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The Ubyssey Mar 24, 1964

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Array These are
Ross Munro
ears
im U8YSSEY
place them
against1 the
nearest door
Vol. XLVI, No. 68
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, MARCH 24,  1964
48 CA 4-3916
In wage increases
Profs seek $1,000 hike
LOFFMARK AND REPORTER BOLTON
Another cabinet car problem
—don hume photo
. a political dilemma
Loffmark uses old Dodge
in  B.C.'s high  politics
By MIKE BOLTON
How could a man who has
just been appointed to the
provincial cabinet have a problem?
Now, appointee Professor
Ralph Loffmark has.
Loffmark's dilemma: to buy
or not to buy a new car.
He drives a shabby 1948
faded blue Dodge.
The original engine has
lasted 240,000 miles.
"I'm afraid of what the reaction will be when I park it
among all the shiny new cars
in front of the legislature
buildings," he said Monday.
"But it will look like a
strictly political action if I
buy a new one now," he said.
He recalled the unfavourable press Highways Minister
Gaglardi received after reports that he was getting a
new car.
Loffmark's car is a stock
joke in the Commerce Department.
"I often start off a lecture
in Commercial Law by offering my car for sale for $500.
But I usually end up asking
for $50," he said.
Loffmark became Minister
of Industrial Develo p m e n t,
Trade and Commerce in Premier Bennett's cabinet shuffle
las Friday night.
He has a leave of absence
from UBC beginning on the
date of his appointment.
His students will not suffer
from his appointment.
"I'm giving top priority to
my students," he said.
"I will make sure my students are properly examined
and graded. I'm going to make
myself wait for anyone writing a thesis."
Loffmark plans to return to
the university.
"My intention is to maintain my contacts with the university by extended leave of
absence," he said.
"My first affection is my
vocation as a professor.
"I would never hold myself out as a friend of UBC
against the other two universities. All three universities
must work together and
should not think their future
development depends on a
pipeline to the government."
Boosts total
$1.3 million
By MIKE VAUX
UBC Faculty Association is demanding
of at least $1,000 a faculty member from the
Ubyssey learned Monday.
The association approved the demands
a meeting March 5.
The increases, if granted by
the Board of Governors, will
cost the university more than
$1.3 million.
The Ubyssey learned that
the Faculty Association motion
said:
salary increases
university, The
unanimously at
•   •
want
Ubyssey stops the press
after Thursdays hot news
The last issue of The Ubyssey for this year will appear
sometime Thursday, March 26.
All student groups wishing to put notices in the final
edition should bring them to The Ubyssey office by noon
Wednesday.
The paper will again appear as the graduation edition
in May. Then it will be continued in September in the
grand old style.
"Whereas the Board of
Governors has repeatedly indicated its intention of main-
taing a salary scale at least
as high as that at any other
Canadian university, and within the same period:
"And whereas the information presented in the salary
brief of the Faculty Association shows that the present gap
paid here and at the University of Toronto is $900, and
even larger gaps exist between
UBC and several other Canadian universities with respect
to average salaries of various
academic ranks,
"And whereas the university
administration has stated that
this year it has received in
full the operating grant it requested from the provincial
government, in addition to
which it has imposed a substantial increase in student
fees,
"Therefore be it resolved!
that this association instruct
its executive to urge the president and the Board of Governors in the strongest possible
terms:
"1) To allot funds for salary
increases at this university
during the coming fiscal year
sufficient to raise the average
salary level at least $1,000;
"2) To procure the necessary
information to plan next year's
and future budgetary requirements so as to meet the board's
objective of maintaining parity
with the highest salary scales
at other leading universities."
Faculty Association president Fritz Bowers confirmed
The Ubyssey's information.
He said the association
would have preferred to have
the demands kept secret.
But he said the Faculty Association considers it imperative that salaries rise at least
to a level comparable with
other universities.
"If they don't, we will have
a lot of trouble recruiting and
holding on to capable people,"
he said.
About 750 of the 1,000 faculty members at UBC belong to
the association.
(Continued on Page 2)
SEE: MONEY
Profs
their men
on board
By MIKE VAUX
Proposals to give the Faculty
Association at least one-third
representation on the UBC
Board of Governors will be
discussed in a study financed
by the Ford Foundation next
month.
The study, designed to discuss reforms in university government will be conducted by
Sir James Montford of the
Ford Foundation from May
21 to 28.
• •   •
The study  is   sponsored by
the Canadian Universities
Foundation and the Canadian
Association of University
Teachers.
Among the proposals to be
considered is a report submitted by the UBC Faculty Association which recommends
the faculty be given at least
one third of the seats on the
board, but not more than one
half of the seats.
At present, members of the
faculty are not permitted to sit
on the board. (There are 11
members on the board, including the president and chancellor—ex-officio. Three members
are elected by the UBC Senate;
the rest by the B.C. cabinet)
• •   •
The report also recommends
that the senate be made up entirely of members of the academic community.
"Complex academic questions are best decided by academic people, while broad
questions of university policy
in relation to the community
are best decided by a mixed
group of academic and lay
people," the report says.
The Ubyssey learned of the
report Monday. Its existence
was later confirmed by faculty members.
(Continued on Page 2)
SEE:  FACULTY
GREAT SCOTT
BOWS OUT
See Pages 6, 7 Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March  24,  1964
Oddballs
Group asks
Ponderosa
for study
A petition is being circulated by the RGGU seeking the
use of the north half of the
Ponderosa for study purposes.
More than 375 students have
signed   the   petition.
Jerry Cormick, president of
the RGGU, an organization of
oddballs, said that there is
room for 200 students to study
under the excellent lighting in
the Ponderosa during the
hours when it is not used, but
the dietitian in charge will not
allow it.
Miss Dorris Shup, Dietitian
said the area is for food service
and not study, and that lighting would cost too much.
About 20 students have been
studying in the north section
using light from the windows,
in the off-hours.
At times they have turned
the lights on themselves but
the dietitian turns them off.
Cormick said that the cost
of lighting is negligible and
would only cost about 50 cents
a day.
"With study facilities on
campus limited, especially at
exam time, this space should
be made available," said Cormick. "We would like to have
it available all year, if possible."
The petition asks to have the
Ponderosa open for study for
three hours in the morning and
afternoon.
MONEY
(Continued from Page One)
University president Dr.
John Macdonald told The Ubyssey through his secretary that
he would not comment on the
faculty wage demands.
The Ubyssey learned, however, that the Board of Governors was presented with the
wage proposals by two faculty
members against the wishes of
the president.
Macdonald is reported to
have told the association that
the meeting with the Board of
Governors did not help him or
the faculty members.
In addition to the $1,000 increase, the association asked
for annual increase in pay to
maintain parity with the highest salary scale at other Canadian universities.
AGRICULTURE dean      Dr.
Blythe     Eagles will     chair
symposium     on animal
science April 4.
Job scene
looks good
for grads
Graduates in all faculties
have good prospects for jobs
this year, student employment
officer Miles Hacking said
Monday.
During the past few weeks,
204 firms and 41 school boards
have visited campus and have
conducted 7,200 interviews
with students in co-operation
with the student employment
service.
• •    •
About 30 per cent of these
were for undergraduates for
summer work in the East and
locally.
About 1,400 grads, including
teachers, will be seeking work
after the end of the term.
Hacking said that high rates
of placement had been recorded for grads in applied science
and commerce, but opportunities in all faculties were generally very good this year.
• •    *
Business has been brisk for
the 130 arts grads so far registered with the office, he said.
"There had been no racial
discriminations as yet," said
Hacking.
Prospects also look good for
summer work, he said. More
than 2,000 students registered
with the employment service.
Oh yawn
VICTORIA (CUP)—Victoria
College paper, The Martlet, ran
a full-page story on the life of
the paper and its staff.
At the end of the one page
filler it was mentioned that
Chuck LaVertu was the new
Editor-in-Chief.
Intrepid presidents riled
at pennies that are filed
The get-rich-quick kids are back again.
Students have been filing pennies down to the size of
dimes and stuffing the Brock Hall candy bar machines
with them.
AMS president Malcolm Scott said, "It would take
the jerk half an hour to file one penny.
"And then the penny usually jams the machine, and
the stupid clot louses up everything for all those coming
behind him," he said.
President-elect Roger McAfee said, "Any student I
catch filing pennies will be sent to the faculty council."
Hunger and wedding bells
get best of Ward's fast
By JOAN GODSELL
Jim Ward has given up his
fast so he can get married.
