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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Oct 13, 1972

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 'Loans provincial duty'
By LORRI RUDLAND
The implementation of the
new Canada Student Loan
Regulations is the responsibility of the provincial and
not the federal government,
justice minister John Turner
said Thursday.
Turner told Alma Mater
Society external affairs officer
Teri Ball and SFU student
society president John Maffett
the federal government
provides the funds but it is up
to the provincial government
to decide on implementing the
regulation.
"So far we've been getting
the old runaround," said
Maffett,   "the   B.C.'  Social
Credit government said the
regulations were federal and
therefore they couldn't change
them.
"Now the provincial
government will have to reexamine its role," he said. "We
are trying to set up a meeting
with education minister Eileen
Dailly     to     discuss      this
THS U8YSSEY
Vol. IIV, No. 9 VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, OCTOBER 13, 1972
228-2301
possibility."
The new loan regulations
require a student applying for
a loan to submit photostats of
birth certificates, income tax
returns, social insurance
cards, marriage certificates,
and motor vehicle registration
forms.
If a student is not "independent" as defined by the
regulations, his parents also
have to submit their income
tax form or a signed
declaration that they cannot
give financial aid to the
student.
"Turner said that students
from other provinces haven't
complained about the new
regulations but he is in error,"
said Maffett.
"At the national student
conference on the financing
post-secondary education held
this summer, David Dick,
UBC, Russ Freethy, U.Vic, Bill
Wells, U.Sask, and I brought
up a resolution that the implementation of the regulations
should be deferred for one
year.
"We received support from
most of the Canadian campuses, particularly in the
Maritimes," Maffett said.
The regulations have been
implemented without proper
consideration.
In Nova Scotia a medical
student was expected to earn
over $1,000 during the summer
vacation, he said, but at
Dalhousie University, the only
medical school in that
province, the summer vacation
was only two weeks long.
The new loan regulations
were drawn up at an Ottawa
meeting of provincial
education ministers held in
March. B.C. had no
representation as Donald
Brothers, the former education
minister, didn't attend.
Although Brothers did not
agree with all the regulations,
there was no attempt by the
Socred government to defer
their implementation, Maffett
said.
"We wrote to the superintendent of post secondary
education, A. E. Soler, to
request a deferral."
But Soles replied that "to
change our procedures at this
juncture almost certainly
would create serious delays in
providing financial aid to a
great many students who have
already submitted applications
for assistance."
Maffett said that loosening
up the regulations could not
delay students receiving loans.
"A much greater delay comes
from the time, required to
examine the new documents
submitted and some loans are
being delayed three to four
weeks longer than before."
—kini mcdonald photo
NOTHING LIKE A FRIENDLY KISS between Alma Mater Society vice-president Gordon Blankstein and
president Doug Aldridge. That's leadership as exhibited at chariot race between engineers and aggies
Thursday. Engineers surged to the lead and won for the 100th time. No injuries.
No students on board
Two former UBC students and the Alumni
Association president were elected by the
senate to the board of governors Wednesday.
Lawyer Ben Trevino, Alma Mater Society
President in 1957-58, topped the field of eight
candidates with 50 votes and Alumni
Association president Beverly Field came
second with 42 votes.
Chuck Connaughan, president of the Construction Labor Relations Association and 1958-
59 AMS president landed the third of the three-
year spots with 40 votes.
They comprise what Ubyssey columnist Art
Smolensky labelled the "liberal slate (read also
large D" in the election.
Smolensky placed the three between a
conservative slate — engineer Aaro Aho, who
got 55 votes, David Williams, previous senate
appointee on the board who got 31 votes, and
Frank Walden, Socred public relations man
who also got 31 votes — and a "radical" student
slate.
On the student slate were science senator
Svend Robinson, who with 29 votes topped Aho
and landed just below Walden and Williams,
and Staif Persky, the more radical of the two
who received 18 votes.
The senate is comprised of 11 members, six
appointed by order in council of the provincial
government in power, three by senate and two
because of their positions as president and
chancellor.
Before leaving office, the Social Credit
government filled its complement of appointees
by giving Beverly Leckie, Paul Plant and
Thomas Dohn seats on the board.
But education minister Eileen Dailly announced two weeks ago her intention to revamp
the Universities Act to seat students, faculty
and university non-academic staff on the
board.
UBC students
well off, urban
By BERTON WOODWARD
Your are the average UBC student.
Your parents are well-off.
They both have high-school diplomas and live in a large city.
Your father — and you are almost sure to have one — works
at a managerial, professional or sales job.
You have two siblings, one older than you.
If you are an American, you had a better chance of being
accepted at UBC than a Canadian student from outside B.C.
These are some of the key findings of a UBC senate committee survey of the backgrounds of 4,000 undergraduates who
applied to UBC in 1970.
The portrait given is taken from the median average of the
responses.
The most telling figures are those detailing the percentages
of students' parents in income brackets ranging up to $20,000 or
more, when compared with the figures for Canadian married
couples with three dependants.
While 2.8 per cent of UBC students' parents make under
$3000 per year, 10 per cent of the Canadian parents are in that
bracket.
And although only 4.5 per cent of the Canadian parents make
more than $20,000,13.1 per cent of students' parents do.
The median average of students' parents is between $10,000
and $12,000. Fifty-seven per cent of them make between $6,000
and $15,000.
Another way of looking at it is that while 30.7 per cent of the
Canadian parents make over $10,000, 57.3 of the students'
parents do.
Fifth-one per cent of the students' fathers are in managerial,
sales or professional jobs and an additional 11.3 per cent are
skilled workers.
The managers' kids have by far the best chance of being,
accepted at UBC — 94.3 per cent of those applying made it. The
second highest acceptance figures are for sons and daughters of
communication and transportation men at 81.1 per cent.
The greatest number of rejections were suffered by farmers'
kids — one third of them were disappointed. Next highest rate is
for children of now-deceased fathers at 32.1 per cent.
If your mother is a manager you're laughing — 97.8 per cent
of managerial mothers' children were accepted.
The other interesting acceptance figures in the study deal
with students from outside B.C.
Of the 293 Canadian students from outside the province who
applied to UBC in 1970, 27 per cent were accepted. Of the 104 -
American students applying, 39 per cent were accepted.
Thirty per cent of all foreign applications were accepted,
with the figure falling to 25 per cent when American students
are discounted.
The study was commissioned by the senate in December
1969, with academic planning head Robert Clarke acting as
committee chairman. Three student senators were on the
original 11-member committee. Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, October  13,  1972
Alternative offered
By BRENT THOMPSON
A group of UBC students and professors
have initiated an alternative to the strict lecture format of science and engineering
programs.
They call the alternative self-paced learning, a name suggesting a more responsible,
less rigid approach to course structure.
"The student may ask for the required
content outline of a course at the beginning of
the year," graduating engineer Mark Spowage
said last week.
"Utilizing seminars and lectures he may
work at his own speed. The rigid, rote lecture
method can be transformed into a more ef-
I'icienct and interesting experience."
The program is a product of the teaching
and learning committee The committee is
comprised of concerned engineering students
and professors.
The dean drew up the terms of reference and
the committee is responsible to him, and the
terms of reference place the balance of power
heavily in favor of the professor and ultimately
the dean.
To effect reform, the students must have the
professors okay to voice the request to the
dean. This is working simply because the
professors recognize the need for change.
Until this year the committee has contented
itself with room lighting and acoustics, instructional booklets, television analysis,
workshops and other  functional  but  hardly
inspiring concerns. From this incongruous
kernel now pops the self-paced learning
program.
Self-paced learning is not new. It is gaining
enthusiastic disciples in Canada and internationally. University Hill school on the
endowment lands has been developing the
program. Its success in Canada is acclaimed by
educators and students.
With the UBC faculty of engineering,
professor M. S. Davies is preparing to launch
his interpretation of self-paced learning.
"In the second term, 70 students from
departments other than electrical engineering
will take a one and half units electrical
engineering course," Davies said Wednesday.
He said the students will be given a comprehensive outline of the course.
"I will be available for at least four hours a
day to allow the student to confer with me."
"I don't want the course to be irresponsible
so I will give five exams, paced during the
term."
"This is an honest experiment and although
I am reasonably sure of the outcome, I will
watch for the results."
"The program will be especially beneficient
to students having difficulty with the course
material," Davies said.
The program ideally, will offer to both
students and professors the opportunity to
make better use of time and resource.
Toronto crazies threaten
left and blacks at U of T
TORONTO (CUP) — An
extreme right-wing group has
threatened to disrupt all
University of Toronto campus
meetings featuring Marxist or
black speakers.
Emiliode Bono, a member of
the Western Guard, phoned the
11 of T student newspaper, The
Varsity, on Oct. 4, and said his
PRC enemies
found inside
China has more to fear from
enemies within her government than foreign powers, said
Ann Tompkins, an American
socialist recently returned
from China.
"The enemies of Chinese
socialism are those persons
who have a position of
authority in the Chinese
Communist Party and use this
position to lead China into
capitalism," she told about 250
people in the SUB ballroom
Thursday.
"These people are self-
concerned and wish to set up a
capitalist elite rather than
serve the majority of the
people of China."
Tompkins said the proletarian cultural revolution
was a great success in China.
Intellectuals were won to the
concept that they could learn
from the peasants.
Tompkins taught in a
Chinese university of
languages from 1965 to 1971
and was able to participate in
the revolution.
"At first it was very difficult
for people to criticize
respected party leaders and
their policies and some of the
party leaders did not appreciate being criticized," she
said. "But self-criticism and
government criticism are
necessary to find the truth."
Chairman Mao knew that the
continuing class struggle was
the most serious threat to
socialism, Tompkins said.
He encouraged the cultural
revolution to help the Chinese
people decide in which
direction China's economic
policy was to evolve, closer to
capitalism or to socialism.
organization would be "on the
lookout, this semester and
next, for any Marxist or
black ... I mean radical black
speakers."
Asked what the Guard would
do, he referred to "past experience."
The Guard has a long history
of disrupting left meetings. In
1971, the Guard, then known as
the Edmund Burke Society,
broke up a meeting at U of T
with Quebec labor leader
Michel Chartrand and lawyer
Robert Lemieux. Members of
the group threw a smoke bomb
into the hall. More than 1,000
people were present. In June,
1970 the rightists unsuccessfully tried to break up a
speech by American leftist
lawyer   William    Kunstler.
Since the 1971 incident, the
rightists have refrained from
breaking up meetings on
campus, De Bono said,
because they considered the
campus "a sacred forum of
free speech".
But the cancellation Oct. 3 of
a scheduled televison taping
with a Ku Klux Klan official led
them to reverse^ their policy.
The show, intended to be taped
in a classroom, was cancelled
because of rumoured violent
demonstrations by the Guard
and the extreme left-wing
Maoists in the Communist
Party of Canada (Marxist-
Leninist).
LAY SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY
Monday's 7:45-10:00 Oct. 16-Dec. 4
1st Hour
Students — $5.00
Others-$10.00
2nd Hour
-Father A. Zsigmond
-The Prophets
-Rev. D. Clarke
-The Church and Urban Community
-Mr. Don Forbes
- "Music and the Church "
VANCOUVER SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY
6000 Iona Drive
Rudy & Peters Motors Ltd.
VOLKSWAGEN SPECIALISTS
225 E. 2nd Ave.
Quality  Workmanship
Competitive Prices
Genuine Volkswagen  Parts Only
All Work Guaranteed
Complete Body Repairs and Painting
879-0491
HONG KONG CHINESE FOODS
Just One Block from Campus in the Village
WE SERVE AUTHENTIC CHINESE FOOD
A T REASONABLE PRICES
EAT IN - TAKE OUT
We have enlarged our dining room to offer you
better service at no increase in prices!
Open Every Day from 4:30 p.m. to 11 p.m.
5732 University Blvd. Phone 224-6121
Kazuyoshi Akiyama
takes over
the sound of the symphony
20th century style
Concert two
SATURDAY OCTOBER 21st
8:30 p.m. in the Queen Elizabeth Theatre
the Vancouver symphony orchestra performs
KHACHATURIAN: Violin Concerto
with brilliant guest violinist Tsugio Tokunaga,
Concertmaster of the Tokyo Symphony
PROKOFIEV: Excerpts from Romeo and Juliet
SCRIABIN: Poeme de L'Extase
SUPER-LOW STUDENT PRICE: $2.00
Adult Prices: $3.50, $4.50, or $5.50
discounted series prices available on request
Tickets NOW at the Vancouver Ticket Centre, 630
Hamilton Street, or call 683-3255 to charge to your
Eaton Account. ^^-a   f*n
W\3 Air
This series sponsored by CP Air
BIRD CALLS-
The Handiest Book on Campus
THE UNIVERSITY OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Available Monday at
UBC Bookstore and SUB
ONLY 75*
with $75.00 in
BONUS COUPONS
included Friday, October  13,  1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
Council to decide lounge fate
By TERRY TURCHYNIAK
The SUB listening room lost
$22,000 last year, and may not
reopen if council decides to
withhold funds, SUB building
manager Graeme Vance said
Thursday.
Cost of wages and repairs for
the no-charge operation
amounted to over $22,000 for
the past year, of which six to
ten thousand dollars went for
repairing equipment broken
both by normal use and vandalism, he said.
In its four years of operation,
all the equipment in the
listening room has had to be
replaced at least once, and at
most, monthly, as in the case of
headphones, jacks and switches.
"Council is seriously considering alternate low cost
systems which would cut
operating costs to under $6,000,
but if none can be satisfactorily
put forward, the listening room
may not be operating," said
Vance.
The most favored system
involves a number of tape
machines,    each    with    a
program of a different type of
music playing through a
number of channels in the
listening room.
The same system of
borrowing headphones in
exchange for an AMS card, or
bringing your own, will still be
in effect.
The taped programs would
be prerecorded twelve  hour
SYMPHONY AND SMELLY SOCKS graced the War Memorial Gym
Thursday when Kazauyoshi Akiyama, new conductor of the
Vancouver Symphony Orchestra, brought the boys in the band to
—Olffk VttMH pnOtO
campus for a one and a half hour concert before capacity audience.
Ubyssey reviewer Forrest Nelson calls performance "first-rate", page
seven today.
Compromises on budget begin
By LESLEY KRUEGER
Compromise in council lowered the
listening room budget and raised the
guaranteed annual income allocation as
the Alma Mater Society budget started
its third reading Wednesday night.
The first two readings were given in
the budget committee, where changes
were made from the original executive
proposal.
There, the guaranteed income plan,
also known as the Palmer Proposal,
which gives undergraduate societies
operating budgets based in part on their
size, was reduced from a basic grant of
$200 and 40 cents per student to $200 plus
20 cents per student.
At the Wednesday night meeting,
science rep Ken Lassassen proposed
returning to the 40 cents per student
budget, taking the needed $3,480 from
the.$6,000 listening room budget.
This failed, and Lassassen moved to
increase the amount to 30 cents per
student, taking $1,740 from the listening
room.
This passed, but a motion again by
Lassassen to increase the amount by a
further five cents failed.
AMS co-ordinator Bob Angus then
moved to deduct $5,000 from The
Ubyssey budget to install light fixtures
in the SUB art gallery — a motion which
he later said was made "facetiously, but
to the point."
He said the $6,000 allocated for the
listening room was part of the SUB
operating budget, and up to Wednesday
the SUB budget was kept separate from
the AMS discretionary funds.
"If we take money out of the SUB
budget and use it for things usually
under the discretionary fund, we are
unbalancing the whole budget.
He then withdrew the motion.
Under the revised budget, funds to
The Ubyssey have been increased by
$10,040.
This includes a $5950 increase in
predicted advertising revenue enabling
The Ubyssey to publish twice weekly,
have meal tickets, continue as a member
of Canadian University Press, a cooperative student newspaper wireser-
vice and send delegates to the annual
CUP national conference.
Intramural sports were awarded an
extra $1,200 — $900 for men and $300 for
women.
This allocation came under fire when
Shelagh Day, spokeswoman for the
Women's Action Group, asked for $1,200
to print a report on the status of women
at UBC.
The revised budget also estimated
the $2,000 Open house grant although it
supported Open House, planned for
March 1973, in principle.
The education committee received an
additional $2,000 under the new budget
and community visitations was docked
$500.
tapes which would be changed
weekly or bimonthly. The
selections recorded and the
variety of tapes available
would depend on popular
demand.
The introduction of this or
any other system depends on
the amount of money, if any,
that council decides to allot to
the listening room for expenses.
In past years, council has
considered the $22,000 investment to be expedient, but
has this year trimmed the
operation budget to under
$5,000 so far, and may withhold
even more, he said.
A major renovation of the
listening room and adjacent
reading room has been in
planning since last year, but
was held up over the summer
due to the construction
workers strike.
Tenders have now been
received, and council will vote
on them in next Wednesday's
meeting. The $55,000 contract
will involve removal of the wall
now separating the two rooms
of the listening room, and the
removal of the wall separating
the reading room from the
adjacent conversation pit.
