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The Ubyssey Sep 20, 1968

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Array Deflower
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. L, No. 6
VANCPUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 1968
224-3916
GABOR MATE spoke from a truly "red" power base Thursday noon in front of Angus.
SUB pub-in planned,
bring your own booze
By JAMES CONCHIE
"Get stoned in good company!"
So said Alma Mater Society vice-president Carey Linde in
a Ubyssey interview Thursday.
Linde was announcing a pub-in to be held Monday noon in
the main lounge of SUB.
The pub-in was suggested at an open-air meeting Thursday
by grad student Pete Brock.
Said Brock: "Why can't we have a pub on campus. All
you need for a pub is air, an open space, people and fun. We
have  all  that here.
When a listener suggested that a Liquor Control Board licence
might be appropriate, Brock said, "What do we need a licence for?
"If 1,000 people show up here tomorrow the way they have today,
and they all sit here and drink beer, what can the authorities
do?"
AMS councillors took Brock at his word. Within an hour,
plans had been formulated for the pub-in.
But AMS president Dave Zirnhelt said Thursday he will
not accept responsibility for the event.
"This is not an official AMS function," he said. "Personally,
I think it's a groovy idea, but I can't support it."
Zirnhelt said he is afraid the pub-in may damage the AMS*
chances for a liquor licence.
Linde stressed the fact that those attending must bring
their own. "We will only be able to supply enough beer for
any visiting city officials," Linde said.
AMS co-ordinator Jill Cameron said if the building is not
ready on Monday the pub-in will be held on the grounds outside the building.
This weekend critical
for opening of SUB
This weekend will decide which way the student union
building gets off the ground.
SUB building manager Dave Cooper said the building
will be sealed off Saturday and Sunday while the bowling
lanes are being lacquered.
"The type of varnish used for this type of work gives
off highly volatile fumes," said Cooper.
"One match can set off half the building."
Mall rally speakers urge
personal participation
By ALEX VOLKOFF
Students must begin to participate in university affairs as
they haven't really done up to
now.
That was the general feeling
expressed at what turned into
an open-air rally Thursday
noon.
"Nothing will be resolved
unless we get the backing of
the students," said Martin Loney, the Canadian Union of Students president-elect.
But participation was no
problem at Thursday's rally.
At least 1200 students turned
up to hear what the five panelists arranged by the special
events speakers committee had
to say.
These were former Simon
Fraser University president
Loney, Stan Persky, arts 4,
AMS president Dave Zirnhelt,
AMS vice-president Carey
Linde and former UBC student
senator Gabor Mate, now
attending Simon Fraser University.
The rally, which started in
Ang. 104, moved to the main
mal at the noisy request of engineers after half an hour of discussion because many people
were unable to get into the
room.
"We've got to become more
concerned about each other as
peple," said Persky. "This is an
issue of personal relationships,
and we must begin to treat each
other as people before we can
get to student-student or student-faculty relationships."
He said he major reason for
universities is to learn to be
citizens, — how to live with
each other.
"If you try to build anything
on the basis you have now
which is aggressive and hostile-
and full of defence mechanisms, you won't change anything", Persky said.
After warning that he might
be misunderstood, he said:
"What I'm interested in now
is to find someone to love and
to sleep with, someone who
loves and wants to sleep with
me."
Persky complained that so
far everything had happened
within the student government
framework. He said he was
against private arrangements
to work out academic reform
such as Tuesday's senate —
AMS meeting which he said
didn't get students involved.
Zirnhelt echoed this, saying
that the weakness of the AMS
brief on academic reform, the
future of university education,
was that it was issued in a
vacuum. But he believes the
situation is changing.
"It's no longer a minority
that's pushing for reform," he
said. "But students must relate
to the faculty personally, not
as'student to professor."
He also said the student
council is a parliamentary thing
that cannot make meaningful
changes.
"Students must not think of
me as a bureaucrat sitting in
Brock Hall, but as a person,"
he said.
"But we must start by fundamentally criticizing the existing system. If we can't do that,
no meaningful change will
occur," he said.
Mate, a former Ubyssey columnist, introduced himself as
"one of those nasty Marxists."
"People don't have any con-
Continued p. 7,
see 'STUDENT*
Straight busted,
'obscene' this time
The Georgia Straight newspaper and three of its staff
members have been charged with publishing obscene material.
Editorial adviser Dan McLeod said Thursday in an interview that morality squad officers had charged him, the paper,
and editor Paul Tarasoff with publishing and distributing
obscene material.
He said cartoonist Zipp Almasy was charged with making,
publishing and distributing obscene material.
"I just got out of jail," McLeod said Thursday afternoon.
"We are to appear in court at 9:30 a.m. Friday."
Police allege that an Acidman cartoon strip drawn by
Almasy and depicting world figures in the nude is obscene. The
strip appears in last week's edition of the Straight.
"Zipp and I were both arrested at our homes at about 2
p.m.," McLeod said. "Paul appears to have split, maybe to San
Francisco.
"We didn't tell them anything. All we can do is hang tough
and wait."
He said lawyer John Laxton will defend all charged. Laxton
is currently defending the Straight, McLeod and writer Bob
Cummings against charges of criminally libelling city magistrate
Lawrence Eckardt.
A decision was expected to be rendered this morning by
magistrate James Bartman on whether or not the libel case should
go to high court trial.
"With these two cases, we don't even like to think about the
financial situation," said McLeod. "It's just impossible.
"What I really don't like is all the hypocrisy everywhere.
It's just absolutely and totally unjust."
McLeod said he has never personally liked the Acidman
strip.
The Emergency Free Speech Movement has declared today
Freedom Friday and urges everyone to attend the trial at 3122
Main and demonstrate support for the Straight.
DAVE ZIRNHELT sees a  ghost from the past in the form of Stan Persky (left). Sitting and
looking very bored are Carey  Linde and Martin  Loney  (with  cigarette).  The  meeting  was
part of the noon-hour event yesterday originally  scheduled   for   Angus,   but   later   moved
outside. Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, September 20, 1968
VANCOUVER'S   COURTHOUSE   FOUNTAIN   is   a    popular
nighttime meeting place for young couples.
Students
deprived
of room
Science students claimed
Thursday they were deprived
of a common room by the
chemistry department.
Barry Richardson, science 2,
claimed that he and other
members of the science undergraduate society made an extensive study of classes scheduled in the chemistry building.
They then calculated a new
schedule of rooms for several
courses such that one room in
the building would be unused
at all times.
"Then we submitted this
new schedule to the chemistry
department," said Richardson. '
"Today we were told we
could not have the room."
A spokesman for the chemistry department claimed that
the students had not taken into
consideration the graduate
classes which were not scheduled until late this week.
"Once the graduate classes
are included there is no possible way for any room to be
continually unoccupied," he
said.
Chemistry department head
Charles McDowell could not
be reached for comment.
Controversy rages in SUS;
telescope erected Thursday
Sciencemen drummed women off their executive Thursday.
Amendments to the science undergrad society constitution eliminate the offices of secretary, women's representative, and women's
athletic representative from the executive and
place them on the council.
When a scienceman remarked that this
would completely banish women from the executive, SUS president Ken Lott remarked
"Men make better executives anyway."
The present executive, decimated by losses
during the summer, rushed through the revisions after Peter Kowalczyk, science 3, asked
that the meeting be adjourned.
Kowalczyk said he wanted to adjourn the
meeting so sciencemen could demonstrate at
the open-air rally in front of the Angus building.
Observers say Kowalczyk will run for science president when current president Ken
Lott resigns because he is no longer a student.
After Kowalczyk spoke, Lott claimed that
the revisions were all non-controversial and
could be passed in a blanket motion.
The meeting fell short of the expectations
of a large number of first-year science students.
Several later demanded the SUS allow
them to hold their own general meeting and
give them the full co-operation of the SUS.
First-year students claimed the SUS does
not provide a satisfactory means of involvement for the first-year student.
