that
sort of thing here when I was here teaching
and they always interfered with work.
But in connection with this first novel, I
did spend about a month merely thinking
about the novel but not putting things down
and the next summer I just got the hell out of
Vancouver and went to an island where a
friend had a place and I tried to write. I
found it very difficult at first. I'd almost
thought about it too much but I hadn't done
any real "testing" writing. I had to get a
particular style. So probably the first two
weeks I didn't get anything done at all.
And then it began to come and I was doing
about 1,000 to 1,500 words a day, at least at
the start. Then I began to get more interested in what I was doing. The characters
started to grow almost subconsciously while
I was doing something else. I'd go out and
fish or swim and then come back and
something had happened. I knew more
about that character and what they'd be
doing in the next scene. An awareness of a
particular dialogue would come and I'd get
that dialogue down. I didn't know quite
where the characters were saying these
things — I'd have to work that out later —
but I'd slap these things down. And things
started going faster and faster.
I was doing less swimming and more
writing as the days went on. I'd take a
weekend off and friends would come over. I
was generally living alone in this place. The
friend who owned the cottage was working
in town and he'd come back on Saturday
morning, and we would relax and have a
I thought that I
would he a novelist.
I would probably
write a poem nous
and again but I trill
pour out novels.
They're so easy
to write.
i
normal summer weekend. And then Monday
I'd go back to work. And every week I'd find
that my speed of writing was increasing.
And at the end of that summer I was
averaging nearly 5,000 words a day. And the
day before I had to come back and start
registering students for school I wrote 6,500
words. That was my peak and I finished the
novel.
And then, that winter I had to revise it
almost to the point of rewriting and get it all
typed out and polished off. That second
writing I got finished with in the spring and I
sent it off to the publisher. The editors had a
few criticisms which I agreed with and so I
SUB FILMS Deceivingly presents
LIES MY FATHER
TOLD ME**
This Thurs., Sun:-7:0G
& Fri.,Sat.-7:00/9:30
Plus Ch. 4 of the Phantom
Creeps-Fri., Sat.-7:00
Page Friday, 6
THE        UBYSSEY
Friday,  October  8,   1976 *, i* ^& ">
literature
Organization helps poets
POET . . . former Leon Trotsky fan
—matt king photo
did part of it as a third revision. Then I sent
it in and it was published by the autumn.
I always look back on that as the perfect
length of time, at least for me, to write a
novel. I had the whole thing wrapped up in
less than two years and with increasing
pleasure in the writing of it. I thought that
now I would be a novelist. I would probably
write a poem now and again but I will pour
out novels. They're so easy to write.
This first thing happened to catch on and
in fact, it's still in print. This was Turvey. So
I thought this was fine and I started another
novel, which was going to be more serious
and much better.
And that one, I think, took most of my life
for four or five years. And I still had
something that I didn't like very much and
my publisher liked even less than I did. And
so I worked and worked on it and finally it
was published. It wasn't very well reviewed.
That was Down the Long Table. It had
enough history in it, I suppose. It was a
novel about the depression. It was a work of
fiction but it was written about things that a
lot of people don't know anything about now.
For the younger generation who has never
seen this sort of thing going on it's hard to
believe what Hastings street was like during
an unemployment demonstration where the
men were trying to get more than 20 cents
out of City Hall. Twenty cents a day for
working. That was what they were getting
paid. They had formed their own sort of nonunion union and elected delegates to go to
City Hall to see if they couldn't get a little
more. And they were thrown down the steps
and at the bottom there were Mounties
waiting tocrack skulls. I saw that and it was
in the novel.
So now the novel has become interesting
again as a record of these times. It has
survived; it has a certain justification now
but it isn't really regarded as a great work
and it never really was.
So I decided that I wasn't really a novelist
and I started writing plays. I wrote dozens of
radio plays and when television came in I
started writing for television. But by this
time I'd decided that I was more interested
in poetry. I got involved, of course, for a long
time, in completely different writing.
Between 1932 and 1940 I wrote almost
nothing but political things. I was a left-wing
Marxist and I wrote for Marxist journals.
PF: Didn't you once interview Trotsky
too?
Birney: Yes, I spent a week with Trotsky.