Ward, who has been fasting
for 15 days to raise money for
a school in Bechuanaland,
gave up his fast Monday night
because of his approaching
wedding and because of his
work with Canadian University  Service Overseas.
He said, "I want to build up
my strength for these two
events and also for exams."
Ward weighs only 110
pounds.
He says he is extremely
weak after the fast.
Ward and his future wife
have both received CUSO appointments.
They will marry in May
and leave for either Tanganyika or Ceylon in the fall.
Ward will take a position in
adult agriculture education.
His fiance will work as a
nurse.
Ward said he was extremely grateful for the publicity
given to the campaign.
"I hope people will continue their support until the goal
FACULTY
(Continued   from   Page one)
Fa c u 11 y Association President Fritz Bowers said he
thought the report should not
be published because it has no
official status at the moment.
Bowers said the report was
compiled by members of the
Faculty Association's Committee on faculty participation in
university government.
The report recommends that
faculty members of the Board
of Governors be elected by
joint faculties, and that deans
of faculties should not be eligible for membership on the
board.
The report suggests that for
the period until the necessary
changes can be made to The
Universities Act (1963) the
senate should designate three
of its faculty members to act
as observers at board meetings.
"Faculty members of the
board should truly represent
the faculty, without being responsible to it as its delegates,
and ought to be chosen by the
administration or other special
groups."
UBC President John Macdonald refused to comment on
the report or its recommendations.
For
QUALITY and COMFORT in
Contact1 Lenses
At a Reasonable Price
SEE
LAWRENCE
CALVERT
705 Birks Bldg. MU 3-1816
9:30-5:30  p.m.—(Saturday 'til noon)
Flighty fashions
bug college shop
Women's fleeting fancies
make stocking stylish fashions risky fo rthe College
Shop.
College Shop manager
Mike Sommers said, "women's styles are changing
every week, and no one will
let us sell on consignment."
Sommers was re-appointed
Monday as College Shop
manager for 64-65.
of $7,100 has been reached,"
he said.
Donations are still coming
in. Alpha Omicron Pi Sorority donated $65 to Pilikwe instead of having their traditional  Chinese food banquet.
Judi Smith, social chairman
of the sorority, said, "We
don't need Chinese food as
much as those children need
the money."
Public donations are still
coming, too. A Vancouver resident sent in a cheque because
he said, "My wife couldn't
get it off her mind."
The drive for Pilikwe will
continue this week.
DIETITIANS
WANTED
by the
Royal Canadian Air Force
DIETETIC INTERNSHIP PLAN
An RCAF sponsored diatetic internship is available to students graduating in Home Economics and majoring in
Foods and Nutrition. This plan includes either Commercial
or Hospital intern training. Successful candidates will be
enrolled in the rank of Flying Officer and granted a 4-
year Short Service Commission. Starting annual salary
is $5052. In addition a gratuity of one month's pay and
allowances is given on release for each completed year
of service (Eg. $1684 upon completion of four years of
service).
PROFESSIONAL DIETITIAN
Dietitians qualified for membership in the Canadian
Dietetic Association are eligible for enrolment in the Food
Services Branch on a minimum 2-year Short Service Commission with the rank of Flying Officer.
A qualified Dietitian who accepts a Permanent Commission and who has over two and one half years of suitable civilian experience will be promoted to the rank
of Flight Lieutenant after six months of service with the
RCAF. Annual salary for Flight Lieutenant rank is $6276.
RCAF Recruiting  Unit,  CAFRC,
545 Seymour St., Vancouver 2, B.C., MU 4-7577
Please mail without obligation, details on  the career of
Food Services Officer in the RCAF.
NAME _
STREET .
COURSE
AGE.
CITY
YEAR. Tuesday,  March  24,  1964
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  3
GEORGE AND  NAVIGATOR .  .  . driving blind
—don  hume  photo
Residences
shuffle,
try again
UBC residences are trying
to make it third time lucky.
Three years ago residence
activities were co-ordinated by
Inter-residence council. It was
abolished a year later and
University Residences Association set up.
Thursday, URA was abolished and a new Inter-Residence Council Association
established instead.
IRCA president D e r r i 1
Thomas, Engineering III, said
Monday the new arrangement
is an attempt to organize residence activities on a more efficient basis.
It is to be an association of
members of the various residences.
Resident students will be
represented only through their
residence councils.
The new IRCA constitution
was approved by representatives  of  residence councils.
David Rowett, a Fort Camp
resident for six years, charged
Monday the move was taken
without the knowledge or consent of URA members.
He said the move has "in
one fell swoop disenfranchised
some 2,000 members of URA
whether they like it or not."
Thomas said the resident students will get adequate representation through their own
councils.
He said students at residence
meetings had given their executives the power to abolish
URA.
AMS president Malcolm
Scott said Monday the matter
was not discussed at the Fort
or Lower Mall general meetings.
Acadia camp has not yet
held its spring general meeting.
IRCA will have no representatives  on  AMS  council.
The URA bank account of
about $98 has been moved from
the AMS to the new IRCA account at the Bank of Montreal.
Rally in Braille
Blind pilot shows
George the way
By GEORGE RAILTON
A 10-year-old blind boy guided my sports car to a second-place finish in a car rally Saturday.
Bill Genest, reading from a
set of instructions printed in
Braille, directed me expertly
over a 60 - mile back - roads
course. We collected only five
penalty points.
Bill was one of 18 students
from the Jericho High School
for the Blind who joined with
the UBC Sports Car Club and
the Royal City Sports Car Club
to put on the rally.
The Braille Rally was won
by Darline Dyck in Hector
MacDonald's Triumph, beating
us by one point.
Kim Cote came third with
six points in Craig Basset's car.
As I warmed up the car at
the starting line outside the
UBC Armory, Bill gave me the
first instructions that would
take us around Southwest Marine Drive and over the Oak
Street Bridge.
We picked up our first
points at the south dike of Lulu Island, where we arrived a
minute early.
The other points were lost
at other check points on the
island before we returned to
Vancouver and Stanley Park.
Trophies were given to the
top four navigators during a
picnic at the finish line at
Brocton Point.
At the announcement of the
winners, screams of "Protest"
were shouted by well-coaxed
navigators.
One of the Royal City drivers commented he and his navigator would make a great rally
team.
"I wouldn't be able to read
and complain about the instructions and he couldn't complain
about my route-finding!"
Questionnaires
trickle back
About 300 questionnaires
for the AMS survey of student means have been completed and returned.
About 1,400 questionnaires
were mailed to students last
week, in an effort to find out
how well students are
equipped to pay for university education.
The survey was begun following the announcement of
a $50 fee increase early this
year.
They ruin studies
Girls in dorms
not necessary'
By AL DONALD
Fort Camp men are not enthusiastic about girls.
At least, not about girls in
the men's dormitories.
"What's the use," said one
of them Monday, when asked
what he thought about the
open dorm policy. "The only
advantage would be for immoral purposes.
•    •    •
"What's the use of having
girls walking around," he went
on. "It cuts down on your
freedom."
Most men interviewed said
they wouldn't mind an open
dorm policy, but that it wasn't
really necessary.
"If I wanted to bring a girl
in here I don't think anyone
would catch me," said Colin
Perry, Engineering II.
"Anyway, they'd ruin
studies."
The girl residents of Fort
Camp expressed a different attitude.
•   •    •
"It's a great idea," said
Louise Pope of Mary Bollert
Hall. "But there should be
some limits on it. None of this
overnight bit.
"There would be nothing
wrong with it." said a co-ed
who refused to be identified.
"Except that I run around with
nothing on."
She explained that if men
were allowed in the dorms, she
would put something on.
Peace group
spends Easter
in March
An Easter parade with a difference will be held Saturday.
It is the annual Easter peace
march and rally sponsored by
eight local peace groups, including the campus Combined
Universities Campaign for
Nuclear Disarmament.
Marchers will assemble at
12:30 p.m. at Burrard and
Georgia and march along Granville to Hastings, then along
Hastings to Main.
Following the march a rally
will be held at Ceperly Park
near Second Beach.
Bomb boob
OTTAWA (CUP) —The library at Carleton University was
evacuated recently when a
crank phoned to say a bomb
was in the building. No bomb
was found.
Bitter Ash
bared again
on campus
Bitter Ash has crawled back
out of the can.
The controversial movie, produced by UBC student Larry
Kent, will be shown on campus Wednesday.
It has just returned from
showings at Carleton and McGill Universities and Victoria
College.
It was banned at most universities.
"We had it lined up for
eight universities, but we were
only allowed to show it at the
three," said Kent.
He said the film has so far
made $100 profit.