The interior appearance of
the listening room will be
changed with more lighting,
furniture, and carpeting
throughout. The concrete wall
between the listening room and
what is now the reading room
will be replaced with a glass
one.
If a contract is granted, work
should start within a week, and
be finished by Christmas.
Phenomena
lives in SUB
By JOSIE BANNERMAN
Gallery phenomena is alive,
vibrating, pulsating in the SUB
art gallery.
Gallery phenomena is made
up of students in architecture,
engineering, fine arts and
commerce working to create a
multi-media gallery-theatre
event.
Directed by curator Rory
Ralston the gallery has
become a maze of dramatic
arrangements, interpretations
and effects.
Gallery phenomena presents
a semi-controlled pathway
which each visitor must take.
"As in any walk of life there
are forks in the road and the
traveller chooses his own way.
But I must warn you, one road
leads to a flaming writhing
devil; the other to the spiritual,
calm godhead," Ralston said.
Ralston said his ambitious
project has received
unanimous support and a
$2,000 grant from the Alma
Mater Society. He said the
project has been enthusiastically greeted as a new
concept in gallery presentations.
Phenomena materializes
Nov. 9.
PANGO-PANGO (UNS) —
Three million screaming
Episcopalians blathered
through the streets of this
grimy island kingdom last
week in search of the mythical
pickled ack-ack eggs, said to
be found 'neath the shade of a
coolibah tree. However the
ranting churchmen were told
by uniformed sources that
coolibah trees grow only near
billagongs and besides they
had no billies to boil. They went
home, daunted. Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, October  13,  1972
Secrets
About 30 people slipped quietly onto the UBC
campus last weekend. Several hours later, they just as
quietly slipped away, taking with them another little
chunk of Canadian independence.
Our publicity-shy "guests" were attending a secret
conference on the sale of Canadian energy resources to the
U.S. The conference was sponsored by an organization
called Resources for the Future (whose resources? whose
future?) which is based in Washington D.C. and is funded
by the Ford Foundation.
Smells fishy, doesn't it?
It's not necessary to editorialize at any length about
why the conference was held in secret and what was
discussed. We already know the basics.
And it doesn't matter whether or not agreements were
reached at the conference on whether X billion gallons of
water or kilowatts of electricity or barrels of oil are to be
shipped to the United States.
Conferences such as these usually cannot be measured
by such concrete things as agreements.
The effect for a Canadian nationalist is more like a
slipping away of things. It's very frustrating and very
difficult to combat.
But it's time something was done about the situation.
It's time the corporation executives, profs and
government experts at the conference were called by their
proper names. The Americans among them are imperialists.
The Canadians who support them are traitors.
But this obviously isn't enough.
Nor is it enough just to make sure that these
conferences never happen on this campus again. It really
wouldn't help too much if the people attending the
conference were tarred and feathered and run off campus
on rails escorted by 20,000 screaming students, although it
would be nice.
Something more fundamental has to be changed.
As we said previously, the national sell-out is very
difficult to fight. This is because the industries and natural
resources are controlled by a small group of individuals.
The obvious solution to the problem is to remove the
control of industries and natural resources from this group
of individuals.
However, you may have other ideas so we'd like to
hear from you.
But we'd also like to see some action on whatever your
ideas are. There's nothing worse than watching a group of
middle-class academics just discussing what they should be
doing.
With a bit of determination it's conceivable that the
academic community, which so far has played such a large
part in the sell-out, could be a major factor in the
reclamation of the country.
THE UBYSHY
OCTOBER 13, 1972
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year by
the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or the university
administration. Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey
publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The
Ubyssey's editorial offices are located in room 241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial  departments, 228-2307; Sports, 228-2305; advertising,
228-3977.
Co-editors: John Andersen, Jan O'Brien
This masthead is supposed to make up for John Andersen's inability to
write longish editorials.
"Take as much as you need," says he to the lowly bard.
Our story today deals with young Lesley Krueger and the way she
drove old and new reporters alike batty with her demands that deadlines be
met and copy be kept clean.
"Aye and she's a tough one, she is," said Doug Higgins, as Ken Dodd
left Krueger's desk trembling.
Dodd, as he walked out the door to the Pit with Josie Bannerman, was
heard to say how Krueger would get hers in the end.
Mike Sasges alluded as to how it was too bad it couldn't be sooner.
Maureen O'Rourke said she thought it was ridiculous that one woman
could put so much fear into the newsroom.
"Wait until you meet Sandi Shreve," yelled Rod Mickleburgh from
under a table in the staff lounge.
Usually unreliable sources have announced Rod will soon be leaving
the paper for a new posting in Edmonton.
Brian Murphy told Lorri Rudland the time has come to make a
decision on the extent of gruffness allowed to young city editors.
Dave Schmidt's holding a party this weekend and won't your house
mates just love to read the masthead.
Brent Thompson told Terry Turchyniak — won't we have fun with
that name in future mastheads — that he'd better be there.
Sports editor Kent Spencer echoed that sentiment to his little buddy,
Simon Truelove.
The photogs, said head Kini McDonald, didn't have to worry about
Krueger this week. Their big worry was Jan O'Brien at news desk. Kini said
she made damn sure the troops, Dirk Visser, Bruce West, Sucha Singh,
Daryl Tan and Ed Dubois, kept the art rolling.
And Berton Woodward put himself into this masthead at the last
minute.
AM$
I thought Leo Fox's Oct. 3
letter very well put. Doug
Aldridge's response was a good
deal less convincing. He seemed to
be side-stepping the important
issues. That the $5 athletic fee now
goes to the administration rather
than to the Alma Mater Society
makes no difference to the
students who pay it. Aldridge's
arguments suggest that it is a sort
of principle with him to not let fees
drop below established levels.
Now that the pool referendum has
brought the AMS fee back to its
former level, Aldridge assures us
that he hopes to extend the
present $15 SUB fee "for several
years."
Aldridge seems to note a
retrogressive tendency in UBC's
having the lowest student fees in
Canada; apparently students who
resist fee increases are petty and
cheap. (Everyone knows that
students really have plenty of
money). He does not consider
whether the whole fee structure
needs re-thinking, whether
students now have the right to bill
future students $20 more yearly
than they would otherwise be
paying (the pool and SUB fee
proposals amount to that), while
leaving them no say in how the
money shall be spent.
It is interesting that Aldridge
complains that student governors
haven't enough time to perform
all the services they would like to,
while he at the same time
expresses willingness to take on
responsibility for food services.
His conviction that it would be
better for students to pay $15
yearly for their food services
rather than to have a
self-supporting operation strikes
me as singular, especially since
many students who would have to
pay the fee seldom or never eat in
the cafeterias.
The comments on AMS
discretionary spending are also
unconvincing. Certainly daycare
could have received more help
from council. (And how does the
AMS come to take credit for the
grad class gift?) Any student who
has been around UBC for a few
Letters
years knows that the student
governing bodies have frittered
away great sums of money.
Finally, I would like to support
Fox's suggestion of a 25 cent per
student stipend for Karl Burau.
Burau has for many years
performed a valuable service in
combatting student and academic
complacency and stressing the
need for educational and social
alternatives, while at the same
time maintaining an example of
rare personal integrity. Moreover,
with no lecture fund, he has
succeeded in bringing an array of
political, educational and religious
speakers to his noon hour
meetings; he has aimed at bringing
together as many differing
viewpoints as possible.
Joan Bunn
grad studies 9
P.S. It seems a bit sad that the
student body now willing to
donate $5 yearly for a new pool
should have shown itself so
niggardly in the recent Shinerama
drive.
Snot
An all to (sic) common
complaint at the university is that
the engineers do not have the
desired level of social
consciousness that is expected of
members of this community. We
definitely refute this claim, and
wish to display to the rest of the
campus our overwhelming
concern for many of the pressing
social issues.
One of the gravest of these
problems, in our estimation, is the
total preoccupation that many
members of the society have with
picking their noses. We feel that
the only reasonable means of
combating this problem, short of
chopping off their fingers, is by
launching a massive campaign
directed at these misguided
citizens. Our program will be
entitled Don't Pick Your Nose
1972. We would very much
appreciate appropriate coverage of
this campus wide campaign and
your favorable support of our
project.
Harold Cunliffe,
EUS president
Credit V
This refers to Leo Fox's letter
in Tuesday's Ubyssey wherein he
suggests that a student-owned
credit union would solve the
problem of financing AMS
projects for "all the profits of
ownership would accrue to us".
As solutions seem to come easy
to this Science 5 student, maybe
next week he will offer a plan for
perpetual motion. However,
before so doing, I suggest he first
outline in detail how the AMS can
profit from a credit union, which
I believe, can be owned only by
individuals.
All students who are ready to
loan their money to the AMS
should come forward to support
Fox's proposal. Please don't rush,
I'm sure the line up won't be too
long.
Al Vince
student publications manager.
Money
I feel the administration owes
students an explanation on the
subject of the recent disbursement
of UBC-administered scholarships,
bursaries and fellowships. There is
something rotten in the state of
the finance department when
almost one-third of the first term
must elapse before students can
collect money awarded in some
cases as far back as March.
Last year students had to wait
until late September; this year the
official date was October 6. It
does not take much imagination
to realize that September is a very
tight month for students largely
dependent on financial aid, or that
students may have rent and other
obligations due the first of the
month. If someone knowledgeable
in the ways of our bureaucracy
could perhaps explain this delay
and what steps, if any, are being
taken to rectify it, I would be
most appreciative.
Don Meakins
grad studies Friday, October 13, 1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
Fifth year education student David
Walmsley offers his views on the state of
the third oldest profession.
Any UBC student will be familiar with
the-term"Mickey Mouse" and he will also
know to which department's courses this
term belongs. If the student is a transfer
student (transferring with a BA to the one
year education program), he will by
October have discovered that such a value
judgement does not entail the meaning
"easy", but he may still be wondering
about its other entailments — as, for
example, useless, unco-ordinated, too
structured, too unstructured, irrelevant,
etc.
Just in case anyone has hypothesized
to himself that the education department
is in a state of flux between Socred and
NDP, as is the rest of the world, and that
this is the reason why the easiness
entailment has disappeared, and the
others not yet, he should reconsider his
hypothesis after taking note of the
following evidence.
Just as the student was aware of the
term "Mickey Mouse", it can be taken for
granted that the education department
was equally aware of it. In fact, I have it
on good authority that the UBC
education department invented the term.
Walt Disney later plagiarized it. It was
invented to entice, out of the environs of
the Unemployment Insurance
Commission, those people who did not
Mickey who?
yet feel an overwhelming urge to work.
For, with the obvious entailment of
"easy", any well indoctrinated Canadian
youth would jump at the chance to avoid
having to tell his relatives that the reason
lie was on the dole was that he had no
idea what he wanted to do.
The education department realized, of
course, that by this means it would be
thrusting hundreds of mediocre teachers
upon the unsuspecting multitudes, but it
justified itself on two grounds: first that
the vast majority of the unsuspecting
multitudes were mediocre anyway and
second that it was impracticable to insist
upon having a preponderance of good
teachers, because that would mean having
a classroom ratio of 187:1, and besides,
good teachers don't last long enough with
local school boards.
Upon the premise of attracting into
the education department all those
elements of the populace who were gifted
enough to rote, learn, plagiarize papers,
and cheat on exams without being
caught, and who were still pragmatic
(that is: wishy-washy) about job-seeking,
the department had to figure out a way
of pushing them in the required direction.
A    committee    was    formed   of   a
cross-section of the faculty. It consisted
of three American psychology professors,
and a cafeteria waitress. They met in
camera, the film of which has just been
developed, and the ensuing outline
emerged.
In order to take advantage of the
student's inability to make up his mind, it
was decided that all courses should be
incomprehensible as possible, and that no
single course should have any content
that was similar to the content of any
other course in any way (satire included).
Furthermore, whereas five 3-unit courses
were all right for arts and science
students, the education student was to be
further confused by having a maximum
of three 3-unit courses, the balancing six
units to be made up of ones and
one-and-a-halfs, with a compulsory zero
thrown in just to balance the
numerology.
Having masticated the student's mind
in this way, the next step was to present
him with a viable alternative, and what
better way was there to do this than send
him out on a practicum? Once he was out
in the schools all the student had to do
was present several prepared-on-
the-spur-of-the-moment    papers,    which
the pupils need not necessarily
understand, so long as the sponsor
teacher did — and how could the sponsor
teacher not understand, his being a
product of the same system? And,
because the pupils did not understand,
the student teacher felt himself regaining
that superiority complex that he had had
before he had enrolled in the education
department.
It was pointed out by the cafeteria
waitress that there might still be some
students who would be confused enough
by the course work to drop out, seeing as
the ratio of practicums to courses was the
same as the ratio of good teachers to
mediocre pupils. Professors Winestain and
Zbigniewski thereupon wrote into the
education constitution that tests should
be frequent, and that anyone who spelt
his name right would get an automatic 66
per cent. The possibility that the student,
during the summer vacation, might
change his mind about teaching, was
carefully invalidated by having him apply
for, and accept, a job before he had
had time to think about the whole
process.
In conclusion then, it would appear
that the true identity of Mickey Mouse is
hidden behind a cloud of diesel fumes
emanating from the CPR shunting yards.
To say that his is a railroad job is, perhaps,
to understate the case. In current
terminology, he is a transit supervisor.
Letters
Trash
We aim to please — please aim
too! Somewhere I have read this
slogan, which nicely suggests a
solution to some of the problems
pointed out in your recent article
on the cleaning services provided
by Best Cleaners & Contractors
Ltd.
As president of the cleaning
firm I am naturally interested in
any comments on our cleaning,
but suggest that your picture
clearly shows that the effective
use of available waste baskets
(look for it in the picture) which
are available everywhere, would
practically eliminate such
conditions.
You might not realize this but
the present contract asks for two
persons on the afternoon shift and
three on the day shift (no change
from before) who have a great
number of duties to perform, such
as bringing in the beer (say, that is
excellent cleaning material), and
all other supplies. They also move,
remove, set up furniture, police
the areas for waste (should
someone be there who can not
aim because he lost his glasses),
refill washroom supplies (we beg
you and your visitors not to
remove tissue and paper for any
other purpose but the one to
assist you whilst in the washrooms
of the SUB).
Young people today seem to
be terribly concerned with human
dignity and the values of life.
Think of the backs of those who
have to bend to pick up the litter
which could have hit the waste
receptacles in the first instance —
think of the cost involved in
money and effort to replace paper
supplies which went out of the
building to clean cars or refurbish
someone else's household.
Your co-operation will not
only help those who at present try
to cope with difficult working
conditions - (which could be a
cinch if you decided to help), but
it will also guarantee you a place
which will look decent at all times
and thus reflect the value you put
on your environment (now this
should get Us the assistance of all
anti-pollution groups).
I am certain that upon
reflecting on some of these points
you will agree that the janitors
deserve all the assistance you can
give them — that they are very
patient and competent people to
be able to perform under present
SUB conditions. And do not
forget, and I quote from Ted the
singing (80-year-old) janitor at
SFU, "Once everyone has his PhD
the last janitor will earn a
fortune".
Manus manum lavat.
Ulf von Dehn
Poet
Those days when you were small,
can you discern?
When worries were not there to
comprehend,
When Man first told you:
"Knowledge, you must learn."
Did you not know the story that
did pend?
Man schooled his offspring very
tastefully,
With paint and song and things he
would enjoy;
His    leggings,     undulating
wastefully,
Lay   pendant   from   his   foreign
wooden, toy.
So Man injected patience in your
veins,
HILLEL
CAR RALLY
& PARTY
Oct. 14
leaves Hillel 7:30
50c for members
$1.00 non-members
As   concepts  intercoursed   your
virgin thoughts,
Your fingers learned to graph the
mind you feigned,
Then rationalization were taught.
Can you recall the value of your
worth,
When from your desk, your feet
did reach the earth?
P.M. St. Pierre
arts 2
The preceding sonnet of sorts
for some reason ended up on
rushant
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The
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A brilliant and timely anatomy of the coming federal
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graduate students in political
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Already adopted by several
universities in Canada.
Paper $1.95
Available at your bookstore
Fitzhenry & Whiteside
150 Lesmill Rd. Don Mills, Ont.
the editors' desk. Editors
rarely publish sonnets,
especially not in the letters to
the editor columns. However,
as devotees of the editorial
pages have discovered, we
ain't too particular. You write
'em, we'll print them.
The Ubyssey welcomes letters
from all readers.
Letters should be signed and, if
possible, typed.
Pen names will be used when
the writer's real name is also
included for our information in
the letter, or when valid reasons
for anonymity are given.
Although an effort is made to
publish all letters received, The
Ubyssey reserves the right to edit
letters for reasons of brevity,
legality, grammar or taste.