I have a part of a manuscript which I'm
trying to get finished. The conversation with
Trotsky is only one part of it. I wrote some
longish articles attempting to analyze the
politics of French Canada in the 1930s and
the economics of Canada. I also wrote a
number of articles when I was working for
the Canadian Forum, on the Canadian
literary scene. Of course in the 30s there
wasn't much of a Canadian literary scene at
the time but there were already established
writers like Morley Callaghan. There was
nobody coming up like today simply because
there was no money to publish things. Of
course it's changed now all for the better.
PF: You mentioned during the reading
that you were selling your own books
because your publisher wasn't distributing
them properly.
Birney: Publishers say that they can't
afford to do the job properly, at least that's
what my publisher says. Perhaps he is right.
Maybe one answer would be to be a
publisher, which would be pretty rough on
those of us who are trying to write and the
other, I guess, would be for them to get even
more subsidy than they get now. There is a
Canada Council subsidy to publishers who
are publishing Canadian material but
maybe it should be increased.
Or maybe less of the money should go into
the actual writing of the book and more into
improving the areas of distribution. It is an
expensive business, shipping heavy books
from Toronto to Vancouver. Maybe the
federal government should help to create
more publishing centres in Canada. In
Vancouver most of the publishing is done by
little presses, most of which have almost no
distribution into the rest of Canada. There
are hundreds of writers in this town and lots
of chapbooks being published. But the rest of
the country doesn't know about them
because they don't see them on their
bookstore shelves back in Toronto, Montreal
or even in Winnipeg. There's an awful lot of
regionalism still. And a lot of the material is
good enough to have national circulation.
The times are very disturbing now.
Everything seems to be heading toward
another depression and they'll be cutting
down on allocation of money to any cultural
area. Every aspect of culture seems to
suffer.
PF: The Canada Council is starting a new
program now where they're awarding two
writers in Canada,' one English and one
French-speaking, $16,000 for three years. Do
you think this is a good idea?
Birney: I don't think it is. No. I think that
my reaction to someone who was asking for
a recommendation from me would be, "No,
because I think that I should get it." It's'
very hard to say that out of all the writers in
Canada these two should be the ones to get
$16,000.
I found this out when I was working as a
member of the cultural sub-committee of
the Canada Council for three years. We had
masses of files down the long table there,
from dance companies, and dancers and
orchestras. And we were turned loose in
these files for three days and we had to come
out with recommendations. But always we
were reminded that there was one pie to cut.
We had exactly this amount of money and
we had to use our common sense about how
it was to be divided.
PF: Are you a member of the League of
Canadian Poets and the Canadian Writers'
Union?
Birney: Yes, I'm a founding member of
the League of Canadian Poets.
PF: So you're in favour of writers
organizing? Do you have any opinion on how
these organizations are functioning?
Birney: Well, I certainly wouldn't be here
today if it wasn't for the League. As far as
my reasons for agitating for the founding of
the League and being one of the founding
members, it was because I felt that the poets
in this country lacked status because they
didn't act as a body. They would be known
within the circle in which they could afford
to travel but they would be equally enjoyed
if the Ontario poets came out and read in
B.C. and vice versa. The extra money that
I felt that
the poets
in this country
lacked status
because they
didn't act as
a body.
would be needed for that sort of thing was a
lot and it needed to be /got from government
sources. The individual poet could never get
it and would never be able to push his own
case. What was needed was to push the case
of all the poets.
I pressed for a very loose organization in
which the only requirement would be that
the poet had published a book of poems. This
was refined a bit because there were other
people who had very different ideas from
mine.
But we got a mass organization and it has
led to a great deal of support from the
Canada Council. They have provided annual
meetings, which I think have been of great
benefit to the poets, in that they have been
able to afford, once a year, to meet each
other. Up until this time they didn't even
know each other. I also belong to the
Writers' Union, which was necessary to
found for the prose writers.
Politicians are nuts
By CHRIS GAINOR
When considering Peanuts and politics,
most people think of U.S. presidential
candidate Jimmy Carter.
But two years ago, smiling Jimmy was
unknown and the world's number one
Peanut politician was Vancouver's own Mr.
Peanut, who was seeking office as Mayor of
the City of Vancouver.
The Rise and Fall of the Peanut Party
By John Mitchell and Vincent Trasov
Air, $7.95 paperbound
Mr. Peanut, who in real life is artist
Vincent Trasov, garnered more corny
headlines and news stories than votes. But,
instead of disappearing into the dustbins of
history, Mr. Peanut's campaign is being
commemorated in a lighthearted and excellent book.