After the meeting, the sciencemen marched
over to the Angus rally and erected a telescope
as a protest to the federal government's cancellation of the telescope atop Mount Kobau
near Keremeos.
When they could not penetrate the crowd,
they retreated and completed the stunt further
down the Main Mall.
A proclamation read at the erection called
on science dean V. J. Okulitch to continue his
efforts to revive the Mount Kobau project.
Poor response cancels retreat
Lack of student response has forced cancellation of this year's Frosh  Retreat.
A total of 17 students had signed up for
the retreat, scheduled for Sept. 20-22 at Camp
Potlatch on Howe Sound, by Thursday afternoon.
The final meeting to decide the fate of the
retreat was attended Thursday by 30 persons
in Bu. 203  .
Organizers* Buzz Knott and Tom Grove
said a major reason for the failure of the
retreat was the lack of a central communications area to catch student interest.
The new student union building had been
planned as a centre of activity but failed to
open in time, they said.
"The lack of a frosh council also hurt us,"
Knott said. "We had one until three years
ago and since then there has been a decline
in the number of participants."
Said Grove: "That's another reason for
this year's poor response. The fact that only
40 students attended the retreat last year
meant there would be fewer second year students this year to incite the interest of this
year's  frosh."
The camp was to provide an informal atmosphere for discussion between faculty, administration and students.
Among those scheduled to attend were
UBC deputy president and dean of inter-
faculty affairs Walter Gage, acting arts dean
John Young, AMS president Dave Zirnhelt
and several senior students.
Knott said he thought the forced cancellation of this year's retreat would discourage
the AMS from attempting a retreat next year.
He said students who signed up for the retreat
can get refunds at the AMS office.
Enjoy a candlelight dinner
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2174 W. 41st in KERRISDALE
AM 1-2750 Friday, September 20, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
THESE LUSCIOUS education queen candidates caught the eye and lens of photographer Dick Button. They are, from  left, to right, Joan McConachie,  Ulrike
Tuscheik,  Lynda  Weibe,  Joy   Battison,   Roberta   Allan   (of  CKLG),  Pat  Jarosinski, Mary Jane Odell, Carolyn Copp, and Sharon Berar.
SUB 'reasonably complete',
main part to open Monday
By NATE SMITH
Alma Mater Society co-ordinator Jill Cameron has accused the chairman of the Student
Union Building management committee of misrepresentation.
Miss Cameron said in an interview Thursday that committee chairman Peter Braund assured several organizations and individuals
they would be able to use SUB after Sept. 1.
"He was in no position to guarantee its use
Symposium
covers Africa
Senator Paul Martin will participate
in a symposium at UBC on the problems
of Africa's emerging nations in early
October.
The symposium, scheduled for Oct. 2-5,
is titled Africa—Conflict and Prospect,
and will explore the problems of the
African nations with respect to Canada's
responsibilities.
Financing of the event will be jointly
covered by Alma Mater Society and the
university.
The speakers will include about a
dozen prominent politicians, sociologists
and economists who are both aware of
and involved in the problems.
because he can't guarantee contractors' work,"
she said.
"As far as I'm concerned, Dave Cooper
(SUB building manager) is the only one who
knows what he's doing," Miss Cameron added.
Braund was reported buying a mural for
SUB in West Vancouver and was unavailable
for comment.
Cooper said only the SUB cafeteria, snack
bar, meeting rooms, lounges, and art gallery
will open Monday.
"The reading lounge will also be open,"
Cooper said, "but I don't know how many
periodicals or books will be in there at first."
Cooper said the parts of SUB not opening
Monday will include the ballroom, auditorium,
bowling lanes and most offices.
Cooper said the postponement of the opening is due to a delay in the completion of the
ventilating system.
"The building will not be completely ventilated until Oct. 15," he said.
"I'd say the building is 70 to 80 per cent
finished," Cooper added.
General contractor A. R. Grimwood said the
ventilating sub-contractor, Canadian Comstock
Ltd., har1 no delay penalty clause in its contract.
"It's not normal procedure and is difficult
to enforce," Grimwood said.
Grimwood said that aside from the ventilation, the rest of the building is reasonably
complete.
Recitation of poetry
begins next Tuesday
Poetry was written to be heard — not dissected by
steam-cleaned and antiseptic minds.
This is the opinion of the UBC creative writing department, which begins Tuesday a series of poetry readings in
Bu. 106'.
First of the readings will be given at 8 p.m. by Alfred
Purdy, one of the grand old men of Canadian poetry and
editor of the controversial essay collection, The New
Romans.
Purdy, the author of eight volumes of poetry and winner of the Governor-General's poetry prize, will read mainly from North of Summer, poems written during six months
he spent with the Eskimos on Baffin Island.
He will also read selections from Wild Grape Wine,
his latest and as yet unpublished volume.
A discussion of the .reading and Purdy's work will
follow the reading.
A department spokesman said undergraduates and
faculty members will be encouraged to read later in the
year.
'VN?*',+¥***** 'fv$*?*■***«****.
SW*V*>^   v«
EDITOR:  Al  Birnie
City Desk    Paul  Knox, Mike Finlay
News   John Twigg
Managing    Mike Jessen
Photo .... Fred Cawsey, Powell Hargrave
Wire   Peter Ladner
Page Friday Andrew Horvat
We're moving, and you better believe
it.  These   moved today.
Alex Volkoff, Ulf Ottho. Wensley
Mole, Leo Tolstoy, Peggy Shewchuk,
Kris Emmott, Elaine Tarzwell, Frank
Flynn, Barry Richardson, Dale Wik,
Rik Nyland, Lawrence Woodd, Frank
Scherubl, Dick Button, John Gibbs,
Nader Mirhady, James Conchie, Daphne
Kelgard, Nate Smith, Irene Wasilewski,
and Debbie who did tween classes. Sorry
Debbie, come back anytime and we'll
give you your last name. Parkins wanted
his name printed.
ftbri   dToOK, ALBERT^ DOri'TMOER-fS^o VOL^ft"'V2U^
WP^STAND EITHER.&JT VOU SEE W&0„™7fIM &£&£ Page 4
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, September 20, 1968
■r-/.***"*^*. ,y«**'s::v/«ff
THEUBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university years
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services
of Pacific Student Press, of which it is founding member, and Underground
Press Syndicate. Authorized second class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. The Ubyssey publishes Page
Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City editor, 224-3916. Other
calls, 224-3242 editor, local 25; photo. Page Friday, local 24; sports, local
23; advertising, local  26.  Telex 04-5224.
SEPTEMBER 20, 1968
SUBthing of value
Monday comes the unveiling of the massive, multi-million-dollar Student Union
Building, built by and for the students.
Students should be humble and proud
that their own student councillors have seen
fit to bless them with this imposng edifice,
embodying all that is fine and outstanding
in modern architecture and interior design.
Visit the building, see the fine carpeted
offices of the student officers charged with
the demanding job of keeping all facets of
the complex building running smoothly.
See the cool, musaked lounges where student officers may relax from their grinding
daily toil in committee and conference.
See the vast theatre, where all of 400
persons can view any one performance. With
luck, even you may once during -the year be
fortunate enough to obtain a seat for some
function.
Your club may even be able to book one
of the twelve club rooms, and meet once or
twice during the year.
But do not fear , you have not been forgotten. The cafeteria, of course, is open to
all, serving selections of the tasty food services fare we all know and love.
And the building also has a fine sunken
lounge where you can read, watch television,'
and talk, all at the same time, thereby saving
valuable time for more important things, like
studying.
So come to the fine new SUB opening
Monday. Bring beer, bring a friend, and
celebrate the joyous event.
After all, it was your $5 million, and you
should get something out of it.
Residence democracy:
You must control the top, but participate at base
By ERIK BRYNJOLFSSON
Ubyssey Housing Reporter
It's my belief that students cannot hope for a
true democratization of the university without a
democratization of the society. That is people must
have control of the top tc have control from the
bottom. It is impossible to reform the senate if the
board of governors controls the university, and it
is impossible to control the board of governors as
long as the corporate minority controls the society
that the university is responsible to.