"We are trying to make some
money out of the Wednesday
showings," he said.
The movie will be shown in
the Auditorium at 12:30, 3:30,
6:30 and 8 p.m. Admission is
75 cents.
FOR SALE — 19-0 Hillman sedan
licensed, has passed city inspection, is in good running condition.
This well-kept second car has
only 63,000 miles. Prices at $125.
ihone AM  1-7346.
THE FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
presents
THE    ESCAPE    ARTIST
Premiere of Exciting New Play
"Terrifying Farce"— Theatre of the Absurd
by
DONALD SOULE
MARCH 27-28, APRIL 1-4, 8:30 P.M.
Tickets:  $2.00
Student Performance 75c
MARCH 31, 7:30 P.M.
BOX   OFFICE:   Room   207,   Frederic  Wood   Theatre
PHONE: 224-1111, Local 796;
Performance Nights: 224-1132
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Available THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial opinions
expressed are those of the editor and not necessarily those of the AMS
or the University. Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office, CA
4-3242,   Loc.   26.   Member   Canadian   University   Press.
NEWS ITEM: Profs ask higher salaries
Authorized     as     second-class    mail    by     Post
Ottawa,  and for payment of postage in cash.
Office    Department,
Winner 1963-64 Canadian University Press trophies for
general excellence and editorial writing.
TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 1964
The big squeeze
The dramatic request by UBC's professors for an
across-the-board salary increase of at least $1,000 has
been in the offing for a number of years.
In the last several years particularly, we have read
many stories about the brain drain to the U.S., about
how professors' salaries here are lagging dangerously
behind those in other Canadian universities. And we've
seen the results of the squeeze on the purse-strings—
handfuls of top UBC teachers have left for supposedly
greener pastures, and grumblings of dissatisfaction have
ruffled the ranks.
One of the consequences of the drastic cutback in
the 1963-64 operating grant was a moratorium on many
routine salary increases, with the result that UBC has
fallen even farther behind its expressed desire to pay
at least as well as other top Canadian universities.
The Faculty Association report states that the average salary here is $900 below that at the University of
Toronto, and lower still than that at other Canadian
schools. The UBC professors' demands are therefore not
out of line, considering the administration's expressed
desire to maintain salaries here equal to the average at
Canada's top institutions.
The professors point also to the fact that UBC this
year received its full operating grant from the government, and on top of this will reap $1.6 million from the
student fee raise.
It would of course be foolish to assume that the
administration is deliberately cold-shouldering the
faculty demands. With the current pressure of expansion and competition with Simon Fraser and Victoria,
the administration is in a sympathetic, but rather difficult position.
The size and strength of the Faculty Association's
demands serves to emphasize only too well the gravity
of higher education's plight, and the urgency with which
solutions must be found here at UBC.
All thumbs
We're glad to see the authorities are finally going
to do something about hitchhikers on University Boulevard—they're going to build a zone at each end where
the plague of the campus can stand and stick their
thumbs out.
We Ihope the zones are placed as far back from the
roadway as possible, so those of us who despise this
rude and selfish breed can pass by without getting bloodstains on our fenders or splashing mud over the scowling
freeloaders.
The hitchhiker has to be the most inconsiderate type
we know. He feels it is the duty of every car-owner to
screech to a halt, and taxi him to his destination in high
style. Not only does he never think of paying you a cent
for the gas, oil, insurance, and other costs you've got to
bear, but he butts his cigarette all over your seat.
And the sneers he gives you when you pass him by!
We'd like to know how many hitchhikers would
think about paying half the fine if a driver were caught
in a radar trap—or what he'd do if you got in an accident.
Ask the next chap you pick up. And when you're
through, hold your hand out for a tip.
We'll bet all he'll do is thumb his nose.
v %, <»s~<- *#/• - *r?^i?yt%'
i   -'%
EDITOR:
Associate __
News
Managing ...
City    ._    _
Phoio    	
Critics .-
Sports  .    _
Mike Hunter
. Keith Bradbury
__    Dave Ablett
George Railton
_ Mike Horsey
Don Hume
_  _      Ron Riter
Denis  Stanley
Asst. City       Richard Simeon
Asst. News _  _ Tim Padmore
Senior Maureen Covell
Senior. Donna  Morris
Mike Bolton, Mike Vaux, Lorraine
Shore, Al Donald, John Kelsey,
Norm Betts, Linda Morrison, Tom
Wayman,   Don  Hull,   Joan  Godsell.
I told my students I was thinking of going on strike and they gave me a standing ovation.
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
On a pedestal
Editor. The Ubyssey:
I feel that I must comment
on your editorial about woman's place in the world today. I agree with you that
this world has suffered from
women yapping in high places,
sweating grotesquely on
basketball courts, and so on.
But I am afraid I cannot
agree that woman's only place
is in the home — barefoot,
pregnant, and in the kitchen
if at all possible. This is
placing her at the other extreme, which is just as undesirable.
I believe that woman is not
the equal of man, nor is she
his subordinate, nor his
superior. Woman is a delightful, illogical creature, whose
place is to be a wife—a wife,
that is, who is placed on a
pedestal, flattered, pampered,
guided, and loved. How can
she be compared to man? She
is a person entirely apart.
To be placed on this pedestal, however, I believe that
woman owes several duties to
her man: namely, to always
stand up for him whether he
be right or wrong, to bolster
his ego, to submit willingly to
his advances, to put up with
his stubbornness, and, above
all, to love him.
A woman who can achieve
this state of perfection with
her man has achieved the full
blossoming of her femininity.
She has no need to yap in high
places, nor to play on teams,
nor to "intrude" in the entirely separate world of men.
A woman who does these
latter things to any extent
either never had any femininity to begin with, or has been
led astray by the foolishly ar
rogant philosophies promoted
by so many women's magazines of the Western world.
A woman should not grasp
and push for what she wants.
If she behaves as I have
suggested she will achieve all
her desires and more, for
surely almost every man feels
as I do, even though he may
not admit it.
I have searched for a woman with this philosophy for
a long time. I am beginning
to seriously doubt that I will
find one at a college. Yet
this remains my idea for a perfect wife, and I shall continue
to look.
A ROMANTIC
Symbolism
Editor, The Ubyssey:
It seems obvious to me that
the graduating students don't
know what to do with their
money. It is with great pleasure I offer my own humble
suggestion.
Wouldn't a nude statue of
marble, in the image of our
noble benefactor Premier Bennett be nice!
The statue would be
equipped with a nozzle to
spout water into the cairn on
the main mall, and the face of
the statue would gaze upon
the new commerce building in
a grand and silent tribute.
In this small way our everlasting gratitude to the government of this province
could be expressed.
J. GROBERMAN
Science I
URA again
Editor. The Ubyssey:
Boo to you, too, Tommy
Wu!
T. Wu, together with other
misinformed   individuals,  un
questionably deserve the proficiency award for accurate
presentation of "facts"—and
no less deserving for slander.
Three times in the past week,
URA has been accused of being an overpowering conspiracy group, concealing pertinent information from the resident students.
What madness — beyond
comprehension!
Truth is—the AMS affiliation proposal was recorded in
the URA minutes which are
posted every week in every
residence area (refer to
minuts of Feb. 20 and 27).
The audacity does not end
with invectives only on URA,
but is extended as far as to
purport that residence exe-
eutives "play with pin
money."
A definite injustice has
been cor mitted, but never
mind. URA is only one year
old—give it a chance!
G. R. YEE
Eng.  IV
Aggie ID
Editor, The  Ubyssey:
In your article of March
17, page 5, you referred to the
Arts Undergraduate Society
as the A.U.S., not Arts U.S. as
it should have been.
We of the Agriculture Undergraduate Society object to
the association with artsmen.
(A.U.S. is the abbreviation for
Agriculture Undergrad u a t e
Society).
Mistakes of this order can
do nothing but detract from
the quality of your award-
winning paper. We trust that
this will not occur again.
BARRIE MADU
Aggie  U.S. Tuesday,  March   24,   1964
THE       UBYSSEY
Page   5
BACKGROUND
Intrepid reporter Reveres Philly:
even  its 25-cent subway fares
By   MIKE   GRENBY
PHILADELPHIA
Being from merely 97-year-
old Canada, I sometimes feel
swamped by all the history
that these United States of
America have managed to
pile up.
Here in Philadephia, I hit
the  historical  jackpot.
"Despite its present-day
fame," a tourist brochure told
me, "Philadelphia will ever
be associated with the stirring
events of 1776 and of the crucial  years   that  followed."
All excited, I headed for
Independence Hall, "the most
historic spot  in the  Nation."