Letters should be addressed to:
Letters, The Ubyssey, Room
241K, Student Union Building,
UBC.
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THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, October  13,   1972
Maritimes form
their own union
SACKVILLE, N.B. (CUP) — Student councils in the
Atlantic provinces, dienchanted with the proposed national
student union, may soon form a Maritimes student union.
New Brunswick students formed the New Brunswick Union
of Students (Union des Etudiants, nouveau Brunswick) or
UENBUS in July, and Nova Scotia student councils are expected to approve a similar union in the next few weeks.
Universities in Prince Edward Island and Newfoundland
will be asked to join a Maritime student union, if the Nova
Scotia union develops, according to Roy Neill, University of
New Brunswick student president.
UENBUS was set up in Fredericton July 15 to tackle student
aid problems in the province. According to Paul Highham, vice-
president academic of the Mount Allison University students
administrative council and chairman of the UENBUS constitution committee, there was dissatisfaction among the
province's nine post-secondary institutions with student aid.
Exasperation with the present system of assistance in
financing higher education was especially widespread and
bitter, he said.
Concern centred on the division of available money into
loans and bursary grants. While the federal government makes
loans available, the provincial government is expected to
provide money for bursaries and decide how much must be
borrowed before a student is eligible for a bursary. In New
Brunswick, the amount rose from $1,000 last year to $1,400 this
year and the provincial government consequently lowered the
bursary allotment from $2.4 million to $1.1 million in its budget.
Representatives from UNB, Mount Allison, St. Thomas
University, College de Bathurst, College St. Louis and the
Universite de Moncton attended the founding meeting, hoping to
form a union to exercise "considerable bargaining power with
youth and welfare minister Brenda Robertson.
The union's first objective was reached following meetings
with Robertson. A three-person committee obtained concessions in the provincial loan and bursary program; the
mandatory loan portion of student aid is now down to $1,100,
after which a $700 bursary is provided. An additional $300 loan is
available if necessary.
UENBUS is not a political organization, UNB student
president Neill says. But "nobody's going to look after our
problems is we don't," he said.
He believes the Maritime and provincial unions are
necessary to provide student-oriented services. Once local
positions are firmed up, he said, Maritime universities will be
better able to face a conference to set up a national student
union.
The national student union, proposed during the summer
and coming up for discussion at the national conference of
student coucil representatives in November, should also be
"non-political", Neill said.,
"We're interested as long as it can do something for us," he
said, suggesting the major topic should be standardized student
loans and student services. If the organization sticks to student
aid or other similar subjects, "it probably would be very
valuable," he added.
However, because Ontario universities seem more concerned with entertainment and Ontario-oriented problems, he is
sceptical of joining the national student union.
Councils organize
All but two student councils from campuses across B.C.
have joined in forming the B.C. Association of Student Councils,
the Alma Mater Society external affairs officer said Wednesday.
Teri Ball said representatives from 11 student councils met
in Prince George last weekend, and with letters of support from
three other campuses, voted to form the loosely-knit
organization.
Ball said the organization will not have an executive or an
executive office in a deliberate attempt to keep the body unstructured and decentralized.
"We won't be paying any fees either for the first year to
keep from getting into all the official red-tape kind of hassles,"
she said.
Information in Friday's Ubyssey reporting the AMS council
had ratified membership in the council was incorrect, she said.
The council had supported membership in the proposed
National Union of Students.
She said The Ubyssey was also incorrect in reporting that
the association was drawing up a student bill of rights. This is
strictly a UBC project, she said.
But the association will deal with "policy decisions on
issues important to B.C. students."
"The main function of the organization will be to present a
unified front when dealing with any important issues," she said.
The association is now promoting a student boycott of
Famous Players and Odeon theatres because of their recent
cancellation of student rates.
"We staged an informational display at the Famous
Players theatre in Prince George to protest the changes and
later talked to the manager," she told the AMS council meeting.
AMS treasurer David Dick said negotiations with the
chain's head office in Toronto would lead more directly to
settlement than would the protest, "although the protest will
serve to show our dismay."
He said the theatres might reinstitute student rates if
Canadian student councils marked expiry dates on their student
cards.
Dick said he and AMS president Doug Aldridge plan to meet
with Famous Players representatives in Toronto later this year
in an attempt to reach settlement.
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Oct. 12-1R S.U.B. Aud.
Dr. John Conway
Reports On
THE CHURCHES
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Wed., Oct. 18
8:00 p.m.
VANCOUVER
SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY
6000 Iona Drive
S.C.M. — Annual Meeting
BICYCLE TOTE BAG
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All seams are double stitched
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B.C. residents add 5% sales tax.
Mail cheque or M.O. to:
Paramount' Enterprises, BOX
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MEET
GRANT
DEACHMAN
-Candidate in Vancouver Quadra
-Chief Government Whip
in the House
-Nine Years Experience
as a Member of Parliament
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 13
SUB CLUB'S LOUNGE 12:30
.J Friday, October 13, 1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 7
Poor acoustics overcome
by symphony, students
By FORREST NELSON
Kazauyoshi Akiyama directed the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra in a nearly full
War Memorial gymnasium Thursday.
The concert, which got progressively better,
began with the Overture to Egmont by
Beethoven. Mendelssohn's Italian Symphony
followed, then Canzoni for Prisoners by local
Murray Schafer and finally Prokofiev's Romeo
and Juliet Ballet Suite.
Several thousand students packed the
Memorial gym to hear the one and one-half
hour concert presented by the dean of women's
office through the generosity of the Vancouver
Symphony Society, assisted by the UBC Alumni
Association and the Leon and Thea Koerner
Foundation.
The struggle of the symphony against the
building was quickly outlined when noise from
the back of the gym ruined a tremendous
beginning of the Egmont overture.
In this struggle the symphony was aided by
the enthusiastic student audience.
By the second movement of the Italian
symphony, there was no doubt as to the
triumph of the orchestra over the situation.
The modern Canzoni for Prisoners by
Murray Schafer engaged a surprising amount
of student attention.
Prokofiev was an enormously pleasant
surprise after the Beethoven having been a let
down. Akiyama has sharpened performance
here to be first rate: superior on an international scale.
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Extradition possible yet
OTTAWA (CUP) — Puerto
Rican independentista student
Humberto Pagan will be
spending up to another year in
Canada.
The Supreme Court of
Canada decided Oct. 5 the
United States should be
allowed to appeal the decision
on Pagan's deportation. The
hearing of the case was held
Oct. 3. The appeal will be heard
in the lower federal court
sometime within the next year.
The court is fully booked this
year and most of next.
Pagan was arrested in Ottawa a year ago after he fled
Puerto Rico where he is
charged with killing San Juan
riot chief Juan Mercado during
a riot at the University of
Puerto Rico March 11,1971. He
does not want to return to
Puerto Rico because he fears
for his life there.
During the past year, extradition proceedings went
smoothly for the Americans
who wish to bring Pagan to
trial back in Puerto Rico, but
the deportation hearing hit a
snag. On June 27 Carleton
County court Judge A. E.
Honeywell refused the
American request to deport the
student to Puerto Rico, setting
a precedent in Canadian-
American deportation
relations. Pagan, who was kept
in jail from the time of his
arrest, was freed on $3,000 bail
in early July.
The counsel for the U.S. went
to the federal court Aug. 3,
asking for an appeal on the
grounds the case was of extraordinary importance.
The federal court refused to
hear the appeal because it
contradicted a 1955 Supreme
Court ruling which prohibited a
country seeking a deportation
to appeal a case. The U.S. then
went to the Supreme Court Oct.
3 asking that it allow the appeal to be heard in the lower
court.
Pagan was consulting with
his lawyer Bernard Mergler in
Montreal today and was
unavailable for comment.
However, a Pagan defence
committee member in Ottawa
said the decision to allow the
appeal was based on one of
three things. Either the court
disagreed with the 1955
Supreme Court ruling, it
agreed with the American
counsel that the case of extraordinary importance or it
felt the federal court's ruling
on the appeal was incorrect.
Another possible result of the
Supreme Court decision, he
said, is that the Americans
may ask for a warrant to put
Pagan back in jail. However,
Judge Honeywell, who
disallowed the first American
deportation request, is the
person who would have to sign
the warrant and reliable
sources report he has already
refused to do so.
On Oct. 2, the day before the
Supreme Court hearing, Pagan
predicted civil war would
break out in his homeland in
"two or three years".
He told a Toronto press
conference that "U.S. imperialism must be defeated by
a revolutionary war of the
people of Puerto Rico."
While 90 per cent of Puerto
Rico's capital is American-
owned, living conditions have
not improved under American
domination, he told reporters.
The average salary of a Puerto
Rican worker is only one-third
to one-fourth that of an
American worker.
In spite of U.S. domination,
Pagan said, the people have
resisted and maintained their
own identity. He cited the long
history of protests and
uprisings against colonial rule.
Kraft Feeds guilty
MONTREAL (CUP) — Kraft Foods Ltd., perpetrator of low
prices to farmers and substandard goods to consumers, has
been caught in the act again.
The multi-national food monopoly was found guilty Oct. 4 on
a charge of false advertising in its Explore Canada contest. ~v
Mr. Justice Claude Valer set Oct. 19 to hear arguments
before sentencing.
The company's sales promotion contest offered participants
"15 big chances to win" trips to any Canadian city, free use of a
vehicle, $1,000 spending money, and a set of luggage.
The contest was advertised in national magazines and
television programs, including the non-defunct Ed Sullivan
Show. Kraft is the second largest television advertiser in the
U.S.
Chief Crown prosecutor Louis-Philippe Landry said no
contestant had "15 big chances to win" and 120,900 of the 271,000
entrants had simply wasted a postage stamp.
Meanwhile, the National Farmers Union boycott of Kraft
products continues. The NFU is demanding the right to bargain
collectively for prices paid to farmers by the monopoly.
While Puerto Rico is a U.S.
colony under direct rule, he
added, the rest of Latin
America, except Chile and
Cuba, is held under the grip of
neo-colonialism, or indirect
rule.
In a speech to about 150
people later Monday, Pagan
said he came to speak of the
Puerto Rican independence
struggle, and "in the name of
people all over the world who
are willing to endanger their
lives for freedom".
"I come in the name of
Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia and
all the countries of Latin
America and Africa to make
this accusation against imperialism."
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WINNER 1972 CANNES FILM
FESTIVAL JURY PRIZE AWARD
SLAUGHTERHOUSE-
piVE
1HEUST
FOURYE4RS.
Canadian Radio-Television Commission
(CRTC)
Establishment of diplomatic relations with
China and the Vatican
Protection of Privacy Bill
Prosecutions for misleading advertising
International Student Summer Employment
Exchange
New Unemployment Insurance Act
Local Initiatives Program to fight
unemployment
Northern Inland Waters Act
Loans to underdeveloped countries
Transient Youth aids
Move toward adoption of metric system
Wildlife sanctuaries
White Paper on Income Security
LeDain Commission on non-medical use
of drugs
Department of Regional Economic Expansion
Student Athlete grants
Proposed Food and Drug and Narcotic Act
amendments
Multiculturalism policy defined
"Opportunities for Youth" program
Establishment of Department of the
Environment
Low income housing initiatives
Foreign ownership policy study
The Competition Bill
Prices and Incomes Commission
Extension of Territorial Sea and Fishing Zones
Committee on Election Expenses report
Drug research studies
Increased monies available under Small
Businesses
Post Office Act amendments—assured mail
Family Income Security Plan
Research grants to Parliamentary caucuses
DDT and phosphate bans
Creation of six new national parks
Report of the Royal Commission on the
Status of Women
Participatory and consultative approach to
policy making—the White Paper technique
Northern Development program
Canadian Development Corporation
Arctic Waters Pollution Prevention legislation
Committees on Youth report
Record Exports
Nuclear Liability Act
Northern and Arctic land use regulations
Sports facilities study
Recommendations re seal hunt
Second language studies
Anti-dumping legislation
See-Canada programs
Establishment of Ministry of State for Science
and Technology
Clean Air Act
International travel programs
Review of Indian Policy
Official Languages Act
Small Farms Development Program
Liberalism—An openness to new ideas
Oct. 30—The Federal Election
Express yourself
UBER4LR4RTY
614 West Pender Street, Vancouver 2, B.C. Page 8
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, October  13, 1972
Limits must be set
By DAVID SCHMIDT
The earth is heading for
catastrophe within the next 25
to 50 years unless man limits
himself before nature does it
for him, said commerce
professor Bill Rees Thursday
noon.
Rees spole to about 40 persons on The Limits of Growth
at a meeting in SUB 207-209
sponsored by the Environmental   Crisis   Organization.
Rees explained the operation
of the environment as a closed
system with predetermined
inputs and outputs which keep
the system operating as it
should.
He described man as a
system which is adversely
affecting the main system by
presenting a pollution input
which destroys the ecological
balance.
"Man can be described as a
cancerous growth type subsystem which is multiplying
exponentially while the rest of
the system just remains stable.
"It is a runaway system
which is having an increasingly dominant effect on
the environment, diseasing the
rest of the organism.
"This can't continue for
ever. There is an overall limit
to the amount of punishment
the ecosystem can take," Rees
said.
"Each lifeform follows a set;
pattern where it rises exponentially in a friendly environment until it reaches the
point where nature can no
longer support it and negative
feedbacks take over to destroy
the excess population  till  it
conforms   to   the   carrying
capacity of nature," he said.
Mankind will reach that
point within our lifetime unless
we take some steps to control
our own gowth, he said.
International House
changing its image
By MAUREEN O'ROURKE
International House wants to change its image.
Carl Beach, program co-ordinator of International House,
said not only is International House a place for foreign students
but also for Canadian students.
Beach said Thursday International House is a place to get
"first hand information of other parts of the world in your own
backyard."
Beach told The Ubyssey he would like to see more Canadian
student participation at International House. They need
Canadian students to help foreign students with their English at
8 p.m. Thursdays.
The House offers a cafeteria service to all students,
featuring a soup from a different country daily.
It also offers trips to foreign countries as well as day trips.
This Christmas International House is sponsoring a two week
trip to Mexico.
International House holds social evenings from 4 to 6 p.m.
daily. Its next dance is on Oct. 27 and cost is $2 per person.
Beach said International House is for the use of the entire
campus. In September it held orientation meetings for all
students in their first year at UBC, both foreign and Canadian.
The house holds speaker programs in the education
department. Speakers from foreign countries go and speak at
education seminars.
UN Day at International House, on Oct. 24 and Oct. 26,
features speakers Stanley Burke, an ex-CBC newscaster and
Mark Zacker, a UBC international relations professor.
NATURAL FOOD ,
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MECHANICS'  INSTITUTE
AND
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LIBRARY ASSOCIATION,
Instituted  September  17th,  1853.
Read slowly, Pause frequently, Reflect seriously,
and Return duly; but do not injure the Book, nor
turn down the corners of the leaves.
NOT TO BE KEPT OVER
szej-vzein" x>a."Z"s.
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hill's library,
1308 St. Catherine Street,
(opposite English Cathedral.)
SUBSCRIPTION MAY COMMENCE AT ANY TIME,
TERMS: PAYABLE STRICTLY IN ADVANCE.
3 Months. 6 Months. 12 Months.
FOR ONE BOOK AT A TIME $1.25 $2.00  $100
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and so on in proportion to the amount paid.
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return of all Works and in good condition, is requested when Reader*
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latest novelties from Engl md and United States.
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Page
Friday
The cover this week shows some of the more unusual
selections for the UBC library's collection of bookplates.
These and many more are on view in display cases at the
entrance to the special collections branch on the seventh
floor of the main library. '    ,-       ,>!
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CHARGEX • EASY TERMS • LAY AWAY
Drama
A mixed bag of meet
Intimacy, coffee and theatre are the
delicacies offered at the City Meet Market.
You'll find all three this weekend in
Counterpoint's production of three
Canadian one-act plays.
Counterpoint is a talented theatre troupe
working from this one-room North Vancouver coffee house. Productions are
frugal and unpretentious. The stage is a
corner of the room flanked on two sides by
the audience. Scenery, costumes and
lighting is spartan. Wooden chairs, the odd
bench or the floor suffice as seats. Poor
Theatre it is, but poor theatre it isn't.
A Glass Darkly by S. R. Gilbert is an
intellectual and abstract theatre piece. A
man played by Dean Foster is lost and
wanders onto the stage seeking help. He
meets Bob and Dod, played by Eugene
Tishauer and David Thomas.
Bob and Dod are menacing and sinister
personalities, and they prey upon their
helpless and confused victim. Assaulted
physically, intellectually and emotionally,
the man is driven to the precipice of insanity.
The play is one of words: long
magniloquent soliloquies and verbal
barrages. It demands concentration and
attention, but the terse stage direction and
pacing used by director Doug McCallum
avoids monotony and boredom.