Neither can the people affected by the decisions
made by the business elite expect democracy, if
they have had no history of a desire for democracy.
Some students don't feel that students deserve or
are capable of handling a democracy. Most either
don't care, or think democratization is impossible.
And that's the very reason it is impossible. But as
soon as students have a desire to democratize the
society, democratization of the university is possible.
MUST BE 'RESPONSIBLE
All the demands that the dreaded AMS brief,
Fair Weather of Foul, presents are possible within
the present setup. But with the mentality that students have, any greater representation on curriculum committees or even the senate would make no
difference. Students feel that they have a responsibility to seem responsible. And therefore the decisions made by a revised structure of these will be
the decisions that would have been made anyway.
So if the structure of the society remains the
same, any meaningful reforms are impossible. If the
university is allowed to be a part of society, responsible to society, (that is, conditional to society's approval) then any changes that come about in the
university setup would either make no difference
or actually perpetuate the social system.
How long would a senate last, that decided that
society would be better served if the commerce
faculty was allowed to study for the purpose of implementing centrally planned economics. How long
would a senate last, that decided that the education
faculty would better serve society if courses in the
free school style of teaching were offered. These
would be changes, but would a radical senate be
accepted even by this university's responsible students. Not likely. I don't think that the students
■want the freedom to change the university so its
purpose would be to study life with the aim of improving society (which means to set up a new social
system) rather than perpetuating it.
STUDENTS PRODUCT OF SOCIETY
It must be remembered that the students of this
university are a product of the society as long as
the university is responsible to society—in fact as
long as students believe that the university is responsible to society, they are willing to work for
gradual "reforms" within the framework of the present society. But, I repeat, as long as society is controlled by the corporate minority, no meaningful
change is possible.
(When I speak of meaningful change, I'm basing
it on the belief that problems such as poverty,
racism, imperialism, and apathy are caused by the
capitalist system, and that to attack them, we must
{•tack the strucure of our sociey.)
Now that I've stated what I have learned from
the world's radicals, I'll discuss how society imposes
itself by suggesting a situation where this imposition could be rejected.
In the univerity residences there is a setup that,
if the residents wanted, could be split naturally into
small co-operative, self-governing units. The old
residences could be split into hut communities and
the new ones into floor communities.
POPULARITY IS THE GOAL
But the residences are clique oriented and the
largest clique runs the government of the entire
residence. Popularity, not friendship is the goal.
Search for status is a product of our society, but in
a community where everyone is financially equal,
popularity is the status.
But is government from above all that bad?
After all, they put on great dances and organize all
kinds of events. Of course, they do. That's all part
of the game. That's the sacrifice the clique makes
for being popular. Or is it to maintain its popularity.
NO ONE MAKES ANY DECISIONS
This is not democracy. It may be fun, but an
analogy to the old cotton fields can easily be applied
in this case. No one makes any decisions. Decisions
are reached only because these are the decisions
that are generally expected. One is expected to have
a dance.
Even these "decisions", however, are made by
only a few and no decision is reached that would
"reflect badly" on the residence. That is, not only
are the decisions not made by those affected by
them, but also, only decisions that would be approved by society are made. This is neither democracy, nor freedom.
To residents accepting that they should live in a
democratic, free community, the suggestions following are worthy of .consideration.
The most important quality that the residents
should develop is the courage to stand up to accusations of irresponsibility. They must accept that responsibility is relative. If they believe that society
holds other values that are not good, then the residents can decide whether or not society's values of
responsibility are wrong, too.
MUST DENY SOCIETY CONTROL
Then the residents must deny society any control of their lives. This allows for the freedom
needed to make decisions. Denying society any control is the only alternative to a democratization of
society. It takes more courage, but it saves 50 years.
Now, in a democracy, every citizen actually is
involved in the decision making. I'm not referring to
the western style of democracy in which every four
years each citizen votes away his decision making
rights. I'm referring to a democracy in which each
citizen actually has a voice.
I admit that residents are not particularly interested in making any decisions, but this is because
an atmosphere has not been created that makes
them care what goes on in the residence government.
I suggest first that the government clique distribute its duties to the hut or floor groups. These
duties would be the social ones — what visiting
hours to apply, when to organize parties and other
events.
INCREASE THE SOCIAL AWARENESS
This distribution will increase the social awareness  of the  residents.  To  increase  their  political
awareness, the government should hold regular general meetings, ideally once a month. General meetings are the essence of a participatory democracy.
Creating an interest in general meetings creates an
interest in decision-making. The agenda should include the debate of resolutions that do not necessarily affect the social life of the residents. Political
decisions about AMS, city, provincial, federal, and
world government policy would simultaneously
cause an interest in, and an awareness of, democracy.
Residents could be included in the residence life
in oither ways. Students could apply their various
disciplines to studying the residences. The possibilities here are unlimited.
Residents must, however, be free from society.
In order to do this, they must take from the housing
administration and the university, control over how
they act. Second, they must make sure that they are
represented well on the residence advisory commit**-
tee, so that they have control over their living conditions.
FROM POLITICAL AWARENESS
The desire to carry out these steps will result
from political awareness. The ability to carry them
out will result from social, as well as political,
awareness.
When they have carried out the steps, they will
be free to experiment with life and love. The purpose of education is to study life with the aim of
improving it. The purpose is not to study it with
the aim of fitting into It.
But when you are studying, you must be aware
you are a product of your society. Your opinions
may be based on custom, not rationality.
The housing administration has successfully imposed the residence advisory committee on the resi-
denst — at least, on the government clique. The residence advisory committee is a group of five administration appointees, plus a student appointee from
each of the four residences and a student who represents the AMS. The purpose of the committee is to
set the standards under which the students live.
A REMOTE VOICE
Decisions of the advisory committee are difficult
to disagree with because it is quickly pointed out to
dissidents that they had a voice in the decision —
however remote.
Perhaps this committee idea would be a good
one if the residence appointee is actually responsible to the residence and also if the appointee .
weren't afraid of the constant threat of "irresponsible". But the appointee, even if the residents knew
who he was and what he was supposed to do, is
much too likely to develop an Uncle Tom attitude
in the presence of the responsible and "mature" administration appointees.
What I've been trying to say here is that in order
for any real change to come about, residents and
other students must first care and they must know."
They must realize that they can effect radical improvements if they want to. Radical improvements
can only be made in a different environment -— the
community must be controlled from the bottom.
That is the only democratic way.
There are only two ways that students (and
faculty) can obtain control from the bottom. Either
the society becomes democratic or the university is
separate from society. Friday, September 20, 1968
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
'Tasteless
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I was quite struck by last
Tuesday's issue of The Ubyssey.
My reaction may be likened
to that of being hit in the face
by a hurled newspaper.
To get down to specifics, I
refer to the low-brow humor
and sensationalism displayed
in the article on page 5, "Cameron Comes Out For Sex — In
Classrooms Yet!" It is somewhat ironical that beside this
article is a picture depicting
the "hard work and little
glory" that The Ubyssey staffers get on "Canada's greatest
student newspaper". Prospective journalist Hanson Lau
should be made to find another
type of hard work in order to
relieve his sexual frustrations
instead of printing quotes that
people might expect to hear in
a whorehouse rather than in
the executive offices of the
AMS.
Also, perhaps Madam Jill Cameron and the other AMS executives should hire an English
tutor until such time that they
learn the words "sexual intercourse" or "fornication".
If the tasteless choice of
words in the aforementioned
article portends what we may
expect to see printed in future
Ubyssey editions, I, for one,
should like the AMS to refund
to the student that amount appropriated for the s t u d e nt
newspaper. Those students that
are unoffended by questionable
language in The Ubyssey, may
use the refund money to  get
yearly    subscriptions    to    the
"Georgia Straight".
If the above suggestion is not
possible, perhaps students
could consult a lawyer in anticipation of launching a collective defamation suit against The
Ubyssey, since it is the student
image that is at stake.
