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The Ubyssey Feb 12, 1971

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Array Growing concern in the Graduate
Student Association over the fact that
certain of its members are not members of
the Alma Mater Society, was reflected in a
recent report presented to the AMS
Council.
The report, submitted by architecture
rep Ken Mariash, deals with the thorny
problem of AMS fees for grad students.
At present, only first year graduates pay
AMS fees of $15 and $9 for SUB operating
costs.
In addition, they pay $27 in GSA fees
and for use of the Graduate Student
Centre, bringing the total for student
services to $51 for the first year grad
student.
Other grad students, do not pay AMS
fees and are consequently not members of
the AMS, according to the AMS
constitution.
In an effort to deal with the problem of
AMS fees for grad students, Mariash's
report presented several alternatives to the
Grad centre facilities
for AMS membership
present structure of the fee system but
concluded in favor of the following
recommendation:
The report proposed that the GSA be
requested to exchange for the official AMS
membership of its senior grad students,
partial and controlled use of its facilities at
acceptable times.
It also suggested that the times and use
of the facilities in question and their
respective rental rates be agreed upon by a
committee representing the interests of
both societies, and be chaired by the AMS
co-ordinator.
The report added that a further tax is
expected to be levied upon grad students
due to financial difficulties of the GSC
extension, so "the AMS cannot hope to
achieve settlement of non-paying senior
grads by requesting them to pay additional
fees on top of their upcoming taxes."
The report said that the recommended
arrangement will facilitate an exchange of
ideas, "that will hopefully lead to a
healthier and more understanding
relationship between the undergrads and
grad students which will ultimately result
in the breakdown of hierarchical academic
stratification or the atomization of the
university community."
At present, lawyers hired by the AMS
are investigating the situation but have not
yet come to any conclusion.
The report was brought up at
Wednesday's council meeting, but the
inability   of council to reach a  quorum
prevented any action, from being initiated
at that time.
GSA president David Mole said in an
interview Thursday that the report was
premature and of little concern to GSA
members as a whole.
He added the situation will be brought
to the attention of the GSA at their general
meeting in March, at which time the GSA
will decide which course of action to take.
The whole controversty of AMS fees for
grad students has a long history. Ten years
ago former Board of Governors' chairman
Walter Koerner donated the graduate
student center to the GSA for their social,
academic, and leisure activities, as well to
enhance the solidarity of the graduate
students.
Further, it was thought by some that
the pleasant atmosphere of such a facility
might help lure upcoming scholars into
pursuing their post graduate work at UBC.
to page 16: see: NO OBLIGATION
Lau AMS win
not sure thing
By MIKE SASGES
Hanson Lau, Alma Mater Society co-ordinator narrowly defeated
student senator Steve Garrod in Wednesday's election for next year's
AMS president.
Garrod's human government slate did, however,
take the other three positions on the first slate and
they will be running a full second slate.
But Lau's victory celebration may be short-lived.
AMS treasurer Stuart Bruce is "highly
concerned" over irregularities in the presidential
election.
"I believe that there are irregularities in the
election that make the final results of the
presidential tally highly suspect," he said Thursday.
"The irregularities were possibly greater than the
difference between the two top candidates.
"I intend to go to the student court and ask
them to rule the presidential election invalid," said
Stewart.
Due to the use of preferential balloting, it took
three counts of the presidential votes before Lau
was sure of his victory.
On the first count, Garrod of the human
government slate topped Lau with 83 votes.. The
popular vote was in Garrod's favor, but he did not
have the mandatory 50 percent plus one vote
majority.
With the second vote, Garrod's lead increased to
95 votes. He still did not have a clear majority.
With the third count, the ballot counters were
looking at the second preference of those 771
people who voted for AMS vice-president John
Scott Mitchell.
Garrod's backers, had by this time, called it a
night.
Mitchell and Lau were too close together in their
political outlooks to expect Mitchell's backers to
vote Garrod over Lau for their secondchoice.
The results were as expected. Lau jumped ahead
by 227 votes and had a clear majority with the
third recount. to page j 5 ^ HUMAN
We're sorry
In Tuesday's issue of The Ubyssey we reported
that Bill Messenger and Peter Taylor were
completing their PhDs in English and were about to
publish.
Since then we have learned that both men have
completed their PhDs and have published.
'Profs under investigation'
English department professors who stuijilil
to have the policies of the depaiinium
investigated have found themselves the •ictu:il
object of an investigation, three profs Mid
Thursday.
The three profs - whose identities are
known to The Ubyssey but who prefer to
remain anonymous at this time - explained in
an interview the motives behind a letter -turned
by 17 of 38 tenured English professors
demanding the resignation of department head
Dr. Robert Jordan.
The profs said they wanted to remain
anonymous in order to prevent furthei
acrimony in the departmen L
"We believe the letter asking for Jordan's
resignation is an example of the faculty's los.-. of
confidence in him," said a spokesman for Ihe
profs.
"This is stated in the letter.
"(But) we asked Kenny to investigate the
department and in turn we find that we
ourselves are being investigated."
Aits Dean Douglas Kenny said in a letter to
member of the department that he believes the
department has proved itself incapable of
solving its own problems and that he (Kenny)
has found it necessary to step in.
The three professors said they believe
Jordan's position in the department has become
untenable because of the loss of faith in him on
the part of faculty members.
"Many of us no longer trust him to keep his
word and no dean's investigation will change
that." the spokesman said. "His position is not
tenable when he has lost the faith of so many
of his faculty members."
The spokesman said the investigation by
Kenny h.isall the earmarks of an administration
whitewash.
to page IS: see: ABOLITION
—John thomson photo
HANSON LAU ponders the uncertainties of victory Thursday
night as down-to-the-wire ballot count continues at Election
Central in SUB art gallery. Lau won on the third preferential
ballot count, but victory may be short-lived as AMS treasurer
Stuart Bruce takes the matter to student court.
AMS candidate fools
UBC Reports editor
UBC Reports editor Jim Banham said Thursday he was duped
when he published an article by arts president Don Palmer on
undergraduate financing.
"I had no knowledge whatsoever that Palmer was running for an
Alma Mater Society position until today (Thursday)" Banham said in
an interview.
"Had I known he was running for an AMS position, I would have
found myself forced to postpone printing it."
The article appeared in Thursday's UBC Reports, the
administrations public relations organ.
Palmer, president of the arts undergraduate society, announced
his candidacy for AMS treasurer the same day.
"You can say I was a dupe," said Banham. "The article had been
sitiing on my^desk for weeks.
"I didn't know until after the paper was out that Palmer was
running for a position.
"He came in to thank me for the space and mentioned he was
running for an office. He didn't say which one."
Banham said the article, although appearing just as nominations
for next weeks second slate elections opened, was not intended as a
campaign statement. Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday,  February  12,  1971
Students granted parity
at University of Alberta
YEAR-END
CLEARANCE
SUZUKI CENTRE
10% Off on 1970 Models
2185 W. Broadway     731-7510
<£
JHE CURRY HOUSE
3934 MAIN ST.
(at 23rd)
Tel: 879-7236
finest EAST INDIAN food
$3.00 for groups of 10 or
more - CLOSED MONDAY
EDMONTON - (CUP) - Students at the
University of Alberta have received parity with
faculty on the General Faculties Council, the major
decision-making body of the university.
A special meeting last week approved by a vote
of 42 to 33 the recommendations of an ad hoc
committee established in September, 1969.
Chaired by administration president Max
Wyman, the committee recommended a
composition of 49 students and 49 faculty out of a
total membership of 127.
Although the student votes will now
theoretically cSrry equal weight with that of the
faculty bloc, it is assumed that the administration's
29 votes would tend to swing contentious issues in
favor of the faculty.
In addition, to Wyman, the ad hoc committee
included two faculty members, two representatives
of the student council and one from the graduate
students union.
The GFC decision came as a surprise as it was
expected there would be overwhelming support for
a dissenting minority report by committee member
D. T. Anderson, a law professor.
The minority report, frequently labelled
insulting to students, said while there are areas in
which students have shown themselves to be
competent, such as food services and the
organization of sporting and other extracurricular
activities, it would be best to leave the situation as
is.
Other opposition was based on the premise that
the university community was "not ready" for such
a step. Professional faculties especially worried that
increased  student power on  the governing body
responsible for academic standards would endanger
the acceptance of degrees from the U of A as
valuable qualifications.
It was felt students were at university to get
credentials, their contribution coming after
graduation, with the feedback of their education
into the community at large. It was also suggested
that the new body would be too large and unwieldly
to be effective.
The GFC formerly had a membership of 82,
with three undergrad and two grad students and 49
faculty.
However, members vote on their individual
preferance and not on the instruction on the faculty
they represent.
In introducing the proposal, Wyman stressed
that students are a constituent part of the university
and not mere clients of it.
Universities, he said, must accept the challenge
of the future.
"The universities in the United States do not do
this and are being ruled by fear, he said. "Academics
fear students and both fear administrators. Society
is fearful of what is happening in universities, and
from legislation now being passed, universities in
turn have good reason to fear society. This must not
happen in Canada."
Increased student representation, he said, is a
"challenge to stop complaining and protesting and
start initiating and innovating."
The student council, which is in agreement with
the new GFC composition, is opposed to the
method of selection of student members. The
proposal that was passed would bypass the council
in favor of direct student elections from each of the
faculties.
STUDENT CHARTER
FLIGHTS
ALL UBC STUDENTS ELIGIBLE
VANCOUVER to LONDON
FOR ONLY $258.00
Leaves June 1st, Returns July 7th.
Other departures and flight times available.
See LINDA at
WESTERN STUDENT       Room 237B SUB
SERVICES  TRAVEL
OFFICE
Hours 12:30-4:30 M-F
or call 731-0933
Drop In At Your
Campus Travel Office Soon!
Room 237B SUB.
Hours: 12:30-4:30 M-F
K>_Li|
The Job:
CITY of VANCOUVER
ELECTRICAL
ENGINEER
As a member of the Electrical Division, Engineering
Department, to participate in engineering design relating to
lighting and power projects.
Student country-club nudism?
The Qualifications:
A group of nude freaks are
organizing to persuade local
nudist camps to offer special
memberships to students so they
can avoid hassles with police at
places like Wreck Beach.
Dennis Boer, an organizer of
the group, said; "Memberships at
most nudist camps are $35 for an
initiation fee and a $45 annual
fee, which is too high for
students.
"Those students who are
interested in nudism must
therefore carry out their activities
with the risk of being arrested by
the police."
Technology
and ecology
Mr. Anti-Pollution, Donald
Chant, will speak on ecology and
technology Saturday at 8:15 p.m.
in Bu. 106.
Chant, who organized
Pollution Probe in Ontario, was
mainly responsible for banning of
DDT by that province and the
federal government.
The lecture, sponsored by the
Vancouver Institute, is free.
Boer suggested that students
who are interested in nudist
activities should join the group
and petition the nudist camps to
offer a special student
membership.
Nudist camps are not camps
for legalized sexual orgies, he said.
They are largely plots of land
with full facilities, much like
country clubs, only the members
must appear in the nude.
There are several nudist camps
in Vancouver.
The members of a nudist camp
are expected to conduct
themselves in the same way as
they would in public.
Boer said, "Members of a
nudist camp are not expected to
do anything which they would
have to apologize for.
For any information on the
group which is trying to obtain
student memberships, or on
nudist camps, phone Doug Boer at
733-3014 after 7 p.m.
Registration, or eligibility for registration as a professional
electrical engineer in B.C. Knowledge of the Canadian
Electrical Code. A Drivers License for the Province of B.C.
is required. Consideration will be given to 1970 and 1971
Electrical Engineering Graduates as Electrical Engineer
Trainees.
The Salary:
P. Eng. - $994 to $1083 per month. Electrical Engineer
Trainee — $721 to $866 per month, depending on
experience. Plus generous fringe benefits.
APPLICATION FORMS:
Must be obtained from and returned to the Director of
Personnel Services, Room 206B, 453 West 12th Avenue,
Vancouver 10, B.C. as soon as possible. Please quote
Competition P-7655.
PERSONNEL SERVICES
FEBRUARY 4, 1971
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71011 BACH: Magnifcat in D, BWV 243; Cantata, BWV 51
71015 HAYDN: Sym No. 6 (Morning), No. 7 (Noon),
No 8 (night)
71020 FRENCH ORGAN MASTERPIECES
71027 PURCELL: Sonata for Tpt; Suites; for Harpsichord
71028 MOZART: Cto for 2 Pianos, K.365; Cto for 3 Pianos
71029 BACH: Cantatas, BWV 140 & 57
71059 MOZART: PianoCtos, No 18, K.456;No. 24, K.491
71063: RAMEAU: Pieces de clavecin en concert (1741)
71065 TELEMANN: Chamber Music with Recorder
71072 MOZART: Piano Ctos, No 20, K.466;No 23, K.488
MAIL ORDERS
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71086 LAUDARI0 911DI CORTONA
71093 STRAVINSKY: The Rite of Spring; 4 Etudes for Orch
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71096 HAYDN: Sym No 39, No 3, No 73 (La Chasse)
71097 RENAISSANCE VOCAL MUSIC
71098 FOUR CENTURIES OF MUSIC FOR THE HARP
71103 CALDARA: Canatata; Madrigal; Cantata; Canons
71104 VIVALDI: 5 Concertos for Diverse Instruments
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OPEN
THURSDAY
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UNTIL
9 P.M.
weec Friday, February 12, 1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
UBYSSEY PHOTOGRAPHER Dave Enns ponders the evils of the newspaper business
while making a brief escape to the beach Thursday. Enns, disgusted with the smokey,
beer-sodden atmosphere of The Ubyssey office, ran to the roadless beach haven to
—brett garrett photo
regain his sanity. But fearing he might be enjoying his last lucid moments, he had the
escape committed to photographic posterity. The next time you go to the beach, think
of Dave, laboring long into the night in his lonely darkroom.
Placement office still finding jobs
By SANDY KASS
University graduates seem to be holding their own in
an economy in which the general unemployment figure
averages almost nine per cent, director of Student Services
A. F. Shirran told The Ubyssey last week.
Only four per cent of UBC's 1970 graduates were
unable to find work, Shirran said.
"To suggest there is a complete lack of job
opportunities for graduates is to mislead those considering
university education."
A survey taken by the UBC student placement office
states that of the 161 graduates who received their PhDs
in 1970, only three are unemployed.
Four grads were untraceable, 53 are pursuing
post-doctoral studies, and 101 have found jobs.
The survey did not state whether those employed
found work within their respective fields of interest.