Death Seat by J. M. Hurley does not fare
as well as the first. A woman (Suzanne
Dubois) stumbles into a bar. She is nervous, excited and desperately needs
someone to talk to. She settles for a woman
(Joan Needham) at a table.
Dubois has escaped from a car crash.
Her son, critically injured, is undergoing
surgery. As the story progresses, however,
we realize we are not witnessing ordinary
people in an ordinary bar. The bartender,
played by David Thomas, is Death, and his.
bar Death's waiting room.
Allegories can be theatrical successes if
the stereotypes, the cliches and the stock
characters are avoided. Unfortunately
Hurley's script makes little effort to do
this. Neeham is the stalwart stoic rock,
braving life's adversity and pain, but
unable to relieve herself of the tedious one-
dimensional characterization.
The Song of Louise in the Morning by
Patricia Joudry is the best of the three. The
script and the acting present an incisive,
compelling and realistic drama.
Within 40 short minutes we are drawn
into the tangled lives of Louise and Stanley,
a married couple played by Marie Foun-
taine and Bren Traff. Stanley is a clerk
struggling in a department store; Louise
babysits for a five-year-old. The central
idea, Stanley's jealousy over Louise's love
for the boy, is woven through the delicate
fabric of their relationship, and by
following it, we unravel the subtle intricacies of their lives. The superb acting,
especially Traff's, imbues the play with the
depth, richness and crucial undertones
possessed by Joudry's characters.
The City Meet Market is at 69 Lonsdale
Ave., North Vancouver. Plays run at 8 p.m.
until Sunday. Admission is $1.50.
—Steve Morris
Immediate future
The Jewish State of Theatre of Rumania
moves into the QE Oct. 17 at 8:30 p.m. for a
once^only performance of The Dybbuk, a
love-and-spiritualism story performed in
Yiddish. Promoter David Y. H. Lui says it
"will appeal even to those who do not understand the language as they may revel in
the extensive use of song and dance."
Tickets are $3, $4, $5 and $6 at Vancouver
Ticket Centre.
The Jewish Rumanians are particularly
interesting as they point up the differences
between Rumania and other East
European states, where the promotion of
Jewish culture is less welcome.
Lui is also bringing the Ballet Theatre
Contemporain, a French dance company,
to the QE tonight at 8:30 p.m. and Sunday
at 2:30 p.m. For $3.25 to $6.50 you can see
the rock ballet Hop-Op, which includes
dancing to the music of such luminairies as
Frank Zappa and Vanilla Fudge. Tickets at
VTC.
And at the Arts Club, Paul Zindel's
comedy The Effect of Gamma Rays on
Man-in-the-Moon Marigold opens* next
Wednesday at 8:30 p.m. Starring Doris
Chilcott, Marti Maraden and Pia Shandel,
it will run Tuesdays, Wednesdays and
Thursdays at 8:30 p.m. and Fridays at 7
and 10 p.m.
And, oh yes, this is (or was) Theatre
Week in Vancouver and surrounding
municipalities.
CAT     #  1)  "Comedy-Erotic"
# 2)  "Social Conscience"
IPQpEI^SS <®W8|p
Sponsored by
Media McGill
and Bellvue Pathe
^VQpElte
Media McGill
3434 McTavish
Montreal 112
Page Friday, 2
THE  UBYSSEY
Friday, October  13, 1972 Books
Refuse to be a victim
By JAN O'BRIEN
"This above all, to refuse
to be a victim." This is what
Margaret Atwood's new
novel Surfacing is all about.
In many ways this book is
similar to her first novel,
The Edible Woman. In both
cases the woman narrator
sees herself and other
women as products.
However, Surfacing is a
more sophisticated version
of this theme.	
Surfacing, by Margaret
Atwood. McClelland and
Stewart, $6.95, hardcover.
The narrator returns to
her childhood home in
northern Quebec to search
for her missing father. By
returning home she is forced
to look at her childhood and
face up to the truth about
her adult life.
She lives in a "never-
never land" and cannot
reconcile her adult life with
her childhood. As her
companion Anna says:
"You had a good childhood
but there's this funny
break."
The funny break is a
tragic love affair with a
married man. She cannot
face the truth about the
affair and creates a complicated illusion to replace
it.
She no longer fights back,
her only defence is flight,
invisibility. The affair has
left her aloof, uncommunicative. She has no
faith and cannot love. "I
was not prepared for the
average, its needless
cruelties and lies."
Her parents take on the
characteristics of gods with
a mythology and a set of
rules backing them. A
transition occurs as the
narrator reaches her home
territory. She begins to
think in terms of "we're
supposed to" trying to fit
into the childhood pattern
created by her parents.
The tension builds up and
■ *- —       - - ,     *      t*  »
when her friends leave she
stays behind to work things
out.
After declaring: "I tried
all those years to be
civilized but I'm not and I'm
through pretending", the
narrator lives out a ritual
which she believes her
mother and father are
demanding of her. It is a
long and painful process.
She can no longer run from
the truth, and realizes the
illusion she created was
more  disastrous  than   the
truth. She is no longer
powerless and victimized.
She discovers her parents
are human and "their
totalitarian innocence was
my own." She drops the
illusion her life has been and
faces reality. She thus
defines woman as product:
"They would never believe
it's only a natural woman,
state of nature, they think of
that as a tanned body on a
beach with washed hair
waving like scarves; not
this, face dirt-caked and
streaked, skin grimed and
scabby, hair like a frayed
bathmat stuck with leaves
and twigs. A new kind of
centrefold."
Anna, her female companion, reinforces this
image of victimized woman.
She wears makeup like a
visor and is described as an
imitation of a magazine
picture which in itself is an
imitation.
The men in the novel play
a secondary role and bring
in some other contemporary
issues like Canadian
nationalism and technology.
Anna's husband Dave, is
tough and spouts all the
radical catch phrases about
Americans,  life  and   love.
At first glance Canadian
nationalism seems to be
treated superficially as
American hunters fishing
out and buying up the
wilderness. Later, however,
the idea is clarified when the
narrator says of
Americans: "They exist,
they're advancing, they
must be dealt with, but
possibly they can be watched and stopped without
being copied."
It appears that
Americanism can be
equated with technology.
Anna and Dave have
become Americans and
"are already turning to
metal, skins galvanizing,
heads congealing to brass
knobs, components and
intricate wires ripening
inside."
Joe, the narrator's
current lover, seems to her
only half-formed and
therefore to be trusted. She
cannot talk to him but in the
end sees him as a mediator
between her and the
"normal" world.
The book leaves one encouraged. There seems to be
hope. At least the narrator is
going to try. It's a strong,
complex book by a woman
who is probably writing the
best Canadian poetry and
fiction.
Films
Unkindest cuts are prime
Prime Cut has all the appearances of a substandard Hollywood gangster movie but it gives a
whole lot more than that. It's not only fun entertainment, it also gets right into America's
problems and comes up with some images and
ideas that are original and touching.
Prime Cut, starring Lee Marvin, Gene Hack-
man. Directed by Michael Ritchie. Music by
Lalo Schifrin. At the Orpheum.
Nick Devlin (Marvin) is sent by a Chicago beef
baron to collect a half-million bucks owed by
Kansas City upstart meat-packer Marion (Gene
Hackman) of MaryAnn Meats. Marion runs a
business that sells live woman-flesh and dope
along with the packaged beef. He's also not above
butchering the opposition, and one Chicago tough
winds up as a rather short string of wieners.
The archetypal unscrupulous, money-grubbing
businessman, Marion draws no distinction between two and four-legged critters: "Cow flesh,
woman flesh; it's all the same to me."
I was hoping they would go more deeply into
the woman-as-object theme which is so obviously
embodied in the rearing and selling (from cattle
pens yet) of young girls. We see the fat-cats ogling
the "stock" in Marion's barns, and at the fair the
parallels are clearly set between the pigs and the
girls displaying them.
Marion is the icontrified male chauvinist who
is ironically driven to destruction by his villainous
wife Clara belle (Angel Tompkins) who makes
material demands so high they are designed to
leave her a wealthy widow. Conversely, Nick is a
city-slicker but treats women with humanity and
respect. But it's not a movie about women's lib
and there are other issues at hand.
Marion and Nick are the key figures in the
urban-rural reversal that is one of the most
striking themes. The ordinarily idyllic country
becomes a hotbed of vice and violence; while the
city is peaceful and civilized and its role as the
much-maligned breeding ground of all of
America's ills is seriously questioned. Nick is the
genteel thug and almost becomes a crusading
knight. He is tough as hell but is kind, gentle,
refined, and a man of grace and polish almost as
much as Henry Higgins. He drinks fine wine and
begins dinrier with Vichyssoise. Even his henchmen are sensitive and considerate.
Lee Marvin is as sneeringly tough as usual and
Hackman oozes corruption and lust. Both are a joy
to watch.
One of the grooviest, most metaphorically
original scenes was one in which a giant combine
literally eats a Cadillac limousine and the
bystanders watch aghast as this confrontation of
the farmlands and Detroit ends in an excretion
from the back of the combine of a bale half hay
and half hubcaps. The Calgary countryside, where
much of the film was shot, had never seen
anything like it before.
I worked for director Ritchie in Switzerland
when he and Robert Hackman were making
Downhill Racer. At that time I asked one of his
staff what they thought of him as a director. "That
idiot," she said. "He's not fit to be directing TV <
commercials." Her judgment at that time was
pretty accurate, and just about everybody agreed..
But Ritchie has come a long way and in Prime Cut
he even betters the individuality of style that
brought rave reviews for his film released this
September, The Candidate. His next film will
truly be worth watching for.
Be warned, it's not a milestone in cinematic
history. But if you want your thinking stirred up a >
little and/or want some raw-spirited excitement,
see it.
—Clive Bird
Friday, October  13, 1972
THE  UBYSSEY
Page Friday. 3 t.
Les Walker, hard-rock miner and labor unionist.
during interview with oral history project.
People
histor
comes to
"We're not history. History is
only important people and important things."
That's what one man said when
his wife was approached by the
Oral History Project, an LIP group
working out of the main library on
campus, to record her memories of
life in B.C.
But it's people like this woman,
who worked for many years in the
logging camps of the interior, that
project co-ordinator Bill Langlois
says his group wants to talk to.
The usual approach to history is
to see it from the viewpoint of the
politicians and bureaucrats, the
corporation presidents and the big-
time entrepreneurs — the people
who had all the power. Langlois
and his group are concerned instead about how ordinary people —
laborers, factory workers,
housewives, independent farmers
— responded to the history that
was happening around them in
B.C. from about 1890 on.
Since February the project
workers have talked with more
than 100 people. The tapes and
written transcripts are on the sixth
floor of the library, available to
anyone. People listening to the
tapes can also look at photographs
and sketches made while the interviews were in progress.
All the people interviewed now
live in B.C. but many also talk
about their experiences in other
parts of Canada as well as the U.S.
Although they were often shy
nervous about speaking, very 1
refused   to   participate   in
project.
As staff photographer F
Weyler says, "most of the pec
we talk to are workers who hi
never been asked their opinior
their whole lives. Not only are tl
flattered that we think th
memories are important, most
these men and women really i
that they have something to
about the great events of histon
the Boer War, First World \\
Great Depression, labor strug^
— that they lived through".
The project has seemed to tak
special interest in labor history .
there are many recorded c
versations with workers and et
union organizers. A hard-r
miner, a washing-woman,
railwayman, a ship's carper
talk about wages and work
conditions; a Swede recalls lift
an immigrant laborer; a fis*
man describes a Japanese la
union and others detail the e;
organization of the CCF ;
Communist parties.
Fortunately a lot of early I
and Prairie pioneers are still li\
and many of them are contribul
to the oral history library. Th
are tapes about farming in I
and Saskatchewan, the settlerr
of interior towns, the history (
commune at Sointula (off north
Vancouver Island) ;
reminiscences of life in Vancou
Wartime internment
Ellen Enomoto, 50, whose grandparents were pioneer members oj
Vancouver's Japanese community, talks to a project interviewer about
the internment of Japanese in the B.C. interior during the second worla
war.
It's over 30 years ago, isn't it? That's a long time, but eh ... we
knew that something was going to happen.. . but we didn't really
think we'd be . . . have to be evacuated like that. . . that was a terrible
thing for us. Because we so . . . we had to start life over again . . . and
for people like my father, you know, middle aged people who had to
start life all over again.
For one thing they lost everything. . . they could only take a
certain amount and they . . . they stored all the stuff from ... of the
store . . . with with a friend. . . who ... in Marpole who had a
house .. . and they were going to stay for a few months longer than we
were, so he stored it in their basement and then had some of it shipped
up to Minto where we went.. . but the other stuff that was left in the
store ... they eh.. . the custodian sold it all... very cheaply ... he
got hardly anything for it.
Then they had to live on whatever they had saved and they hadn'1
saved much because naturally you don't expect to be moved like thai
and you're not saving money, are you, when you have a business..,
trying to keep the business going ... so my father had to spend all his
savings.
When the money was nearly gone, when we were down to the last
few hundred dollars, they went down to Devine ... I don't know where
you'd ... if you know. . . it's near D'Arcy ... on the P.G.E.... wel
between Pemberton and D'Arcy. He had a chance to start i
cookhouse . . . and a commissary for a lumber company ... so he tool
lh.it iImiky and he vmmii down there .uid Ihov bailed to |ust work
hki m.id and save inone\ . imining .i cookhouse is not an easy
business.
Page Friday, 4
THE  UBYSSEY
Friday, October  13,  1972 *■■ *$?**».'ri ■*•».. ■■■'.
s
r
JBC
id Victoria at the turn of the
intury. As part of this cultural
immunities series the group is
so experimenting with tapes on
perception of the natural en-
ironment" with long-time
tsidents of places such as Pernor ton.
The ethnic groups who have
)tne to B.C. are also well
^presented. The French set-
ement of Maillardville and
apanese community life in
eveston and Vancouver are both
intensively documented,
oukhobors, Swedes, East Indians
id Jews also talk about living and
orking in B.C.
As long as it can find funding the
ral History Project will keep
iding to its collection. Right now
le staffers are beginning a series
' interviews on the early women's
tovement in B.C. and they have
ts of other plans. You can find
iem on the sixth floor of the main
orary for the next couple of weeks
id then they're moving to the
isement of Brock Hall. If you're
terested in Canadian hostory or
ist want to know what it was like
' homestead on the prairies or
*ospect in B.C., the Oral History
arary is worth visiting.
- Anne Petrie
UBC graduate Mildred Fahrni, 22, talks
to Chrystall Dick about her life as a student
and the early days of the CCF.
DICK: What were your days at UBC like?
FAHRNI: Well mine started fairly early
in the morning because living out in the
middle of Burnaby and having to collect. . .
having to come in on a tram ... I had to
walk about 15 minutes, or run usually to
catch a tram and I felt my life was divided
into 20 minute periods. . . because if I
didn't get this one, I got the next one, and
sometimes just got one foot on the bottom
step and hung on tenaciously till we got to
the next station and I was able to worm
myself in, and once in a while get a seat.
But usually I came in to Broadway, and
then   took   a   streetcar  across  Broadway,
Mildred Fahrni, Cheryl Pierson: "There was much more companionship amongst the students.'
UBC student life, 7 920-style
arriving in time for an eight o'clock or a nine
o'clock lecture. At that time, most of the
lectures were confined within the daytime
period. . . they didn't run on quite as late,
and because I was not taking laboratories, 1
was able to leave and get home, and usually
in time to get dinner for the family
consisting of my father and my brother, and
I didn't join too many clubs, which met in
the evening because of this. But I belonged
to the player's club, and one of the public
speaking groups.
DICK: You must have been quite
politically aware of the growth of socialism
in the world.
FAHRNI: I knew J.S. Woodsworth, who
was the founder of the CCF. I had known
him personally on the prairie through my
family's connection in the church when he
was in the church, and when he moved with
his family out to Victoria, 1 can remember
the whole family visiting in our home, and
our relationship on a friendly basis
continued through the years and 1 was
fortunate enough in being able to go to the
Regina conference which founded the CCF
and kept in touch with the... the
movement. . . from the beginning, became
very involved in it for a time. It was eh. . .
more than a political organization to those
of us who entered into it under the
leadership of J.S. Woodsworth... it was a
great cause... eh, in which we were
involved for the good of humanity, and the
slogan. . . "From Each His Best" and "To
Each His Need".
Joining a textile union
Retired glove factory manager A. F. Mabbett,
72, talks to Cheryl Pierson about his early
apprenticeship in Saratoga, N. Y.
PIERSON: What would you say is the most
difficult... or was the most difficult part in
making gloves?
MABBETT: Well now ... we were just at the
first operation. Now . . . there are 43 different
operations all together in glove making. There's a
colossal lot of detail I can tell you ... and ... we
would be here all day today and all day
tomorrow ... if I were to describe the whole thing
and go into the forgiting ... for instance ...
PIERSON: Forgiting???