Up until this time, we have
had a damn fine student newspaper on the whole. Let's clean
up the act a bit and keep it that
way. After all, we are the future generation and the public
should be given a fair chance
to respect us.
ENDORSED BY
160 STUDENTS.
our SUB closed longer than
the library. No loitering, smoking, or spitting.
And 101 others.
Fellow peons, we are allowed to sit in this new place, but
council has every fear that we
will live in it, and make it ours.
We peons must keep moving,
so don't sit too long.
After, all, council built our
SUB, and they don't really
want to share it. And we just
elect the council.
HUGH  McGILLIVRAY,
arts 4.
SUBversion      Bomb gong
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sirs
We've got the Tower of Babel to worship in front of the
library. It's anonymous, so
there is no sounding board for
complaint, except the thing itself.
There is also this new SUB,
a stony fortress, the dimensions
of which outstrip even our
stadium. Initially proposed only
10 years ago as a student haven
from the calamities of desks
and timetables, this has become
in its latest stages more of a
monument to student demo-
monument to student bureaucracy.
Unknown to us, our elected
council has drawn up a set of
rules to keep all of us peon
students in the right stairwell.
Just a small book of rules —
104 of them. To keep us undisciplined students from eating
candy in  our lobby. To keep
No place on campus
for large meetings
By JOHN MATE
One of the conclusions that the twelve hundred people who
came to listen to the panel discussion Thursday must have had
was that we, the students, need a place where a group of more
than a thousand people can meet indoors.
It is difficult to understand why the people who designed
SUB did not think of including a room large enough to hold a
quorum. In fact, when we began to speculate, our speculation
leads us to the cynical conclusion that a meeting area was excluded on purpose, simply because large scale student meetings
are undesirable from the point of view of the administration.
However, especially this year, a meeting place is essential.
The meeting on Thursday indicated that finally the students are
beginning to get united, many more students are actively concerned and wish to take part in discussions of student problems
and that large scale meetings are going to continue throughout
the year.
The problem has to be faced now, and until a proper, permanent meeting place, covered courtyard, etc., is provided, here
are a couple of suggestions for a temporary solution. The only
sufficient, covered area today is in the armory.
However, as far as we were able to ascertain the armory is
either being converted to be indoor tennis courts and an indoor
golf course, or it is to be torn down. Since the armory provides
the only sufficient place for large activities, neither of the above
mentioned plans is adequate from the point of view of the needs
of the student body. Therefore, the first suggestion is the armory
should not be converted to another gymnasium, nor should the
armory be torn down, but rather, until better times, the armory
should be made available to the student body as a meeting place.
Moveable partitions should be built in so that smaller functions could also be held there. Possibly the roof should be
lowered to make the place more friendly.
A second temporary solution could be covering either the
-main mall or the mall in front of SUB. It is not an unrealistic
or an unreasonable suggestion when we consider that five million dollars were spent on a SUB that doesn't provide a shelter
for many of us together.
We hope that this won't go down as just another article in
The Ubyssey, and that enough of us will be concerned that if
need will come, we would break down the doors of the armory.
Of course the need won't come if something is done before hand.
Ultimately, both suggestions must be viewed as temporary
-solutions, for a permanent meeting hall, will have to be built.
It looks like it will be a hot, but cold winter for some of us.
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
In   a  few  short  weeks  the
bureaucracy that rules this vast
ghetto will again put another
obstacle in the path of a basic
Canadian right — the freedom
to think.
One hundred and fifty-six
times a day the large gong will
sound to remind the student-
nigger to return to the training,
that will satisfy the whims and
desires of the big business firms
of the world.
I trust the members of this
university will put an end to
this tall monster with its dull
sounds by any violent means
possible.
The challenge is urgent, the
task is large, the time is now-.
Bomb the gong.
Yours truly,
J. R.
commerce 3.
Old methods
Ama Mater Society housing
lists have assured women students in need of housing that
one time-honored methods of
getting a room is still effective.
A listing in the "women
only" list read.:
"House — free for services
to a man and his 11-year-old
son."
Caw A
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THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, September 20, 1968
ZAP
CBC types were back on
campus yesterday, planning to
film some of the panel of student activists. They were overjoyed to hear the engineers
were going to come and cage
them.
Things were tense in the little CBC recording truck as
the technicians focused on the
door through which the mob
was supposed to pour. But no
mob. Just shouting off-stage.
Disappointed grumbles from
the camera men.
The same crew was here a
little while ago interviewing
beloved zoology prof David
Suzuki.
Suzuki's sq popular they
ought to include his lab as a
stopover for those tourist bus
tours.
When asked to account for
his absence from the list of
the ten top science profs, Suzuki  said   he   couldn't.
• • •
Why haven't we printed any
reaction from Leon Ladner
about the blast of criticism
aimed at the old boy's monument to himself? Why, because
Ladner's in Toronto and doesn't know what's happening.
We await with interest the enraged developments—the letter
to  the  editor  that  should  be
coming in around the end of
the month.
Next time you're in our new.
million billion dollar SUB
building, stroll around the
clubs section. Notice how Rad-
soc has about 15 little soundproof room-f, offices, studios
and other goodies. Now notice
how cramped nearby offices
are. Now applaud Radsoc for
having a professional design
engineer draw up their "requirements" when SUB was
being planned.
Now check out the fancy
darkrooms with elaborate passageways belonging to either
Photosoc or Filmsoc, we could
not   tell.   Now   note   the   itty
bitty miserable darkroom setup provided for the Ubyssey.
Waaaaah!
And all those-cafe teri a
chairs — they may not be
very comfortable, but they
sure do stack nice, eh?
Now check out the offices of
Dave Zirnhelt and SUB manager David Cooper. They're
identical, aren't they? Nope.
Cooper's got the one with a
door onto the balcony.
And forget about sending
delegations to Zirnhelt about
anything. The snaky little corridor leading to his office
would hold only about 1%
delegates.
And the balconies are all
divided with  giant partitions,
so you can't stroll around the
building. Isn't that nice?
And that giant plaza in the
upper storey courtyard, covered with restricting walks because fire laws say .* only 30
people in the plaza at one time.
So all that space is wasted.
And that 400-seat theatre
that's absolutely useless, what
with all the small theatres
we've already got and the big
one we need but haven't got.
And the fancy, dust-collect-
i n g , expensive windowsills
here and there, which are one
of the reasons why the cost of
the whole schmozzle shot up
the way it did.
If it were a card game,
somebody would be screaming,
"Who dealt this mess?"
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VANCOUVER, B.C. 684-7341 SUDDENLY, A CELESTIAL  OUTBURST OF KPlRJE BEAUTW pf 2WO
Yippie Mafia coalition exposed
By PETER LINCOLN
It was no coincidence that the Democrats chose
Chicago for their convention this year and that the
Hippie-Yippie protest movement chose to demonstrate at it rather than the Republican convention
in Miami.
The Democrats chose Chicago because it was the
home of one of its strongest backers and it was with
this fact in mind that the young rebels chose Chicago,
hoping to break up this alliance. So it was that while
the Democratic convention held the national spotlight that in an abandoned warehouse somewhere in
south-side Chicago the Hippie-Yippies held a meet
with that very same group of powerful backers, the
Mafia. But before the details of that conference, a
little history is needed to enlighten the reader.
1. Brief history of the Mafia-Government Alliance
The Mafia and the various governments in power,
both Republican and Democratic, had over the years
developed a satisfactory working agreement. The
government would enact laws that turned seemingly
harmless human activities into illegal vices, the price
for these activities, since they were now illegal,
would rise, the Mafia (after it had eliminated all
effective competition) would fill the increased demand at the new high price, and the government
would receive a certain percentage of the profit.
(For further information on the economic aspects the
reader is advised to consult John Berris Fartippton's
Models for a Free Enterprise Competitive Capitalist
System.)
2. Break up of ihe Alliance
Three events sadly shook this alliance however.