• •    •
I saw where the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence had been signed,
"in a room which echoed to
the footsteps of Washington,
Adams, Jefferson, Madison,
Franklin, Hamilton — even of
Paul Revere."
Almost every other postcard I hfid seen showed The
Betsy Ross House. This, I
found out, was where a Mrs.
Elizabeth Ross had made the
first American flag in 1777
at the request of George
Washington and the Continental Congress.
Then there was Carpenter's
Hall, another example of colonial architecture, -which had
housed the First Continental
Congress of 1774.
• •    •
But Philadephia's fame didn't start with the American
Revolution, I was told.
Founded by William Penn
in 1682, Philadelphia grew into the colonies' largest city,
and gathered more firsts as it
did so.
Ben Franklin called Philadelphia home and helped
make it the capital of the
United States, before Washington, D.C., was established.
Franklin also helped to
found Pennsylvania Hospital
in 1751. The hospital is a pioneer as well, claiming the first
planned operation for appendicitis. I couldn't find out
whether the operation had
been successful.
During its almost 300 years,
Philadephia has built up a
slogan, "The city of brotherly
love." I found that in spite of
all its history the city lives
up to its boast.
A bus driver cracks a joke,
a passenger responds and
soon half   the  bus is taking
part. And this during rush
hour. Even cab-drivers, waitresses and newsstand dealers
are patient  and friendly.
Compared with New York
— and Vancouver — this is
amazing, especially for a city
of two  million people.
¥    ¥   *
I was surprised to find that
Philadelphia has a subway
system and still uses streetcars.
I was unpleasantly surprised to find that the bus, subway and streetcar fare is 25
cents.
But, considering the abundance of history and brotherly love, I guess this last accomplishment can be overlooked.
Paper meets Waterloo
in a tower of babble
A gag issue of the Coryphaeus, student paper of
Waterloo University, stirred
up controversy when it appeared March 12.
The issue, called The Wash
Tower, contained an article
attacking the Roman Catholic
Church.
The article was entitled
"Why I am a Nun", and included such comments as "We have
holy water fights and play ring
around the rosaries."
Waterloo student president,
Jim Kraemer, complained by
letter to Coryphaeus editor,
Dave Clark, but a motion call
ing for the firing of Clark was
defeated by council.
In a letter of apology, Clark
said that he had not exercised
the proper degree of responsibility and hoped that the letter
would soothe bad feeling.
Student council accepted
Clark's apology, but formed a
commission to study the structure and responsibility of the
student press and the University of Waterloo.
Some kinda nut
TORONTO (CUP) — University of Toronto student Bill
Connelly pleaded insanity to a
jaywalking summons.
Duke's a soft touch —
// you've got the money
By  FRED   FLETCHER
DURHAM
In some ways, perhaps,
Duke University is a typical
U.S. university. Although the
graduate students are generally serious and hard-working, the good-time Charlies
and Shirleys seem to be in
the majority among the
undergraduates.
During a football game, for
example, everything closes up
on campus. The college shop
and snack bar closes its doors,
not so the staff can see the
game, but just because.
The staff sits inside looking through the glass at the
thirsty graduate students who
couldn't afford the time or
money ($4.50) to go to the
game.
It is rumored that the library used to close also in
the days before Duke became
graduate-school oriented.
Perhaps this may be the
way to get UBC students out
to the games: close everything else up and force them
to go. Some 26,000 people
(there are 6,000 students)
showed up at the last home
game in Duke Stadium.
•    *    •
This extra-curricular orientation is not toward student
government, however. The
administration slapped a $30
parking fee on the formerly
free  student  lots  this year.
The student reaction? A
feeble protest by the student
president that he was not consulted. And an equally feeble
editorial in the extremely
weakly Duke Chronicle. It
called for "student participation at the advisory level."
A few people grumbled and
that was all. At UBC, the $5
fee caused much more furor.
It leads one to think, perhaps,
that most of the students here
merely have to write a letter
home to dear old Dad and ask
for $30 to pay up. After all,
he bought the car didn't he?
-from   U   of California   Daily
"Is he leaning on it or holding it up?"
L
THE IDEAL PLACE
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Try Our Delicious T-Bone
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$1.35- Ifs Really Good
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within your income.
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4554 West 10th Ave.
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CHARTER FLIGHT TO LONDON
PRICE $390 RETURN
Enquiries at cashier AMS Office
Glenayr
NEW
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in
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by
Be very casual this Spring in this
exciting new long-sleeved pullover
raglan full-fashioned beauty ... in
scrumptious new Spring colours!
These superbly tailored, pure wool
double-knit tapered slims are dyed
to match perfectly! Pullover 34-42,
$12.98, slims 8-20, $16.98. At
better shops everywhere!
Without this label
t&t£AL&
it is not a genuine KITTKN. Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 24, 1964
Malcolm leaves his blessing
Retiring AMS president
Malcolm Scott leaves his office with his blessings and recommendations to the generations who will tread in his
considerable footsteps.
Here are his recommenda-
tons:
• Continuation of the work
of the special commissions established this year to review
the constitutional organizations, goals, and financial
structures of the AMS.
• New efforts, such as the
proposed personnel board, designed to bring more and
more members into active participation in the society
• A well-researched brief to
the Board of Governors on the
operations of UBC. This could
be a most constructive way to
produce improvements in the
university situation.
• Continued work on the
establishment of a B.C. Federation of University students.
• Production of course commentary on university curriculum offerings. Calendar descriptions of many courses are
misleading   and   inadequate.
MALCOLM SCOTT
... his blessings
• A current affairs seminar
program along the lines of
such activities as French Canada Week. This is vital. Perhaps the newly established
Academic Activities Committee would provide the best vehicle for this type of expansion.
• Continued campaign on
the part of the AMS to have
UBC give full disclosure to
its financial and operating details. We have nothing to hide,
and we should make this quite
clear to the public. This type
of campaign should be tied in
with suggestions to the Board
of Governors as to how student representation could be
improved. Perhaps a Rector
system, such as in use at some
universities on the continent,
would be of value here.
• Continuing improvement
of our relationship with the
Faculty Association and the
Alumni Association.
• Investigation into the field
of summer employment and
the opportunities for the expansion of same.
• Continued work on the establishing of a summer job exchange program with Quebec
province. Being undertaken
in a minor initial way this
year, it could be undertaken
by large numbers of students
next year.
DR. JOHN MACDONALD
. .  . 'keep backing him'
• Continued work in the
area of improvement of extramural and intra-mural athletic programs. Both could
stand review and improvement—perhaps integration.
• Further improvements in
student welfare through the
expansion of AMS activities in
service areas, such as housing,
campus transportation, and
off-campus transportation.
• The setting up of an ombudsman scheme to handle
student complaints.
• The hiring of the AMS
president on a retainer basis
for the summer months so
that preparatory work can be
carried out to lead to the
rapid progress of the Student
Union Building project and
the early development of
many of the suggestions outlined above. It is literally
and physically impossible for
any one person to undertake
the duties of this office, to
make a success of the routine
work, and to expand the program without expending a
number of months before the
term to organize its activities
and establish suggested policies. This is by far the most
important recommendation
that I make and the success
and failure of many of the
programs we have undertaken and many of the recommendations I have made
hinge entirely on its acceptance.
•    •    •
I would like to extend my
thanks to all those who have
assisted me during the past
year, and whom I have not
been able to mention in this
report. It has been a great
privilege and pleasure to have
served as president of the
Alma Mater Society in this
most interesting and challenging year.
In his annual report, Scott
also makes the following observations and recommendations:
UBC students advanced the
cause of higher education beyond all measure through the
Back Mac campaign. Its success cannot be measured in
dollars, although it was undoubtedly responsible for the
additional financial support
UBC achieved last year.
We backed Mac, Mr. Macdonald, with a massive show
of strength and determination,
and shall continue to do so.
Though  the  AMS  and the
Board of Governors may disagree, and disagree violently,
there exists a near-ideal relationship between us.
But there is room for improvement. Communication
channels between student government and the board are unnecessarily indirect and cumbersome. Much misunderstanding and controversy
could be averted if there was
a full and frank exchange of
confidences.
• •    •
The AMS is willing to work
toward this end and calls on
the board to do so.
Another challenge that constantly faces us is that of sectionalism. We as students
have common interests and aspirations that require a united
front to be sustained effectively.
We have obligations to work
for the betterment of higher
education, student welfare and
the promotion of reason in national and international affairs.
I appeal to those of you
who have been passive participants, bystanders. Join
with the thousands of students who have become true
university students through
the Back Mac campaign and
the year's activities and
events.