MABBETT: Yeah ... the little pieces that's in
between the fingers. You look at your glove and
you got a little piece in between the fingers... All
right. Now those forgits have to be attached...
and then afterwards the glove is closed . . . and the
forgit is stitched on the other side and the glove is
completed... so then ... the the glove has to be
trimmed ... has to be trimmed... the fingers.. .
each finger's trimmed around . . . trimmed around
so it'll leave no ragged edges.
PIERSON: Well how did it come about that
you were accepted into the union?
MABBETT: Well of course there was always
men needed... they were at that time ... and if
you showed that you had learned your trade, well
you were accepted into the union.
PIERSON: They made you take a test of
some kind?
MABBETT: No, no test at all. You soon get a
test the very first day you're at work.. . that's
your test. .. they very soon know whether you
know your business or not.
PIERSON: Did you have any kind of papers
to show that you'd put in such-and-such a time as
an apprentice glove cutter?
MABBETT: No . . . none at all. . . no.
Because see your . . . your papers is what you can
do. There's your table, you're allocated three
yards and a half of table with a drawer in it, and
you have your own tools, your own shears, your
own cutting knives and they give you a couple of
pieces of cloth and show you what they want.. .
now this is the glove we want cut. . . glove like
that, and now let's see what you can do. So
you . . . they soon find out. . . because if you
didn't know .. . you couldn't move.
PIERSON: And how was the union set up at
this time? Back in the 1900's.
MABBETT: Well I can't go into too much
detail as how the union was set up. It was
there ... and well-organized and secretary and
treasurer and president... and it was a going
concern and still a going concern.
PIERSON: Was it all across the States at that
time?
MABBETT: Yes. Yes. Well I daresay there
would be some factories that weren't unionized
but the most of them were.
PIERSON: What was the relationship between
the union and the management?
MABBETT: Was fairly good, I would say . . .
fairly good. We did go on strike... we were on
strike for 11 months. We were on strike for...
ah... we were getting seven cents a dozen for
cutting short gloves ... and we went on strike for
nine cents... so you can see... today I don't
believe anybody cuts a dozen gloves for less than a
dollar and a half... well there's quite a stretch
between that and nine cents.
Gold miner Neils Madsens talked about depression days.
?'&>. itw*
'*sif-. ■>" .'%*'•*«!
Friday, October 13,  1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 5 Chess players and guitarist Dusty at Haida coffee house.
Coffee, chili and jazz
As long as I have been a student here,
filling a Sunday evening has been a perplexing problem.
I used to do mind-destroying jobs for the
library. Some people even resort to
studying!
This year, however, there is an occurrence called the Haida Coffee House
every Sunday from 8 to 12 p.m. in the
basement of one of the fraternity houses on
Wesbrook. It is like the downtown coffee
houses, but on a smaller scale.
I walked into a long low-ceilinged room
with a scattering of small tables, chairs or
old barrels to sit on a floor two inches in
wood shavings.
Soft candle-light and live musicians
afford a warm congenial atmosphere for
either conversing or getting into the music.
I sat on an old wooden crate by the wall. In
one corner a round low table was attended
by a mustachioed gentleman who was
tipping his chair back and amusing a small
group of intent listeners.
At another table two girls sat moving
gently in time with the music. Several
chess games were in progress; one, in front
of me, exuded mental effort as the players
hunched over the configuration, oblivious
to the fascinating patterns formed by the
candle-light shadows of the chess pieces.
The guitarist played and sang amidst a
clutter of other musical equipment. His
eyes said he played to himself, but the
music filled the room. After this song he
just turned, went to the piano and played
free-form music. Others began to join in: a
guitar took the lead and passed it on; the
clear tones of a silver flute floated in rom
one side, a bass guitar drifted in, lurking in
the background.
Communication was established and
soon up to seven people were jamming. I
was amazed to hear that it was the first
time they'd ever played together.
A coffee maker stood unattended near
the door, and I helped myself. Later
someone produced a huge dish of steaming
chili which we guzzled ravenously to the
strains of jazz piano played by a new
arrival. I went home at peace in mind and
stomach.
Norm Allyn, the organizer of the affair,
tells me he has very good musicians
coming this Sunday. They are not paid and
there is no charge for coming so if you are
stuck for something to do at 8 p.m. or so,
the address is 2270 Wesbrook, opposite the
psychiatric hospital.
—Simon Truelove
rushant
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Page Friday, 6
THE  UBYSSEY
Friday, October  13,  1972 Books
A dangerous lie
After reading 34-year-old
Saskatchewan, poet John
Newlove's new collection,
Lies, and waiting long
enough to see what drops
away and what sticks with
me, I find two striking long
poems: Company and
Eleventh Elegy.
Lies, John Newlove
[McClelland & Stewart,
Toronto, 1972].
Company is the strongest
poem of the book. It is
Newlove's voice and
message. Eleventh Elegy is
a translation or version of a
work by Rumanian poet
Nichita Stanescu, and
stands as a recognition of
other possibilies (of being)
than the bleak world
Newlove characterically
inhabits.
It's unfair to judge a book
by a single poem, I suppose,
but I'm sticking to a strong
intuition (perhaps that's the
only sensible way to read
poety). What comes through
in   Newlove's   writing   is
personal pain, loneliness,
certainly a developed sense
of disgust and even despair.
"There is a rancidness, a
smell of having given up, /of
having been given up on,"
Newlove writes in Company, whose alienated
subject is simply described
as: "it is a man".
This does not mean that
one turns away from such a
book. The purpose of poetry
isn't light entertainment, if
the poet goes to the bottom
and returns with the stuff of
sorrow, then that's what he
finds. That's the reality
encountered.
It's more complicated,
however. If Newlove encounters the loneliness of
sexuality unfulfilled ("It
sits in the public
library/coveting the women
it fears") and the
grotesqueness of human
relations ("company enjoys
being disgusted by it;/ it
enjoys disgusting company"), the human condition is further aggravated
by   the   despair   that   we
cannot even tell the truth
about it in the context of
dying.
The title metaphor of
Newlove's collection is 'the
lie'. In these lies we discover
some cold truths. That's
part of the word-play. But
under the puns and irony,
Newlove has a genuine
distrust of what we do with
language, how we use it. His
disgust with our lying (even
to ourselves) no doubt accounts for the simple style of,
the poems. They are without
conceit. Insofar as one of the
traditional functions of
poety is to reveal the truth
(in a way no other writing
can), Newlove denies this
and conveys to us his own
horror in being forced to
deny it.
Technically, there is
nothing particularly
noteworthy in Lies. As in his
previous work — . most
recently Black Night
Window (1968) and The
Cave (1970) — the poems (or
sections of poems) are brief,
See pf 8
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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 19
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Information - 733-7067
Sponsored by Charismatic Campus Ministry
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in
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FOR THOSE INTERESTED IN GRADUATE
AND UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
John Sayweil (Arts), Joseph Green (Fine Arts), and
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for further information on individual programs.
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Friday, October  13,1972
THE  UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 7 An
ecstatic
loss
From pf 7
straightforward and unpretentious. Newlove's
concept of the line is conversational, and neither
tricky or innovative. His
work is unaffected by the
modern discoveries of, say,
Pound and Olson. As a lyric
writer he has neither the
intensity or Robert Creeley
nor the linguistic brilliance
of Louis Zukofsky. His
'stance' toward the world
isn't startling or especially
profound.
Pointing this out isn't
meant as a putdown
(although, hopefully, it will
insure that his reputation
isn't inflated merely by a
burst of national chauvinist
enthusiasm). Rather, it
means that Newlove's
poems simply have to stand
on the strength of their
usually painful perceptions.
As insights into individual
life (in present society),
they often do. The "man'
at the centre of Company is
so estranged from others
(the "company" he
ironically longs for) that he
is referred to as "it":
•   It thinks that it likes to act
as company expects  it  to
act:
cadging,   begging,  groping,
insolent subservience,
arrogant whining
In      Eleventh      Elegy,
Newlove      keeps      alive
(through   the   words    of
another   poet   in   another
language)   the  counterpart
to the familiar landscape of
library     rooms,     lonely
beaches, more or less empty
social occasions:
But above all we are  the
seeds,   we   are   the   ones
seen simultaneously from
every direction.
Here we have people in
their generative aspect (as
seeds) and the landscape is
the whole earth in spring. If
elegies are poems of loss, in
this poem the loss  is ecstatic. It is proposed that we
at
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duthie
BOOKS
'lose' ourselves into the
phenomena of the world.
"We make ready to throw
ourselves out of ourselves/
and into something else,
something much higher,
something/ that carries the
name of spring . . ."
Newlove moves from a
stark social reality in which
the individual person is
utterly alone to a
metaphysical experience of
being in and part of the
whole world.
What is missing — and for
me, this* is a serious lack —
is any intimation that the
reality Newlove perceives
can be transformed by the
work of people. Instead
there is a metaphysical
vision of healing. It is a
powerful vision. Yet, of all
the lies, intended and accidental, it is this beautiful
lie that is the most
dangerous amid the
sobering truths of this book.
Stan Persky
~ACt — ACT — ACT — ACT — ACT — ACT~
AUDITIONS FOR
THEATRE DEPARTMENT'S PRODUCTION OF
TARTUFFE
by Mo Mere
to be presented January 10 - 20
will be held on
Tuesday, October 17   3:30-5:30
Wednesday, October 18   3:30-5:30
in Room  112 of the Frederic Wood Theatre Building
- Auditions Open To All UBC Students, Faculty and Staff -
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Page Friday, 8
THE  UBYSSEY
Friday, October  13, 1972 Friday, October 13,  1972
HE       UBYSSEY
Page 17
Turner lashes out
at Tory vagueness
By GARY COULL
Finance minister John Turner lashed out
against the vagueness of Conservative party
policies Wednesday night before an overflow
crowd at Magee High School Auditorium.
"Trying to find out where that party stands
on most issues is like trying to pin jelly to a
wall," he said.
Turner said the Tories had nothing specific
to offer except a promise to make Liberal
policies work better.
Turner spoke on behalf of Vancouver
Quadra MLA Grant Deachman and Vancouver
South candidate Gordon Gibson at a joint-riding
meeting.
Answering New Democratic party leader
David Lewis' "corporate welfare bum"
charges, Turner said the Liberal party regards
incentive to industry as a major investment by
the nation.
"They will repay themselves in terms of
increasing jobs for all our workers."
Turners said neither the Conservatives nor
the NDP's economic policies are feasible with
today's resources.
He said Stanfield's proposed tax cuts would
cost the federal government between $1.5 and
$1.8 billion dollars in lost revenue.
He said Lewis' charges of a "phoney incentive society" would be remedied by granting incentives in exchange for shares in the
company. In time the government would be "a
part owner in hundreds of enterprises in this
country."
Lewis' proposals for increased government
spending on low-income  housing,  urban
renewal, urban transportation and pollution
are being implemented bv the Trudeau
government as the resources permit, he said.
"Lewis' criticisms of the government might
be appealing to some Canadians, on the surface," he said, "but as Mr. Lewis said last year,
simplistic slogans cannot solve problems too
complex for simple solutions."
Turner said the issue in this campaign will
be who is best qualified to lead this country into
the 1970s. He said the Liberals will not run
solely in their record "although we could."
Their improvements in pollution commer
legislation, reform in taxation and foreign
policy have been good, he said.
"If there is one thing this government has
neglected it is to tell the people what we have
done," he said, adding "we have two weeks to
do it."
Turner said Canadians are being hurt by
prices. "But wage and price control is not the
answer." He said that if these measures were
instituted, Canada would be subjected to food
rationing.
Taking another stab at the Tories, Turner
said he agrees with Lewis' observation that
they were totally inept in their role as official
opposition.
While Turner was speaking two representatives of Pensioners for Action Now picketed
outside.
Spokesman Andrfew Neill said they were a
non-political organization demanding an increase in the basic pension to $150. This would
give pensioners a monthly sum of $246.30 when
the Guaranteed Income Supplement and Social
Security Assistance are included.
Canadian culture, identity
primary Liberal policy
By KEN DODD
Ensuring Canadian identity,
culture and interests from the
U.S. and other foreign influences is a primary concern
of present Liberal government
policy, urban affairs minister
Ron Basford said Thursday.
Speaking before about 100
people in the SUB clubs lounge
Basford said it is important to
always ask ourselves "how
should we respond to the U.S."
"This is always important
because we're living beside a
giant of 200 million people."
Citing the recommendations
of the recent Watkins Task
Force on Foreign Ownership
he quoted: "The object of
Canadian policy is to maximize
the disadvantages of this
relationship to the U.S."
Basford criticised the opposition parties for blocking
foreign takeover review
legislation in the last
parliament. He said the
legislation was opposed by the
NDP as not going far enough
and by the Conservatives as
going too far.
He said he would like to see
the implementation of two
recommendations of the
Watkins Report.
Firstly, he sees the need for
improved monitority of the
actions of foreign corporations
in Canada, and calls for
private companies owned by
foreign interests to report their
assets in Canada. Public
companies must do this now.
"As it is foreign coporations
have been establishing private
companies in Canada and
wouldn't report their actions to
the government," he said.  .
"We could find out more
about them from Washington."
Basford attacked the
provinces for not promoting
similar legislation.
Keeping to the same theme
of f foreign encroachment
Basford pointed to two am-
BASFORD... ensure identity.
mendments to the combines
investigation act, passed
during his tenure of minister of
consumer affairs as having
helped stifle foreign takeover.
He described the act as the
Canadian name for anti-trust
laws in the U.S.
He said stopping U.S.
companies from ordering their
Canadian subsidiaries not to
deal with American enemies
such as China or Cuba was a
significant development.
He also said the "prohibition
of importation into Canada of
interests of foreign corporations" was important. As
a result he said foreign concerns now could not buy out a
Canadian company in order to
minimize competition.
Continuing on the topic of
protecting Canadian integrity
and resources Basford also
touched on the MacKenzie
Valley pipeline proposal and
Canadian sovereignty in
coastal waters.
Basford said the pipeline
,plan is superior to tankers
coming down the B.C. coast.
He   said   the  government   is
spending money through three
departments to ensure no
ecological damage is done. He
listed assurance of such environmental protection along
with the insistence that the
pipeline be "Canadian controlled" as pre-conditions for
its construction.
"Our resources and supplies
must be protected," he said.
He said the Americans would
be charged for use of the
pipeline and that it could be
used to carry Canadian
resources south.
Turning to water resources
he pointed to the Arctic's
recent legislation passed by
the Liberal government
designed to protect Canadian
rights over pollution and
shipping through Canadian
waters.
He defended the record of the
Liberal government in applying special tax concessions
for Canadian companies.
He also said he believes the
Liberals had been successful in
providing "artificial
stimulation" to protect
Canadian culture and identification.
A questioner said he was
disturbed at the arrogance of
the Trudeau government in
avoiding "the real issues" of
the campaign. He said he
wondered why Basford hadn't
talked about why people don't
have jobs, can't afford decent
food, many are housed in
terrible conditions and Indians
live in hovels.
Replying, Basford said:
"Today is the first time in the
campaign I have spoken on
anything but housing," and
launched into a lengthy account of Liberal housing
policies.
He said the Liberal government was looking for alternatives to huge housing
schemes   and   listening   to
See page 19: LISTENS
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"SKETCHING CHALK-TALK -1
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Fri.  G-11   p.m.:   Sal.   1-11   p.m.:   Sun.  1-6  p.m. Page   18
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, October  13,  1972
Liberals claim LIP
to boost employment
OTTAWA (CUP) — The
federal government is trying to
put a dent in the ranks of the
unemployed by continuing its
Local Initiatives Program for
another year.
But its contribution to the
plan has dwindled to $85
million, down from last year's
$180 million, manpower
minister Bryce Mackasey
announced last week.
The new program will get
underway in December and
lasts until May 31, 1973.
Decisions on which projects
receive support will be made in
December, thus nullifying
potential charges of political
patronage, according to the
government.
The new LIP program is a
supplement to the $40 million
training-on-the-job plan which
Mackasey announced recently
in Toronto.
This year the emphasis will
by placed on creating more job
opportunities and the betterment of community services, rather than on the former "quality of life" theme,
said Mackasey.
Projects created under the
program should start 15 days
alter receiving approval, so
the main employment impact
will strike immediately.
The government hopes the
plan will create a total of 50,000
jobs.
"Projects must create
employment for unemployed
people," the LIP information
pamphlet tells applicants.
"This employment should be
over and above that which
would normally take place"
during the December to May
period.
Project sponsors must use
manpower centres to hire
unemployed people and show
they intend to hire those
receiving unemployment insurance or social assistance
and seeking work.
program included three extensions of funds for 5,700
projects, and created more
than 92,000 jobs, the government claims.
This year's appropriation is
lower because .of the tighter
regulations,   Mackasey   said.
"A higher figure could well
strain our resources," he said.