The main problem with the Rise and Fall
of the Peanut Party is that Mr. Peanut's
loyal fans are compelled to shell out $7.95 for
one of the 1,000 copies printed.
Most of the 80-page account of the craziest
civic campaign in Vancouver history is
taken up by photographs of Mr. Peanut,
sidekick, spokesman and co-author John
Mitchell, and the Peanettes, who helped the
campaign. There are also letters and
newspaper clippings relating to the campaign, plus a spare but perceptive text.
Inside his peanut shell under that top hat,
Mr. Peanut tap-danced his way into the
hearts of at least 2,685 voters. Two weeks
before election day, Vancouver's number
one nut was the feature attraction at a UBC
rally. This, according to Mr. Peanut, is what
happened: '
"A mob of 300 students had gathered in the
lecture hall. We took up positions behind a
large panel on the stage.
"George Puil (the civic Non-Partisan
Association mayoral candidate) started
another attack on (Mayor Art) Phillips with
more Reader's Digest observations on
welfare and crime. He blamed Mayor
Phillips for holding a permissive attitude,
MR. PEANUT . .
encouraging  single  male   unemployables,
denying them the gift of life.
"After Mr. Puil's television comments, I
introduced our platform with the captions P
for performance, E for elegance, A for art,
N for nonsense, U for uniqueness, and T for
talent, adding:
"The Peanut Party holds a deep respect
for the democratic system! We are not
entering the arena of politics to waste press
time. Boring repetitive rhetoric borrowed
from mediocre political theorecticians is'
like approaching the ideas of democracy on
one's hands and knees.
"By these standards, Mr. Peanut is the
only serious candidate for the mayor's
chair.
"We watched Tom Campbell riding
Wasserman's'mechanical horse' with spurs
and whips in true rodeo cowboy fashion. We
watched Art Phillips mount the computerized horse in smooth technocratic
style.
"Beneath the weight of a solid gold saddle,
even the finest horse can grow weary. Now
tap dances in SUB -marise savaria photo
we can watch Mr. Peanut leading a vibrant
city through the verdant pastures of a new
and exciting era."
The book documents well the press
reaction, which almost invariably centered
on the theme of a 'nut' running for mayor.
Trasov and his artist cohorts from the
Western Front collective were pointing out
with the campaign that politics and art are
closely connected, more so than epople
believe. They are right.
After two years as a reporter covering
politicians from lowly student politicos,
through the municipal, provincial and
federal variety, I can only agree with Mr.
Peanut's comment: "I'm sure people are as
ready for one nut as they are for the next."
And now its municipal election time in
Vancouver again. After watching the shady
dealings, temper tantrums and shenanigans
of the still-young campaign, I think it's too
bad Mr. Peanut isn't running again.
In a nutshell, he's the only one in that
whole crowd of nuts who is prepared to come
clean. I can't think of anyone else to vote for.
Friday,  October  8,   1976
THE
UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 7 VISTA
By RICHARD CURRIE
8 KEN TOBIAS will be appearing with Offenbach tonight
and tomorrow at the Old Roller
Rink in North Van; shows at 8:30
and 10:30, $4.
CENTRAL MUSEUM is continuing its two shows 'Aspects of
Realism' and 'Within the Potter's
House' daily from 10 till 5:30.
Films are shown in the auditorium.
For more information call 736-4431.
FRED BOOKER opens this
year's coffeehouse season at the
Lutheran Campus Centre. Show is
at 8:30'and costs $1.50.
WEST SIDE FEETWARMERS
will warm up the Hot Jazz Club.
Tomorrow night brings the APEX
JAZZ BAND; 36 E. Broadway.
Further  information  at  873-4131.
THE BIRDS, that Hitchcock
classic, is showing tonight at the
Vancouver East Cultural Centre
i VECC) 8:00 p.m., $1.25.
Tomorrow night Alfred whips up a
FRENZY.
RANK BEGINNINGS, Lynn
Hughes' earthenware and papier
maehe collection, as well as
drawings by Ann Kipling, plus the
Current Pursuits of 9 B.C. artists
may or may not overshadow the
Whole Message holography display
at   the   Vancouver   Art   Gallery.