Of the 1970 graduates receiving Bachelor degrees
only 94 out of 2,379 have registered at the student
placement office. And most of those registered were in
arts or science courses.
Shirran said he realized not all unemployed graduates
may have registered at the student placement office.
Technology institute head resigns
HALIFAX (CUP) - Following repeated demands from the faculty and students at Nova Scotia Institute of
Technology, administration president G. W. Holbrook handed in his resignation this week.
Heavy opposition to Holbrook developed after the dismissal of seven professors, when the administration
maintained they could not obtain enough funds from the provincial government to cover the salaries of the men and to
grant pay increases to other faculty.
Holbrook was accused at a mass rally Feb. 2 of using the seven as a political ploy to obtain additional
government grants.
Holbrook tendered his resignation to the board of governors on both Feb. 1 and Feb. 2. Both times it was
rejected.
At a board meeting on Feb. 8, the resignation was accepted at Holbrook's insistence.
The president's resignation was followed the next day by that of the dean of engineering, Dr. E. L. Holmes.
Although Holmes made no public explanation, he had announced at a student rally that he would accept blame-for the
decision not to reappoint the seven faculty members.
On Feb. 3, students staged a protest march to Province House to deliver a three point brief to Nova Scotia
premier Gerald Regan. The brief contained demands for a change in the pre-engineering programs and the initiation of a
four-year degree program in engineering. There has been no response as yet.
'Foreign ownership 76 per cent'
OTTAWA (CUP) — A recent government report on
foreign ownership on non-financial firms in Canada for
1968 indicates that slightly over 76 per cent of the
country's major companies were under foreign control.
Of 362 firms with assets of $125 million or more in
1968, 276 were under control of a foreign country,
mainly the United States.
The report noted that big firms grow faster than small
ones, and big firms tend to be under foreign control.
"A study of foreign ownership and corporation size
for the years 1965 through 1968 underlines the
importance to the Canadian economy of a few very large
foreign   owned  corporations, particularly  those  in the
mining and manufacturing industries," the report says.
Some of the one year increases in foreign control
# 39.4 per cent of all non-financial firms, from 38
per cent in 1967.
# 62.8 per cent of the mining industry, from 60
per cent in 1967.
# 58.1 per cent of manufacturing firms, from
56.7 per cent in 1967.
Firms controlled in the U.S. made up 75 per cent of
all foreign-controlled firms, with British owned firms a
poor second with five per cent.
The position of education students is difficult to
assess, said Shirran.
There are 22,750 teachers employed in B.C., and
currently 291 teachers are registered with the B.C.
Teachers Federation as available for work.
But more than half of the 291 have put geographic
limits to their employment. Only 75 (or four per cent of
the B.C.T.F. membership) are willing to teach anywhere
in the province.
Many others, Shirran said, are teachers from
elsewhere who want to locate in B.C.
"Undoubtedly, the graduates who have the greatest
difficulty getting jobs are those with B.A. or B.Sc,
degrees."
In one study of BA graduates, it was found that
about 35 per cent subsequently entered one of the
professional schools such as teaching, law, social work, or
library school; 30 per cent enrolled in grad school; and
about 35 per cent used their BA studies as general
background for on-the-job training.
"Graduates in the last group went into a wide variety
of government and industry jobs where, in most cases,
training on the job existed," Shirran said.
He added that any student who thinks a BA degree will
provide job skills is going to be disappointed.
"But this in no way detracts from its usefulness to
the individual who has the capacity to benefit from a
broad educational background.
Graduates holding these degrees should be able to.
enhance their vocational opportunities if they accurately
assess the situation and realize they still must acqure skills
necessary for the marketplace," he said.
It is still too early to assess the job opportunities for
the 1971 grads, Shirran said, "but let us not behave like
Chicken Little until the situation can be accurately
assessed."
Ken Hare returns
Former UBC administrative president Kenneth Hare
is returning to speak on the climate and ecology of the
Canadian North Monday at 8 p.m. in the Hebb lecture
theatre.
The free lecture is sponsored by the centre for
continuing education and the Canadian Meteorological
Society. Hare is now in the department of geography at
the University of Toronto. Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, February 12, 1971
TKUBYSSIY
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C.
Editorial opinions are those of the writer ind not of the AMS or
the'university administration. Member, Canadian University Press.
Founding member. Pacific Student Press. The Ubyssey publishes
Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's
editorial offices are located in room 241K of the Student Union
Building. Editor, 228-2301; city editor, 228-2305; news editor,
.228-2307; Page Friday, 228-2309; sports, 228-2308; advertising,
228-3977.'
FEBRUARY 12, 1971
Strange but true
Throughout their long and questionable history,
AMS elections have seen some monumental screw-ups,
but in Wednesday's first slate election and the
preliminaries to next week's second slate contest the
whole thing reached something of a pinnacle.
So far in this year's sandbox political season, there
have been enough irregularities to make a Chicago ward
boss blanch.
Rightly disturbed, AMS treasurer Stuart Bruce
(who isn't running for anything) is now formally
challenging the results of the presidential election,
which co-ordinator Hanson Lau won through the magic
of the preferential ballot after trailing student senator
Steve Garrod on the first count. That was the only close
race and thus the one where any irregularities might
have made all the difference.
But you ask "what irregularities?" Well, try these
for starters.
One of Garrod's strongest polls was Buchanan,
which he carried by almost a two to one margin over
Lau. Unfortunately for Garrod, the Buchanan poll was
not set up until almost noon, two hours after voting had
begun.
Of course, it's just coincidence that the man in
charge of setting up that poll was arts undergraduate
society president Don Palmer, who just happens to have
seconded Lau's nomination.
(While we're on the subject of Palmer, it certainly
was a neat trick to get a lengthy article on
undergraduate society financing published in UBC
Reports Thursday, the same day he announced his
candidacy for AMS treasurer. Needless to say, UBC
Reports didn't know of Palmer's political ambitions at
the time they agreed to publish his article and wouldn't
have touched it with a ten-foot press release if they
had.)
Then there was the little matter of the preferential
ballot that is used when more than two candidates run
for an office.
The election rules clearly state that a student has
the option of marking his choices in order or simply
putting an X besjde one name, but at several polls voters
were told their ballots would be declared spoiled if they
didn't vote preferentially.
As a final example, there is the case of Michael
Robinson, Lau's hand-picked candidate for
vice-president in the next week's election. The AMS
eligibility committee has cleared Robinson to run by
waiving the section of the AMS constitution that
requires a vice-presidential candidate to have completed
two years at UBC.
That, you'll remember, was the same rule under
which the AMS disqualified Christine Krawczyk after
she had been elected vice-president last year.
We can only hope Bruce is successful in having the
presidential election invalidated.
Perhaps Lau would win a new election, perhaps he
wouldn't, but if we're going to go through this nonsense
every February we might as well do it right.
Editor: Nate Smith
News Maurice Bridge
City     GinnyGalt
Jan O'Brien
Wire    .John Andersen
Managing     Bruce Curtis
Sports Keith Dunbar
Ass't News    Jennifer Jordan
Leslie Plommer
Photo    David Enns
David Bowerman
Page Friday Tim Wilson
Judy's brow was McLeoded over and
Sharon came to a rolling Boylan with
envy as Sandy Kass celebrated. 20 of
the finest. Eating her cake and having
it too were Josephine (she of the big
bylines) Margolis and Jim (let me lick
your icing) Davies. Mike Finlay tried to
stick In his thumb, but Leslie pulled
out her Plommer. Mike Sasges and
Dick Betts pitched in. winding up for
the pitch, Shane ("Guzzlegut")
McCune contributed an uncontrollable handshake. Kathy
Stewart and Kathy Carney agreed that
Nate looked funny dancing on the cake
box with a bottle in his ear. Jan
O'Brien took her tongue out of the
pencil sharpener long enough to scold a
late reporter. John Andersen got
screwed around by B.C. Tel (his first
ever) and said he didn't want his
middle name Oscar in the masthead.
Dave just wanted to Schmidt on the
proceedings.
"Howdy, now y'all open yore books to chapter twenny and we'll figure whatall rightly DID happen in
that little ole Riel Rebellion, okay?"
BY JIM UAVIES
DAVIES RAVIES 	
Memoirs of a mangy lover
I came upon her in a dream.
Well, actually it was something
less than a dream—Brock Hall to
be exact. However, the moment I
saw her I was consumed with
desire.
"Good evening young lady," I
said, "I'm consumed with desire."
The young lady clearly had a
speech impediment, however, I
was able to make out the last
word of her statement—"off'.
Undaunted by the lack of her
elocution, I continued my
plaintive call.
"Owwooooo," I love-called.
The young lady, at this point,
clearly began to appreciate my
advances.
"What are you," she
demanded.
"Gemini," I replied, fully
realizing that she intended on
buying me a birthday present,
even though we barely knew each
other so soon in our budding
relationship.
"Are you really necessary?"
the young maiden sweetly
queried.
Ah, I thought to myself, this
damsel of damsels has mastered
the art of the rhetorical question
— she must be aquainted with my
prominent position in the great
Chain of Life.
At this stage in our
relationship, being the sexy
bastard that I am, I decided to
impress the pert young thing with
my knowledge of what we in the
know casually refer to as "The
Scene."
"Hey baby," I cooed, all of my
social aplomb veritably bursting at
the seams, "Didja hear Georgie
Harrison's 'All Things Must Pass'
LP.? Well, didja?"
Clearly the young lady was
non-plussed at this exhibition of
musical expertise, however, I did
hear her mutter something about
a laxative fixation and another
Beatles' oldie titled, "We Can
Work It Out."
Calling upon the persuasion
and political savvy that made
John Diefenbaker a Canadian
giant,    I    commented    on    the
DAVIES
chickadee-dee's extremely pleasant
appearance.
"Say, you ain't half bad," I
offered, not indication which half
met my approval.
This obviously set her heart all
a-flutter because she threw up her
knees in a fit of controlled
excitement.
"Ooooooompphhhh," I
chuckled.
When the color began to return
to my cherubic cheeks, I inquired
the comfort of my new-found
belle.
"My neck, being under your
heel, does it bother you?" I
courteously remarked.
Apparently my dream girl
didn't quite grasp the infinite
implications of my statement, so I
expanded further.
"Gaaaakkkk," I said.
She appeared to take note of
my shrewd observation, because
she stepped back suddenly, wiping
her foot on the rug.
She appeared dismayed, so,
while she cleansed her footwear, I
grasped her tightly about the
waist and murmured, "Don't
worry my sweet, Big Jim is here
with the treat."
The winsome woman clearly
mistook my sincerity for
jocularity, for she expounded,
"Are you kiddding?"
Embarrassed, I cast my eyes
downward, "Don't let this come
between us," I crooned.
In the excitement of the
moment, the poor thing swooned
and accidentally planted one of
her fragile, shell-like elbows in my
eye.
"Can't you understand that I
despise male chauvinist pigs," she
shrieked.
"I don't blame you," I replied,
"salt pork always makes me
nauseous."
As I lay in a crumpled ball on
the Brock Hall floor, whistling as
the pulchritudinous miss
departed. I could not help but
think of her distinct resemblance
to the infamous Josephine The
Plumber.
Ubyssey  official notice
Applications are now being received for the position of
editor-in-chief of The Ubyssey for the 1971-72 academic year.
Applications must be submitted in writing to The Ubyssey
editorial board, SUB 241K, no later than noon on Tuesday,
February 23.
All applicants must include a resume of newspaper
experience and a statement of objectives for the paper.
Applicants must also be prepared for merciless grilling by
members of the editorial board, who will make the final decision
subject to formal ratification by the Alma Mater Society council. Friday, February  12, 1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
LETTERS
Smolensky
Editor The Ubyssey, Sir:
Since when does one of the
biggest bureaucrats of the AMS
system, namely Mr. Art
Smolensky, former grad studies
president and current student
senator, consider himself
competent enough to appraise the
presidential candidates in an
.apolitical and unbiased manner?
How can a person like Smolensky,
who actually actively participates
in AMS political manipulation
give an accurate opinion of each
candidate?
From the viewpoint of an
individual who has closely
watched the campaigns and
platforms of each candidate, I
could hardly state that
Smolensky's article was unbiased.
It is rather peculiar that Mr.
Smolensky gave particular
attention to candidate Steve
Garrod (who is also a grad
. student), while practically
ignoring the other candidates. If
Art feels he has a flair for this
type of reporting perhaps he
could replace Allan Fotheringham
or work for the public relations
staff for mayor Tom Campbell. If
not, then he should stick to
revealing the corruption in food
services with regard to the price
of the large glass of coke. With
training maybe Art could become
Canada's Ralph Nader, but I feel
he should leave political reporting
to more able people.
BRIAN McBRIDE
Commerce 2
More Yet
. Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I challenge you to print the
following comments relating to
Art Smolensky's Confessions of
a Politico, which appeared in
The Ubyssey on Tuesday.
Through my experience on
the AMS council and my contact
with Hanson Lau and John Scott
Mitchell, I personally find very
little in the article that I can
honestly agree with. Nevertheless,
it is quite apparent that racism
and slander have been used to
undermine the personal characters
and competence of both Lau and
Mitchell.
Furthermore, the fact the
article appeared the day before
the AMS presidential election
without any time at all for
rebuttal clearly indicates the
political interests of The Ubyssey
editor.
As an AMS councillor, I am
sickened that Nate Smith should
desire to illustrate his disinterest
in the election procedure, thereby
jeopardizing the chance of a fair
election.
I urge all students who feel as
I do to write the editor and
demonstrate displeasure at his
actions.
PETER MALCOLM
AMS Recreation rep.
Still more
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
We wish to file this letter of
complaint in reference to Art
Smolensky's article, Confessions
of a Politico, in your issue of
Feb. 9/71. We consider this article
to be nothing more than a
glorified seconder's statement. We
all know of your decision to
eliminate the publication of
seconder's statements and we
consider this specific article to be
a biased betrayal.
If you've
got THE BUG
See Page 17
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With particular reference to
Mr. Smolensky's remark about
Mr. Lau's attempt to run under
racist sympathy, we consider this
remark to be childish and
unfounded. The posters
containing the slogan "Hanson
Rau for Plesident" were not
authorized by Mr, Lau but were a
product of someone's personal
humor. If Mr. Smolensky had
asked Mr. Lau before composing
this article, he would have realized
the truth. We consider Mr.
Smolensky's remark to be
negligent and emotional. It is
degrading to Mr. Lau who has,
along with the undersigned,
worked long hours (often after
midnight) without pay or
appreciation. Compare this to the
track record of the other offices.
We will be fortunate if Mr. Lau's
successor to the co-ordinator's
position, is able to run as
competent and human an office!