He did not know if the $85
million represents the total
amount that will be allocated
for the renewed scheme.
The tighter regulations include a decrease in the
maximum contribution
allowable per project. It will
not exceed $200,000 this year,
compared with $500,000 last
year "in order to allow more
money for smaller and more
diversified projects" the
minister's press release said.
Only projects which do not
require federal funding after
May 31 will be approved. Those
that wish to continue must
show they have alternate
funding before approval is
given thus effectively cutting
down on work of a long-term
benefit.
Projects suggested by the
information pamphlet include
expanding and improving
community "store-front"
services by repairing facilities
or adding support staff; groups
organizing employment for
themselves by providing new
services for their communities; development of
services for children, the
elderly or the handicapped;
environment improvement
programs; employment of
natives by native groups to
improve community facilities
and services; extension of
cultural arid social
organizations' programs;
minor repairs to substandard
housing; and employment of
people in non-profit projects by
organizations with limited
revenue.
Last   year's   $180   million       No   project   that   involves
Resignation forced
GUELPH (CUP) — Amid charges of sex discrimination, a
woman zoology professor has been forced to resign her position
at the University of Guelph.
Dr. Anne Dagg was fired last November but appealed the
decision and won. Soon afterwards, the administration told her
she would not receive tenure and would not have her contract
renewed in 1973.
Dagg obliged and submitted her resignation last April but it
was not made public until last month, effective the end of last
summer's semester.
Students plan to question the dean of the College of
Biological Sciences about the Dagg affair when he returns from
a holiday in Greece Oct. 21.
Dagg had been at Guelph U. for three years.
Earlier this year, university tenure and promotion committee charged that Dagg was not available for consultation
with students, her research was poor, her university participation was minimal, and she did not take a place in community life.
Dagg claims the deans told her that tenure was refused
because she lived 15 miles out of town and had a family.
She feels a major reason for her dismissal was her opposition to the dean's choice for a new zoology department
chairman in 1970. His choice was eventually rejected, but she
says that three of the other seven professors opposing the appointment were later forced to resign.
Dagg said her research work has been impartially judged
as excellent by a respresentative of the Canadian Association of
University Teachers, and her students rated her a good teacher.
She also said women were not allowed to participate on
university committees.
The only remaining charge is she lives 15 miles from the
university and she has a family.
"To find my work counts for nothing because I have a
family and live outside Guelph, the only accusations I have
received that are based on fact, has been totally demoralizing
for me," Dagg said. "I think the future of women is very bleak
in the professional world while such discrimination exists."
Fellow professors questioned about the charges have been
tight-lipped. Dagg is not pushing the issue and is looking for
another teaching job in Waterloo.
profit-making or subsidization
of a profit-making enterprise
will be supported.
Other project types that will
not receive support include
those giving financial aid to
employed people, those supporting "leisure activities"
solely for the sponsors, and
large   construction    projects.
Any project affecting the
"social objectives and spending priorities of other levels of
government" will be subject to
consultation between the
federal government and the
province     concerned.
Last year's scheme hardly
made a dent in the unemployment figures which have
been rising on a seasonally
adjusted basis almost continually during the past year.
STUDENTS
FACULTY & STAFF
10°/c
o
off on all
BOOKS
Just show your i.D. card
SEE OUR WIDE SELECTION
Mfr's.
Suggested List
• All the latest fiction
• Serendipity section
• Children's friezes
• Canadiana
• Dover colouring books
CHARGEX • EASY TERMS
DRIVE IN & SAVE
• Handyman's corner
• Children's books
• Gen. book dept.
• Art supplies
• Gift books
MILLERS
1123 DAVIE ST. 683-1326
Hours 9 a.m.-9 p.m. Mon.-Fri. Sat. 9 a.m.-6 p.i
SUB Film Soc Presents
Alex in Wonderland
with
Donald Sutherland
Ellen Burstyn
Federico Fellini
Oct. 12-15
Thurs. 7:00
Fri. & Sat. 7:00 $(9:30
Sun. 7:00
S.U.B. Aud., 50c
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— Landrover expeditions or by Minibus
3 weeks Ethiopia
4 weeks Afghanistan
3 weeks Greenland
One Month Trans-Sahara
2 weeks Morocco
2 weeks Scandinavia
the popular Camping Tours of Europe
5 weeks, 6 weeks or 9 weeks,
student driver-guides to take the
bus where the majority likes to stay.
It is not too early to make inquiries and reservations NOW! Capacities
restricted per departure because of the nature of the trips.
Ufl»
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world uuide travel
"IN THE VILLAGE"
5700 University BM.
Phone 224-4391 Friday, October  13,   1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  19
Regina prof fired
REGINA (CUP) — A lecturer at the
University of Saskatchewan Regina campus
will not have his contract renewed in
December, apparantly for political reasons.
Leland Sapiro, special mathematics
professor, will be forced to leave the university
where he has worked for seven years. His first
three years were spent at the Saskatoon
campus.
The official reason for not rehiring Sapiro is
a shortage of funds, probably due to falling
enrolment at the university. But the student
newspaper at Regina, the Carillon, has been
refused a copy of the budget so it cannot
determine the university's exact financial
picture.
The social sciences division was able to keep
"more faculty members than originally anticipated when the budget from the government
was first handed down," administration budget
committee chairman Dan de Vleiger commented. On the other hand, the natural sciences
and mathematics department, with the largest
divisional equipment expenditure, was apparently unable to economize. Sapiro was the
only math faculty member released, although
some lab members were also not rehired.
The administration claims it did not "fire"
Sapiro; it was simply letting his contract expire. The end result is the same — unemployment for the lecturer.
Sapiro thinks there is more to the expiration
than monetary problems.
In a letter written Tuesday to the Carillon,
he said: "It was suggested that the sacking
results from my city council speeches on behalf
of the youth hostel at Wascana student co-op."
He was deeply involved in this co-operative
student residence project of five or six houses
which the government closed last June.
"The government's recent action in shutting
down Wascana indicates, at least, that cooperative activities (communistic activities)
are not appreciated by the present NDP
government or their academic followers," he
added.
Sapiro said that lack of a PhD and failure to
publish have also been suggested as reasons for
the firing. However, he added, many other
Regina faculty members in various departments are tenured without a PhD. As for
publishing, he is editor of the Riverside
Quarterly and other publications which the
university has refused to fund.
"The basic issue," Sapiro said, "is the administration's failure to understand that a
legally correct action can nonetheless be
morally reprehensible. (And nobody else needs
to be told why it's wrong to dismiss somebody
with seven years service who has no prospect of
finding a job.) The university thinks its
behaviour is blameless simply because there is
no law against it."
Income tax holiday ends
for new foreign teachers
OTTAWA (CUP) — Newly-arrived foreign
teachers will no longer get away without paying
income tax for two years.
During the past 10 years, under reciprocal
treaties with 14 other nations, Canada has
exempted from income tax foreign teachers
who declare their stay in Canada will be no
more than two years.
Now foreign teachers will have income tax
and Canada pension plan contributions
deducted from their pay at the source. If they
leave the country within the two-year period
they may apply for a refund from the Department of National Revenue.
The new regulations make it almost impossible for a foreign teacher to get two years
of tax-free income.
Under the old system, it was possible for a
teacher to pay no tax and then decide to stay in
Canada after being here two years.
Revenue department officials concede they
have no plans to recover the tax that has not
been paid.
The new regulation will affect Americans
the hardest. During the 1971-72 academic year,
20 per cent of those appointed full-time teaching
staff at Canadian universities and colleges
were Americans.
The high rate of American appointments
comes at a time of massive unemployment
among Canadian graduates.
American appointees now will have to pay
the Canadian tax, but probably not pay any
American taxes.
Because of U.S. tax laws governing foreign-
based nationals, an American teacher in
Canada could claim a $20,000 exemption on
teaching income if he or she stayed in Canada
at least 510 days during 18 consecutive months.
Collective bargaining near
SASKATOON (CUP) — The
Liberal government has
opened the possibility of extending collective bargaining
rights to farmers, prompting a
challenge from the National
Farmers Union (NFU) for
opposition parties to declare
themselves on the issue.
Federal agriculture minister
H.A. Olson said in Wingham,
Ontario the Liberals would
"seriously look" at legislation
giving the NFU full bargaining
power for all farmers, if the
union had the backing of 51 per
cent of the farm community.
NFU president Roy Atkinson
wired to New Democratic
Party leader David Lewis and
Progressive Conservative
Party leader Robert Stanfield
last week asking them to
declare their parties'
respective positions on Olson's
statement.
Lewis told CUP in an interview last month that the
NDP favored collective
bargaining rights for farmers.
"With a slight ammendment,
that's all we want," Atkinson
said of Olson's statement.
"We think it would be appropriate for the government
to set up enabling legislation
first, then we would have a
positive position with which to
go out and sign up farmers.
The legislation would not
become operative until the
NFU would have more than 51
per cent of the farmers signed
into membership," Atkinson
said.
Listens to locals
From page 17
proposals by local housing
groups for solutions to low-cost
housing.
Citing Vancouver's Strathcona area as an example
Basford said the government
was beginning to release
money to provide these people
with "start-up" funds to get
them going.
Before, he said, "the
practice was send in the
bulldozers and sweep them out
of the way."
He said the Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation
now releases 85 per cent of its
resources to low-income
housing as compared to only 15
per cent four years ago.
Further defending the
government's policy toward
those with low incomes he said
the Canada assistance plan
was working with Manitoba in
investigating the possibility of
guaranteed annual incomes,
but  said   he   thinks   Canada
doesn't have the resources to
implement this at the present
time.
He did not comment on food
prices or the job situation.
Basford said sales of armaments to the U.S. were done
within the Joint Defence
Production Act "which is
essentially a job-creating
scheme". He said none of the
three parties would rescind
this and it is "nonsense to think
this will affect the length of the
war in any way."
A chorus of boos and
laughter greeted this response.
He said he felt the uniform
age of consent for homosexuals
should remain at 21 years.
Criticized by a questioner on
his recent quiet stance on
abortion, Basford said he
supports the present laws and
in the last parliament it wasn't
the consensus to arnmend the
laws further and it won't be in
the next parliament.
Basford left hurriedly after
to attend a radio talk show.
P+D
BILL
CLARKE
CARES ABOUT QUADRA
Just as it bungled the Vancouver Harbor landfill debacle, the
Trudeau government has applied the same sort of inept touch
to the Jericho Park land issue.
Adjacent to the land that will now become a Vancouver park
there is an additional 38 acres (in the government parcel north
of Fourth Avenue). Under a Bob Stanfield government, the 38
acres would also become parkland. In a letter about which I
have spoken before, he commits our party to return the 38
acres to Vancouver for a further token payment of one dollar;
this is the same cost value at which the property is carried on
the government's books.
By contrast, the Trudeau Liberals claim a price tag of
$900,000 or higher for this 38 acre parcel is necessary in order
to recapture the cost of moving the former armed forces base
that occupied the site to Chilliwack. Surely the cost of such an
inevitable move must have been calculated and budgeted for
years ago. Surely the citizens of Vancouver shouldn't be asked
to pick up this tab.
* *  *
If the Trudeau politicians were frank about government
business, they would have disclosed long ago that the
Department of National Defence still owns more than 40 acres
of prime hillside property with the best view in Quadra,
SOUTH of Fourth Avenue. If they needed a profit with which
to bolster their mis-managed federal treasury, they could have
offered this surplus land on the open market.
It seems the Trudeau Liberals have set a high price on parkland
for people. They would prefer to see multiple housing on the
site instead of open space for the enjoyment of all of us.
By constrast, Bob Stanfield wrote in a letter, to which 1
referred above, that has been public since mid-May:
"This area was park land prior to expropriation by the federal
government and now the federal government should return it
as nearly as possible to its original state."
* *  *
Trudeau's sitting candidate claimed in a recent interview that
his government will not give land to Vancouver that is owned
"by the Canadian taxpayers". He forgets that "Vancouver" is
owned by Vancouver taxpayers who also pay federal taxes. His
disregard for us makes him appear as one who doesn't live in
Vancouver and who couldn't care less for Vancouverites.
The fact we have been denied the use of this land for its
original purpose since the end of the war surely is grounds for
compensation from the Defence Department. This should not
be an opportunity to exploit us further. It is this same
department that under the Liberal regime allowed the aircraft
carrier Bonaventure to be completely refitted before sending
her to the scrap heap. That little exercise cost the Canadian
taxpayers $17 million.
What did the sitting member have to say about that? We're still
waiting to hear.
* *  *
The Jericho issue is emblematic of my whole campaign during
the past year and a half. It has been demonstrated over and
over again that I speak out for the people of Vancouver
Quadra on issues that affect them. Surely the voters of Quadra
will want to send a representative to Ottawa who has
demonstrated his concern for their problems and who puts
their interests first. It would be a great change from what
they are used to. ' -
Bill Clarke is the Progressive Conservative candidate in
the October 30th federal election. Page 20
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, October   13,  1972
Election closing with
high unemployment
OTTAWA (CUP) — While the federal election campaign
swings to a close the unemployment rate roars to a new height.
Unemployment hit a peak of 7.1 per cent in September on a
seasonally adjusted basis, the highest rate for that month in the
last 20 years, except for the 1960 figure of 7.5 per cent.
Although the actual unemployment rate is down to 5.2 from
5.4 in August, there was a larger-than-normal decrease in
employment and smaller-than-normal decrease in unemployment. This accounted for the increased adjusted rate, up
from 6.7 per cent in August, according to Statistics Canada.
At the same time, the actual size of the labor force dropped
434,000 to 8,840,000 as students went back to school. But it is a
greater-that-usual decline for this time of year, the statisicians
say.
People over 25 years old, particularly women, were hardest hit. The female unemployment rate for those over 25 went
from 3.2 per cent in August to 4.2 per cent last month, all on a
seasonally adjusted basis.
Youth (14-24 years of age) unemployment decreased only
slightly from 12.1 per cent to 12 per cent on an adjusted basis.
There were some 217,000 unemployed youth in September,
compared to 208,000 a year ago, using unadjusted figures. That
means youth unemployment is up from 9.6 last year to 9.7 on an
unadjusted basis.
The number of unemployed people seeking work for less
than a month increased sharply from 89,000 in August to 118,000
in September, or from 18 per cent to 26 per cent of the 459,000
total unemployed. It is also above the 150,000 in the same
category for September 1971.
The number of hard-core unemployed decreased slightly,
on a seasonally adjusted basis, from 107,000 in August to 105,000
last month, still well above the figures from April to July. Hardcore unemployed are those seeking work for seven months or
more. They comprise almost 20 per cent of the unemployed
labor force.
The Trudeau government's claim that it has created enough
jobs for Canadians entering the labor force does not hold water,
Statistics Canada figures indicate. Although the labor force has
increased by 2.5 per cent or 218,000 people in the last year, only
193,000 have found work, leaving almost 11.5 per cent of the new
workers unemployed.
The adjusted unemployment rates have also climbed
steadilv from 5.8 ner cent in Anril to the present 7.1 per cent.
Prime minister Pierre Trudeau said Tuesday he was
"puzzled" by the figures, and promised the government will
combat unemployment by putting more emphasis on policies
designed to create jobs directly. This would mean less emphasis
on programs which create work through stimulation of the
economy.
Trudeau said he was puzzled because every other economic
indicator showed the economy was growing at a fast rate.
Carleton students vote
to end council fees
OTTAWA (CUP) — Students at Carleton University here
will vote Oct. 23 and 24 to abolish compulsory student council
fees and make them voluntary.
It successful, the referendum would erode the financial
base of a student council already riddled with mass resignation
and inertia.
Students now pay an annual fee of $21 to the council, which is
automatically deducted from their tuition cheques.
Council last week voted to hold the referendum, when two
students brought the necessary motions to a council meeting.
They also demanded refenda on compulsory athletic fees ($24),
health and counselling fees ($12) and university centre fees
($16).
Council approved referenda on council and athletic fees, but
rejected the other two.
JTwo students promptly proceeded to gather 250 names on a
petition, which forces council to place all four questions on the
ballot.
The students claimed that many students do not use the
programs and facilities offered, and should have the right to
decide whether they will pay for them. They also claimed the
referendum would be a method of getting students involved in
some decision-making, rather than letting council members
decide what they think is best for students.
Student council president Bruce Cameron abstained on the
referendum vote, but said after it passed: "If the people want a
referendum, they shall have a referendum."
The vote will be held along with byelections to fill 12 vacant
positions on the 23-member council.
"STUDENTS"
Student Tenant Problems DO EXIST
Landlord-Tenant relations is an everyday affair which
affects a vast number of students residing off-campus.
We need Your Help!  Assist us in working to correct
these problems.
Call 228-3092
or contact Terri Ball in SUB 248
Alex in Wonderland?
Doris Day singing
"Hooray for Hollywood"?
Oct. 12-15 S.U.B. Aud.