The work started with
Back Mac is being carried on
*>■"■ t><e st^ndin? committee on
Higher Education Promotion.
HEP will do much to constructively support higher
education development under
the able and experienced
chairmanship of Byron Hender.
• •    •
To further such activities,
we have co-operated in planning a joint agency, the proposed B.C. Union of Students.
I hope it will become a reality during the coming year.
On the subject of the year's
student activities, be it quite
clear that all accomplishments
have been the work of many
minds and a great many willing hands.
The blood drive and all
other charitable appeals have
been unqualified successes.
Individuals and undergraduate societies responsible deserve thanks for fine efforts.
The Pilikwe campaign is
another extremely worthy project that has received a great
deal of student support. We
may disagree on the best
method to carry out such a
campaign, but we cannot quarrel with its objectives.
•    •    •
I give great credit to the
majority of undergraduate society presidents for their diligent work at both society and
council levels.
But there are some who
have shirked their responsibilities. Those who have failed
to participate in council deliberations, been constantly
absent from meetings and fostered separatist and muddled
thinking in their undergraduate societies have done a great
disservice to those they represent and to the student body
in general.
It is short-sighted and unworthy conduct. I hope we
will see none of it in future.
University  Clubs'   Commit
tee and its many clubs had an
extremely successful year under the able and conscientious presidency of Cliff Bowering.
I would like to extend the
congratulations of everyone
associated with UBC to Ed
Lavalle and his excellent
Open House committee. This
year's Open House was without doubt the finest ever.
•    •    •
The Special Events program
was greatly improved, a great
feat, with chairman Rick McGraw largely responsible for
this triumph.
This year the Debating
Union  not  only  regained  its
^tmgmP&^W*^
CHRIS HANSEN
. get out the bugs
feet, but covered itself with
honors. A lot of the credit
must go to Mr. D'Aquino and
his able executive. The
triumph of Messrs. Forkin and
Hyndman in the Canadian Debating Finals deserves the
appreciation of all.
The Ubyssey has continued
to pile up honors and awards.
It is no accident that The
Ubyssey has been the best student newspaper in Canada for
the last three years. It has
taken a lot of hard work and
long hours. Much of the credit goes to the many staffers
who have devoted so much of
their time to the paper.
•    •    •
Special recognition should
be accorded to the present
editor, Mike Hunter, for his
unselfish attitude and his excellent job. I am confident
that the editor-designate, Mike
Horsey, will carry on in the
fine tradition of his predecessors.
I think that the special status of The Ubyssey deserves
mention in this report. Quite
some time ago I reached the
conclusion that its present relationship to the AMS is the
ideal one. Council has no control over the editorial or other
policies of the paper and the
appointment of the editor is
automatic with his selection
carried out by the Editorial
Board of the paper. This
guarantees a vital and independent student press, one of
ANGLICAN CHURCH
MAUNDY THURSDAY, MARCH 26th
THE SERVICE OF HOLY COMMUNION
WILL TAKE PLACE AT 12:30 P.M. IN
BUCHANAN 2202.
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
High School Conference
Leadership Conference
Written applications stating name, phone number, interests and
experience are now being received by the newly appointed Chairmen of High School  Conference and  Leadership Confernce.
DEADLINE  IS THURSDAY, MARCH 26
Applications  should be sent to:
Mr. Bob Hallby, Chairman High School Conference
Box 45, Brock Had
Miss R. DuMont — Mis* E. Trovers
Co-Chairman   leadership   Conference
Box 78, Brock Hall
OFF CAMPUS HOUSING LISTS
Alma Mater Society is again providing a listing service for Off Campus
student accommodation for 1964-65 Winter Session.
Housing  Lists  will  be  published  in July  —  September.
Housing Lists will be available to students by mail or in the Alma Mater
Society   Office. Tuesday,  March   24,   1964
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
and some parting shots
the cornerstones of an effective student government.
We have decided, for financial and competitive reasons, to withdraw from the
Western Intercollegiate Athletic Association. W.e can be
confident that this was a bold
step taken in hopes that an
improved program would result.
The major drawback is the
effect on the Women's program. We hope to persuade
other WCIAA members to
separate men's and women's
programs so that the women's
program  can   continue
• • •
This year has seen the dissolution of the Undergraduate
Societies Committee and will
likely see the dissolution of
the Associated Women Students' Organization. Let's
not join with those who shed
crocodile tears at the passing
of these organizations. They
are no longer required and it
would be a foolish waste of
time and talent to retain them
under such circumstances. We
must view their demise as progress.
The most major expansion
of AMS services has taken
place in the area of housing.
Council this year instituted a
housing-listing service for the
use of out-of-town students
who take up residence in pri-
v a t e    accommodation
The   Housing   Co-ordinator
DEAN FELTHAM
... a new job
appointed, Bill Nielson, did
an outstanding job of organizing the service. Dean Feltham, his successor, will no
doubt bring about further
changes in the service and we
hope to see its scope greatly
expanded this coming year.
The AMS administration
has been greatly improved
through the diligent efforts of
this year's treasurer Chris
Hansen. We hope that continuing improvements will result in working out of all of
the  "bugs"  in our system.
This year saw several major
developments in the area of
student  facilities.     The   new
Winter Sports Centre was
finished and opened, and is
enjoying a great success. We
hope to be able to expand
these facilities in the near
future. Incidentally, it should
be noted that this is the first
building on the campus that
the AMS has owned outright.
• *    •
The long-awaited Student
Union Building is finally well
underway. The action of the
general membership in approving a greatly expanded
facility list and additional
financing should greatly enhance the future success of
this project. We need a central meeting place to enlarge
ideas, to create and to live
together—the union is designed to fulfill this need.
This year we have submitted a number of briefs of importance to various government levels and agencies concerned with student welfare.
• •    •
The Canadian Union of Students has been of great controversy over the past year.
It is in an unfortunate position in that it is making an
honest and sincere effort to
bring together students from
both the French and the English cultural groups. With
differences in points of view
between the two groups as to
such questions as federal aid
to education, the role of CUS
is made most difficult and trying.    We  have, however, an
obligation to make our point
of view clearly known and to
press for it at the National
Congress. We can succeed in
this endeavour as was evidenced by our success in persuading CUS to adopt our
viewpoint on the federal scholarship and loan plans.
With regard to the scholarship and loan plans, a great
deal of work has gone on at
the Students' Council level in
seeking immediately implementation of these plans. We
hope that success will crown
our efforts and we have every
expectation that that will be
the case. However, we' can-
nto expect to ride rough shod
over the constitutional rights
of others, and we do not believe that it will be necessary
to do so to achieve our objective.
•    •   •
Again with regard to the
Canadian Union of Students, I
must pay tribute to the fine
effort of Frank Millerd, this
year's chairman, who has done
an outstanding job. Frank
was perhaps the best CUS
chairman in the whole of Canada, and no more active and
conscientious person could
have been found to be our
local CUS chairman. The
French Canada Week that was
held on this campus, an outstanding success, was entirely
the work of this committee.
The AMS, on behalf of the
Canadian Union of Students,
has undertaken the publication of a national student
magazine, Campus Canada.
This venture has met with
mixed success. It is our hope
that, with continued publication, and with the evidence
of increased support that has
become evident, this magazine will continue to grow and
ultimately will become a financial, as well as a literary,
success. We have undertaken
this project on behalf of the
Canadian student community
in general and it is to our
credit that we have carried it
through.
KEN   LEITCH
. advances made
BID N BUY SALE
The College Shop closes for the year on March 26th and, since our
staff is rather lazy, we are making stock-taking easier by throwing
a Clearance Sale. Selected items have been placed on our clearance
fable and they can be yours for any reasonable offer. (Ridiculous offers
accepted as well - we need a good laugh).
-NO REASONABLE OFFER REJECTED^
- PRICES SUBSTANTIALLY REDUCED -
THESE ITEMS ALSO ON SALE
UBC Sweat Shirts, reg. $2.50	
Women's Leather Gloves (incomplete sizes) reg. $6.95
reg. $5.95
Faculty Sweaters (incomplete sizes)
-Science, Arts, Aggies, reg. $15.95	
Plastic Rainwear, reg. $1.?9 „	
Joke Mugs, Reg. $1.50	
Jewelry-Totem Charms, reg. $1.59	
Assorted Charms, reg. $1.50	
UBC Stone Charms, reg. $6.50	
-PLUS MANY OTHER VALUES-
NOW $ 1.98
NOW $ 4.95
NOW $ 3.95
NOW $12.95
NOW $ 1.29
NOW .98
NOW $ 1.25
NOW $ 1.19
NOW $ 3.95
Also, complete stock of UBC Jackets perfect for Spring and Summer Wear - $17.98
UBC Blazer Crests -$6.95
THE COLLEGE SHOP, BROCK EXTENSION Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March  24,  1964
iW
We're getting so many
letters, they're
floating in the windows
So far, almost a third of the 1,200 students
who were mailed the student means questionnaire have returned them.