JOE PLASKETT and Tom La
Pierre have their work at the
Burnaby Art Gallery. A health
collection of pastels, paintings,
prints and drawings.
GENTLEMAN'S AGREEMENT
directed by Elia Kazan (1948)
shows at 7:00 and 9:30 - 1155 W.
Georgia, $1.00
il BOYS OF THE LOUGH
traditional British music to grace
the QET - 8:00 - $5.00
GAY FILMS—IL MARE at
Pacific Cinematheque 7:00 and
9:15 p.m., 1155 W. Georgia, $1.00
1(1 FLUTE & PIANO music by
Jane Martin mellow out a Sunday
at the Burnaby Art Gallery 2:30,
free!
SUNDAY JAZZ at Oil Can's
presents Henry Young & quartet.
PAUL HANN, a cockney folkie,
is at the VECC 8:30 p.m. - $3.
11 SONNY ROLLINS jazz legend
at Oil Can's thru till Oct. 14.
CLASSIC FILMS at the Burnaby
Arts Centre screens "The Best
Years of Our Lives" and "The
Philadelphia Story". They are at
VANCOUVER
INSTITUTE
lectures
PROF. HAROLD
EDGERTON
Massachusetts Institute
of Technology
Prof. Edgerton, inventor of the
stroboscopic camera for
underwater photography, has
taken part in American
expeditions to photograph the
fabled Loch Ness monster.
USE OF ELECTRICAL
METHODS FOR
UNDERWATER DISCOVERY
- INCLUDING THE LOCH
NESS MONSTER ,
SATURDAY, OCT. 9
Vancouver institute
lectures take place on
Saturdays at 8:15 p.m.
on the ubc campus
in lecture hall no. 2
instructional resources
centre
admission to the qenera
the James Cowan Theatre 8:00
p.m. and only $1.50.
McCABE & MRS. MILLER
which was filmed locally a few
years back by Robert Altman, is
showing tonight only at the VECC
8:00 p.m.
12 RONNIE HAWKINS and Paul
Hannput in their stint till Oct. 16 at
the Old Roller Rink 986-1331.
13 CARTOONS & CLAMPETT
cartoons from the 30's and 40's with
rather interesting themes...iron
lungs, Hitler's bombers, Elmer
and Bugs in old age. 1155 W.
Georgia, $1.00, 7:00, 9:00 & 11:00
p.m.
VASLAV NIJINSKY'S life story:
a legend in ballet at the BECC
showtimes at 8:30 p.m. Admission
varies as to what night you attend.
So give them a call 254-9578.
14 HOT CLUB at the Hot Jazz
Club, 36 E. Broadway to keep your
toes and ears warm.
HAWKS AND SPARROWS post
war Italianfilm (Pasolini 1965) one
in a series of films at Pacific
Cinematheque, 1155 W. Georgia $1.
BALLET DE MARSEILLES
with Karin Kane music by Pink
Floyd, Pas De Deux, Carmen
opens at the QET 8:30 tonight to
Sat.
Remember, if you think you have
any info that should appear in this
column pleez send it in! (by Tues.
afternoon).
THE OLD ROLLER RINK
Theatre Restaurant
135 West 1st St., North Van.
986-1331
Friday and Saturday
Ken Tobias
Admission $2.00
COMING NEXT WEEK:
Ronnie
Hawkins
October 12-16
This coupon worth $1.00 off
Admission any Tues., Wed. and
Thurs.
k    Valid until October 21, 1976
FREESEE
Sponsored by the
Office of the Dean of Women
with the support of
The Leon and Thea Koerner Foundation
Presents Sir Kenneth Clark's
CIVILISATION
Seven films will be shown in the first term, every
Wednesday, Oct. 13 - Nov. 24, 1976. Dates for the
six remaining films will be announced in January.
Sub Auditorium
Oct. 13 — Nov. 24
Every Wed.
12:35 p.m.
All Students, Faculty and Staff are invited.
FREE FREE
i
Our finest actors
weren't allowed to act
Our best writers
weren't allowed to write.
Our funniest comedians
weren't allowed to make
us laugh.
What would it be like if
there were such a list?
It would be like America in 1953.