The first was the death of Alphonse Capone, the
underworld leader. His arrest for tax evasion had
originally been agreed to by both the syndicate and
the government. The government needed the arrest
to quell public clamour over crime and Capone himself had expressed a desire to rest for a while partly
in order to cure his ailment. The government agreed
to give the special treatment he requested and finally
arrested him, quieting down the public. (Prices of
„, course once again rose with this new crackdown
on vice.) However when Capone died in a federal
prison the Mafia charged negligence and breach of
contract and were ready to sue the government.
To avoid total disaster the government repealed prohibition. This gave a legal front to the underworld
speakeasies that had risen up during prohibition and
through various methods had driven out the non-
syndicate  owners  that  had  existed  before.
This smoothed things over somewhat until 1941
when the U.S. went to war with Italy. The Mafia
regarded this as outright racism and it was only with
the greatest reluctance that they accepted, in way of
appeasement, leading positions (their names changed
of course) in the arms industry and the military
(many went on to distinguish themselves in conflict
for their courage and daring and as a result became
top-rank leaders and shared in rewards of such
future successes as Korea, Bay of Pigs, Dominican
Republic and Viet Nam).
The two events were not however sufficient to
break the ties that bound and it required the third
event to do it. Actually, it was not an event but
rather a series of events, a subtle, growing danger
that the Mafia had been watching with increasing
concern.
A change in government's fundamental position
towards crime was coming about. Whereas once the
government had been content to let the Mafia do
the dirty work and just sit back and collect, it
seemed now to be moving towards an attitude that
•» the Mafia could be made a junior partner or even
done away with altogether. The movement towards
this position came from, of all places, the Canadian
province of British Columbia.
This movement was based on a philosophy called
Social Credit (Mafia equivalent loan-sharking). The
basic premise of this theory was that though the
government itself might sternly disapprove of certain practices, it and not the Mafia should run these
industries. (A sterling example of this would be the
Liquor Control Board of that same province.) Of
course all syndicate members would be offered the
choicest jobs in the new government industries.
Several who accepted did so well because of their
past experience that they were given positions in
other fields, government and business, such as the
care and conservation of natural resources.
Social Credit then seemed to be in opposition to
the theory being put out by a high-ranking French-
Canadian official that the government had no business in the bedrooms of the nation. Social Credit
seemed to be saying there is business everywhere and
better yet profit for all. (One plan particularly along
these lines was the placing of money meters in
bedrooms. The report entitled Pay Fuck was classi
fied as Top Secret and thus we can only speculate
on the details.)
The proud, free-spirited and independent-minded
gangster faced a dismal choice: glorified civil service
or extinction. The turning point in their decision
came with the arrest of Joseph Valachi. The public
was led to believe that Valachi was arrested so that
he would name names and games but the Mafia
knew better. Big business and big unions along with
big government had long been copying big crime's
techniques and adopting its principles but they still
hadn't reached the level of efficiency needed to
compete   successfully with  the Underworld.  They
therefore arrested Valachi not for the names and
doings which he could reveal (the government knew
them well enough) but rather to gain the last bits
of managerial technique that the Mafia still held in
secret, and to try them out at the earliest convenient
time, which strangely enough turned out to be the
1968 Democratic Convention. Thus the Mafia pretended to continue supporting the government while
they were arranging to confer with their possibly
new associates, the youth protest movement.
3. The Mafia and the Protest Movement
Because both the radical movement and the underworld regarded the situation as basically a struggle
for survival, they immediately had a rapport as to
the strength of dissent from the path America was
on. The Yippies, though idealists, recognized the
easiest way to destroy the government was to form
a third party alliance with one of the most important
backers of the present social order. The Mafia, more
so than business * and labor, and despite its long
association with them still possessed to a small degree
the flair or charisma that the youth were looking for
in the life of the nation. Even the official name, Casa
Nostra (our house) rang with warmth in comparison
to the cold names of other bureaucratic (for the
dissenters recognized that the Mafia was bureaucratic as well) institutions, e.g. General Motors,
American Telephone and Telegraph, etc. There was
more a sense of community and identity, that primitive tribal feeling in the Mafia.
(A more cohesive and practical factor was the
drug market. The Mafia eyed with envy the potential
market for drugs among youth which was now
mostly in the hands of inefficient and usually unreliable kids themselves. Though they had the best
intentions, service was not the best. The Mafia had
hoped to turn this into a bargaining point in which
they would give support to the radicals in return
for the control of the drug trade. Their service would
be insured by the famous Mafia Code of Ethics for
Pushers: Always Can Get. Always It Late. Always
Too Little. Always It Costs. Better than a well-
meant nothing, isn't it, they demanded with reason,
and several of the rebels who weren't high agreed
reasonably.)
4. The Meeting: Beginnings and Internal Affairs
However right from the beginning great differences were evident. Tempers flared when several
bleeding protestors, who were being taken to the
washroom in the warehouse to be cleaned up, ran
into several men changing out of blood-covered police
uniforms and spiked boots into the Mafia garb,
custom-tailored mohair suits and pointed shoes..
Another outburst arose when Sergio Franchi
started to sing Ave Maria, the traditional opening
song of regular Mafia meetings. At the other end
of the Hall the protestors had erected a platform
THE     UBYSSEY
and on it the Mothers of Invention had set up their
instruments and started to sing Suzy Creamcheese.
A compromise was worked out and Perry Como was
brought in to sing Lady Madonna.
The seating of delegates was -for the most part
an internal affair as various groups, scrambling for
recognition in the crime world, challenged the
delegations and even though the Yippies supported
the majority of the challenges they remained in the
background for a while and because of this fact I
will only go into the barest of details about the
credential challenges.
The Mafia-picked chairman tried to rule out the
challenges. Fingers Scarletti pointed out that though
the Mafia was for the most part Sicilian it had
allowed Capone, a Neopolitan, to be its boss. He
further pointed out that several top Mafia jobs such
as Governor of California and Mayor of Chicago
were held by non-Sicilians.
"We are making progress," he said. The protestors screamed tokenism arid the fight went to
the floor. I will only go, as I have said, into the
most important challenges. The first of which occurred in New York, when a delegation called the
Harlem Followers of Marcus Garvey (originally the
Black Mail Party but it eventually branched out)
unseated the rival Mafia-backed delegation.
The Blackstone Rangers received a narrow defeat
in their bid to unseat the all-Mafia delegation from
Chicago headed by Ricardo Dalini. Immediately cries
of racism arose and a minor riot was only averted
when the Rangers pull out ice-picks, chopped down
the legitimate delegation, and left en masse immediately. The only other major incidents were the
requests of several favorite son delegations, the
Bonnie and Clyde, Jesse James and Billy the Kid
ones in particular, to receive Honorary Membership
in the Mafia for their non-Mafia favorite sons. They
received it .
5. Down to Business
The Yippies, after the internal affairs had been
settled, came back into the forefront. The platform
was being drafted that would be the beginning, hopefully, of the much-awaited third (actually now fourth)
party. It was here that the differences once again
came out.
On the questions of the means to insure victory -
there came about tremendous differences. The young
rebels were for violent revolution and abortion but
against capital punishment. The Mafia was willing
to go along with the stands on capital punishment
and revolution but were dead set against abortion
on religious grounds.
This difference on religious philosophy caused
another debate on free love. Several prostitutes and
their pimps argued against free love charging it
would leave them unemployed and basically devaluing love itself. Love, they argued, if it is to be
love, must be worth something, and if it is worth
something then it must cost something, be it
emotional wear and tear or dollars and cents. The
idea of free love was therefore a contradiction in
terms. Love was giving and taking. And somebody's
got to do the taking. However within this group
itself dissent had risen as a result of several young
radicals who, because of labour unionization ex- _
perience, had been able to organize a few of the
hookers. These girls in turn protested the wages they
received from their men. The pimps then tried to
explain to their girls that money was not everything
and that the best things in life were free and it
started all over again.