The questionnaire is intended to provide a
comprehensive picture of the financial situation
of UBC students.
It is hoped that the tabulated results will
form the basis of detailed submissions on student
aid to be presented to the federal governments
this spring.
If you have received one of these questionnaires, please fill it out as accurately and as fully
as possible. Its prompt return will assure the students of UBC that there will be solid, irrefutable
facts to back up their submissions.
The validity, and consequently the usefulness, of the entire survey depends upon the
prompt return of your questionnaire.
GURGLE
GURGLE
GURGLE
All gone
Pick up some more beer
for that long, dry exam cram
This advertisement is not published or displayed by the Liquor
Control Board, the government of B.C., or by any brewing
company, but in the interests of UBC students. Tuesday,  March  24,   1964
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 9
Play Bears Thursday
UBC underdogs
in World Cup
By GEORGE REAMSBOTTOM
This week the final and feature games of World Cup
Rugby will be played between UBC's Thunderbirds and the
University of California.
,^aw_A>
JIM
JAMIESON
, hat trick
Birds grab
sweet win
Victory was sweet for the
UBC Thunderbird soccer team
which defeated B.C. Sugar, 6-0,
Saturday at Mclnnis field.
The win enabled the varsity
club to clinch a tie for the
lower mainland first division
_occer title.
UBC has one league game left
and has accumulated 27 pts. St.
Andrew's, the only team with
a chance of catching the Birds,
have two games left but trail
by four points.
Displaying what must be
the heaviest soccer team in
these parts the lumpy Sugar
boys were easily outplayed by
the swift-moving, precision-
passing Birds.
In the first half the varsity
team opened up a 2-0 lead. Jim
Jamieson steamrolled up the
centre to blast the winner past
the Sugar goaler
Moses Luy sped in from the
right wing and picked the far
corner for the second goal.
Jamieson added two in the
second half, making a hat trick
and Bobby Johnstone notched
two more to round off the afternoon's scoring.
The first game will be played Thursday noon and the final
Saturday at 2 p.m. Both games
will take place in Varsity stadium.
These are the final two
games of the four-game World
Cup series. The opening games
were played in Berkeley where
the Bears tied the Birds 6^6
then defeated them 21-8.
•    •    •
To win the cup the varsity
team must either win both
games or win and tie while accumulating a better points for
and against record than the
California club.
California's team features
three all-stars from New Zealand attending school on scholarships. Steve Nesbitt with
experience on the famed New
Zealand All-Blacks will be
playing at the first five-eighths
position.
John Whyte and Warren
Moyes of the New Zealand university all-stars will manoeu-
ver at the second five-eighths
and hooker positions, respectively.
•/ • •
The Birds are plagued with
injuries to three key men for
the games. Timmy Cummings,
fly-half who was captain of the
B.C. under-25s, will miss the
games with a broken collarbone. Centre Dave Howie and
hooker Cliff Moore will also be
out. Howie has an injured
shoulder and Moore a sore
back.
First win
VICTORIA (CUP)—Victoria
College Vikings beat Esquimalt
Chiefs 7-1 in the first game of
a five-game playoff.
Same old story
in Locarno Cup
The first games of the summer-long Locarno Cup tennis
playoffs got underway Sunday
with an under - conditioned
Pauncho Hunter taking a 6-3,
6-4 drubbing at the hands of
Lewhoad Willson.
Hunter's loss again established the trend that has characterized previous matches and came
as no surprise to the onlooking
experts.
Willson's crisp cross - court
shots, base-line drives and perfectly executed lobs left Hunter in a state of frustration and
exhaustion.
Field hockey Birds
knockout North Shore
Varsity field hockey team won the first game of their
knockout finals, 4-0 against North Shore Saturday.
Joost Wolsak, league scoring champion, scored all four
in the second half.
Blues knocked out Vancouver 1-0 on a score by Warren
Bell.
Golds playing two games this weekend managed to
beat the Hoopers 4-0, to take first place in League play and
knocked Hawks out of first round of the finals with 2-0 win.
Advocates were knocked out by the Hoppers 2-1.
Pedagogues were beaten 2-0 by Westminster.
sne
r*        -f»~  v
*■■    *nr	
WORLD CUP RUGBY resumes play with the final two
games to be played here Thursday and Saturday. University of California's Jim Anderson demonstrates passing
form of much heavier California team.
UBC women
eliminated
from tourney
UBC Thunderettes were eliminated early in the Canadian
Senior Women's basketball
tournament.
They were disqualified after
a 52-46 loss to the Edmonton
Jasperettes, in the first game.
Phyllis Schmidt scored 16
points for Edmonton, while
Barb Robertson topped the
UBC scoring with 22.
Edmonton went on to place
third in the tournament.
Richmond Merchants took
the Senior Women's Championship for the twelfth time in the
last fifteen years. They beat
the University of Saskatchewan
Huskiettes 34-25 in the final
game.
Miss MacDonald and Dar-
lene Currie from Richmond
were selected as the most valuable players.
STUDENT PUBLICATIONS
1964-1965
APPLICATIONS ARE NOW BEING RECEIVED FOR
THE FOLLOWING POSITIONS WITH A.M.S. PUBLICATIONS FOR THE 1964-65 TERM. STUDENTS
SHOULD APPLY IN WRITING TO:
MANAGER OF STUDENT PUBLICATIONS,
PUBLICATIONS' OFFICE,
ROOM 201, BROCK HALL
• EDITOR: "TUUM EST" HANDBOOK
THIS IS A SUMMER JOB. APPLICANTS SHOULD
BE AVAILABLE FOR JULY AND AUGUST.
• EDITOR: "BIRD CALLS" TELEPHONE
DIRECTORY
THIS IS ALSO A SUMMER JOB. EDITOR WILL
WORK WITH ADVERTISING SALESMEN IN
SECURING ADVERTISING DURING SUMMER.
• ADVERTISING SALESMEN! "BIRD CALLS"
THESE POSITIONS ARE AVAILABLE FROM
MAY 1ST. COMMISSION OF 15% IS PAID ON
ADVERTISING SOLD.
•ADVERTISING SALES: "THE UBYSSEY"
APPLICANTS SHOULD HAVE KNOWLEDGE OF
VANCOUVER AND UNIVERSITY MARKET. JOB
COMENCES ON SEPT. 1ST. COMMISSION OF
13% PAID ON ADVERTISING SOLD.
PLEASE GIVE NAME, VANCOUVER ADDRESS, PHONE NUMBER,
FACULTY, YEAR, STANDING ON YOUR APPLICATION. BECAUSE
OF CURRENT ADMINISTRATIVE REVISION, APPLICANTS WILL NOT
BE NOTIFIED UNTIL EARLY MAY. Page   10
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March  24,  1964
-national film  board  photo
ESKIMO ARTISTS  .  . . cutting stone block
Laing opens show
Eskimo artists
carve UBC niche
Eskimo graphic art debuts at UBC Thursday.
Northern Affairs Minister Art Laing will open the 1963
collection of Eskimo arts at 8 p.m. in the Fine Arts Gallery,
Library basement.
Symposium probes
animal research
A symposium on animal
science education and animal research will be held at
UBC on April 4 and 5.
Dr. K. L. Blaxter, leading
Scottish animal scie n t i s t,
will be a guest for the two-
day symposium.
This will mark the first
time an official opening of
Eskimo art has been held in
the west.
The exhibition will include
stone carvings, woodcuts and
sealskin  prints.
UBC    president   Dr.   John
Macdonald and Chan c e 11 o r
Phyllis   Ross   will   attend  the
opening.
The exhibition will run
with two others: Canadian
Ceramics, 1963, and the Metal
Arts Guild.
Animal researcher
to discuss cold
A leading animal scientist
will speak to UBC students on the physiological
effects of cold in agriculture
in Agriculture 100 on April
3 at 4:30 p.m.
Dr. K. L. Blaxter, head of
the department of nutrition
at the Hannah Dairy Research Institute in Ayr, Scotland, is touring Canada under the Nuffied Foundation
and the National Research
Council.