It saddens us deeply to
witness Mr. Smolensky's two-page
article in support of Mr. Garrod
when the other candidates were
denied a seventy-five word
seconder statement. The remarks
in reference to Mr. Lau ("Garrod
is reasonably principled — a
contrast to the other two
candidates") hurt us deeply, since
we   have   grown   to   love   and
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understand Mr. Lau. Does Mr.
Smolensky really >understand Mr.
Lau?
19 SIGNATURES
Our correspondents have
shown an incredible degree of
contempt for the intelligence of
their fellow students.
It is ludicrous to suggest that
anyone would decide his or her
vote purely on the basis of what
Art Smolensky said. Those of us
who know Art would be truly
horrified to see him wielding such
hypnotic power.
Smolensky's article was not
intended to be an impartial
analysis of the AMS election. It
was clearly labelled as one man's
educated opinion and was printed
on a page that is always reserved
for opinion pieces.
As for the opinions of The
Ubyssey, our only answer can be
"of course."
Smolensky's article appeared
as an opinion piece and The
Ubyssey is as much entitled to its
editorial opinions on an election
as on any other event.
Finally, Lau can't claim
ignorance as an excuse for the
"Hanson Rau for Plesident"
poster. As a candidate for office,
he was responsible for every aspect
of his campaign.
We can't believe that Lau or a
member of his considerable
entourage did not see the poster
in the several days it was up. The
fact they did not take it down or
publicly disassociate themselves
from it would indicate their
approval.—Ed.
Correction
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
In last Friday's "Sisterhood"
issue, Nettie Wild implies in her
article on page 3 that we have no
"female department heads" at
UBC.
May I remind your reporter
and your readers that the
department of history has enjoyed
the leadership of Dr. Margaret A.
Ormsby as its head for some years
now?
FRITZ LEHMANN
History Department
WORK
Your Ass Off...
NO REWARD!
AMS COMMITTEES
— where the work of the AAAS is done.
COMMITTEE STUDENTS
Finance  4
SUB Management  4
Winter Sports Centre
Management     4
Discipline  4
Elections  4 P|US
1 Returning Officer
Eligibility  1
Orientation Chairman
Special Events Chairman
University Clubs Chairman
SUB Art        Chairman
Cultural Activities   . . Co-ordinator
Bookstore       4
Food Services       4
Traffic & Parking ......     4
Graphics (Signs)      3
Safety, Security & Fire
Prevention       1
Future Housing        1
Applications — in writing to AMS Secretary
deadline - Fri., Feb. 26
FOR MORE INFO-
SEE AMS SECRETARY ANNE CLARKSON Page 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, February  12,  1971
'Women forced to fight
to control own bodies'
By DAVID SCHMIDT
Abortions should be taken out of the criminal
code and handled like any other medical problem,
said Vancouver doctor Robert Mackaroff who was
recently convicted of performing an illegal abortion.
"The assumption that everything is fine is
false," said Mackaroff to about 150 persons at a
two-hour abortion seminar in the SUB ballrooom
Thursday.
"The medical association oath has been
changed so that performing abortions is no longer
unethical," he sajd.
The seminar was sponsored by the UBC
Abctrtion Action Committee in conjunction with
cross-Canada days of abortion protest.
Margaret Burel of the Women's Liberation
Alliance told the audience of the group's march to
Victoria Wednesday and of their poor reception.
"Loffmark showed arrogant, aloof views,"
Mackaroff said.-"He didn't even give me an
audience."
Burel said, "Loffmark said most women in B.C.
didn't want abortion legalized but he wouldn't say
where he got that information."
She also reminded the audience of the
upcoming march from the Vancouver General
Hospital to the Courthouse, beginning at one p.m.
Saturday.
Mary McCallum, a member of the abortion
committee, then read a prepared speech in which
she condemned the government for its failure to
provide a solution of women's problems.
fixin*   to
By THOM WESCOTT
PART THIRTEEN
You learn a lot of things working in
intelligence, like how the Pentagon gets its official
count of enemy dead.
To understand the way things work over there
you have to realize that most American
commanders want nothing more badly than to top
the kill charts, and that includes going home.
But before the generals can compare kills over
cocktails in Da Nang, the statistics have to start
somewhere. It quite often runs something like this:
Corporal Puff has taken his squad out on a
night patrol. They get as far as hilltop where they
can see the river they're supposed to be patrolling
and decide that that's good enough. Besides, you
can get hurt running around Viet Nam in the middle
of the night.
By the time the watch has been set up all nine
of them have finished their first joint and most are
starting on their second. For a while it's enough to
groove on thoughts of home and maybe talk quietly
once in a while.
But after they've called in their "progress"
along the patrol route a couple times, things start to
drag and someone says that they could really get off
on a light show. It sounds like a good idea, and so
Puff grabs the radio.
"Barkeep, Barkeep, Golf two two — we just had
some movement about 600 meters off our rights."
Back at Barkeep, the battalion headquarters,
the duty lieutenant gets excited — this could get us
some kills!
"Roger that, two two — how many are there?"
"Uh, I don't know ... we just heard them."
'They're in a tree line and we'll have to cross
this big paddy. Can't we just call a fire mission?"
"No, you'd better try and get a closer look."
"Roger that. Out."
Things are getting tense out on the patroL
Another round of joints is done up while they wait
until it's time to call in again.
Ten minutes later Puff is on the radio again.
"Barkeep, Golf two two again. We can see 'em
now. There looks like about 15 of'em or more.
Can we get a fire mission now?"
"Women should be freed from roles they
haven't chosen," she said.
"There is no better place to start than on
campus because this is where the streaming into
these roles reaches its ultimatum."
Borrowing heavily from last week's special
edition of The Ubyssey, Sisterhood, McCallum said,
"Most women take the roles that are subservient to
males.
"Women have to be three times as competent as
men in order to compete.
"Abortion is a rallying ground for all women
and their oppression," she said.
"It's a crime to have to campaign for control of
our own bodies," Linda Meissenheimer, a member
of the Simon Fraser University Abortion Committe,
said.
"Canada has the wealth to set up 24-hour child
care centres and abortion clinics. Technology is now
being used to prop up oppression rather than to
destroy it," she said.
"I'm blasting at the traditional family idea. It's
an oppressive agent."
Mackaroff was asked about the moral aspect of
abortion by a male member of the audience.
"A women doesn't ask questions like that when
faced with an unwanted pregnancy," he said.
"There is no clear cut answer. It calls for a
mature judgment."
"If you need an abortion, you should exhaust
all local possibilities first," he said.
"If you still can't get an abortion you should
fly to California or New York."
"Can you tell what they're doing, two two?"
"Looks like most of 'em are sleeping. They're
in a treeline and we can't tell just how many."
"Alright, two two. Give me a grid to shoot on
and then move back so you can direct the fire."
Somebody manages to figure out just where
they're supposed to be and sends the information
in.
"Roger two two. Standby."
After 20 minutes or so the radio crackles
again. "Golf two two, standby for shot."
"Roger, Barkeep, we're ready."
"Round out, one willy peter to mark."
The round whistles overhead and lands in the
middle of a rice paddy. The white phosphorous
bursts with a hollow thud and a pulse of yellow
light. The smoke drifts over the paddy like the
collapsing , parachute of whatever... no one can
make too much sense of it at the moment but it
looks good.
"Barkeep, Golf two two. Come right 100, drop
50 and repeat."
The next round lands in the middle of a
treeline. No one can remember if it was the one
they picked out but it looks good.
Now the high explosive rounds come crashing
into thee treeline, three salvos of five rounds. It
looks really good.
"Golf two two, Barkeep. What does it look like
out there?"
'They're leaving."
"You better move up and check the area out,
see if we got an KIA's (kills)."
"Yeah, I think they're dragging three or four
bodies."
"You better go up and check it out anyway."
"Roger that."
Ten minutes later Puff is on the air again.
"They didn't leave anything but it looks like there's
a couple of blood stains here and there's three or
four drag tracks like they're dragging a body."
"Is that all?"
"Well, maybe five tracks."
And so it goes down in the book as five possible
KIA.
Later in the week when the Captain is preparing
his report to send to regiment he notices that he is a
couple kills short of last week's total.
"Five possible ... well, if there were that many
possible there must have been at least seven
confirmed."
And so the regiment gets a record of seven kills
for that night's games. But regiment has a
reputation to maintain in its report to division and
so it's rounded off to ten kills.
Not bad for nine guys who couldn't shoot
straight if they had to.
LORNE ATKINSON'S
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A TH      SHOW TIMES: 12:45,.2:50, 4:55,
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Week LANGUAGE   -B.C. DIRECTOR
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m^AXnmm^S,   and Coarse
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*frl*-*im,2'k    —B.C. DIRECTOR DONALD SUTHERLAND
*7*'1747 SHOW TIMES: 7:30. 9:30 ELLIOTT GOULD .
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Feb. 14th "MACBETH" Color
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THE   DOLPHIN   THEATRE
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Sunday, 2 p.m.
Feb. 14 "FELLINI'S 81/2" Italy
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Masthead
Our cover today is a portrait
of Chief Dan George, we got the
picture in the mail and like his
face. He's a movie star, having
just completed Little Big Man.
George is the hereditary chief of
the Squamish Indian Band on
the North Shore.
* * *
There are some real goodies
in store for us from the
Contemporary Arts Festival. It's
called Operation Kontemporary
this year, I suppose to
distinguish it from last year's. I
get a lot of notices in the mail
with a big OK seal on them.
There will be magicians, and jazz
groups and the opportunity to
see your brain wave pattern on
video screen. It starts the week
of February 21, see Tuesday's
paper for a complete runup.
In the Fine Arts Gallery
under the library, there are some
really fantastic prints by Richard
Hamilton. One of them, "Kent
State", is a real must, go over
and take a look, it's free, what
else have you got to do at
lunchtime?
This week, Page Friday was
engineered by a collection of
&wits led by Mike Sasges who
contributed his cunning and his
jocular humour to several blurbs,
while Bill Storey, industriously,
almost beaver like, smote the
paper with his rapier sharp pen
an and his keen eyed
intelligence. Nettie Wild turned
her creative talents to a an
expose of the National Ballet,
while Grant Dickin and Jim
O'Leary typed out their fiction
with golden typewriters, upon
rare Himalayan Snow Tiger skin
paper.
-TIM WILSON
ACADEMIC ILLUSION SEMINAR
Sponsored by A.M.S. & Anglican-United Campus Ministry
FRI. FEB. 26 & SAT.. FEB. 27 - S.U.B. 206
Cross-Departmental Student/Faculty
Confrontation and Discussion on:
The University - Higher Learning?
Freedom in the Classroom?
Change in the Structure
Papers by:
DAVID MOLE; DR. HOWARD BOUGHEY; STAN PERSKY
Limited registration - Students $4 - includes 3 meals
Send confirmation to AMS VICE-PRES. NO LATER THAN FEB. 23
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Li
PEOPLE"
Applications are now being accepted from students for the
position of DIRECTOR of the programme "PEOPLE - AN
EXPERIENCE IN HUMAN RELATIONS AND HUMAN
SEXUALITY", '71-'72. These should be directed to Sean
McHugh, Office of Interprofessional Education, Woodward
Library, Rm. 324.
Letters should include all material  that  the applicant
considers relevant to the position.
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CALL LYNN, 228-3083
Page Friday, 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, February 12, 1971 The Destruction
of my House
On Tuesday morning, when a red truck
appeared outside my house, I was eating cheese
with a cracker. I was not expecting visitors, and
was therefore surprised when the three men who
alighted from the truck entered without
knocking.
I watched with increasing interest as they
entered the room. They made no
acknowledgement of my presence, nor did they
introduce themselves. They merely advanced to
the corner of the room, unplugged the television
set, and carried it down the stairs and outside.
Through the window, I could see them placing it
in the truck.
I was still standing by the window when,
they returned. The possibility of speaking to
them occurred to me, but I felt there was no
need for this, as I rarely watch television, and
there was no sense of loss connected with their
activity.
This time, however, they seized my bed. I
watched with a detached feeling of consternation
as they manouvered it down the stairs.
Aside from my television set, my bed is my
only piece of furniture.
The three men returned once more. They
spread throughout my four rooms, and fearful
that I might be in the way, and realizing that
there was undoubtedly some sound basis for
their actions, I retreated down the stairs and
outside. Soon one of the men appeared carrying
some tile which I recognized as coming from my
living room. He re-entered the house and one of
the other two, or, perhaps the same one, for I
found their features difficult to distinguish,
brought some floorboards out to the truck. This
activity continued for several minutes, then
stopped. Then, one of my pictures was carried
out. Following this, sheets of torn wallpaper. A
door frame soon followed.
At this point, the activity became more
hectic. The pieces of my walls, instead of being
carried out and dumped on the lawn or in the
truck, were now being thrown out through my
windows, or, more accurately, through my walls,
since the windows, and most of the walls, had
been taken apart and were now at my feet. At
the point when the walls no longer existed, the
men, I recall, expressed subdued jubilation, as it
would now be easier to dispose of the pieces of
my house.
I thought that I should, perhaps, inform
them that since the floor and walls of my house
had been dismantled, there was no support for
either themselves or the roof of my house, but
since this condition did not impede their
progress, I assumed it was of no concern to them.
When the first of them attacked the roof
with an axe, the structure collapsed upon them.
I have begun to reconstruct my house, but
the process may take some time, as I must first
build a garage for the red truck.
—Grant Dickin
The Bus Story
By JIM O'LEARY
I'm glad the buses are back. I missed those
drivers. The Men In Grey, proud, loyal,
courageous, and making six dollars an hour.
Keepers of the law on our buses. Step out of line
and you don't get a transfer. And on the roads,
too. A Volkswagen starts lane-jumping and —
squash!, no more.
I think the buttons on their jackets are really
medals. You know, like — the Blue Cross, for
courageous action unscrambling the poles from
eight trolleys in rush hour while being pelted
with orange peels and old bus tokens by angry
passengers; The Red Eye, for injury inflicted,
while punching transfers, by flying paper
shrapnel; the Medal of Valour, tor running over a
taxi and three hitchhikers.
The transfers are really citations to us all for
waiting half an hour in freezing rain for buses
that run every five minutes. I keep mine on the
shelf right next to my collection of Buzzers.
What a great rag; I never miss it. I keep hoping
for a foldout of Reddy Kilowatt.