COLUMBIA PICTURES PRESENTS A MARTIN RITT • JACK ROLLINS • CHARLES H. JOFFE PRODUCTION
III
.wu. ALLEN ."THE FRONT"
with ZEROMOSTEL    HERSCHEL BERNARDI
MICHAEL MURPHY, ANDREA MARCOVICCI • WRITTEN BY WALTER BERNSTEIN
EXECUTIVE PRODUCER CHARLES H. JOFFE • PRODUCED & DIRECTED BY MARTIN RITT • A PERSKY-BRIGHT/DEVON FEATURE
PG rMENTU GHUMCE SUGGESTED «B»
SOW Milium HAY K01  et SUIU8LE f0« PHI UftMGlRS
Odeon
oiJi  GRANVILLE     jTime:   12:25,2:20,4:15,6:05,8:10
6 8 2-746 8        ISunday starts at 2:20
New West
OOEON
333 - 6th   St.
322-7626 7:30-9:30
Page Friday, 8
THE        UBYSSEY
Friday,  October  8,   1976 Friday, October 8,  1976
THE
UBYSSEY
Page 15
Grid fight Saturday
Female athletes
look for money
rugby
trip
The women's athletic committee
will decide Tuesday whether to ask
the Alma Mater Society to allot
them more money for women's
sports.
The committee, if they do want
to ask for moremoney for women's
sports—and it seems likely—will
have two options. They can ask
that the percentage of the current
$5 athletic fee going to women's
sports be increased, and they can
ask that the athletic fee be increased to give women more
money.
All students currently pay a $5
UBG
ends
with win
The Thunderbird rugby team
capped off its six game tour of
Japan Sunday with a 31-10 victory
over the all-Japan selects.
UBC wound up with a 5-1 record
and its position as a world
university rugby power intact.
Queens University of Ireland, one
of the very top university sides,
recently eked out a narrow 13-6 win
over the same all-Japan side.
In Tokyo Sunday UBC got off to a
slowstart, David Whyte's try in the
ninth minute being their only tally
in the first half. The Japanese hit
on two penalty kicks to lead, 6-4.
But the 'Birds broke things loose
in the second half. Whyte started it
with a second try in the first
minute. Rob Greig then scored a
pair of tries. Graham Taylor and
diminutive scrum-half Preston
Wiley each added one. Wiley was
also good on a penalty goal and a
convert.
On September 29 UBC smothered
the Kobe Steel Co. side 26-4.
Its only loss of the tour came at
the hands of the All-Kyushu
selects, as they bowed 26-15.
The third win was a come-from-
behind effort as the 'Birds clubbed
the all-Japan industrial team 29-10.
The hosts had forged an 11-7 first
half lead. In that game it was the
foot of Wiley that led the way as he
connected on three penalty goals
and two converts. He added a try to
total 17 points.
Hook Larry Chung picked up two
tries and Doug Harvey chipped in
one.
UBC's second win was a 59-17
whitewash over a local all-star side
in Akita.
UBC opened its tour with a 37-21
win over the. All-Waseda
University squad 37-21 before a
crowd of 35,000.
The 'Birds returned to Vancouver Tuesday and will have little
rest before they commence their
regular season. The first important
quest for them will be the defense
of their Canada West title.
Come spring UBC will be out to
defend the other two titles they
picked up last year—the Pacific
Northwest Intercollegiate
Championship and the World Cup.
Big pr Small Jobs
ALSO GARAGES
BASEMENTS
& YARDS
732-9898
CLEAN-UP
per year athletic fee, of which $4.20
goes to men's athletics and only 80
cents to women's athletics.
A request by the women's
athletic committee for a fee increase would have to be passed by
students in a referendum.
The last such referendum was in
1969 when both men's and women's
athletics wanted to raise the
athletic fee to $10. That failed to
receive the necessary two-thirds
majority and failed.
Women's athletics have been
receiving only 80 cents a year per
student since 1950, when there
were only 5,000 students on campus, and only a small percentage of
them were women.
At that time women's teams
played in city leagues and other
local competition. The program
was inexpensive because few
women were active in sports and
there was little travelling.
The administration pays more
than 50 per cent of the women's
athletic budget, and less than 50
per .cent of the men's athletic
budget.
Saturday the UBC Thunderbirds
play the biggest game they've had
in more than io years—for them it
is the first of many such games but
for their opponents, the University
of Saskatchewan, it is a do or die
game.
The game, at Thunderbird
Stadium, starts at 2 p.m.
The Huskies have dropped two
games already this year. The
University of Calgary Dinosaurs
had little problem with them in the
second week of the season.