Ride Wanted by Staff —
8:30 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
Vicinity of Broadway and
MacDonald. Phone Irene
after   5:30  p.m.   RE   3.3678
it
Bitter Ash
rr
RETURNS FOR ONE DAY ONLY
WEDNESDAY, 25th MARCH
AUDITORIUM
12:30, 3:30, 6:30 and 8:00
UNDERGRADS
who   will   be  seeking
Summer Employment
•r-r^^—i should register now with the
*__S*I    NATIONAL EMPLOYMENT
OFFICE
1145 Robson  Street
Student Placement Section
SPECIAL NOTICE
THE BOOK STORE
WILL REMAIN CLOSED ALL DAY
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 1st, 1964
For  Purposes  of  Taking   Inventory
Regular  Hours Will Be Maintained
Tuesday,  March   1st
8:45 a.m.  to  5  p.m.
New top men
for the North
EDMONTON (CUP) —Francis Saville was elected president of the University of Alberta student council.
Bill Winship was appointed
editor of The Gateway, the
second best Canadian college
newspaper.
Spatial£v&niA
present!
in conjunction with Canada  Council
THE   STEREO    SOUND   OF   THE
VANCOUVER   SYMPHONY
ORCHESTRA
Hear the music of Brahms,
Tchaikovsky,  Debussy and Borodin
THURS. MARCH 26   BROCK LOUNGE
12:30 p.m. 35c
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES IN
CANADA'S ARMED FORCES
REGULAR OFFICER TRAINING PLAN
(ROTP)
First Year Students — contemplating applying for tri-
Service ROTP benefits with the Royal Canadian Air Force
are urged to apply now. The deadline for completion of
applications is 1  July, 1964.
CANADIAN FORCES
MEDICAL SERVICE
Medical Officer — A graduate in Medicine from an
accredited university who holds a licence to practice in
one of the provinces of Canada.
*Medical Undergraduate 45-Month Subsidization Plan —
covering final three years of university and a year of
internship. Undergraduates may apply at any time after
completion of their fourth from last academic year up to
the end of their internship year.
Nurse—A Registered Nurse and a current member of a
provincial Registered Nurses Association. Male nurses are
not eligible for enrolment.
Physiotherapist — A candidate must be a female graduate from a recognized university, eligible for membership
in the Canadian Physiotherapy Association.
CANADIAN ARMED FORCES RECRUITING UNIT,
545-547 Seymour St., Vancouver 2, B.C.
NAVY    Q            ARMY    \J                RCAF    rj
Please mail, without obligation, details on career opportunities   in      . __       __     	
NAME             __,          __     __AGE	
ADDRESS __           __       CITY __
FACULTY __     __     __      YEAR __       TEL. Tuesday, March 24,   1964
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 11
Fund-raiser Adams faces
SFA's big money hunters
By   MIKE   BOLTON
UBC Resources Committee
chairman Alfred T. Adams
has his work cut out for him.
Adams is responsible for
collecting private donat ions
for UBC's development program.
He will have to compete
with aggressive and experienced campaigners from SFA.
Accomplished fund-raisers
Alan McGavin, president of
McGavin Toastmaster Limited, and Cyrus H. McLean,
chairman of the board of the
B.C. Telephone Company,
will spearhead the SFA campaign.
McGavin followed McLean
in 1963 as head of the Red
Feather drive.
The SFA fund-raisers hope
to reach their $18 million
quota in one year by soliciting lump-sum gifts or pledges
to be extended over a five-
year period.
Professional fund-ra i s e r s
G. A. Brakeley and Company
ALFRED ADAMS
. . . stiff competition
will   conduct  the  SFA   campaign.
But UBC fund-raiser Adams
is no beginner either.
From 1956 to 1963 Adams
worked as chief executive officer for the Federal Party
of Rhodesia and Nyasaland.
His success in increasing
the   Party's   normal   annual
funds and special election
funds is evidence of his ability.
Eighteen months after he
introduced a target system
into the Party's 100 odd Natal
branches, the system became
the mainstay of the regular
fund and was later introduced
into all provinces.
Premier W. A. C. Bennett
has committed the government to match SFA's capital
fund drive up to its $18 million target.
He also pledged a $4 million advance payment to SFA.
"This arrangement follows
a similar one made with the
University of B.C. in 1958
when the government undertook to match donations up
to the sum of $10 million over
a period of years," said Premier Bennett.
UBC fund raiser Adams refused to comment Monday
about whether the aggressive
SFA campaign will have an
adverse effect on his own
efforts to raise money for
UBC.
More money pledged
to undergrad groups
By JOHN KELSEY
UBC's undergraduate societies will  receive  30  to  50
per cent more money from the AMS next year.
"The whole campus benefits
from a strong undergraduate
society program. We hope additional money will encourage
society activity," AMS president-elect Roger McAfee said
Monday.
"Therefore council will be
asked to alter its budgeting
philosophy so that there is a
continuing increase in undergrad society funds."
The money is expected to
come from increased revenue
next year, in the form of increased enrolment and interest
returns on AMS investments.
"If revenue doesn't increase
sufficiently," McAfee said,
"Council will be asked to approve any cuts in other programs necessary to provide
enough funds."
"The undergraduate societies
nearly got a further $1,600 to
split up at the general meeting," he said.
"But the foresters and their
smoke bomb loused that up,
since it had to have general
meeting approval."
The extra $1,600 was to
come from a reduction in the
accident benefit fund fee —
from 20 cents per student to
10 cents.
Exams held
in ice rink
TORONTO (CUP) — Students here may be writing
their exams in a skating rink.
An overload of students ha?
forced officials at the Uiver-
sity of Toronto to schedule a
number of exams to be written
in the varsity arena.
More than 19,000 students
will be writing exams between
April 20 and May 8. Up to 600
at a time will write in the
arena.
class of '64
graduates
[president's message
A special Totem is being offered this year for thel
first time for you who are graduating. You will have
been at the University of British Columbia consider-1
ably longer than I have been, and yet I must say il
look forward very much to having this literary andj
photographic record of the campus as I first knewl
it in July 1962. The life thus chronicled in this new]
kind of Totem extends back over your freshmen years j
when you were always positive and occasionally right.
It brings you up to the years of maturity when you I
begin to wonder how, after four years, you can knowl
so little about so many interesting subjects. The main}
events in the life of the University, the day to day!
events in the lives of all of you, are set out here fori
you to see; and perhaps your children and grand-]
children will see them too. r hope that this issue off
the Totem brings as much pleasure to you over the J
years as it will continue to bring to me.
Dr. John B. Macdonald!
;7|»if:'ft   i
'. 77 '7* "*
7E»iift*7[ji
m
.-_>'_*«
'%*     %
lAdvance  Sale  Stubs  are now  available for  $2.50 at  thel
[AMS or College Shop. Totem '64 will arrive on campus byf
■April 2nd — price will then be $3.00. Why not purchase a
"Campus Life" tool Pane   12
THE       UIYSSEY
Tuesday, March  24,   1964
'tween classes
Planners discuss
life in suburbia
"Six Solutions to Suburban Living," Part Two, Sweden
and Canada. La.  102, noon Wednesday.
•    •   •
UBYSSEY CRITICS
Meeting Thursday noon in
the Ubyssey office, north
Brock basement, for all those
interested in contributing to a
new, expanded Critics' Page
next year.
• *    •
FENCING  CLUB
Free night Wednesday 7:30.
All members please turn in
their equipment afterward.
• •    •
ARTS US
Arts US General Meeting,
noon Wednesday Bu. 104.
• •    •
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Elections, Wednesday noon.
Bu. 1221. Films Thursday, Bu.
205.
• •    •
PRE-MED
Elections: Vice-president and
Secretary, Film. — "A Breath
of Life."
• •    *
MUSSOC
Important — Spring General
Meeting, today at 12:30 in Bu.
203.
• •    •
BADMINTON
Short General Meeting before Tuesday night session. All
those wishing to play next
year are urged to attend.
Grads ahead
in earnings,
report says
University graduates earn
more than twice as much as
men in the same age group
who have no high school education, a report issued by the
Dominion Bureau of Statistics
says.
The report said a male between the age of 45 and 54 who
has at least some university education earned an average of
$7,372 in 1961.
Males in the same age group
without high school earned an
average of $3,258 annually.
More than 50 per cent of
males with some university
between the ages of 25 and 54
earned more than $6,000. Thirteen per cent earned $10,000 or
more.
Only 16 per cent of those
with some high school education in the same group earned more than $6,000.
Druggists name
new executive
The Pharmacy Undergraduate Society has elected its
executive for next year.