Getting on a bus is the worst thing in the
world. People STARE at you. I usually wear
thick glasses and a false moustache. "Transferre,
eh, pleazzze," I say in a French accent. Once, the
disguise fell off. I stook there, staring back at
people. They were looking at me questioningly,
as if, "Why should YOU exist?" "My name is
Harty Bon-Bon," I said. "I'm only a plumber but
I do have a wife andd three kids and I'm really a
nice guy. I'm only going as far as Broadway and
Granville, if that's all right with you." They let
me stay.
I hate the double seats. You always feel like
Mr. Halitosis if no one sits with you. I dust my
seat off, put doilies on it, pillows, ashtray.
Then I give them all a little boy look as they get
on: "Wanna sit with me?" But I'm cool. When
someone does sit down I grumble so everyone
can hear, "God, does he have to sit here?"
The best thing is looking down on cars. You
get them at stop-lights. They're talking away and
then they look up. Fifty feet up there's this face
looking down on them from a HUGE bus. If you
really want to get them nervous you call out,
"Look, an accident!" and everybody rushes to
the window to see. And in the car far below
there's now a hundred faces staring at you. They
uncross their legs, straighten their glasses, brush
their hair, the women take off their earrings so
they won't look too rich and the men set their
jaws so you'll think they're Marlon Brando.
Then they talk to you. Ahhhhhhhh! What
do you say?! They say, "Brrr, it's cold out
there." A long pause. "Boy, it's freezing out
there." . They see that doesn't work so they
try a different tack. "So, what do you do for a
living?" "I'm a plumber" (More people know me
as Harry the Plumber than as Jim O'Leary). "So
... and how juch do you make?" Finally you
crack. "Yes, I am a plumber. Harry Bon-Bon's
the name, I have a wife and three kids, I'm going
to Broadway and Granville" etc., etc., etc.
I'm glad the buses are back. The emergency
door is my fetish. I watch people sitting next to
that door. They're dying to open it. I can see you
squirm, don't deny it. You see them, sometimes
they sort of touch it, jiggle it a bit, hope it'll
open by accident. I'll get on the bus some quiet
Sunday and just let it take me somewhere. I'll sit
real quiet, not make a sound. Then, when
everyone's gone, the bus will go to a loop.
It'll be in the country, in the springtime, with the
birds, and the gentle grass growing. I'll let the
driver get out and walk around a bit. THEN I'LL
JUMP UP AND JERK THAT BLOODY DOOR
OPEN! ... And I'll be a changed man. "God
bless you B.C. Hydro, everyone!" Jm Q,LEARY
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Friday, February  12,  1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 3 The National Ballet performs Kraanberg.
Page Friday's Nettie Wild Examines
Take a French choreographer, a Greek composer,
a Hungarian artist and a Canadian ballet company and
you come up with a modern ballet which could easily
mark the beginning of a new era in dance.
Last week Vancouver audiences were able to see
the National Ballet of Canada present "Kraanberg," the
result of a potpourri of international talent.
Choreographer Roland Petit whose Paradise Lost
is well known to Vancouverites, worked soley with
movement in response to different music patterns.
Disregarding any story line, Petit created visual images
which were almost surrealistic with the black and white
costumed dancers seeming to float against the stark
geometric set.
The set design alone was worthy of the applause
that started when the first curtain went up, revealing
Victor Vasarely's stunning artwork. Enormous
plexi-glass shapes — circles and squares, all moving and
reflecting dizzy light, the forms provided the
background for yet another dimension in which dancers,
sound and set came together to create a kind of
beautiful illusion.
The musical score seems strange to our ears as
composer Iannis Xenakis has put together an amazing
combination of electronic tapes and a live orchestra to
create an errie acoustic effect and what sounds like a
near impossibility to dance to.
However, the dancers managed to do the
impossible, responding to the amplified, near tuneless
sound with movement that at the same time reflected a
classic ballet style as well as a subtle form of athletics.
Perhaps one of the most comfortable aspects of
the performance was the assurance the dancers
displayed in carrying out their roles. And they had every
right to be confident as their technique, looking at the
company as a whole, is extremely sound. Too often
audiences are so conscious of the faults that appear in a
performance that it ruins the overall effect that the
performers are trying to put forward. With the National
Ballet there was no tenseness on the part of either the
audience or the dancers because they were good and
they knew it.
The National Ballet
This company has a solid classical background which is a basic requirement in
forming a good contemporary group. As we have seen locally, with Vesak's Western
Dance Theatre, a company cannot expect to perform well in contemporary dance
without a formal background in the techniques of classical much the same as a good
cartoonist must know the basics of drawing inside out before attempting his more
abstract art.
Celia Franca, artistic director and founder of the company, realized this early
in 1951 when she first came to Canada. In order to provide a strong backbone of
good classical dancers who would support the company, she crossed and recrossed
Canada searching for dancers, as well as teaching, directing, choreographing, dancing
in lead roles, and driving for more financial support.
All her efforts have obviously paid off when only nineteen years after
founding a fledgeling dance company in a country with relatively little theatrical
tradition, she is able to boast of both school and a ballet company that have
achieved international status.
One has only to look at the varied program she presented in Vancouver last
week to see what kind of background the company comes from. After the modern
Kraanerg on Wednesday night, Thursday's program was strictly a classical one, with
The Nutcracker Suite, Le Loup, and Solitate being danced.
A perfect example of a dancer who is able to combine her classical background
into a contemporary dance is Veronica Tenant. Appearing as a soloist in the first act
of Kraanerg, Miss Tennant was free and lucid in her movements although Petit's
choreography was surprisingly rough in some places making her movements quite
angular and crude. Despite some choreographic drawbacks, she possessed a self
assurance that seemed to radiate to the other members of the company as well as
the1 audience.
Another woman soloist, Mary Jago, who was featured in the second act,
displayed a particular talent in her ability to combine the most difficult of moves
into her repertoire without losing any of her smoothness.
Among the male soloists, Clinton Rothwell was featured the most. Although
he gave a more than capable performance he seemed to be too staid, using Petit's
choreography as the last word in his interpretation, and failing to project any
spontenaity into his dancing. One of the surprises of the evening was tiny Tim Spain
who gave the impression he had springs in his feet that catapulted him to amazing
heights in his spectacular leaps.
By complete contrast, Garry Seminiuk who appeared mainly in the first act,
dominated the stage solely with his imposing physical stature. A good head and
shoulders above anyone else, the handsome blond proved to be less of a dancer, than
one would expect since his< height hindered his movements, making him seem more
ponderous than graceful.
The corps de ballet was able to support the soloists well and served Petit's
choreography in scenes like the one closing the first act where the whole company
was used to form a dramatic tableau. In fact it is surprising that there are so few
soloists. Perhaps, it would enrich the company to give its corps members
more exposure as soloists in the future.
There were times in the two hour long ballet when the dancing seemed to lag
due to a certain degree of repetition. However, the overall effect was a pleasing one.
Perhaps one of the major faults in the production was the musical score, which
seemed foreign to our ears as it had no discernable tune. After two hours the sounds
became tiring, if not for the dancers, certainly for the audience.
However, the company is something for Canadians to be proud of and one
that is certainly going to give the Royal Winnipeg Ballet a well-needed run for its
money.
Page Friday, 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, February 12, 1971 The
New
Rock
Group
by Ralph Gleepson
Silver tone,   Really   Stoned
Left to right Billy Silver, Robert Blossom, Peter Unsound, Nick Jaguar and Gordon Darkfeet.
As everyone will soon know, Silvertone is a top rock
group that has spent the last three years practicing in
Naramata, B.C. In Naramata, they've really got it
together. The five members of the group, on the eve of
bursting on the scene with an avant-garde album and a
single which should top the charts, decided that it was
about time they gave an interview. The following
interview took place in Silvertone's penthouse apartment
in the west end of Vancouver.
Silvertone is composed of Billy Silver, lead guitarist,
Robert Blossom, vocals and bass, Gordon Darkfeet (who
incidentally is an Indian), drums, Peter Tinsound, organ
and sax, and Nick Jaguar, organ.
Pf: Well Billy, you are the leader of the group aren't
you?
Silver: Yeah, I guess you could say that, as much as
anyone could be a leader of a group like ours.
Sometimes, y'know, when I'm really wrecked, I let
Blossom do the leading.
Pf: So it doesn't really matter who does the leading?
Silver: Nah, up in Narmata, we really got it together.
Blossomm: Yeah, that's right on.
Pf: I didn't realize that you were religiously oriented.
Silver: Yeah, we are quite a bit, we feel that God is the
only thing left, y'know, for people to turn to.
Pf: That's a really nice sentiment. I've also noticed in
some of your songs, that you seem to be interested in
ecological problems, am I right?
Darkfeet: Yeah, you're right, we are interested in that.
Like, we really hate dirt, you know what I mean, there's
something about dirt that really turns us off. I guess it's
a phobia or something.
Pf: Is there anything specific that you would like to see
happen in the way of ecological progress?
Darkfeet: Yeah, there is, we want to get rid of all the
cars and all the factories. We think that everybody
should get a piece of land, y'know, go back to nature,
y'know, and grow tomatoes or something.
Pf: That's a nice sentiment, but isn't it a little
impractical. After all, everyone can't go out and start
planting tomatoes. A lot of people don't know how to
grow them.
Blossom: Well that's where the communal thing comes
in. Like everybody has to get together, y'know, and help
each other plant tomatoes. People could do it if they
really wanted to. God would give them a hand.
Darkfeet: Yeah, I can dig it. Far out.
Pf: How do you fellows feel about the Indo China war?
Silver: We hate it. It's really crummy you know, it's so
inhuman. Like I'm a draft dodger, y'know, and like
when I was in high school I joined the SDS. We really
hated that war you know. We had a lot of good times,
bombing a few ROTC buildings and Dow Chemical
things.
Pf: Oh. Who are your favourite musicians?
Silver: Yeah, we do like them quite a bit.
Pf: Who did you say?
Silver: That's right. The Who are our favourite
musicians.
Tinsound: Yeah, the Who are good, but the Stones and
the Zeppelin are right in there.
Pf: What about the Beatles?
Jaguar: What about them?
Pf: Do you like them?
Blossom: Nah, they're the shits, y'know, they're only in
it for the money.
Blossom: Right on Nicky.
Pf: What about you, you're not interested in money I
take it?
Jaguar: No, we don't want a lot of money. You know,
just   enough "to  keep  us  playing.  We  only  charged
seventy-five   thousand dollars to do the Greenpeace
benefit.
Pf: Seventy-five thousand? That sounds like quite a bit, I
thought that most groups did benefits for free.
Silver: Well we would like to be like that, but since we
only just got started, we needed a few bucks to get some
equipment. A couple of trucks, and car just to get us
around.
Pf: But I thought that you wanted to get rid of all the
cars?
Silver: We do, we do, but we can't until everyone else
does. You know. How else are we going to get around?
Pf:   Oh.   Have   you   played   anywhere   else   besides
Vancouver?
Jaguar: We played in Saskatchewan for a while, in Moose
Leg or somewhere.
Darkfeet: We didn't like it there, those people are just a
lot of farmers, and those Indians they have there. Simply
disgusting to look at.
Pf: What do you think of those young girls that follow
rock stars around, the groupies?
Blossom: We like'm. It gives us a warm feeling to go
out with a few nice young girls after we've been playing
really hard.
Pf:What about drugs; do you use them?
Tinsound: Yeah. We do up a bit, y'know. (Laughter).
Pf: Do you think that it improves your music?
Blossom: Well I know that when I'm ridin' the white
lady, wait a minute, no, when the White Lady is ridin'
me, I can really get it on with my axe/bass.
Pf: So you're on a Hendrix trip?
Darkfeet: No, not really, we just like to crank once in a
while, it's good for the digestion, sort of like cod liver
oil, to a musician, y'know, it allows you to get all the
crap that builds up inside you to come rocketing out
through    your instrument.
Jaguar: Southern Comfort with a little hash is nice.
Silver: Actually, that's a little sideline of ours, off the
record of course.. Do you need any?
Pf: No, I don't touch the stuff, I think life  is   too
beautiful and exciting for that kind of thing.
Pf: What do you think of the different styles of playing,
like the Who when they smash up their instruments at
the end of their concerts.
Jaguar: We used to have that problem with Tinsound. He
used to smash his guitar after every gig, but it got really
bad you know, like, his guitar was worth more than the
gig. We started grabbing it off him when he started to get
violent, y'know, but then he tried to outsmart us by
smashing it after the first song. We solved it by giving
him a plastic guitar that we slip to him just before the
end of the gig.
Jaguar: We all work real well together, y'know, because
my star is rising in Aries, Gord's an Aquarius, Tinny's
star is going down: in Taurus.
Blossom:    Yeh,   and   Billy's   star   works   great   in
conjunction with   mine, 'cause mine's going up in Leo
and coming down in Sagittarius, and his is going up in
Sagittarius.
Darkfeet: Yeh, like we all really get it on together, man,
'cause our stars are right. Besides, we've all turned on to
Jesus. Like, Jesus is really where's   it at, man.   He's
really far out.
Tinsound: Jesus loves you, y'know, man. Once you've
seen God, man, like you really know ... y'know?
Silver: Like, we're gonna call our album "Grow Your
Own Tree". We're gonna turn people on to trees, man,
'cause, like trees are really far out. Y'know. Trees are
really where it's at.
Pf: I understand there's going to be a picture book with
your   album,   and   that   it's   going  to  include   some
ecologically-ioriented photos.
Tinsound: Yeh, right on,"man, it's gonna be a 400-page
book of color shots. Some of the pics are of us on stage,
y'know, breaking our guitars and jumping and like that,
taken in our premiere concert in Sheep Tracks, Alberta.
Pf: But there is some ecological stuff?
Silver: Oh, yeh. Like, there's some far-out shots of these
sea-gulls, y'know, all covered with oil. Real horrible,
y'know. And all this horrible smoke and d crap, y'know,
in the air, like, y'know?
Blossom: Yeh, we originally wanted to put a couple of
oily seagulls jn   the   record, but the record company,
y'know, the record company wouldn't let us...
Darkfeet: Dirty capitalist pigs.
Blossom: Something about how they couldn't package
them, or some shit like that.
Blossom: Like, I'm really into 50s rock, y'know, like
Chuck  Berry  and  all   mat  shit, like, y'know, like it's
really far out.
Jaguar: Yeh, like, one of my favourite 50s groups is the
Rubber Balls. Like, I really dig it when they do "The
Night We Laid Old Trixie Down".
Pf: What role do you see your music playing in today's
world?
Jaguar: Never thought about that.
Tinsound: Neither did I.
Darkfeet: We are trying to make people aware of the
plight of the underprivileged, the working class heroes,
like the Indians.
Tinsound: Don't be stupid Darkfeet, we're interested in
ecology, that's our raison d'etre.