VARSITY GRILL
4381 W. 10th
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^"Design and Word Trade Marks  in Canada of the Villager Shoe Shoppes Ltd." Friday, October  13,  1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 21
'Tween classes
TODAY
ABORTION ACTION COMMITTEE
Film,    illegal   abortion   in   Canada,
noon, SUB 205.
SKYDIVERS
General meet, noon, SUB 125.
PRE-SOCIAL WORK CLUB
Speakers   from    school-   ot,social
work, noon, SUB 113.
GERMAN
Polka   party,   I.H.,   lower   lounge, 9
p.m. to 1 a.m.
UBC SMEGMA ASSOCIATION
New club, first general meeting, new
members   welcome.' Come to. SUB
207 at noon.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
The economic issues within federal
elections;     four     different     views,
noon, SUB 111.
ISPC
Down under, 4 p.m. to 7 p.m., I.H.
lower     lounge,     every     Friday.
Facilities available.
EIC
Dr.     Gordon Shrum,     Hydro
chairman,    speaks:     The    role    of
engineers  in today's society, noon,
civil engineering 201.
YOUNG SOCIALIST CLUB
Joan Newbigging speaks on Mideast
question, 8 p.m., 1208 Granville.
NDP CLUB
Organizational meeting, noon, SUB
215.
HAMSOC
Meet    the    sharp    operators    who
pUiced first in Canada, fourth in the
world,   in   the  third   annual   world
RTTY contest, any weekday, Brock
ext. 358.
SOCIALIST STUDIES CENTRE
Organizational     meeting,     noon,
Buchanan 104.
SATURDAY
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Frosh dance,  8:30  p.m.  SUB party
room. Frosh, 50 cents, members 75
cents, non-members $1.
TAE KWON DO CLUB
No   practice 1:30 p.m., 2422 Main
St., due to tournament.
SUNDAY
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Rice bowl football championship,
Eric Hamber, 1:30 p.m., Oak and
Thirty-third.
VANCOUVER SCHOOL OF
THEOLOGY
Fireside, 8 P.m., 6050 na icellqr,
Fireside room, V.S.I.; chapel at "l
P.m. Dr. Bill Willmott talks on
Modern China.
HAIDA COFFEE HOUSE
Live accoustic music, no cover
charge, 8 p.m. to 12 p.m. 2270
West brook,
PHOTOSOC
General meeting 7:30 p.m., SUB
clubs lounge.
VARSITY DEMOLAY
Meet noon, SUB 213.
ELCIRCULO
Dr.    Siemens    to    show   slides   of
Spanish-speaking   countries,    noon,
IH, 402.     .
UBC KUNG FU CLUB
Practice,   4:30   p.m.   to   6:30   p.m.,
SUB 207-209.
BADMINTON TEAM
First practice for varsity team, gym
B.
TUESDAY
STUDENT MOBILIZATION
COMMITTEE
The Campus As Killer, guest
speaker, Richard DeGaetano, VMC
Toronto. Film, Ottawa Nixon
Protest, April 15th., noon, SUB
207-209.
ANTHRO SOC UNDERGRAD
Meeting, bring problems, hassles,
gripes, noon, Angus 303.    -
CANADIAN CROSSROADS
Apply for summer volunteer work
overseas, noon, IH stage.
SAILING CLUB
Club film, noon, SUB 205.
CAMPUS CRUSADE
L.T.C., 7 p.m., SUB 215.
Hot flashes
Women's
resources
The UBC women's action
group has made a list of important
resources for women at UBC.
Birth control information is
available from Speakeasy on the
main floor of SUB or 228-3700,
the women's referral bureau,
736-8471 (2) and the Free Clinic,
731-6929.
Abortion information can be
found at the women's referral
bureau or NOW, 736-7376. Both
groups will talk it over with you,
tell you about procedures and
refer you to doctors.
If you want to join a women's
rap group which meets to help
women handle the problems of
being women call Bonnie or Sue,
733-7514; Joanne or Karin,
732-7343 or Marg 325-6417.
Good academic counselling can
be found by calling Sue,
733-7514.
For gay women there is the
Gay People's Alliance on campus,
228-3700, the Gay Women's
Resource Centre, 738-344 or drop
in 1766 West Broadway, Sunday
at 8 p.m. and the Canadian Gay
Activists Alliance 24 hour help
phone line, 685-4850.
For information on women's
activities in Vancouver call A
Woman's Place, 731-9617.
Films include The Origins of
Settled Life in Meso-America,
Thursday; The Nuer, Tuesday,
Oct. 31; The Hunters, Juesday,
Nov. 14 and Dead Birds, Tuesday,
Nov. 28.
Registration may be made at
the door or by telephoning
228-2181.
Teacup
The Teacup football game
between the nurses and the home
economics women helped raise
$1200.50 for the Crippled
Children's Fund Thursday.
Admission prices to the game,
which filled Thunderbird
Stadium, and a campus-wide
classroom blitz held by the
engineers accounted for the
money.
Mexico
Films
The UBC centre for continuing
education in co-operation with
the National Film Board is
offering four anthropology films
at the NFB theatre, 1155 West
Georgia.
The films, selected for their
authentic insights into the lives of
people of other cultures, as well as
the artistic-documentary quality
of the production, will be shown
with comments and post-film
discussions headed by four UBC
anthropologists.
IntemationaJ House is offering
interested students a chance to go
to Mexico for Christmas.
It will cost you $200 including
air fare, insurace, room and board
plus about $50 for personal
expenses.
Send applications, which
should include at least one letter
of reference from a non-relative,
name, address, phone number,
department, year and age to L.
Barteski, International
Understanding Mexico Project,
International House, UBC,
Vancouver 8, B.C. by Oct. 22.
Radio
City tU$Kt4 Tfeatre
685-5831150 & Hattkas
FRIDAY & SATURDAY
"Colossus— The Forbin Project"
(6:15  &   10:15  p.m.) Science fiction
at its best
. . . New York Times
and Truman Capote's
"IN COLD BLOOD"
(8:00, p.m.) Directed by Richard
Brooks.
Starts Sunday for one week only!
"PUTNEY SWOPE"
(6:15 & 9:45 p.m.) The truth and
soul movie voted one of the year's
top ten by New York film critics.
also "The Rise and Fall of the Third
Reich"
(7:45 p.m. The historic documentary
of Hitler's Germany.
Admission only $1.35
for double feature!
CYVR and Grunt Records
presents: The Fourth Tower of
Inverness.
This is a contemporary radio
drama consisting of 65 continuous
segments. One each night at 8:00
p.m. and a summary of the
preceding week's events at 6:45
p.m. every Saturday.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Campus - 3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional lines, 25c;
Commercial - 3 lines, 1 day SI.50; additional lines
35c; additional days $1.25 & 30c.
Classified ads are nut accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the dav before, publication.
Publications Office, Boom 241 S.U.B., UBC, Van, 8, B.C
ANNOUNCEMENTS
DANCES
11
FROSH — DANCE TO TEMPO, A
CVC production, Sat., Oct. 14, 8:30
p.m.-l:00 a.m.  in SUB Partyroom.
POLKA PARTY. OCTOBER 13, $1.50.
International House, 9-1. Always
fun! Refreshments.
Greetings
12
SATURDAY SALE 100 FUR COATS,
jackets, many vintage items, $29
or less — all day Saturday, 10 a.m.
6 p.m. Pappas Bros. Furs. 459
Hamilton Street at Victory Square.
Phone 681-6840 weekdays 12-6 p.m.
Lost & Found
13
LOST — BLACK CAT, NEAR SUB,
Sept. 23. Reward ($10) for information leading to recovery. Leave
message at 228-3977.
LOST — FLAT BROWN LEATHER
case, three coil scribblers, several
papers. 926-2733. Between Buch-
anan and Chancellor gates.	
HARRY HOUDINI IS HIS NAME.
Escaping is his game. Would anyone who picked up a light golden
Lab male aged 1 year about Sept.
26th please phone 224-1416 evenings. He is sadly missed by the
children.
Rides & Car Pools
14
Special Notices
15
$75 FOR 75c. WATCH FOR B.C.
Bonus Coupons coming early
October  .
MUSIC. SOCIOLOGY AND RELIGI-
on, bible presentations. Day School
of Theology. Eight Mondays, 7:45-
10:00 p.m. Students $5.00, Oct. 16-
Dec. 4. Vancouver School of Theology 6006 Iona Drive. Information
V.  Anderson,  228-9031, 224-0069.
DISCOUNT STEREO, EXAMPLE:
AM-FM receiver, turntable, base,
cover, cartridge, two speakers, 2-
year guarantee, list $200, your
cost $125. Carry Akai, A.G.S.,
Zenith TVs. CaU 732-6769.
DR. JOHN CONWAY: REPORT ON
Churches In Europe", Wed., Oct.
18, 8:00 p.m. at S.C.N, annual
meeting, Vancouver School of
Theology, 6000 Iona Dr. All wel-
comel 	
FROSH — DANCE TO TEMPO, A
CVC production, Sat., Oct. 14, 8:30
p.m.-1:00 a-m.  in SUB Partyroom.
COME TO UNIVERSITY STUDENT
FELLOWSHIP — At lunch time
after the 11 o'clock services at St.
Anslem's and University Hill
Churches every Sunday. Bring a
bag lunch, tea and coffee provided,
meetings held at University Hill
Church. Ministers: Rev. Luis Cur-
ran and Dr. W. S. Taylor. HARVEST SUPPER at University Hill
United Church, on Friday, October 13, 6 p.m. All welcome! If
you plan to come, reserve in advance by phoning 224-1943, 224-
3663,  224-6963,  224-7011.	
DUST OFF YOUR INSTRUMENT!
Concert band looking for new
member* 1st rehearsal October 15.
For information phone 224-0386 or
684-7750. 	
EXPERIMENTAL GROUP SES-
sions are being formed by two
people who have had extended experience in group therapy. Aspects
involved include: Gestalt, sensitivity, Psychodrama, and role playing. If interested call: Neil at
738-0786 or Robert at 736-4016.
Travel Opportunities
16
Wanted—Information
17
HELP! REWARD FOR INFO LEAD-
ing to recovery of green Peugeot
10-speed lost at new student services center, Wed., Aug. 4 at 4 -
4:45.  Phone Larry, 224-9813.
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
1968 OLDS. 88, POWER EQUIPPED,
perfect condition, new tires, $1,750
or best offer! 736-4948.
—    1970 MGB  B.R.G.	
• Excellent shape — $1,950	
  687-6274 	
'56 CHEVY PANEL TRUCK, RUN-
ing order, no -plates. First reason-
able offer. Call Phil, 985-4269.
'65 T.R. SPITFIRE 4, 29,000 MILES!
Must sell. Exc. performance. Ph.
738-1142. $650 firm.
1962 VALIANT, REBUILT MOTOR.
New brakes, city tested, $300. Also
13" studded snow tires $30. Murray,
Rm.  110,  Ponderosa "B". 926-1004.
Autos Wanted
22
COMPACT IN GOOD CONDITION.
Maverick or Duster preferred. Ph.
224-0370 evenings, except on weekends.
Photography
35
l^tfje Hen* ant) gutter
Cameras!
LOAD YOUR OWN!
Cut Your Film Costs
In Half
Watson Bulk Loader $17.50
Lloyd Bulk Loader __ $9.95
98.5' llford FP4, HP4 $8.39
56' llford FP4, HP4 __ $4.89
3010 W. Brdwy.     736-7833
utile JLtn* anb gutter
\)j,"f      Cameras
REGULA FLASH
CLEARANCE
VARIANT FP $35., FT $41.,
CP $48., CT $60.
All Fully  Rechargeable!
Have We Got A  Flash For You!
VIVITAR, METZ, BRAUN,
TOSHIBA, etc.
3010 W. Brdwy.    736-7833
Scandals
37
MACBETH—A ROCK OPERA—BY
Richard Ouzounian and Marek
Norman, Oct. 25-Nov. 4. Student
performances Oct. 29-30, $1.00-$1.50
tickets now avaiaiable UBC Old
Auditorium Box Office,  228-3176.
FROSH — DANCE TO TEMPO, A
CVC production, Sat., Oct. 14, 8:30
p.m.-l:00 a.m. in SUB Partyroom.
PUT AN END TO POLITICS AS
usual. Come out and work for Ron
Johnson, 1956 West Broadway,
736-0288. Vancouver Centre Federal
N.D.P.
Typing
40
ESSAYS AND THESES  TYPED
Experienced Typist,
Mrs.  Freeman,  731-8096.
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING
my home. Essays, thesis, etc. Neat,
accurate work. Reasonable rates.
263-5317.
EXP'D TYPIST—THESES, ESSAYS,
etc. Phone Mrs.  Brown, 732-0047.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
WANTED HOCKEY COACHES TO
coach at Thunderbird Winter
Sports Centre, weekends. Bantam
League, 13-14. Contact Chastarnow,
261-9244.
Help Wanted (Cont.)
51
INTERESTED  IN   SELLING?	
Then why not be an advertising
salesman for the Ubyssey? This
part-time job offers an opportunity
to gain experience and to earn
worthwhile commissions. Reliable
2nd or 3rd year business-minded
student who will work hard for 10
or 12 hours weekly is needed. Must
have transportation. If interested
apply to Publications Office, Room
241,  SUB,  after 2 p.m.	
AFTERNOON MOTHER'S HELPER
— 3:30- 5:30 weekdays, on campus,
pay proportional to experience —
call 228-9874 after 6:00 p.m.
Work Wanted
52
EXPERIENCED SECRETARY OF-
fers fast, accurate typing service
on own electric typewriter.
Reasonable rates. Helen Ashworth,
683-1161 (days) or 681-8921 (eves.).
INSTRUCTION & SCHOOLS
Music Instruction
61
Special Classes
62
Russian
CLASSICAL BALLET
Night Classes
For Men & Women
CONSUELO TOREY
685-7518 (9:30 a.m. & 5:00)
Tutoring Service
63
Tutors—Wanted
64
WANTED: FRENCH TUTOR FOR
second year H.S. student — one
hour per week. 228-9557.	
WANTED: A TUTOR FOR A
Grade Six boy with learning problems. Qualifications: eduction student, third year or higher. Must be
free to work with the boy three or
four mornings a week; approx.
8:45 to 9:45. The tutor must be
kind, patient arid have a good
sence of humour. A salary of $3.
per hour will be paid. Contact Mr.
Gillies at Kerrisdale School, 261-
1851. Leave messages with the secretary.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
FOR SALE: ELECTRIC TYPE-
writer; Remington 2-year-old standard', newly reconditioned. $200.00.
J.  D.  James,  254-9451.
ROBERTS REEL TO REEL
stereo, tapes, etc. $150.00. Rossignol
Strato Skis, Salomon bindings, 210
cms,  $80.  Phone Chris, 224-7235.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
SUNNY BED-SITTING ROOM. WO-
men only. Share bathroom & large
kitchen with one other. $60 mon.
266-9828.
Room  &  Board
82
DELUXE ROOM & BOARD. CEN-
tral Shaughnessy. $100 month. Girl.
Non-smoker.  263-0159.
Furnished Apts.
83
Houses—Furn. 8e Unfurn.      86
WATERFRONT SALTSPRING IS-
land. Over 80 acres with ^ mile
waterfront. 2 beaches. 15 acres
cleared farmland surrounded by
treed slopes. Absolute privacy.
Ideal for group development or investment at less than $100.00 per
waterfront   foot.   Call  228-8126.	
TWO PEOPLE TO SHARE HOUSE
near UBC. Own bedroom. Available now! Phone 224-0230. Page  22
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, October   13,  1972
CANADIAN SKI ASSOCIATION
ANNUAL "SKI SWAP
PURE FOODS BLDG. — P.N.E.
Sat. October 14, 1972 —
1:00-6:00 p.m.
IF
FREE ADMISSION
Register equipment
at Pure Foods Bldg.
FRI. OCT. 13,4- 10 p.m.
SAT. OCT. 14, 9 - NOON
Further information:
Days: 732-8811
Nights: 985-6364
Intramural talk
By SIMON TRUELOVE
Seventy-eight men's
basketball teams are entered
this year, compared to 55 last
year.
There are also 38 soccer
teams (16 last year) and 38
hockey teams (26 last year),
inis increaiDie aesire on me
part of UBC students to play
sports has thrown the intramural exec into a state of
turmoil.
So if we get disorganized
sometimes (often?), it is
because we have run out of
such things as paid personnel,
gym space, and particularly —
money.
The swim meet was won by
forestry with Dekes splashing
in a close second. Fine fishlike
performances were turned in
by Jeff Wren and Grant Turner
who won two races each.
In the course of a game,
your skate ts punished
by sticks, skate blades
and pucks. So you need
a skate that can take it
... a skate made by
Daoust.
Daoust protection
The famous Daoust boot
is made of high quality
materials — like finest
Kangaroo leather —
chosen for strength and
durability. Inter-lined
with ballistic nylon mesh
and lined with English
kip leather provides
all-round foot protection.