President is Larry Krause;
vice-president is Chuck Will-
ett; secretary, Peggy Lum;
treasurer, Bill Kralt.
John Farmer is social convenor; Les Ashcroft is sports
representative; John Rands,
public relations officer; Cliff
Proceviat, pub 1 i c i t y; and
Sus Mason, Associate
Women Students.
UBC RICKSHAW RACING
SOCIETY
Film, "The use of braced
tread tires on wide-rim rickshaw wheels." Guest speaker
Wolfgang von Balfram. SU. 4
• •    •
NDP
Banned war propaganda
films, 'Nazi Strike" Tuesday,
"Divide and Conquer" — Wednesday. Bu. 106 noon, only 25
cents.
• •    •
UNDERGRAD WRITERS
Meeting at Mr. J. Zilber's,
4439 West 4th Ave., 8 p.m. tonight.
• •    •
PLAYERS CLUB
Bitter Ash returns for one
day only, Thursday 12:30, 3:30
6:30 and 8:00 p.m.
• •    •
ROYAL UBC CRICKET CLUB
Film, "Is it morally right to
cross a Union wicket picket?"
Guest speaker, George Rail-
bird. 12:30 TR 2.
DEAN F. H. SOWARD
. . . honorary president
Soward honored
by grad class
Dean F. H. Soward has been
nominated honorary president
of the 1964 graduating class.
Dean Soward, Dean of graduate studies, was nominated at
a meeting of the grad class
executive last ■week.
Engineering president Pete
Shepard was elected class valedictorian, Daphne Marlatt is
class poet, class prophet is
Bonnie Erickson, will writer is
Winton Derby and historian is
Tom Skupa.
UBC  CLASSIFIED
ONE bedroom apartment to sublet
for May and June. Phone 738-
1405.	
LOST: A pair of black-framed women's glasses in a white case In
the upstairs Library washroom at
Xmas.   Call  Evey,   RE   3-6097.
WANTED: Ride from 16th & Arbutus area—Monday-Friday, 8:30—
Also wishing to stay out nights.
Dave,   733-1265.
LOST BRIEFCASE. Can't study,
need notes. Will ransom (if necessary). Initials J. L. G. on brown,
2-handled case. Had shoes &
small trophy inside. J. Gaskill,
AM   6-2286.
LOST: Birks gold watch. Black
wrist band and square dial. Lost
in   C-lot.   Phone   WA   2-8275.	
FOR SALE. Judson supercharger
for all Volkswagen models. Reg.
$238 for $80. Incraee horsepower
by 45%. Like now. Phone CA 4-
0592.
LOST: At 12:00 on Tuesday, March
17, In Bus Stop—silver bracelet
with small silver balls hanging on
it—surely missed. Please phone
Linda   Warren,   CA   4-9912.
FOR SALE: 1960 MGA. Red iinerior,
metallic brown. Best offer. Phone
581-5342.	
GOING EAST? Passengers wanted
for trip to Ottawa. Leaving be.
tween April 29 and May 1. Share
driving and expenses. Call Walt,
evenings   at  FA   5-9593.	
FOUND: UBC text on Trafalgar between 4th Ave. & 2nd. Phone 224-
0464.          	
MISSING: One brown reversible
raincoat and glasses from dance
lounge during bronze pin exams.
Person concerned  please  return  it
-—to  lounge  or  phone  LA  1-4509.
TO WHOEVER found and returned
my library card to Library last
Friday at 10:30 a.m., I appreciate
your kindness.  Susan Lighthall.
LEAVING for Toronto May 2. Returning in Sept. Call Shirley, RE
3-2391. 	
GO ANYWHERE CAR: 1957 Land
Rover hardtop convertible. Fold-
away double beds, curtains—personality plus. Phone Barry, 7 a.m.
4   p.m.   CY   9-2696. ■
FOR  SALE:   12-foot   plywood   boat.
4  years old,  good condition.  Suitable  for  inboard  motor.  Phone  922.
4069 evenings.  $55.00.	
WITNESSES to accident. East Mall
adjacent north end C-lot Feb. 4,
1964, 10:30 p.m.—'57 Mercury &
'61 Chevrolet. Please phone Grant
Hughes,   L.L.B.,   CR   8-8451.
TEXT WANTED for Eng. 430 notes
"Romantic Lit." Also 1957 Zephyr
' for sale. Very good cond. Reason-
able.   Call   FA   1-1307.	
FOR SALE: Skis 2.05 metre. Blitz
comb. Kofix base. Safety boots.
Size 9. Austrian poles. Phone
Larry,   224-4044   5   to   7   evenings.
WANTED TO RENT: An apartment for three from May to July
Inclusive, between the gates and
Granville preferably. Phone Margaret between 6:30 and 10:30 p.m.
THANK YOU—To the person who
picked up my briefcase Monday
16th at Clot and returned it on
Tuesday. Your kindness is appreciated.
TERM and graduating essays typed
fast and accurately. 25c a page.
Phone   CA   4-1538.
FOUND: Black horn-rimmed glasses. East Mall evening March 18th.
Contact  Hut  M29,   Rm.   6.
HELP: Would the person who accl-
dently took my black wallet from
the men's locker room at the
W. M. gym on Monday, Mar. 1,
at 3:50 please return it to me. Receipts and I.D. are desperately
needed.	
FOR SALE: 1961 Simca 2-door H.T.
Clean, low mileage. $825. Phone
Louis   Schulson,    CA    4-9054.
TICKETS for trip to Ottawa to
be drawn Thursday evening,
March 26. Winners will be announced In September. Keep your
fingers   crossed!	
COME and meet the DECEMBER
BRIDE! Exciting and entertaining
comedy well narrated. Early In
September. Watch for announce,
ment in Ubyssey on your return to
school   in   the  Fall.
Cheerleading
Tryouts
Hut L-6, Tues. and Wed.
MARCH 24, 25
BOTH BOYS AND
GIRLS WELCOME
Lounge slackers to be
chopped off at neck
BERKELEY, Calif. (CUP)—Necking will be banned in
the student union building at the University of California
if promoters of a new set of dress and conduct rules have
their way. 	
Student wins
theatre prize
"People should have shoes
on and should avoid necking
on the couches," said a spokesman for the group.
"Around exam time the
lounge gets very sloppy with
cigarette butts on the floor and
couches and newspapers and
magazines  all over."
They blame some of this on
the 'beat' set.
"I object to girls and boys
in grubby jeans and no shoes.
People sleep on and monopolize whole couches, and sometimes you see a girl and boy
asleep on the same couch."
Opponents of the move say
the proposal is childish.
Student president Mel Le-
vine said: "There are minimum
standards of dress and conduct
in society. It's none of our business to set up further standards
for  students."
UBC student John H. Wright
has won a fellowship for advanced work in theatre at the
University of Minnesota.
He is one of 16 outstanding
students in theatre from the
U.S. and Canada to win the
McKnight Foundation award.
He will study theatre for
five months at the university
and then join the Guthrie
Theatre for seven months
theatre internship, which will
include participation in the
Minneapolis theatre's 1965 season.
Wright, who graduates from
UBC this year, will specialize
in acting.
ST. ANSELM'S CHURCH
(Anglican)
University   Boulevard
GOOD FRIDAY:  10 a.m.-LITANY
8  p.m.-COMPLINE
EASTER  DAY-7 a.m.-HOLY COMMUNION
8 a.m.-HOLY COMMUNION
9 a.m.-HOLY COMMUNION
11  a.m.-MORNING PRAYER
NOON-HOLY COMMUNION
7:30 p.m.-EVENING  PRAYER
CAREER
OPPORTUNITIES
ROYAL CANADIAN AIR FORCE
Qualifications: Canadian citizen or British subject resident
in Canada with "landed" status. Applicants for aircrew
Branches must be under the age of 25; under 35 for all
other Branches. May be  married.
Social Welfare Branch — Successful completion of one
year or more post-graduate training in an accredited
School or Social Work. Accelerated promotion for two or
more years of experience.
Pilot or Radio Navigator — Degree in any Faculty.
Legal Branch — A member of the Bar, any province.
Armament Branch — Degree in Electrical Engineering,
Engineering. Physics, Mechanical Engineering, Mathematics and Physics, or Chemical Engineering. A strong
background in physics and mathematics is desirable.
RCAF RECRUITING UNIT, CAFRC,
545 Seymour St., Vancouver 2, B.C.
MU 4-7577
Please mail, without obligation, details on the
     Branch.
NAME __              AGE	
ADDRESS             	
FACULTY    YEAR TEL. 	

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