Last week the University of
Manitoba Bisons upset them in the
first game of a home-and-home
series. If they are going to keep
their first place hopes alive the
Huskies will have to win all their
remaining games.
A team might be able to take
three losses and wind up in second
place, but would forfeit the home
field advantage in the playoffs.
Saskatchewan and Calgary both
hold down 3-2 records, a half-game
behind the 'Birds, who have a 3-1
record.
UBC meets each of the other
contenders once more this season,
both encounters are at home. Thus
the fate of the 'Birds' drive for
their first-ever WIFL championship is in their own hands.
While a loss won't be fatal to the
'Bird cause it will force them to win
at least one of their remaining road
games. These will be in Edmonton
and Winnipeg.
Arts S.R.A. Rep.
BY-ELECTIONS
Wed., Oct. 13, 1976
Polls in Buch & Sedge
9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
All-Candidates Meeting Oct. 8, 1976
Buch 100 at 12:30
CAREERS
Public Service Canada
The Federal Public Service is now recruiting
graduates of '77 for careers in the following
areas:
ADMINISTRATION
PURE SCIENCES
APPLIED SCIENCES
HEALTH SCIENCES
SOCIAL-ECONOMIC SCIENCES
Career Information and application forms are
available at your campus student placement
office and regional staffing offices of the
Public Service Commission.
Applications must be postmarked no later than
MIDNIGHT, October 14, 1976.
GENERAL EXAM: October 19, 1976 at 7:00 p.m.
for applicants to the following occupational
groups: Administrative services (AS), commerce
(CO), customs inspector trainee (CAE),
financial administration CFI), information
services (IS), organization and methods (OM),
personnel administration (PE), program Administration (PM), and purchasing and supply (PG).
FOREIGN SERVICE EXAM: October 16, 1976 at
9:00 a.m. foe applicants to the foreign service
(FS) occupational group.
These competitions are open to both men
and women.
Public Service
Canada
Fonction publique
Canada
UBC recorded home victories
over both those teams in the first
half of the season but a sweep of
the games on the road is a different
matter.
UBC coach Frank Smith anticipates the Huskies being up for
the game but should have little
problem getting his charges ready.
The Tiirds dropped their second
game of the season last week in
Bellingham. The Western
Washington State Vikings edged
them 26-24, in a game the 'Birds
thought they should have won.
A little righteous indignation
goes a long way in getting a team
riled up.
The two teams met in the season
opener and the Huskies snuck
away with a 21-20 decision. A Greg
Gardiner-engineered final quarter
rally had been good for 17 points
but not the game.
Since that time Gardiner has
come in late in the game to lead
comeback rallies in helping the
Birds  post  their   three  league
victories.
At press time Smith was still
vacillating between the triple
option running Gardiner and the
dropback passing Dan Smith as his
starting signal caller.
In addition to a potent passing
attack the 'Birds have had their
ground game jell in the last two
games. Fullback Gord Penn and
running mate Glen Wallace have
each been totalling a minimum 130
yards per game.
The Huskies also boast a
balanced attack. Quarterback
Barry Fraser led the league in
passing last year. He has been
hitting receivers Ted Dilinski, Bill
Bowd, and Brian Utley with
dreadful consistency this year.
Gene Wall and Jim Minz supply
Saskatchewan with a respectable
ground game.
In the other WIFL games
Manitoba meets Calgary tonight.
The Co-operative
Christian Campus Ministry
U.B.C. Lutheran Campus Centre
5885 University Blvd.,/Vancouver, B.C./V6T 1K7
Ph. 224-3722
INVITES YOU TO TAKE PART IN ITS ACTIVITIES:
RETREAT:     OCT. 15 to 17
at Point Roberts
'TEACH   ME TO DANCE"
with the film Zorba and Rick Coe UBC English Dept.
vrunv rvniipc.   Science and Re,'9ion
,,gul   VlWUra.    Women and ReHgion (women only)
Men: who are we?
Process Theology
Bible Study
Worship — Mon. noons in chapel Eucharist
WED. NIGHT - Pot lucks at 5:30 Campus Centre
the centre is open for study —
come by the coffee is on! I!