6. The Las Vegas Issue and Final Resolutions
The biggest issue of the night came when the Las
Vegas plank of the platform was read. It was here
that the division between the radicals and the underworld became most acute. The Mafia had gone into
Las Vegas to rescue it from the menace of Walt
Disney Productions, a group which had slowly been
taking over Las Vegas, using the same methods that
it had used to wrest its western counterpart, Anaheim,
away from the Mafia, renaming their new possession Disneyland West. The Mafia had feared that it
would do the same to Las Vegas and it had been
slowly moving its forces into Las Vegas to prevent
this occurence. But despite all its efforts, in fact
half its forces were occupied there, they had been
unable to take over effective control of Las Vegas.
The threat at the present time seemed greater than
ever for while the Disney people had once been
resigned to the use of infiltration they had now
come out into the open under the leadership of a
man called Howard Horatio Hughes and were making gains every day.
The Yippies urged immediate withdrawal but
the Syndicate said that if they withdrew immediately they would lose face. "What guarantees could we
offer the grape orchard owners, who are right next
Continued on pf8
Friday, September 20, 1968
o Y^AV-VA^^^^^
p£ shree
Udo Erasmus? Oh no Udon't!
By REILLY  BURKE
I wonder if the day has come when
graduate level research projects must be
submitted to the campus brown-shirts for
approval?
For instance, last Friday it was reported that Mr. Udo Erasmus was ticketed by the uni-cops while conducting a
reasonably sophisticated study on marginal existence and mobility, using himself as the test subject.
Mr. Erasmus' research facility was a
converted bread truck equipped with a
small bed and a few other bits of living
aparatus. For want of a better location
the truck was parked in C lot.
The object of the experiment was
simple, and success would have been indicated if Mr. Erasmus still had his health
and sanity at the end of the academic
year.
Unfortunately our neo-nazi custodians
regarded this enterprising experiment as
the ultimate violation of section 17 of the
1968 traffic and parking regulations. It
seems, you see, that the commissionaire
mafia has gone beyond the mere control
of wheeled vehicles on campus to gain
control of the activities within the
vehicles.
It is blatantly apparent that this is a
sinister and egregious plan to take over
the academic control of the university by
convenient and stubtle manipulation of
the traffic and parking regulations.
The traffic minions are no doubt aware
of the significant trend developing which
is resulting in a switch from fixed location buildings to the increased use of
trailers. A good example of this is Simon
Fraser University, where trailers are now
being used as classrooms and laboratories.
Thus it can easily be seen that when
the time comes that trailers are used at
UBC, their use will be strictly regulated
by the traffic and parking regulations. It
is conceivable that the use of trailers will
gradually supercede the use of buildings,
and at this time the control of the university will be completely in the hands of
the brown-shirt goon squad.
Their control will be clinched by
simple additions to the traffic and parking regulations. For example section 17
states that "No person shall use a camper
or other vehicle for sleeping or living
accommodation on campus."
It is obvious that a section 18 could
be added which might read "No person
shall use a camper or other vehicle for
political activity", or "No person shall
use a camper or other vehicle for the
reading of or harboring of rude, salacious, subversive, or other publications".
Under the pretext of enforcing the
traffic and parking regulations, the
brown-shirts could enter any campus facility and penalize any student caught
talking, or reading a book, by handing out
traffic tickets. Any other unforseen subversive activities could be controlled by
further unilateral additions to the traffic
regulations.
Our only chance to save our university from this back room power-play is
to enforce the immediate withdrawal of
the commissionaires and de-balls the traffic regulations.
Mr. Erasmus' project must be allowed
to continue and others should be encouraged to investigate this subject of marginal existence and mobility, about which
so little is known.
In the very near future the whole
lower mainland will be paved in asphalt,
at which time all buildings will be on
wheels instead of foundations. It is a fact
that North America is being covered in
roads at the rate of 3.5 million acres per
year, and if we are not careful the uni-
cops and the other cops will have our
every move under the ruthless thumb of
traffic regulations.
cX&adaddtdhd
PAGE FRIDAY
•the   -peoples pap-e-r
UANTS
mmmS
TOumTE SERIOUS
ARTICLES.
pf
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 20th
On the Cover: For one instant in time, at the twenty-
fifth hour, all the universe
is in accord and the secrets
are revealed. (Saba has
finally cracked).
Andrew Horvat, downing
a pint of calf's blood with
relish, stated that anyone
who slept with a model had
to be a necrophiliac.
Stephen Scobie (Hi, Jill!)
was forced to agree with
him, since Reilly Burke
had him in a South Javanese stranglehold. Arnold
Saba expressed some polite
disapproval of the current
state of American policy
towards toasted muffins,
but was himself unaware of
the yellow pearl of Kurt
Hilger balancing a soft-
boiled egg above his hairy
head on the point of a genuine copy of Johnson's Dictionary.
Despite appearances, this
is a highly serious-minded
publication. We invite contributions from all and sundry on any topic you may
be interested in. In-depth
studies of questions of social, artistic, cultural, political, or aesthetic interest are
made    joyfully    welcome.
Brothelly Jack gets axed
By KEITH FRASER
What with wife swap roulette in John Updike's latest novel, and call girl merry-go-round
by suburban housewives in Edward Albee's
recent play, Chaucer's account of the Wife of
Bath is today a pretty tame tale.
I would hesitate to call Metro Theatre's
rather shaky first production of this season,
Everything In The Garden, a play by Albee In
the strictest sense however. Yet it is his name
attached to an adaption of Giles Cooper's play
of the same title that appeared responsible for
attracting a good crowd of pilgrims last weekend.
I was interested to see what director Ian
Dobbie had done with Albee's adaption of the
British play that has rated three commendable
local reviews, when the same play, with presumably a tighter production in New York,
had not converted critics there to discern anything approaching Albee's potential. The play
is clever enough in conception, but its adaption is not something that one might look toward for original Albee.
Its story is straight forward: Jenny (Charlotte MacDowell) is one of a number of local
wives who accepts an afternoon job from
brothel owner Mrs. Toothe (Mary Boyle) for
enormous wages. At a party the various wives
discover they are all entailed in the same profession, and their acquiescent husands are left
to murder and to bury Jack in the garden when
he discovers and threatens to spread their secret about the  club.
From what I could determine Albee has
Americanized Cooper's indictment of modern
avarice by increasing the sum of money for
which Jenny  prostitutes  herself;  has,  for  no
significant effect, turned Jack into a talk-to-the-
audience character; has rearranged the time
sequence between acts; and generally has reworked Cooper's dialogue while retaining the
funny lines and plot. For this, the shrine of
America's most distinguished playwright is attended for another term.
If one fails to discover in this adaptation any
remarkable extension of the original play in
light of what it is condemning, then what director Ian Dobbie has done with Albee's version will not help to overcome that failure.
The mercenariness was there, certainly, but
it was not savage in this production; when
Jack, the gate-crashing lush, was killed, his
murderers had no brutality about them. Don
Murray, as Jack, remained ambiguous throughout because at times he appeared sober, and
then drunk — in the same scene. The intensity
of the play seemed erratic because Miss MacDowell who controlled the play could neither
show surprise nor remember lines; the way
she walked made her appear to be playing
house, instead of ruining one with her duplicity.
A glaring misconception seemed the lighting
or sun which shone into the living room from
outside, but strangely failed to catch the characters when they moved into the garden. And,
finally, if there had to be a fire in that fireplace
on such a warm day, Mr. Dobbie, could you
not have made it appear a bit more believable
with some handwarming before all that money
is tossed in and supposedly burned?
Everything In The Garden runs for another
week and perhaps you will disagree with the
above analysis. But for original Albee may I
suggest A Delicate Balance which opened last
evening at the Arts Club and will hopefully be
reviewed in this space next issue.