Jaguar: Hell, I thought we were pushing God?
.Silver: It's peace and love.
Blossom: Violent social revolution is our bag.
Tinsound: Fuck you Blossom.
At this point the interview was interrupted by a
fistfight that broke out between Blossom and Silver.
After a few moments it subsided when Silver was
knocked out cold by Blossom.
pf: Is there anything that you would like to say in
parting?
Blossom: Yeah. Get the hell out of here you goddamn
troublemaker.
Tinsound: Yeah, beat it.
Darkfeet: Racist!
At this point, I left the interview, with Darkfeet
close upon my heels brandishing his bone handled
hunting knife that he keeps constantly at his side.
Friday, February 12,  1971
THE      UBYSSEY
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Van Morrison
Mr. Slick
Van Morrison was here last week, and he was perfect. Too perfect. SO very
perfect that it is hard to believe that he is human.
From the beginning, Morrison belted out his songs in an exacting fashion,
delivering just the right amount of feeling and just the right amount of muscial
power to satisfy the people who packed the Queen E to see him.
Morrison was slick, his songs were prepackaged, things like "Brown Eyed Girl"
were so well done that they sounded just like the records that we hear umpteem
times over the radio. But there was nothing else. It was like that Peggy Lee song,
"Is that all there is." Morrison stood, expressionless at the microphone, only once
during the whole concert did he look up at the audience. Instead, he kept his eyes
closed. There is nothing really wrong with that, except that coupled with his
immobile form, you might as well have taken a full length photograph of him,
pasted it on a cardboard cut out, put it on stage, then played his records.
Morrison's band was good. The two saxes, electric piano, drums and lead
guitar were really excellent. Morrison obviously kept a tight rein on them, as a
matter of fact, they seemed to be in terror of him. During some of the quicker
songs, they looked like slaves.
Morrison beat the time monotonously with his right hand., Several times the
band fell slightly out of beat. Each time, Morrison turned to them and gave them a
sharp look. At times during the performance, Morrison forgot the words to a song.
It   didn't   really   make   much   difference,   since   the   words   were   almost
unintelligible.
It is really interesting to note the recurrence of the word radio in Van
Morrison's songs. It is probably significant that radio stations in Vancouver like
CKLG and CKVN play a lot of his songs. It seems that songs with the word radio in
them would just have to be hits. After all, what is better than a record that plugs the
medium?
Van Morrison's lyrics are inane, there is nothing to them. A lot of do do do's
and wa wa wa wa's strung together with phrases like "'listenin' to the radio" and
"brown eyed girl" make for a lot of garbage designed, packaged and engineered to
sell, and to rip off the gullible for anything that he can get. His music isn't really
music at all, it is a pure advertising product engineered, and geared to the market.
There is no question that the concert was a success, the applause indicated
that. Morrison obviously gave the audience everything that they wanted. If people
continue paying $3.50, $4.50, or $5.50 to watch sterile performers, then that's all
they'll ever get. |j]jj
Records- The Locals
From the wonderful world of wax this week,
a couple of trips into the local musical past. ..
COOL-AID BENEFIT ALBUM (VOL. I)
ASP4001D
This record has been forthcoming for quite a
while. Planned as a collection of some of the best
things from the late-60s Vancouver music scene,
it was awaited with some interest. It's too bad,
then, that it has to fall so flat.
Some really good things were happening
musically in this town in the late 60s, but this
record serves only to obscure that fact. A major
problem, of course, is that several of the groups
who made the local scene so exciting are under
contract to record companies, and were
presumably unavailable. Chilliwack and Mother
Tucker's pop to mind. Still, that's no excuse for
this rotten effort.
AMATEURISH PRODUCTION
One of the worst things about this album is
the lousy sound which results from simply
abominable and amateurish production. Several
cuts are so full of surface noise that they sound
like they were recorded by a thousand hissing
snakes. Others, like the two by the
Hydro-Electric Streetcar, reverberate hollowly as
if the musicians are playing in an abandoned
.mine shaft. On some cuts, you can't hear the
drums; on others, the guitars are obscured.
COUPLE OF GOOD THINGS
All this could be overlooked if the music
had been well chosen. Regrettably, only two of
the cuts on this album strike me as being worth
recording. One is Bring Yourself Down to Earth
Loving Blues, Baby by Spring, the only group on
the record who are still going strong. This is the
only cut on the album which doesn't sound like
it was recorded in someone's basement, and the
music is capable and even exciting in spots. The
other good thing is Golden Girl by Papa Bear's
Medicine Show, one of my favourite groups
before they split a couple of years ago. This is
certainly not the best version I've heard them do
of this song, but it still displays a lyrical talent
which none of the other groups on this record
come close to. Drummer Kat Hendrikse was and
is one of the best drummers in town, though it's
hard to tell from this cut, on which his
performance is partially muted by the poor
production. He now plays for Spring, and his
subtle, fast-handed technique is better
represented on their cut.
ROCK MUZAK
The rest? Well, I'm not impressed. The Mock
Duck's Do Re Mi isn't bad, but their unmusical
moog synthesized bleeps and tweets leave me
cold. The Hydro Electric Streetcar are rock
muzak, while Route Nine's (who?) trite lyrics are
just nauseating. It's too bad. Cool-Aid is great, I
really dig them, but this record just cannot stand
as music. I hope they can do better with Volume
2.
PAPA BEAR'S MEDICINE SHOW
MEMORIAL ALBUM
Some of Ihe exciting things which were
happening musically in Vancouver can be found
on this album. The now-defunct Medicine Show
was one of the more talented groups on the local
scene for many years. They combined a gentle
lyricism with power and a taste for intricate
rhythms.
Most of this record makes the Cool-Aid
Album sound sick. Many of the cuts are really
interesting, and I think several of them are good
enough to stand comparison with the work of
betterJcnown American or British groups. A case
in point is "Wait and See" (short version), which
changes pace beautifully from lyric to drive and
spotlights Kat Hendrikse's light virtuoso
drumming. The songs which really rock, like
O.K. and Baroque, display in their involved
interplay a degree of talent amazing in a group
who, to my knowledge, never before cut a
record. This one's a limited edition. There's only
a hundred of them around, so pick up on one
now before they are all gone. „... «*
Page Friday, 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, February 12, 1971 Leon Bibb
The Special Events
Committee of the Alma Mater
Society of the University of
, British Columbia is presenting a
two-part concert program
featuring the recording artist
Leon Bibb.
"The Poet's Thing" - poems
and songs of the times
PART ONE - Tuesday,
February 9, 1971, 12;30 p.m.,
Ballroom, Student Union
Building, UBC.
PART TWO - Friday,
February 12, 1971, 1230 p.m.,
Ballroom, Student Union
Buuding, UBC.
Admission to each concert
will be 50c.
Leon Bibb is currently
residing in the Vancouver area
and is preparing material for live
concerts as well as television
appearances. He is also currently
the host and moderator of the
NBC show "Someone New"
which allows young artists an
opportunity to appear on
national television.
Leon Bibb is a well-known
American folk-singer who has
recorded an extensive
folk-repertoire for Vanguard
Records.
The material which Bibb will
be using in this performance
(which incidentally is the
premiere of a proposed tour
across North America) is a
synthesis of his knowledge and
experience of the past twenty
Leon Bibb.
years in the entertainment
business. The history of earlier
forms of music and its
relationship to today's
contemporary music is of vital
concern to Leon Bibb, and this
is reflected in the work songs,
chain gang songs, blues and
contemporary music that will be
a part of the program.
From the early American
work songs and chain gang
songs, the program will develop
into anti-war ballads and the
powerful sound of Negro blues.
The poems of Malcolm X and
contemporary American poets
will blend into the music of Neil
Diamond, Paul Simon, and
others.
Notes
Valentine's Day is this Sunday, and one of the highlights of the day will be High Wind's
first musical presentation of 1971. The concert, featuring the Quicksilver Messenger Service and
Love, will happen at the Coliseum at 7:30.
Quicksilver was one of the best groups involved in the San Francisco psychedelic
explosion of the late 60s, and although they have since gone through a lot of changes, they
should still provide some exciting entertainment. Their bassist, David Freiberg, is one of the
more talented people in West coast rock, while pianist Nicky Hopkins, who has played with the
Airplane and the Stones, plays some mean honky-tonk. Love is an up-and-coming new group
whcrhave received rave reviews from previous performances.
Word is that Quicksilver will be doing a two-hour set, and, with any luck, a jam may
develop. It should be good evening.
* * *
The Vancouver Symphony Society, in an effort to appeal to younger audiences, is coming
up with some good things for the Spring season. The first of "Three Concerts for Young
Heads" is happening this Friday night at 8:30 in the QE Theatre. The feature of Friday's
concert will be the combined performance by Norbert Vesak's Western Dance Theatre and the
VSO of Igor Stravinsky's "Soldier's Tale". This blending of contemporary dance and
symphonic stuff should result in a unique and exciting evening.
Simon Streatfield will return to the VSO to conduct the Stravinsky ballet, and also
Malcolm Arnold's Tam O'Shanter Suite, Billy the Kid by Aaron Copland, and the Mackerras
arrangement of Sullivan's Pineapple Poll Ballet Suite.
The second concert, on March 27, will feature the superb Vancouver rock group Spring,
while the third, on April 5, will be a colloboration between the VSO and Toronto's gala rock
orchestra, Lighthouse.
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1:00, 3:50, 6:35, 9:20
Sunday 2:30, 6:00, 9:00
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683-2634
Friday, February 12, 1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 7 Love in
the OR
Part 111
by Rebecca Quirk
You will recall from the last
episode of Love in the OR, that the
dreaded disease Galloping peedink X
was raging through the general
hospital where our valiant hero, Dr.
Lance Sterling, and his platinum
haired tragicomic mistress Nurse
Angel White struggled to keep the
disease under control.
At last word, Lance had not yet
recovered from the disease. Allan
Gay, the administrator, (who had by
the way, not yet succumbed to this
peculiar disease that seemed to affect
only males) was in an awful tizzy.
Gay had his hands full running a
hospital with almost no staff, and to
top it off, Lance's mother was
continually bothering him, she had
taken a fancy to Gay and pestered
him until he was going crazy. Now as
we re-enter our story, Mrs. Sterling is
in Gay's office looking at him with
eyes that bespoke hunger. Gay was
sitting at his desk muttering "Mercy
sakes, what will I do?"
Mrs. Sterling looked longingly at
Gay and said, "Oh, Mr. Gay, I'm
sure you can handle it. You look so
capable." The latter was said in a
husky voice that seemed strangely
inappropriate to her dumpy and
somewhat frowsy appearance.
Elsewhere in the hospital, Nurse
White was sobbing on the shoulder of
her best friend, Nurse Loveheart, a
pretty redheaded girl who worked in
the children's ward.
"Oh Mary," said Nurse White.
"What is going to happen to Lance?
No one has been able to come up
with a cure yet." Nurse Loveheart
looked down at poor Nurse White
and said, "Angel, we must be strong,
we nurses can take it. You can't go
around sobbing about dying people
like that, it disturbs the patients."
"Dying!" exclaimed Nurse White,
"Dying! Oh no, he can't be dying, he
just can't be, I can't stand it!" she
sobbed. "Get a grip on yourself you
slobbering idiot!" said Nurse
Loveheart. "He's not worth it, he
never cared about you, it was me he
loved all along. You thought that just
because he made love to you on the
vibra bed that he was crazy about
you. Well, you've got another think
coming, you witch! He loves me, it
should be me that is crying, not
you."
'"Ohohoh!" was all Nurse White
could say. She rushed from the room.
Then ran on down the hall, blinded
by tears, she ran right in to Mrs.
Sterling who was just emerging from
Gay's office, her eyes sparkling
through her bifocals.
When the two had recovered from
their collision, Mrs. Sterling perceived
that Nurse Whit6 was crying. "Nurse
White," she exclaimed, "whatever
can be the matter?" Nurse White
looked at her in astonishment, "But
Mrs. Sterling, you must be in shock.
Don't you understand, your son is
dying, and there is no help for him."
"Oh that," said Mrs. Sterling.
"You mean Lance. Oh don't worry
about him. I've got three more sons
who treat me much better than that
playboy in white ever did, besides
he's not really my son, anyway. I
found him on my doorstep, and
every month, someone sends me a
hundred dollars in the mail."
*   *   *
Will Lance recover? Will Nurse
White's fears be realized? What about
Gay? Tune in to this space next
week, for another episode of'Love in
the OR.
No "Time Out" at
— We Hurry
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Page Friday, 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, February 12, 1971 Fridqy, February 12, 1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  15
Human government to run full second slate
from page One
Evert Hoogers took the
position of secretary by
acclamation.
Joan Campana, the third
member of the human
government slate, had 2699 votes
to take ombudswoman. Hjr
closest rival, Hamish Earle, the
incumbent, had only 942 votes.
Sue Kennedy, AMS external
affairs officer this year, was easily
elected activities co-ordinator.
Lau, faced with an unfriendly
executive from the first slate told
The Ubyssey, Wednesday, that he
will run a second slate to counter
the promised human
government.slate.
"I have the people and they're
going to give the human
government slate a real run," said
Lau.
"The Ubyssey, especially Art
Smolensky's story, biased the
election," he said.
Lau had more to say about The
Ubyssey Thursday.
"I don't feel we're getting a
return from the Ubyssey for the
amount of money they get," he
Abolition of rank
remains unsolved
from page One
Kenny defined his position as being one of review rather than
judgment.
"If a true picture is not given by the department head it is my job
to ask for more evidential data. But I want to emphasize that this in no
way questions the judgment of the department," said Kenny said.
Diversity in the English department has been long standing. The
split involves two groups. The rigid group is traditional, valuing
prestigious publication; the opposition accords value to all types of
scholarship including teaching.
"Any system works if you have a generous administration — we
don't," said John Doheny, a tenured English professor.
Doheny said the rigid group is the one with the power.
"The split involves educational philosophy — teaching versus
research. Eventually, good teaching leads to publicaion; publication
should be the result of mature thought, it cannot be timetabled," said
Doheny.
Walter Young, head of the political science department, said
Thursday: "A big department like English is a headache, especially if
you try to run it traditionally. At least if you run it democratically it
would be more productive.
"The prerequisite is that everybody must believe in the intrinsic
worth of a democratic structure, and I'm not sure that they do.
"In this boiling affair maybe they'll realize that's the only way,"
he said.
"The situation now is turning colleagues into enemies."
Young is now attempting to have rank — the assistant prof,
associate prof and full prof designations abolished by the faculty
association.