The rigid box toe is
guaranteed. And on top
of all this ... the Daoust
Daoust performance
Just as a player must
perform under pressure,
a skate must perform
under punishment. . .
and Daoust skates do
just that. An example is
the Daoust National 300
— illustrated above.
Before this skate leaves
the plant in Montreal,
the blade is tested for
strength and resistance
on the Rockwell scale.
It must register a reading
of 58 to 60 — guaranteeing the DAOUST standards
of excellence.
With over 75 years of
experience, DAOUST has
created an impressive
line of skates — ranging
from the superb National
300 to the rugged Junior
Pro ... the skate for the
future superstar.
,J|   The DAOUST line
11%,     also includes
f§ls%.     lady's skates.
lFO_, Of solid
^Mm <. '«      construction
and elegant look, this
model — the Ice Ballet —
is a Daoust top seller.
The official skate of the
National Hockey League
Players Association.
Forestry won the medley
relay and gears somehow
engineered a freestyle relay
victory.
In division one football action, ADs held St. Andy's to a
one-all tie, engineers tied arts
two-all. Betas (the favorites)
smashed forestry 15-0, and
forestry beat education 6-0.
The badminton tournament
runs   Mondays   for   anyone
whose name begins with A-L,'
and Wednesdays for M-Zs
The defending champion,
Bill Ruby, has already reached
the top of his ladder.
In bowling, the Vancouver
School of Theology put on a
good show averaging 163 over
three, games.
The arts 20 race is on for
Thursday 12:30 p.m. with 108
great little trekkers setting off
in the eight man relay from
VGH.
Forestry speedster Jack
Lavis, co-holder of last year's
title, is reputedly whipping his
squad to the peak of their
training schedule to aim for the
1936 record time.
Softball comes to a climax
Wednesday at 12:30 p.m. with
forestry playing the winner of
Sunday's eliminations. ADs,
VST, dentistry, and commerce
are all running neck and neck
with the bookies.
Golf and tennis ladders are
posted at our office, Mem. gym
308. Games are arranged by
challenge, the results to be
submitted here.
There will be a hockey
referees' clinic Sunday noon at
Mem. gym 211. Professional
referee Nick Andriash will go
over the basic and more subtle
points of intramural refing.
Womens' sport
Two sports are currently
offered in the campus league,
women's tennis and mixed
volleyball.
The campus league is
organized for people who enjoy
competitive tennis but who
cannot afford the time to join a
university team. All equipment
is provided — come out and
enjoy the fun.
Tennis is played in the armouries 4:30-7 p.m. Mondays:
mixed volleyball goes
Tuesdays 8:30-11 p.m. at the
winter sports centre gyms.
Women's athletics still needs
a member at large to sit on the
executive. Please see Laurie
Wilson Mem. gym 202.
Intramurals
All unit managers for
womens' intramurals are
reminded of the meeting today
at 12:30 p.m. in Mem. gym 213.
The number of t-shirts
required for each organization
will be discussed at the
meeting.
Broomball games start
Monday and badminton starts
Wednesday. Friday, October  13,  1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 23
—tmic. wtit photo
IT IS POSSIBLE to have a winning football team on campus as the Nurses proved Thursday. The day was a
dismal one for home ec hannah and her girls as the wreckers lost 30-0 to a superior bedpanner team. Val
Cartmel scored three touchdowns for the nurses and Shirly Hiland added two more.
Opinion
By DAVID SCHMIDT
In British Columbia we have grown accustomed to mediocre football, and Saturday
that trend was continued.
In a game attended by almost 400 fervent
fans, most of whom were yelling "go Calgary
go," our own Gnuppermaniacs, the true blue
(and white) UBC Thunderbirds, demolished the
visiting Calgary Dinosaurs 10-6.
The game, as noted above, was somewhat
less than exciting, rivaling only our own dearly
beloved Lions in ineptitude.
The game could best be described as short:
short passes, short gains, short kicks, short on
action, and inevitably a short score.
Even UBC's Doug Young, or as the Province
preferred to call him, Dough Young, was short.
The aforementioned halfback was the game's
leading pass receiver as he made gains of over
50 yards on two fine catches.
. Unfortunately for Calgary, their quarterback was throwing the ball on both occasions.
Young's defensive teammate, Jim
D'Alfonso caught another perfect Calgary pass
and wandered 40 yards along the sideline with
the ball for UBC's only major.  (Considering
UBC ekes third win
By BRIAN MURPHY
As a result of Saturday's football win, the UBC Thunderbirds find themselves in the strange position of being tied for
second place in the Western Intercollegiate Athletic
Association.
Their second league victory of the season came against the
University of Calgary Dinosaurs, who had blundered into town
Saturday expecting to return to the plains with an easy victory.
Such was not the case, however, as UBC emerged victorious
on the strength of a 10-6 score in the locals' favour.
The keynote of the game for both teams was defense, as
neither offense generated much in the way of a scoring threat
for five-sixths of the game.
The Calgary offense, supposedly one of the strongest in the
Western conference, sputtered in a show of ineptitude bordering
on the ridiculous.
They were not wholly responsible for their problems,
however, as the UBC defense played as a tough, hard-hitting
unit that forced many Calgary miscues.
The 'Birds pass defense performed admirably. Leading the
corps with two interceptions was Doug Young while Jim
D'Alfonso, Mike Steffich, and Bruce Kiloh intercepted one each.
D'Alfonso's interception, at 11:29 of the first quarter,
covered fifty yards and resulted in UBC's only touchdown.
Kiloh kicked one convert and added a third quarter field
goal to ensure a 'Bird victory.
During the game guard Jim Blair suffered a break in his leg
which will keep him out of action for a least a month, and
possibly the season.
The 'Birds now sport a 2-2 lost record in league play, the
best they've done in years. The team deserves the support of a
greater proportion of the student body than it has received.
Saturday UBC travels to Manitoba for a game against the
Bisons. They're at home to league-leading Alberta next week.
In other conference action the University of Alberta Golden
Bears smashed the University of Saskatchewan Huskies 70-15,
which put the Bears ub a 3-1 tie with Manitoba for top spot.
UBC's win game them a 2-2 record, to tie with the Dinosaurs for
runner-up spot. The Huskies finish the first half of the schedule
with an 0-4 record.
1 win, 2 ties
The UBC Thunderbird soccer team is at the halfway stage
of its six game intercollegiate series and has recorded two
tied games and one decisive win.
The ties came Oct. 4 against San Francisco (0-0) and Oct. 6
against San Jose State (2-2).
The game against the Naval Post Grad School brought the
'Birds a 7-2 win and added five names to UBC's scoring list.
Daryl Samson and Joe Blell netted two each, and Wayne Larson, Ed Soltysik, and Iscobewis notched one each for the seven
goal total.
The score-less game against San Francisco university drew
a crowd of 5,000, an event that probably surprised the UBC
players who feel their following on campus is pathetic.
The second game with San Jose State was played with
another 3,000 in attendance.
The schedule has resulted in minor injuries to Ned Mulock,
Chris Suzuki, and Barry Redel. Coach Joe Johnson anticipates
that all will be fit for the upcoming games.
Back in Vancouver the B.C. soccer commission has
suspended any Pacific Coast League player now playing in the
semi-professional Premier league. No UBC players are affected, although the move could weaken the league and many of
the teams.
UBC will return to Vancouver Sunday. Their first game in
the Pacific Coast Soccer league is Oct. 29, with the full schedule
to be announced later.
Admission to soccer games on campus at Thunderbird
stadium is free to students.
that the total offence made by the defense was
greater than the total offense made by the
offense, perhaps we should play without a
quarterback, or better still, without an offense.
Perhaps, without a team.)
Near the end of the game the two teams
finally realized that the ardent fans were not to
be bored out of their seats, so they decided to
reward them with some last minute heroics.
UBC gave the Dinosaurs the ball and in a
rousing display of camaraderie Calgary
quickly moved it down the field and into the
UBC end zone.
At this point the teams agreed that a two
point conversion would be more scintillating
than the ordinary kicked convert, but at the last
moment Calgary's QB balked and refused to
throw it near a receiver.
However, UBC was still in a generous mood.
They allowed Calgary a perfect onside kickoff
recovery to give them one more try at winning
the game.
However, Calgary's quarterback, getting
more surly every second, threw three quick
incomplete passes in succession to try and
restore the game's mediocrity. A UBC penalty
foiled that attempt.
In a last desperate attempt to lose the game,
he threw another perfect pass that was completed by UBC.
The game, mercifully for the fans, was over
and as far as I'm concerned, so was the season.
Weekend Action Box
Date
Sport
Opponent
Place
Time
Oct. 14
Field Hockey (a) Falcons
Tsawwassen
1:00 p.m.
Oct. 14
Field Hockey (b) Grasshoppers
Spencers Field (East)
2:30 p.m.
Oct. 14
Football
U. of Manitoba
Manitoba
Oct. 15
Soccer (2)
S. Burnaby
Richmond Pk.
Oct. 11
Rugby
Kats
UBC
6:15 p.m.
Oct. 11
Rugby
Pocomo
UBC
6:15 p.m.
Oct. 14
Rugby
Can. West Tour.
Victoria
Oct. 14
Rugby (Braves)
Langley (tentative)
Woolfson
2:30 p.m.
Oct. 14
Rugby-Frosh
Ex-Brits
Clinton
1:15 p.m.
Oct. 14
Rugby-Totems
Ex-Brits
Clinton
1:15 p.m.
Oct 14
Rugby-Toma.
Pocomo
Hume
1:15 p.m.
Oct. 14
Sailing
Kickoff Regatta
U. of Washington
Oct. 13
Field Hockey
C.W.U.A.A. Tournament
Edmonton
Oct. 9
Soccer
U.S. Naval College
Monterey
Oct. 11
Soccer
Colorado College
Colorado Springs
Oct. 13
Soccer
Colorado All-Stars
Colorado Springs
Oct. 15
Soccer
Metro State College
Denver
Oct 12
Rugby (V)
U. of Victoria
UBC
12:30 p.m.
Rugby
The first Canada West
university rugby championship will be played in
Victoria Saturday and Sunday,
with the universities of
Alberta, Calgary, B.C. and
Victoria participating.
The opening round of play
wiH have Alberta playing
Calgary, and UBC vs. Victoria,
prior to the tournament
schedule.
The final round will have
UBC meeting Calgary and
Victoria vs. Alberta on
Saturday. The Sunday
schedule will pit UBC against
Alberta and Victoria against
Calgary. The total points of the
round-robin schedule will
determine the winner.
Last Saturday the 'Birds
defeated Rowing Club 54-13 at
Brockton Point.
Do you work in Aquatics in the Summer? Have you
longed for a change of real Lifeguard Training?
NOW'S YOUR CHANCE
U.B.C. Recreation Program is offering THE NATIONAL
LIFEGUARD CERTIFICATE, Saturday, and Sunday
October 14, 15, 21, 22, 28, 29 at 9:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m.
(Pool Option).
For more information and Registration contact Mr. Nestor
Korchinsky in Room 208F or by telephoning 228-2401 in the
War Memorial Gymnasium Page 24
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October  13,  1972
An uncommon event:
UBC's secret energy meeting
Who were these guys
and why were they
discussing Canadian
energy resources
By MIKE SASGES
OH, PLEASE, Tony Scott, tell us it isn't true.
Secret meetings are pretty common
on this campus.
What is uncommon, however, are
unpublicized secret meetings.
It's general knowledge that the board
of governors and the senate elite work
in secret.
What isn't general knowledge is that
UBC academics often work secretly
with highly placed civil servants and
corporation biggies.
One such meeting took place this
weekend behind barred doors at the
Cecil Green mansion and the faculty
club.
The meeting is being called a conference and a 'think tank" by participants.
Whatever it's branded, the meeting
involved the future sale of Canadian
energy resources to the United States.
About 30 corporate executives,
professors and government experts in
the energy field, both from the U.S. and
from Canada, attended.
And it was sponsored by an
organization known as Resources for
the Future, based in Washington, D.C.
and funded by the Ford Foundation.
It was organized jointly by the
economics department here and the
University of Denver.
Economics head Tony Scott, one of
the meeting's organizers, told The
Ubyssey the public was barred from
the meeting because some of the
participants would have stayed away if
the discussions in the meeting were
made public.
Among those attending were:
James Cross of Philadephia, an
official of the Sun Oil Co.; Arlong
Tuffing of Washington, D.C, a member
of the staff of the U.S. Senate committee of the interior; William Vogely
of Washington, D.C, an official of the
U.S. department of the interior.
Bob Burch of Denver, a banker and
independent   U.S.   oil   man;    Ronald
Ritchie of Toronto, vice-president of
Imperial Oil; Milton Lipton of New
York City, of the economic consulting
firm of W.J. Levy. '
Jack Austin, deputy minister of
energy, mines and resources; Prof.
Eric Kierans of McGill University, an
economic nationalist who opposed the
wholesale export of Canadian energy
resources to the U.S.
David Furlong of Calgary and Ottawa, managing director of the
Canadian Petroleum Association, the
representative in Canada of the major
international oil companies; Rodney
Dobell, a University of Toronto
professor on loan to the federal finance
department as a consultant; Paul
Dickie of Ottawa, a National Energy
Board economist; Morian Gurfinkel of
Washington, D.C, a member of the
staff of the World Bank.
D.G. Hartle of Ottawa, assistant
deputy minister, treasury board; Carl
Beigie of Montreal, director of the
Private Planning Association of
Canada; Dr. Hugh Keenleyside of
Victoria, former co-chairman of B.C.
Hydro who held responsibility for
B.C.'s obligation to build dams on the
Columbia river.
B.C. resources minister Bob
Williams dropped in for lunch Saturday, reportedly to speak on his
government's opposition to
unrestricted export of provincial
energy resources.
Although Scott was reported to have
said that none of the proceedings at the
conference would be made public,
reporters attended a Wednesday
seminar of economics profs and
students when the meeting was
discussed.
Paul Bradley, a UBC economist
currently conducting energy resource
studies in Britain, and an organizer of
the  weekend  conference,  detailed  a
study shown at the conference made
by the National Petroleum Council, a
U.S. industry organization.
The study claims U.S. consumption
will grow at a rate of 4.2 per cent per
year for the next decade or more, while
domestic energy resources will only
expand at a rate of 2.6 per cent.
The gap will be partly closed by
nuclear and thermal energy, the study
says, but mainly through an increase in
imported oil and natural gas.
He said the Americans will look to
Canada for part of their gas needs if the
Canadian price is near the going rate.
Scott asked The Ubyssey Thursday
not to attribute statements made at the
seminar and to treat it, not the public
conference, but as an "off the cuff"
discussion.
"I was most disappointed that the
press showed ud." he said. "But it was
my fault in not explaining that the
seminar was part of the economics 670
program."
At the seminar Scott said Canada
might be better off allying itself with
Venezuela or the Middle East when it
goes to sell energy resources.
"This was just pure seminar
speculation," Scott told The Ubyssey.
Scott called the weekend meeting
with the corporation executives and the
civil servants "a briefing session for
academics."
"I was quite genuinely interested in
learning," said Scott. "It can be expected that research reports will
follow."
When asked if the corporate
representatives had presented their
proposed energy needs to the meeting,
Scott said: "I don't think I can answer
that type of question. It would be
divulging the contents of the meeting."
Why was the meeting organized?
"Oh, well I think that all the
background studies make it very clear
there's going to be a gap or a deficit in
20 years and that the U.S. is going to be
looking around, not only as a nation,
but individually for new energy
resources.
"Their imports of energy resources
are going to have to increase."
Scott told The Ubyssey he believes
both the U.S. government and
American corporations are unsure of
their future energy needs.
Colleague Milton Moore said
Thursday he didn't care if the public
attended the weekend meeting.
Colleague Peter Pearse told Wednesday's seminar he unofficially
estimates Canada could expect a $208
million return on the proposal to pipe
natural gas from MacKenzie Valley.
Moore told the seminar he learned at
the weekend meeting that of the total
25 trillion cubic feet of gas to be
transported by the pipeline, 10 million
would be sold to Ontario consumers.
"And at a higher rate than they are
now paying for Alberta natural gas,"
said Moore.
Another 10 trillion cubic feet would
be sold to the U.S. and five trillion
would be lost in transmission, said
Moore.
Moore told The Ubyssey the
MacKenzie pipeline proposal is "very
unattractive".
"I expect to carry on privately-
funded studies into the matter," he
said.
Moore said he wants to know if there
are any benefits in exploiting Arctic
gas and oil and if there would be any
benefits if Canada was to do so.
"I expect the best thing is to leave the
resources there for the next 10 years or
so," he said. "I don't know why the
Canadian government wants to get
exploration going."
If and when Moore does find his
answers it's hoped he won't keep them
secret.
Unlike some people around here.

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