Pioem
CONCRETE POEM FOR
CONCRETE BELL TOWER
BELL TOWER
you   tower
over
your
shadowless
soul
like a god
of concrete
in my
silent dreams
between  heaven
and hell
BELL TOWER
you
hope
to toll
the hours
and
hour
of
our u
days o
day y
and
ways — but n
do o
you
hear p
or u
see
the hulking g
hunchback n
of i
hungry k
generations       a
sne
to pull
your
bellrope where
the world
tries to hang itself ?
BELL TOWER
do
you  see
our city
and cities
with crowded
houses
splayed
among
streets
like the dice
of a dicer
who gambled
for Christ's
cloak ?
BELL TOWER
do
you feel the
hooked talon
of
our
needs
knuckling
your colorless
walls ?
BELL TOWER
do
you   hear
the clapping
mandibles
of my hunger
for one
square
foot
of
silence
unshadowed
by the
nightmares
of your
needless  spectre ?
—Andrew Suknaski.
Friday, September 20, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY pf 4our
Tiny plug
By WENSLEY MOLE
Roger Schiffer presented me with three free records and
two free tickets to the Tiny Tim show, so that I would write
some nice things for him, but he didn't have to. I've been in
love with Tiny Tim all summer.
Some people think that Tiny Tim is funny, like Mrs. Miller,
and most people just don't know what to think. This world
really isn't the place for a fellow like Mr. Tim.
Do you believe that he is sincere, that all those birds and
flowers and sweet things are
not supposed to be funny ? Do
you believe that he is really
happy when he sings those impossibly happy songs, and that
those cliche-sentiments are for
real ? They are, I tell you, they
are.
It is some kind of impossible
dream, that anyone could be so
untouched by so-called "reality". Tiny time is not a man for
the cynical. He has been singing for fifteen years in, of all
places, New York, but it took
until now for a generation
idealistic enough to appreciate
him to arrive.
Undoubtedly he is being exploited and manuplated. But he
will endure, I have faith. He is
.       no ordinary forty-odd-year
old man to begin with. He is a poet in his vision and his attitude.
It only remains to be seen what this extraordinary person can
do to half a billion people in the Coliseum..
Ol' Roger says the Collectors come on first, for an hour,
followed by Country Joe and the Fish, and Mr. Tim comes last.
If it weren't for seating problems, I would suggest that everyone
arrive just in time for Country Joe. The Collectors are the most
monumentally egregious group ever to spring from the brow
of Satan.
All the surface features pf a dozen top groups have been
gleaned to make an empty package of loud noise. Their musicianship is fine, but their words are dull and quite meaningless. To
cap  it,  Howie  Vickers'   mock-Morrison   antics  are   totally  re-
pellant.
However, we all know about Country Joe and the Fish,
the phenomenal singers-poets-revolutionaries, who manage better than anyone to make revolutionary politics artistically and
musically pleasing. Thev are so overwelmingly good that it takes
a while to really realize it. You have to stand back a bit.
End of free plug. Come and assimilate your culture on
Saturday.
Public privates pushed
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By DALE WIK
So who would want to get away from it all?
I mean people are beautiful, aren't they?
with their brilliant chatter and their sweet
togetherness. And here at UBC there is such
togetherness. I mean when you eat, people are
all around you and you wonder if they can hear
the squeal of your salivia glands. Isn't that
lovely?
Of course there are a few demented souls
who would like to be by themselves occasionally. This is absolutely ridiculous. You see a
few of these neurotics wandering about the
campus searching for some dark, secluded nook
to think those nasty thoughts that people think
when they're alone.
Fortunately, because UBC is a progressive
institute of education, there are none of these
nooks. Isn't it absolutely unthinkable that UBC
would want to encourage any such unpatriotic
acts as lonely thinking? I mean you never
know what people will do or think when
they're by themselves. Thinks like: Where do
marshmallows  come from?
I am willing to admit that once in a long
while some people may have to be alone, but
this is a disease that must be stamped out to
preserve the socio-economic structure of our
society.
However, I feel that I am being too harsh
on this minority of thinkers, if one can call
them that. I mean they're just people like us,
aren't they? So what I would suggest is a nice
compromise. What UBC should do is to set
aside an old building to be alone in. The building could be subdivided into cubicles measuring
5x5x6. They would be completely soundproofed except for a microphone set into the
wall.
Now, because of time and space limitations,
each person would be allotted an hour, no, let's
be generous, says two hours a week, scheduled
to fit into his timetable, in which he could
just be alone. Unfortunately, he would not receive academic credit for this.
He could sit in his cubicle, and if any
thoughts came to him, he could broadcast them
into the microphone which would be monitored
to someone in a big cubicle, someone who could
lead and direct the student's thinking.
This would serve a dual purpose. The student would be happy because he could think
thoughts by himself and yet have them purposefully directed by a professor so that he would
know what thoughts not to think.
I mean have you ever noticed what a problem it is, not knowing what thoughts you're
supposed to think and what ones you're not
supposed to?
Science scene needs arts
By FRED BUCKWOLD
As a science student looking
over the course requirements
leading to a Bachelor of Science
degree and the manner in
which these courses are presented, I find myself feeling
amazed and revolted. Science
students are, in reality, only
learning to regurgitate facts
and formulae, and to mechanically work through problems.
But a scientist has more responsibility than just solving the
physical mysteries of the world.
He must become an integral
part of the community in which
he is undoubtedly highly respected for his knowledge.
In setting the curriculum and
course outlines the science ad
ministration has done its best
to stagnate the process of subjective thinking. The graduating student is, in effect, no
better than a walking computer. He has no idea of the
philosophy or the responsibilities of the scientist in society.
He does not even possess a
superficial amount of academic
freedom. He has virtually been
trained not to think.
On the other hand, it should
be noted that most science
courses must be dealt with in
this manner. This appears to be
the best way to teach the future
scientist the tools of his trade.
I feel, however, that the university has a responsibility to
train these students to think
subjectively and broaden their
outlook on life. I therefore pro
pose that the science curriculum include a mandatory
course on the philosophy and
responsibilities of the modern
scientist — especially in respect to their future role in
society.
This could be accomplished
through a series of seminars
chaired by members of the various departments. Also, to remain free from the confines of
the normal grading process^ it
should be given on a pass-fail
basis.
A course such as this would
be but a first step. Other steps
would involve series of meetings and discussions between
arts and science. Only through
these exchanges of ideas can we
hope to become part of a unified and mature society.
Symphonic Musings
By MICHAEL QUIGLEY
"We will strive everyone of us . . ..to surpass all we have done before! From Beethoven,
Brahms, and Bach to the avant-groove, Symphony 68/69 will be textured with soul and
experiment."
Surprisingly enough, this promotional blurb
for the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra's upcoming thirty-ninth season has some truth in
it. Aside from the staple diet of "classics"
(Haydn, Handel, Mozart, Tchaikovsky et al.),
there are several unfamiliar works to test the
endurance of the mink-coat-and-jewels set and
also to draw weary refugees from the Retinal
Circus: Aaron Copland's Lincoln Portrait;
Charles Ives' Unanswered Question; symphonies by Hans Werner Henze (Fourth), Gusiav
Mahler (First), and Carl Nielsen (Fifth); plus
the Western Canadian premiere of John Tav-
ener's The Whales, a dramatic cantata for
voice, organ, and orchestra; William Walton's
Belshazzar's Feast; and the world premier of
Assassinations for Orchestra and Electronic
Tape by UBC composer Lloyd Burritt.
As well, a Great Symphonic Competition
will take place on November 3 and 4 when
the Seattle Symphony Orchestra partakes in
an exchange concert. The VSO will be in
Seattle on the same dates, performing, among
other things, Alberto Ginastera's Esiudicos Sin-
fonicos, commissioned by the VSO for Canada's  centennial.   The   Seattle   orchestra  will
THE      UBYSSEY
perform two works which were played here
last year — Brahms' Fourth Symphony and
The Flying Dutchman Overture, with Ravel's
La 'Valse and As Quiet As ... by Ameridan
composer Michael Colgrass.