He told the association Thursday that rank serves no purpose and
elimination of it would facilitate decisions regarding promotions.
He said the issue of rank may influence the granting of tenure,
. one of the major problem-spots in the English department. He said a
department head may look first at rank, then at tenure.
The faculty association was supposed to discuss the proposal at
its Thursday meeting but did not get to it. Ubyssey reporters were
turfed out of the meeting.
Car wash on Saturday
for NOW   project
The NOW Bus is organizing a car wash on Saturday to raise
money for its youth projects.
Forty NOW volunteers will be washing cars at the following Shell
stations: Tenth and Discovery, Burrard and Davie, and Forty-first and
Granville. The proceeds of the car wash which is happening from 10
a.m. to 6 p.m. will go to the NOW bus and the Warehouse.
The NOW bus, that psychedlic vehicle which was outside SUB this
week, provides free medical and legal aid to youth on the street
NOW has other projects in mind. Project Window is construction
of The Warehouse, a discount bookstore, crafts shop and drop-in centre
for youth.
However to finance all these projects NOW needs money. So if
your car needs a wash the time is now.
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said. "We'll definitely be taking a
look at the paper's finances"
Lau then went on to make
some AMS president-elect
promises.
"I want to get down to some
concrete programs with my new
executive," he said.
"I want to get down to work
on a better frosh orientation
program and better utilization of
SUB.
"I'm also planning to look at
the feasibility of more
independent undergraduate
societies," said Lau.
Garrod said he was not
planning, at this time to contest
the presidential election.
"We wartt to run a strong
second slate and that all we're
going to do for the time being,"
Garrod told The Ubyssey
Thursday.
"Our beef lies with the
election procedures," he said.
"For instance, the use of the
preferential ballot is unclear.
"There is no clause in the
constitution that says the AMS
must use the preferential votes yet
scrutineers were telling people to
vote preferentially in the
advanced polls and early on
Wednesday.
"The poll in Buchanan did not
open on time. We expected our
strongest turnout there," he said.
"It was possible for a student
to walk all over the campus and
never see a polling booth.
"We should have more refined
electoral procedures on this
campus," said Garrod.
Graduate Student Association
president David Mole, Sharon
Boylan, council chairman and
editor of the student paper at
New Caledonia college in Prince
George, AMS social work rep Bob
Smith and AMS deputy vice
president Rob McDiarmid will be
running under the human
government for the second slate.
Lau's second slate will consist
of AMS science rep Adrian
Belshaw, arts rep Mike Robinson,
Don Palmer, arts undergraduate
society presidenfrind Hohn Olson,
arts 3.
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Tues., Feb. 16 at    12:30 p. 111.
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WE HAVE AN OFFICE NEAR YOU
QUESTION?
HPiNG-UP?
STUDENT-RUN - STUDENT-ORGANIZED
SUB 234 Mon.-Fri. 10:30-7:30 Ph. 228-3700
\ \
PEOPLE
/  /
Due to the popularity of
LOVE IS JUNK
Dr. Ben Wong is returning to present the
final evening of our programme
LOVE AND SEX
Monday, Feb. 15-7 p.m.       SUB Ballroom Page 16
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, February  12,   1971
No obligation on senior grads
from page One
With the establishmen t of the
GSC it was thought unfair that
grad students be required to pay
for their building and the newly
designed SUB. Thus, in 1961 a
referendum was passed alleviating
senior grad students from any
economic obligation to the AMS,
although first year grads were still
to be required to pay the total
AMS fees.
Thus over two-thirds of the
GSA membership does not
presently^, pay AMS fees (1,200
out of 2,000).*
The GSA's annual fee
assessment was $12 for building
maintenance and one dollar for
the society.
Five years ago, in the face of
an expanding membership and
pending the congesting of their
facilities, grad students instituted
a building fund for the expansion
of their centre, which resulted in
the subsequent increase in fees
from $13 to $27.
In an attempt to modify their
campus identity, the GSA
executive has several times tried
to open the building for the use of
campus undergraduates, but the
executive received a negative
response from its membership on
every such occasion.
There is at present a movement
to incorporate fifth year
education or library science
students or those from other
colleges who meet entrance
requirements into the GSA.
But according to Mariash this
solution is not practical, because
if the GSA begins soliciting
membership, the AMS will soon
realize a falling off in membership
and funds.
LAW U.S.
Fee Referendum
Results
In Favor 191 (73%)
Against 54 (22%)
40% of students voting.
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The Arts Undergraduate Met)
PRESIDENT'S
REPORT
A Year of Growth: Creating a Firm Base for Student Action
In tackling the job of serving Arts students and trying to get
things moving on this part of campus the executive first looked at
the weaknesses of the Arts U.S. Given the low ebb of
organisation of the Arts U.S. last spring and the complete lack of
funds in the treasury we made the development of some finances
our original priority.
Grants from the Alumni Association and the Dean of Arts
helped us finance the Orientation program put on in front of the
Main Library in September. Installation of vending machines and
reinstitution of a locker system have given the Society some
sources of yearly funds. Vending machines have gone over well
and the locker system resulted in over six hundred lockers being
freed from disuse (they had been left locked by students that had
left the University).
We have set up efficient offices during the year and have
been able to publish a newsletter (The Scroll and Moon) and a
Journal (Thursday's Child) from these. We have been careful to
record all our efforts so that the new executive can review that
which has happened and improve upon it as they see fit.
Attempts at setting up course unions were not as successful
as we had hoped and students who did come forward seemed to
be unfamiliar with the philosophy of course unions and student
power. More work is definitely needed in this area. Society
representatives did sit on three Faculty of Arts committees. We.
had two reps on the Curriculum committee, three on the new
Investigative Curriculum Development committee and one
(tentatively) on the new committee looking into the Evaluation
and Improvement of Teaching. We have been cautious about the
third committee because the UBC administration has until now
been less than subtle in its lack of commitment to improving
teaching. •
We put on an Arts Festival in October and although we
believe that most of you who turned out enjoyed the events it
was not as well attended as we had hoped. This was partially due
to improper advertisement, not enough funds at the time and
inexperience.
Our philosophy in developing the Arts U.S. has been that the
Society, if financially strong and well organized, can serve
students and make possible a variety of events, political speakers,
intermurals, and communication between Arts Students on what
is going on in Arts. We have tried to be as open to as many
student groups in Arts as possible financially and resource wise.
Also we see the Society as being able to increase its political and
bargaining power in terms of the Administration. Then student
wishes will have a chance of effecting the general university
development.
An income proposal made by me and coming up for vote at
the AMS general meeting in March will give all the undergraduate
societies and student associations on campus a basic income each
year from the present $9.00 general student fee levy. This will
enable each local government to put on relevant programs and
serve students at their decentralized level. We also believe the
relationship between the undergraduate societies and the AMS
will be a lot healthier under this system.
So this is what we have tried to do for you. Please forgive us
the mistakes. All we wish now is that some good students come
forward, take over, avoid our defeats and excell in everything we
have done right.
A very special thanks to Patti Duggan for just about
everything that went right this year. Thanks to Bob Rankin and
David Schmidt for publications. A special thanks to David
Gillespie for imagination, creativity and the new official Arts
Undergraduate Society Seal (pictured above — the Latin means
"Out of the Arts comes the University"). Also special thanks to
Murray Wilkinson for many efforts. Many thanks to John Sproule
for help with Orientation and the Arts Festival (and to Clayton
Vogler - the Colonel). Thanks to David Mackenzie for the
same and to all for perseverance. To Larry and Jerry a deep debt
of gratitude for so much help.
Yours Sincerely,
Don Palmer,
PRESIDENT
ARTS U.S. EXECUTIVE:
ARTS REPS TO AMS:
ELECTIONS:
NOMINATIONS
CLOSE THURSDAY FEB. 18th.
ALL CANDIDATES MEETING WED. FEB. 24th, BUCHANAN 104.
ELECTIONS: THURSDAY FEB. 25th.
NOMINATIONS CLOSE THURSDAY FEB. 25th.
ALL CANDIDATES MEETING MONDAY MARCH 1st, BUCHANAN 106.
ELECTIONS: WEDNESDAY MARCH 3rd Friday, February 12, 1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  17
The things your media doesn't tell
By LESLIE PLOMMER
Everyone knows what women's
liberation means.
It means burning bras, cultivating
ugliness and knocking senseless any "male
chauvinist pig" who presumes to light a
cigarette or hold open a door for a
woman. It means hating men, or
alternatively, just being a poor, frustrated
broad who only needs a good strong man
to straighten her out.
We all know this is true about women's
liberation. It must be true — we read it in
the newspaper, see it on television and hear
it on radio.
But a funny thing happens when some
of us come in live contact with these
fearful women's liberationists. We don't
hear them tell us that the crucial issues
facing the liberation movement are the
burning of bras, cultivation of ugliness, the
lighting of cigarettes or the holding open of
doors.
But   the   joke   and   cliche   source   was
women's liberation itself.
Many of the current cliches filtered
through from the earlier, defensive days of
the newly-mushrooming movement. Before
a good political base was built underneath
women's lib, some women looked only as
far as the male bosses for the source of
their second-class status.
We
re find most of the women not only
saying they like or love men, we find them
showing it in their relationships with men.
We see that most of them aren't evil
man-chasers — they're already married, or
enjoying other types of permanent or
transitory relationships with men.
We also find that they are working hard
at constructive, warm relationships with
other women.
In fact, we begin to wonder just who
media people have been talking to about
women's liberation. Where have they been
getting their information about this
disgusting assemblage of sacreligious
monsters?'
Do they, indeed, know ANY of the
people they talk so much about?
The "facts" peddled about women's lib
by mass media often seem so much at
variance with the reality many of us have
come to know, that we can't help asking
these questions.
It doesn't take long to figure out that
the "facts" are not facts at all. They are
cliches. The people who put them into
print are trivia-mongers.
But like all cliches, these portraits of
women's liberation didn't drop from the
skies onto the eagerly-waiting media.
The media were eagerly waiting all right.
That phase ended fairly quickly, this
segment of women's lib saw it wasn't in the
oppression game alone. The men were
there too.
But the media, seldom bothering to find
out what's really going on in women's lib,
are still two years or more behind the
times, and even then are telling only a
small part of the whole story.
In     fact,     the     cigarette-lighting,
door-holding debate (a small part of the
total movement) was as much an attempt
to free men from these silly roles as it was
to free women from their "dumb and
fragile" lot.
Many women now realize that media
distortions have partly arisen because of
errors in tactics and communication made
by women's lib people themselves.
But even when we bend over backwards
to criticize women's liberation in this
regard, it is obvious that even with flawless
thinking, tactics and communication, the
social odds are heavily stacked against any
attempts by women's lib to convey its
really serious philosophy via the media.
The overwhelming obstacle is the
defensive, life-or-death position taken by a
society about to lose its definitions of
baby-sitter and girl Friday. A society
threatened with the loss of its cheap labor
and centuries-old classification of men and
women.
And so the media, as defenders of the
status quo, prepare to wage battle. The
weaponry is simple. It consists of trivia,
usually in the form of second-rate humor.
(It is ironic, to say the least, that the
joke-makers are precisely the people who
think this sexual transformation is the
most un-funny thing that could happen to
society.)
A\nd please note that no one has
suggested that women's lib should not be
open to criticism. It can't grow strong
without criticism, as a matter of fact. But
the trivia-mongers don't criticize, don't
think, don't even consider a little.
In part, the trivia is a product of the
minds of desperate, unimaginative writers,
always eager to snatch at any shred of an
idea.
Every Canadian daily newspaper has at
least one of these people as a columnist.
For most of them, it's easier to make a
joke out of bra-burning than to think or
write seriously and well about women's lib.
Unfortunately for all of us, reducing
women's lib to trivia in the guise of humor
meets with the approval of most editors,
and may readers and listeners — though
there is reason to believe that this group is
becoming smaller.
In a time when most Canadians think
twice before joking about "niggers" or
"frogs," few media people seem to hesitate
at disparaging attempts by some women to
rise above their "proper places."
And yet, supporters of women's
liberation step on the joke-makers arid
trivia-mongers at their own risk.
After all, the trouble with those
ridiculous women's lib people, as we're all
told, is that they have no sense of humor.
Too bad, all you jokers. I know I have a
good sense off humor. But I've never
thought it especially funny to laugh at the
debasement of anyone.
And   when   it   comes  to   women   in
particular —that means me and many of
my friends — it gets even harder to take
jokes that can only be called take-offs on
oppression.
It's difficult to laugh after you've
watched hours of television commercials
portraying women as giggling, silly
creatures who spend their days in super
markets fawning over Derwood Kirby and
his soap products.
It's hard to laugh when one of the men
in the office says, "wear skirts, will you? I
like my fringe benefits."
It's hard to laugh when every day you
see members of your sex turned into
painted, plastic stereotypes on magazines
and newspaper pages.
And I don't do any chuckling over the
plastic male stereotypes on those pages
either - though I don't have much
occasion to laugh about that. Nobody
seems to tell me any jokes about it.
So I can't really say Fm sorry to the
people who want to accuse me of lack of
humor. I've never been too worried about
my inability to laugh at second-class
citizens.
When jokes become a desperate attempt
to discredit a cause that is fundamentally
right and absolutely essential, they are not
humorous.
The trivia process is not always a
conscious one. But conscious or
unconscious, it's just lucky for all of us
that the joke-makers are going to lose their
campaign.
Lose? Not really. They'll be the
eventual winners, along with the rest of
Canadian society.
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 OPEN	
MON. THRU SAT.
752 THURtOW ST. 683-7306
UBC Center for Continuing Education
presents
A Special Lecture by Canada's
Foremost Interpreter
PROF. PAUL T. K. LIN
Director, Center for Asian Studies, McGill University
"THE PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA:
OBSERVATIONS ON THE CULTURAL REVOLUTION"
8 P.M. FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 12
HEBB THEATRE, UBC
Admission: $2.00     Students $1.00
Professor Lin spent four months in the People's Republic last summer, the
most recent Western academic to do so. He travelled extensively and will
discuss the changes he observed resulting from the Cultural Revolution.
We've Got The Bug
KIRKPATRICK'S IS GOING VOLKSWAGEN
Max Kirkpatrick announces his new Volkswagen dealership at 41st and West Blvd.
He invites you to come in and test drive the beetle.
Purchasers of Pontiacs, Buicks, Acadians and Vauxhall's
will continue to receive the same fine service for their
cars. All GM parts will be kept on hand:
KIRKPATRICK
5799 W. Boulevard (at 41st Avenue)
263-3231 Page 18
THE      UBYSSEY
Tenants will demonstrate in Victoria Tuesday
for reforms in the Tenant and Landlord Act.