THREE FREE LECTURES
By
HAROLD EDGERTON
Dr. Edgerton, a professor of electrical engineering at
the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, is known
wherever oceanography is practiced and is regarded as
the "father" of underwater photography. He returned
recently from an expedition to search for the Loch Ness
monster in Scotland.
Dr. Edgerton is at UBC as a Cecil H. and Ida Green
Visiting Professor and will speak publicly three times.
All of his lectures will be in Lecture Hall 2 of the
Woodward Instructional Resources Centre.
SATURDAY, Oct. 9, 8:15 p.m.
'Use of Electrical Methods for Underwater Discovery
including the Loch Ness Monster'
TUESDAY, Oct. 12, 12:30 p.m.
'The    Electronic    Flash    and    its    Applications    in
Engineering and Science'-
THURSDAY, Oct. 14, 12:30 p.m.
'Underwater   Research  Using High-Speed Photography
and Other Techniques' Page 16
THE
UBYSSEY
Friday,  October  8,   X976
n&s
SALE!
ID
WE'RE SELLING MORE HI-FIDELITY STEREO COMPONENTS AND RECORDS THAN EVER BEFORE! AT OUR LOWEST PRICES EVER!
OVER 40 TOP QUALITY AUDIO MANUFACTURERS'
GEAR NOW ON SALE AT UNBELIEVABLE SAVINGS!
ENJOY GREAT MUSIC TONIGHT!
O YAMAHA
FIVE YEAR PARTS
AND LABOUR
WARRANTY
O YAMAHA
YP-450
Modern styling goes hand-in-hand with Top
Performance in this Belt Drive Manual Turntable. Professional S-shaped Tonearm is a
pleasure to operate. Base & Hinged Cover
are included.
NOW ONLY
©YAMAHA
YP-701
An Outstanding Single Play, Belt Drive
Manual Turntable with automatic
tonearm return. Very sophisticated
tonearm matches its understated
good looks and top performance.
NOW ONLY
219,s
VENTURI FORMULA 2
A highly accurate'medium priced
system. Features an 8" woofer
with the VENTURI principle which
improves bass response. Horn
loaded midrange and tweeter give
improved dispersion. A Super
Sound ONLY eo.
VENTURI FORMULA 4
So efficient you can fill large
rooms with even low powered
amps. A 10" woofer give you
remarkable bass. The BICO-
NEX horn for midrange and
the tweeter for the highs have
been praised for their definition
and accuracy. NOW ONLY
 ea.
1399S
1899S
(©YAMAHA
lfcv^-v'^'%"^^i*W^>£^w^
*,.*».
CR-200
YAMAHA'S newest AM/FM stereo receiver has
15+15 watts RMS per channel and distortion under
0.5% as well as crystal clear FM. A great choice for a
small room with efficient speakers. NOW ONLY
22y5
-jug™ DREAMBOAT ANNIE $3.99
PRESENTS
HEART
[Qjway |Qafl% jQJw^
HAGOOD HARDY
Maybe Tomorrow
includes:
MISSOURI BREAKS
SECOND WIND
SEND IN THE CLOWNS
"MAYBE TOMORROW"
HAGOOD HARDY
Includes the Love Theme
from Missouri Breaks
AVAILABLE NOW AT
A&B SOUND
ONLY
$0.99
A FIFTH OF BEETHOVEN
WALTER MURPHY BAND
LOVE TRILOGY — DONNA SUMMER
MORE, MORE, MORE— ANDREA TRUE
CONNECTION
MOONLIGHT FEELS R IGHT — STARBUCK
DESTROYER — KISS
HIT THE ROAD — STAMPEDERS
YOU ARE EVERYTHING I NEED
— LARRY SANTOS
RCJI   ItC/l   ItC/l   RCA
PART 3 - KC &
THE SUNSHINE BAND
NEVER GONNA LET YOU GO —
VICKY SUE ROBINSON
BIGGER THAN BOTH OF US—
DARYL HALL & JOHN OATES
SPITFIRE— JEFFERSON STARSHIP
CHANGES ONE (BEST OF) — DAVID BOWIE
ARE YOU  READY FOR THE COUNTRY
— WAYLON JENNINGS
STARLAND VOCAL BAND
DARYL HALL & JOHN OATES
SPIRIT — JOHN DENVER
MISTY BLUE— DOROTHY MOORE
tt.MV
sound
156 Sapor Dowrtmra      682-6144

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0126790/manifest

Comment

Related Items