"It is an act that favors landlords," said Bruce
Yorke, secretary of the Vancouver Tenants Council
this week at a tenants' rally in the SUB art gallery.
"Landlords can still evict tenants without
reason. You can have all the rights you want but
what good is that if you're out on the street," said
Yorke.
The council plans to talk to municipal affairs
minister Dan  Campbell  and  attorney-general  Les
Peterson, he said.
Reforms include limitations on rent increases so
they will not exceed the rise in the cost of living in
the previous 12 months, emergency legislation for
unemployed tenants who cannot pay their rent and
inclusion of tenants on the voters' list for provincial
money by-laws.
Buses will be leaving Oakridge at 7:45 a.m.
Tuesday at a cost of five dollars return. The Alma
Mater Society external affairs office is sponsoring
four students.
FRIDAY
YOUNG  SOCIALISTS
Meeting 8 p.m., 1208 Granville  Street
UBC CYCLIST CLUB
Meeting noon SUB clubs lounge
WOMEN'S  INTRAMURALS
Managers meeting, 12:30, SUB Room
213
ALPHA OMEGA SOCIETY
General meeting, 12:30, Sub 211
NDP   PROPOGANDA   WAR   FILMS
Battle  of Britain,  12:30, Bu.  106. 25*.
EXPERIMENTAL  COLLEGE
Program on the failure of UBC: The
AMS and The Ubyssey, 12:30, SUB 125
LEON   BIBB
Leon Bibb, Music and Poetry from
ancient blues to contemporary, 12:30,
SUB Ballroom
PRE.SOCIAL  WORK CLUB
Dr. Glen Hamilton of the B.C. Association of Social Workers to speak and
answer questions. All welcome,  12:30,
SUB 105B.
SATURDAY
INTERNATIONAL   FAIR
Dance—Ngoma Ya Africa band, $1.25.
9:00 p.m.  International House.
MONDAY
SPANISH CLUB
Presentation of the poetry of Garcia
Lorca,  12:30, Bu.  204
UBC   PROGRESSIVE   CONSERVATIVES
Speaker   from    Canadian   League    of
Rights, SUB 213.
SIERRA CLUB OF B.C.
Film   and   speakers.   Jim   Behlen   and
John  Milne,  12:30, SUB 211
TUESDAY
INTERNATIONAL  HOUSE
Arab - Israels    Conflict     today,    Issa
Fahel, 12:30. International House
EXPERIMENTAL   COLLEGE
Failure  of  UBC:  Failure  of the political clubs, 12:30, SUB  125
WEDNESDAY
ZERO   POPULATION   GROWTH
"Population     Explosion:     Fact     or
Fancy?"   Dr.   Hamish   Kimmins,   8:15,
Kitsilano Community Centre.
PRE-LAW
Mr. C.   C. Locke, 12:30, Angus 4M
IP- —
'tween
classes
MISCELLANEOUS
AQUA SOC
Whaling  Slides,   4:00  p.m. - 9:00  p.m.,
SUB 207 and 209
SAILING  CLUB
General meeting,  12:30 Bu.  104
LUTHERAN   STUDENT MOVEMENT
"When  you come  to  the  end  of the
perfect   church".   Rev    J.   Voit,   12:30.
SUB 205
FEB-FEST
Febteber Fest and Cabaret, Sat. Feb.
27,  on campus
CAMPUS MINISTRIES
SUB 228, Mon. Wed. Fri. 10:00-12:00
Tues. Thurs. 10:00-4:00
SAILING CLUB
Mast painting party in SUB basement,
Sat.   Feb.  13,  and  Sun.   Feb.   14,   at
10:00 a.m.
V.O.C.
Open House: chorus lines, dam down
and up-hill, Feb. 13 & 14, Whistler
Cabin
KUNG-FU
Kung-Fu demonstration, Fri. 7:30 p.m.,
Sat.  3:30  p.m.   International Fair, International House
LEGAL  AID
Mon. Wed. Fri. SUB 228 and 232.
99
For More Efficient Studying Take
"EFFECTIVE STUDY
4 Lectures About Reading, Writing, Listening and Studying
4 SATURDAYS, FEB. 13 - 10 A.M. - NOON
Fee $10.00 — includes study materials
Vancouver Public Library Downtown
A new course for those who want to improve and update their study methods
For information Phone Centre for Continuing Education 228-2181  — loc. 272
ATTENTION, SKIERS!
SKI SALE!
HEAD SKIS
HEAD 360— $4 EC
Reg. $185 NOW     199
HEAD 660—- $4 CC
Reg. $185 NOW     193
HEAD 606— $4 *»r
Reg. $165 NOW     I03
HEAD 404— $4 1 C
Reg. $145 NOW      I   I 9
HEAD 160— $Qn
Reg. $110 NOW        «JU
R0SSICN0L Srraro—        $4 «J|-
Reg. $165 NOW     100
R0SSICN0L Allais Major $4 OC
Reg. $165 NOW     I 00
FISCHER SKIS
'210
M60
'125
"/"r1
^
FISCHER Imperaror—
Reg. $250 . . . NOW
FISCHER Superglass—
Reg. $200    . . NOW
FISCHER Class C.T.—
Reg. $155    .    NOW
FISCHER Class 707— $QQ AP
Reg. $129    . . NOW    39.99
FISCHER Silverglass— $EA QtT
Reg. $79.95 . . NOW    99.99
LANGE BOOTS
LANCE Standard—   $4 AC LANCE Pro— $4 OC
Reg. $135 . . NOW     IU9        Reg. $165    . NOW     109
LANCE Competition—     $1
Reg. $195 NOW
165
JACKETS   'SWEATERS
BOOTS • WOOD SKIS • SKI PANTS,
IVOR WILLIAMS SPORTING GOODS
2120 WEST 41st AVE.-TELEPHONE 261-6011
Open Daily 'Til 6 P.M.-Thurs. 6 Fri. 'Til 9 P.M.
LOCATED RIGHT IN THE MIDDLE OF KERRISDALE
II
All
Sales
Final
Friday,  February  12,  1971
Tenants to rally in Victoria Tuesday
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Campus — 3 lines, 1 day $1.00; 2 days $1.75.
Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $1.25; additional
lines 30c; 4 days price of 3.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable
in advance.
Publications Office, STUDENT UNION BLDG., Univ. of B.C.,
Vancouver 8, B.C. Closing Deadline is 11:30, the day before
publication.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
LOVE PULSATES, PEAKING IN
Feb. Dance to Beyond Nemesis.
SUB Ballroom, Fri. 12, 8 p.m.
Valentinos $1.25. Others $1.00. Un-
der 5 free.  AMS  cards  req.	
INTERNATIONAL FAIR — FRI.
4-10 p.m. & Sat. 10 a.m. - 8 p.m.
Admission 50* students, $1.00
community, $2.00 family. Dance
Sat. 9 p.m. - 1 a.m. to Ngoma Ya
Africa  band.  $1.25  each.	
GOLD RUSH NITE AT PLACE
Vanier. Fri. Feb. 12 8:30 - 1. Dance
to "Crowe" Saloun — Gambling.
Res.  75*. Non-Res. $1.25.
Greetings
12
Lost 8c Found
13
Rides St Car Pools
14
DESPERATELY NEED RIDE TO
Campus from Ladner and back.
Mon. to Fri. 7:30 a.m. and 4:30
p.m. Start March 1. Phone Carrol,   228-2878   or   879-6943.
Special Notices
15
IF ... IS A STUDENT'S DREAM
come true. See how in the SUB
Auditorium, Friday and Saturday,
7:00 & 9:30; Sunday, 7:00. AMS
card holders 50c.	
NEIL SWEETEE—MESS AROUND
with Love and Your Valentine
Shnooks,  Okay?	
"WHEN YOU COME TO THE END
of the Perfect Church" with
James Voit, Noon, SUB 205. Sponsored by Lutheran Student Move-
ment.	
GOLD RUSH NITE — DANCE —
Saloon — Gambling. Fri. Feb. 12
8:30 - 1.    Place   Vanier.    Res.   75*.
Non-Res.  $1.25.	
SAVE   $20.
Waterbeds   all   sizes   and   shapes
Phone Florence 738-3464 2-6 p.m.
Mon. - Fri.
Travel Opportunities
16
INTERNATIONAL   CHARTERS
687-2855 224-0087 687-1244
List of 1971 return 1-way & relative flights U.K., Continent, India,
Africa,  Hong Kong.
106—709 Dunsmuir St.,  Van.   1,  B.C.
Wanted—Information
17
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
'59    BUICK    4    DR.    V8    P.S.    P.B.
Radio. $200 or offers. Phone Larry
224-6917.	
1969   MGB   RED,   WIRE   WHEELS,
Tonneau, 16,000 miles, Radio. $2000
433-6635.
Automobiles—Wanted
22
Automobiles—Parts
23
'57 CHEVROLET. GOOD RUNNING
condition. $100 or so. 224-9869. Ask
for  Bob  in  room  209.
Motorcycles
25
1970 YAMAHA 75 EXCEL. CONDI-
tion. $250. Write or see Andrea
Grieve,   3164  West   6th.	
'68 SUZUKI 50 cc. GOOD CONDI -
tion. $125. 731-4206 between 4-6
p.m.   Ideal   for   Girl.	
BUSINESS SERVICES
Day Care ft Baby Sitting    32A
Photography
34
Scandals
37
$10 REWARD. NEED 2-BEDROOM
unfurnished apt. under $150.
Starting  May.   263-9774.	
FLYING CIRCUS PETITION ! !
Outside Buch. 207, Mon. 8:30 -
11:20,   Tues.   12:30 - 3.20.	
LINDA  ALL  IS  FORGIVEN—SUE.
You   are   tired   of   authority,   see
IP        !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
SUB Auditorium Friday and Saturday, 7:00 & 9:30; Sunday, 7:00.
AMS   card   holders   50*.
Typewriters & Repairs
39
Typing
40
EXPERT IBM SELECTRIC TYPIST
—experienced in all types of technical thesis. Reasonable rates.
Call Mrs.   Ellis,   321-3838.	
NEAT ACCURATE ELECTRIC
typing. Theses, essays, etc. Reasonable   rates.   Call   Mrs.   Duncan,
228-9597.	
ESSAYS AND THESIS TYPED
my home. Phone—Mrs. Murdoch,
261-3607.	
ANY TYPE OF TYPING DONE,
essays, theses, notes, or anything
else. 186 W. 18th Ave., or 872-
1129. -
EXPERIENCED ESSAY AND
thesis typist. Electric typewriter.
Mrs.  Ann Treacy.   738-8794.
Typing
40
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING;
my home. Essays, thesis, etc.
Neat Accurate Work. Reasonable
Rates.   Phone  263-5317.	
ESSAY & THESIS TYPING, IBM
Electric — 35c/page. Call after
noon,   733-4708.	
ESSAYS AND THESES TYPED
Experienced Typist, Electri Type-
writer.  731-8096.	
TEDIOUS TASKS—PROFESSION-
al and Technical Typing, IBM
Selectric—Days, Evenings, Week-
ends.  Phone:  228-9304—30c per.
TYPING SERVICES BY MALE
Secretary, Manuscripts, General
Typing, etc., Evenings and weekends. IBM Selectric Typewriter.
Pick up and Deliver. Reasonable
rates to students. Phone 522-8378
after  4:30  p.m.	
STUDENTS! I WILL TYPE YOUR
term papers. Reasonable rates.
Call Yvonne — 738-6874.	
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
CO-ORDINATOR REQUIRED FULL
time for Nanaimo Crisis Centre.
Qualifications: Ability to relate
easily with young people, leadership potential, Knowledge of drug
scene helpful, but not essential.
Duties: Co-ordination of voluntary
personnel and activities of a youth
oriented Crisis Centre established
to provide intervention in Crisis
situations, drug information, referral services and to discourage
use of drugs by young people.
Salary: Commensurate with experience. Send Resume describing
education and experience to Jean-
nette Matson, Malaspina College,
Nanaimo, B.C., by February 18,
1971.	
NEW MOTHER NEEDS BABY
and light household help. 4-5
half-days a week. N.Van. Phone
980-1355.	
INSTRUCTION & SCHOOLS
Instruction Wanted
61
Music Instruction
62
Special Classes
6a
Tutoring
64
COACHING FOR ENGLISH 100
students for whom English is a
new   language.   261-6410.	
WILL TUTOR MATH 100 ft 101,
day, evening, or Sat. Reasonable
rates. Phone 733-3644—10 a.m. to
3   p.m.	
FRENCH TUTORING, TRANSLA-
tion into French, experienced
Parisian teacher. 687-6494. Alain
Neumand   (804),   1949  Barclay St.
IS ONE OF YOUR COURSES A
drag? Need help? Come to the
UBC Tutoring Centre. Almost all
subjects, SUB 100B, 228-4583, 12-
2  p.m.,  daily.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BIRD CALLS
Your Student Telephone Directory
NOW HALF PRICE • 50c
at the Bookstore, Thunderbird Shop
and AMS Publications Office
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
ROOMS FOR RENT, MEN ONLY.
Near UBC. $40100 a month. Call
682-2581.	
TWO ATTRACTIVE SLEEPING
rooms for rent in young household. Kitchen privileges, phone,
washer. 10 mins. UBC, $60' and
$65 per month. Call Mrs. Duncan
228-95'97.	
FOR RENT: ROOM IN HOUSE.
Share cooking facilities. Mature
student preferred. 16th & Dunbar,,
phone  738-5408   after   5:00   p.m.
Room & Board
82
Furnished Apts.
83
EXCHANGE OR SUBLET; APRIL
to Septembtr, modern 2% (Faculty), everything included, downtown Montreal, close to McGill:
write Daniel LaTouche, Dept. of
Political Science, McGill Univer-
sity.	
GIRL IMMED. TO SHARE APT.
with same near UBC.  224-4186.
SENIOR STUDENT (MALE) TO
share 2 bdrm. suite, with another
$65.00. Near 48th & MacDonald.
Avail,   now.   731-1625.
Unfurnished Apts.
84
Halls For Rent
85-
Houses—Furn. & Unfurn.
86 Friday, February 12, 1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 19
UBC
- BUCHANAN CUP BASKETBALL -
SFU
H°rXc SHE TS
By TONY GALLAGHER
If you are one of the expected 10,000 bodies at the
Pacific Coliseum Saturday evening, you will probably see
a number of sights not always perceptable to the casual
observer.
This piece of writing is to help one who isn't familiar
with the unimportant aspects of the game of basketball,
to fill space, and also to give your agent an opportunity to
mouth off.
Initially, it is necessary to dispense with the only
important aspect of the Clansmen-Bird affair given the
accepted values of a sporting event — who will win it.
I don't know of course, only Hanson Lau would
know something like that.
But I do know that you will see the Birds trying to
fast break in an attempt to get the slower, larger Clansmen
to give up their deliberate style.
Similarly you will see 23-year-old Greg Poole, the
likeable fellow who has replaced the ailing John
Kootnekoffas director of the SFU troops, trying to do the
opposite. His efforts will be directed at slowing down the
Birds, probably by using a zone defence to take away the
drive from Birds' great Ron Thorsen and to make
extensive use of his three big forwards to control the
boards.
The Clansmen will attempt to isolate their two stars,
Wayne Morgan and Bill Robinson on whomever is
covering them in UBC's man-to-man defence, probably
Derek Sankey and Thorsen respectively.
The Birds will probably press, man-to-man or zone
press, depending upon the whims of Peter Mullins.
If things are going well for the Birds, you will see
Mullins lounging on the bench in much the same form as a
millionaire tourist sipping a Bacardi on the Riviera.
Under similar circumstances you will see Poole
grimacing on the Clansmen bench, attempting to rend
his garments but succeeding only in calling a time out in
an attempt to halt the UBC momentum.
And if neither team is going well, the spectators will
be lamenting their loss of a dollar or two and the waste of
a Saturday night.
One prediction — the latter is extremely unlikely.
Hot tips for non-fans
By STEPHEN MILLARD
Well kiddies, it's a big weekend again. A big weekend
for you non-jocks is a Simon Fraser-University of B.C.
athletic clash. This weekend it's basketball which means
good old UBC stands a chance of winning.
Naturally, great numbers of you will head on out to
the Pacific Coliseum to watch the two giants of local
basketball duel. Admission is a buck which is about as
small a rip-off as the PNE people will allow in their
building.
Of course, if you don't like basketball, think of the
game as a social event to relive the old high school
days... pick up the chick, wheel out to the game, sneak
in a mickey of rum and harass the vendors for a coke and
two paper cups. Then get pissed, go home and ball.
Or you  more  progressive   types can  bring a little
THE ANNUAL CROSS-TOWN debacle between UBC and
SFU goes this Saturday night at 8:00 p.m. in the Pacific
Coliseum. Pictured above are the starting three forwards
for each team. From the left are: SFU's Larry Clark, Mike
Charles, and Wayne Morgan along with UBC's Terry
MacKay, Derek Sankey, and Jack Hoy. Today's sports
page is devoted to an analysis of each team's chances of
winning the coveted Buchanan Cup.
something in a pouch, you own papers and role some big,
big Jays. You can then watch those 10 players throw the
big ball into the little net All this without worry, for after
all, who ever heard of narcs at a basketball game? Then
after the game leave the funny smelling building and
without tripping over the empty bottles go out and ball.
And just like grade 10 you can do it in the car. Of course
screwing is always fun, but the added romance of reliving
the old grade 10 days is kinky).
As for the game itself, you don't have to know too
much. Just look at the scoreboard (that bright thing above
the basketball floor with all the changing numbers).
Simon Fraser will be 'home' and UBC 'visitors'. Whoever
has the most points when the game is over wins.
Who to cheer for? Doesn't matter. Cheer for both
teams, nobody will notice.
Who will win? Probably UBC, but both teams have
tried their best to lose as many games as possible this
season and so anything can happen.
So be there. You should all have a swell time just like
high school. And if a whole bunch of people show up to
fill the place and make lots of noise, Monday's downtown
papers will say what nice kids we are.
Buchanan Cup
belongs to both?
By BILL RUBY
Predicting the UBC-SFU basketball game COULD be
an easy chore. At least for someone who hasn't seen either
team play, has no idea what heights or depths each team
can reach, and doesn't base his prediction on what team is
: supposed to have the better basketball players. Thus,
without the basic facts to cloud the issues, the predictor,
the arm chair coach, or the amateur sports writer can tell
one and all who is going to win with the assurance that he
has a 50 per cent chance of guessing right.
For someone who has been 'fortunate' enough to see
either or both teams, when they are having good and bad
moments, an attempted prediction could cause a
neurosis. Knowing what a good team is capable of and
then watching them perform at a much lower level can
cause one to completely disown the team. Then the team
changes as abruptly as day and night and performs up to
the most optimistic expectations. What is one to think?
Doesn't the team care about the amateur predictors who
sit around preaching the gospel truth about how, without
a doubt, team A is going to demolish team B, except if. ..
At times this year SFU has played well enough to
defeat any Canadian college team. At other times they
have played like individuals forced to play on the same
team. 'Dissension within the team has been noted by
more than one second guesser, With this knowledge of
internal conflict within the SFU team, a prediction of a
UBC victory can come very easily. UBC by 20.
Only problem is that UBC hasn't exactly torn the
relatively weak WCIAA league apart with their team play.
In the tough games where team play from rebounding —
to fast breaking — to defence, is the key to victory, the
Birds have been defeated. Now the prediction that UBC
can't win the 'Crucial' games. SFU victory by 20.
Is it getting any clearer?
The way the Birds have been playing this year they
could run SFU out of the Coliseum, score well over 100
points, and completely dominate the boards. Prediction:
UBC by 15. Or else they could be intimidated into a slow
control game, get pushed under the boards like high
school kids, and have great difficulty taking enough shots
to score 75 points. Prediction: SFU by 15.
SFU is a Rah Rah team. Their players react to the
cheers of the spectators. With the large crowd that is
expected at the Coliseum, SFU could be in their glory.
SFU by 10.
UBC, with their wide open attack, can also tend to
get caught up by the positive or negative cheers of the
spectators. With well over 65 per cent of the audience
being UBC supporters, the Birds could again begin to fly
like they are capable of. Birds victory by 10.
Now that the prediction problem is solved — with
second guessers having a chance to study the 'Relevant'
points necessary to predicting; arm chair coaches knowing
that their strategy, if used, would lead to immediate
victory; and amateur sports writers, feeling that just as
easy as the flow of the pen they can predict the victory —
I will leave with the only 'SURE' prediction about the
game as stated by coach Mullins, "There will be an
exuberant noisy crowd at the game" .. . unless...
TODAY
12:30 in the
SUB
Ballroom
Leon Bibb
"THE
POET'S THING"
-poems and songs
of the times
Part Two -      ■■■■mmmmm^"™
TODAY at 12:30 in the BALLROOM LEON BIBB
continues his program of music and poetry — from ancient
blues to the contemporary sound.
Don't miss it - it's only 50c
Different
At Scandia
SALE
BRING IN YOUR OLD
WOOD OR METAL SKIS IN
ANY CONDITION WITH A
U.B.C. STUDENT CARD &
RECEIVE A 15% OR MORE
DISCOUNT  ON   NEW SKIS.
ALSO 15% OFF on all your CROSS-COUNTRY needs.
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KNEISSEL
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BEST SERVICE IN TOWN & THE COFFEE IS ALWAYS HOT
4th ft
Burrard
SCANDIA SKI SHOP
732-6426 Page 20
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, February  12,  1971
The NDP
and Quebec
"War Declared on Quebec",the article in the December
issue of Canadian Dimension typifies much of the
confusion in thought of social democrats in Canada today.
As such it deserves an extensive review criticism.
Remember that Canadian Dimension is the organ of social
democracy in Canada. It represents the spectrum, right to
left, of the New Democratic Party and its analysis is based
on suppositions of parliamentary change and the Canadian
"nation". CD gives no credence to the fact that Canada is
a colony and, within Canada, Quebec comprises another
colony.
The truth of Canada's "nationhood" is a series of
regionally exploited areas under the domination of foreign
capital. B.C., the prairies, Ontario, the north, and the
Maritimes make up Canada's regions.
These regions, held under the Ottawa colonial
administration, form the Canadian "fact". In the most
metaphysical sense we Canadians form a nation but before
we mechanistically talk of "national unity" we had better
start realizing that colonies are resource bases for the
contolling country are are treated as such. Living
standards are decreasing in each region, with the
exception of perhaps Ontario, where things are static.
Lven there, labour legislation becomes more repressive.
By DICK BETTS
On the subject of Quebec, the colony within a
colony, national unity becomes an absurd
parliamentarian's notion as long as a distinct culture and
people remain trapped in Confederation. The same
statute, the BNA Act, which keeps Canada a system of
colonized resource bases keeps the Quebecois victims of
domestic and foreign oppression.
The CD article seemed to miss this fact in favour of
assumptions of vibrant nationality directed against
Quebec, a concerned public and a responsive government.
This stereotype becomes evident when we read in
Dimension after the kidnappings and assassination of
Pierre Laporte. ".. . Canadians were angry and confused.
They sought firmness and authority to impose order on
the chaos they felt had suddenly enveloped them. Into the
picture came the prime minister... Mr. Trudeau provided
the firmness the public wanted." This refers to the War
Measures Act.
Trudeau is the responsive statesman according to CD.
The truth is the Act was introduced, not on account of
public outcry which did not exist but by the
businessmen who really run parliament.
In fact parliamentary, or representative processes,
such as they were became defunct. What remained was a
dictatorship of the cabinet and the army which is the
traditional solution to rebellion in banana republic
countries. Instead of the marines we had the Canadian
army which, if armed insurrection ever began seriously,
could not hold Montreal for more than a few hours. The
Canadian Army and the Quebec police became the
colonial police Franz Fanon mentions in The Wretched Of
the Earth. This time Trudeau did not need the marines.
But he was prepared to use Canadian troops to fight the
Quebecois in the interests of "national unity".
In the interests of social democracy CD continues.
"In an atmosphere of mass hysteria, the nationalism and
socialism of the FLQ is easily equated with the
nationalism and socialism of peaceful groups in both
French and English Canada." It's not necessary that they
say who those peaceful groups are. Obviously they refer
to the NDP and the Waffle neither of which understand''
the situation in Quebec.
m. he NDP promotes federalism for Quebec and the
Waffle pays lip service to an independent Quebec
The use of the term "French Canada" by the Wafflers
on the CD staff indicate where their minds are when they
think of Quebec. "Ad mari usque ad mari" emerges deep
somewhere from the CD unconscious and lodges in its
collective ego.
CD's libidinal attachment to nationality and nation
becomes more apparent when it defends a federal party in
its article. In a distorted account of Tommy Douglas' role
in the crisis it extolls the virtues of the man by saying,
"Only NDP leader Tommy Douglas was willing to buck
public opinion and remain adamant against the
WMA."
Douglas did come out against the WMA it's true.
What CD fails to mention is that Douglas and the NDP
also called for other forms of repressive legislation to deal
with the situation and it came under the form of the
Public Order Temporary Measures Act. He voted against
this as well but still wanted (Christ knows what) some
government means of smashing the more militant arms of
the independence movement. Social democratic confusion
reigned and the NDP never really knew what it was they
wanted for Quebec. Probably an NDP victory some day.
Douglas goes on in the CD article, "We must remove
the social dicontent and the frustration that is beating at
the hearts of four or five million Canadians tonight." This
seems to be the stand of the CD article although it
remains ambiguous about the cause of independence.
.MJ'ouglas, the federalist, (note the use of the word
Canadians referring to the Quebecois), will never face the
fact that the Quebecois are beginning to feel themselves as
a national force in the positive sense, a force for
liberation. They are not just protest groups as Douglas
seems to imply with his remarks of "discontent" and
"frustration". The acceptance of the FLQ Manifesto
indicates this quite clearly.
CD in its conclusion runs down quite accurately the
list of grievances the Quebecois face (always referring to
them as "French-Canadians"). They then apply their
editorial coup-de-grace. It is a classic piece of social
democratic muddled thinking, the reasons which will take
a while to explain.
"Terrorism is unjustified and unnecessary — we insist.
Change can be brought about peacefully. Reformists of all
kinds can function within the system we say."
The FLQ is CD's bogey-man. Because of the FLQ
reformists in Quebec were crushed CD tries to tell us.
What CD does not realize is that the WMA is the
logical extension of liberal bourgeois democracy when it is
threatened. The aisles of peaceful change were closed to
the Parti Quebecois without the WMA. Reformists also
threaten the system or so the rulers think. Dimension still
believes in the myths of the liberal nation-state which
although beset by outside control can be reformed. What
they do not realize is that the FLQ took drastic measures
preciselyibecause things have not changed since 1760 in
Quebec and will not change under the present system.
MJ'imension also provides with a classic example of
Canadian chauvinism. "Canada is not Peru or Bolivia.
Quebec is not Peru or Bolivia." Who the fuck says so?
There is more foreign (American) investment in Canada
and Quebec than there is in all of Latin America
combined. Unemployment in both countries is beginning
to rival that of so-called "more underdeveloped areas".
Dimension, fooled by appearances, takes the myth of
our affluence and liberal traditions as not warranting the
tactics of the people of the Third World. One almost reads
"Third World Rabble" into CD's smug remarks.
Dimension's lack of a cultural and coherent political
analysis shows up this time as it does in the NDP as a form
of colonized chauvinism. Most NDPers, indeed most
Canadians (and certainly the vast majority of Quebecois),
recognize the the economic, political and cultural
domination of Canada and Quebec by the American
system.
It is the refusal to take seriously the cultural sphere
which proceeds from the economic system which leads to
the political mistakes and the simplicity of Dimension's
analysis and which also leads it to take many of the
positions of the colonial status quo.
The lack of understanding of the "colony in a
colony", Quebec in Canada, plus an eagerness to assert
Canadiana independently of political action abstracts CD's
analysis. Liberation from U.S. imperialism and the
colonial status quo will come in Canada through a
movement which stresses not nationality or the
parliamentary process but which emphasized liberation
and people's control over their productive and cultural
sphere. It will come from workers' control and a culture
built from that control which stress life and not death,
personal, political and sexual revolution and freedom.
Abstractions drawn by Dimension in "War Declared
on Quebec" do nothing to further this process. It leads
only to nationalist and (worse) a reformist mentality
which stresses the continuation of the power game of
politics and not liberation inherent in positive political
action.
M am not advocating a "freely continentalism" nor am
I saying that the aspirations of a peple set off by national
borders does not matter. I am saying that North American
capitalism must be smashed and the best place to do it
is along the 49th parallel.
The positive national feeling, the feeling of group for
liberation could begin in Canada as it has advanced in
Quebec. Signs of it are here and Dimension does
sometimes point them out. The knowledge of domination
from American capital at least identifies the enemy for
many Canadians. National feelings based on the desire for
freedom marks the time when nationality in the era of the
multi-national corporation becomes a meaningful force.

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