The '"soul and experiment" also extends
into the special concerts to be held in the
QueeniE and the Pacific Coliseum. Two concerts of modern music entitled Sounds of the
Century are planned for November 8 and 26,
and another concert on April 30 of next year
features folksongstress Judy Collins. Corky
Siegel of the now-defunct Siegel-Schwall Blues
Band will hopefully perform his Concerto
Brasso with the symphony on April 14, though
confirmation on this has not been finalized due
to  "financial and mechanical problems."
The first concerts of this season on October
3 and 4 feature, along with a most of dignitaries and the ubiquitous odor of mothballs,
the young Spanish pianist Rafael Orozco attacking the QueeniE's decrepit piano with that
over-labored musical war-horse, Tchaikovsky's
First Piano Concerto. If Orozco doesn't manage
to bring any "new, fresh poetic insight" to the
piece (about all one can expect from a performance of it now, perhaps he'll attempt to
break the records for numbers of wrong notes,
bars forgotten, and tempos misconstrued as set
by Ludwig Olshansky, who gave an agonizing
performance of the Tchaikovsky First at a
Pops Concert here two years ago.
Friday, September 20, 1968 •   U  *.   M\H   Ui *•-   *  «X<       *
Vy.wv.V v v .\ *. v'c Vv.CV.v vYa' v'»
SEPT.     21
SEPT. 24-29
TOTEM PARK
VILLAGE BISTRO
TOTEM PARK
, - *•*•
. ^ f. j** *". ' _» . *^
iMK   ,     "S*T.i..  I***-  J*
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THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, September 20, 1968 p£ sive
Macragas and Macmuffins
By STEPHEN SCOBIE
Je suis un separatiste. Not,
however, of the kind that
Pierre Elliott takes exception
to. I'm a Scottish Nationalist.
As an exile of three years'
standing, I find that my nostalgia and/or patriotism for my
native country tends to grow
proportionately with distance
from it. Distance lends enchantment to the view, as was said
by (probably) Shakespeare, or
some other dirty English swine
imperialist lackey.
One advantage of being in
Canada is that, whereas the
papers still give me news of
the various idiocies of the London government, they say nothing about the Scottish Nationalist Party <SNP) except
that they exist, and are winning elections.
If I were at home, I would
be reading all the inane statements which the SNP leaders
are (doubtless) making, and
that would turn me right off.
I suspect that the basic reason for the SNP's success lies
in what I call the Egg-Throwing Principle. This runs, briefly, as follows:
The London government
(Tory or Labour) has made a
god-awful mess of everything.
An SNP government might
Very well make a mess, in fact
they would be almost sure to,
but it would be very hard for
them to make a bigger mess
than London has. And besides
— this is the crucial point —
it's a helluva lot easier to
throw rotten eggs at Edinburgh
than it is to throw them all the
way to London.
The English have so far proceeded on their usual principle
of ignoring the question. To
them, Scotland is merely the
north of England — the Far
North, somewhere around the
Arctic Circle.
They have always acted on
the unquestioned assumption
that English culture is the
finest in the world: after all,
God was educated at Eton,
wasn't he? In recent years,
they have become a bit cagey
about imposing their dominion
on foreign peoples in Africa
and India, but they never
worry about Scotland. After
all, to the average Englishman,
the Scots are nothing but inferior Englishmen who happen
to be good at football.
Even that most reasonable
of left-wing English journals,
the New Statesman, was reduced recently to an article
against Scottish Nationalism,
supposedly based on "reasoned arguments". In fact, it boiled down to a thoroughly middle-class appeal, "Come on
now, you chaps, don't break up
the team, what?"
This article ended on a totally hilarious note with the dark
warning that a resurgence of
Scottish Nationalism would
arouse a backlash of English
Nationalism.
As if the political and cultural genocide of the Scots had
not been the central factor in
English policy towards its
northern neighbour for the last
seven or eight hundred years.
Certainly the first priority of
an independent Scotland would
have to be the release of the
English stranglehold on the
Scots educational system,
which has been aimed, for the
last two hundred years, at the
steady eradication  of all ves-
Friday, September 20, 1968
tiges of native Scots culture
and language. Until only a few
years ago, for instance, it was
a punishable offence to speak
Scots in a Scottish school.
It is argued, of course, that
nationalism is a retrograde
step in the world today, that
the ideal should be internationalism. This is always a laugh
coming from the English, the
most nationalist race in the
world. "Internationalism" is a
nice-sounding liberal word
which serves as a convenient
disguise for neo-imperialism.
The fact is, of course, that no
nation can be truly internationalist unless it is speaking from
a position of national integrity.
And this applies to Czechoslovakia, or Biafra, or Vietnam—
or even poor little Scotland,
which has been around so long
that all the liberals have forgotten it.
One possible course of action
would be to renew the "Auld
Alliance" between Scotland
and France. In fact, at the time
of De Gaulle's junketings in
Quebec last summer, a telegram was sent to Paris by a
Scots publisher called William
MacLellan, inviting Charlie to
take up the cry of "Vive
Ecosse Libre!" (It is hard to
reconcile this with the SNP's
avowed opposition to the Common Market.)
MacLellan himself is a high-
grade nut: a genteelly bankrupt publisher who is also vice-
president of the British Druids
Society. While down in the
south last summer attending
the Druids' annual rites at
Stonehenge, he took time off
in London at an avant-garde
poetry reading to give a demonstration of the Ceol Mor, the
classical Scottish pibroch.
The avant-gardists responded enthusiastically, because the
structural principles of the
Ceol Mor are very close to
those of the Indian ragas. Classical pibroch sounds like a
kind of nasally whining Ravi
Shankar.
This is because the Scots,
like the other Celtic peoples,
are fundamentally different
from the English (as Andre
Maurois acknowledged in the
opening sentences of his biography of Six Alexander Fleming.) Scots culture is basically
non-European: the English,
however, belong to the European tradition. There is thus a
deep-seated cultural and racial
incompatability   between   the
Scots and the English. Never
were two more unlike peoples
lumped together on the same
small island.
What will happen next?
To this there are two answers.
One is idealistic, wishful thinking. Scotland will re-gain her
independence. England will at
last surrender. This kind of
answer was given best by the
great Scottish poet and nationalist, Hugh MacDiarmid, who
was asked recently when Scotland would be free. He replied,
magnificently, "When the gutters are running with English
blood!"
But in terms of practical
politics, the outcome is likely
to be somewhat different. The
SNP, besides being fatuous in
most of its public statements,
is fatally weak and divided. It
is in any case a self-annihilating party: if it succeeds, it removes the need for its own
existence.
Meanwhile, the thin thread
of Scottish national sentiment
holds together a very diverse
bunch of eccentrics, whose
more conventional political affiliations run all the way from
the extreme right to the extreme left.
What I believe will happen
is this: at some time in the not-
too-distant future, one or both
of the major English political
parties will be forced to offer
major concessions to the Scots.
Most likely they will suggest
a situation similar to that
which presently exists in Northern Ireland, which still sends
representatives to London, but
has its own Parliament at Stor-
mont, near Belfast, which deals
with domestic affairs.
An offer of this kind would
split the SNP straight down
the middle, between those willing to accept the compromise,
and those who would defiantly
hold out for complete independence. And this split would
ruin the SNP as an effective
political unit.
The English would then
negotiate on their compromise
offer, and implement some
limited form of devolution.
The drive for Scots independence would be halted, or at
least set back a good few
years.
And the English, in their
habitual sublime stupidity and
arrogance, would congratulate
themselves very loudly on their
magnanimity and generosity in
returning a portion of what
they stole.
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VOLKSWAGEN
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featuring the soul music of
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2 Blocks N. of Hastings Ask for Tyron or Linda
THE     UBYSSEY lyed
Rising to the fore of pop rock is Tomorrow's
Eyes, a trio from Ueno, Nevada who have set
up their operational headquarters in Vancouver.
The group consists of Jimmy Schoen, 21,
lead guitar; Dana Andrews, 20, bass guitar; and
Tary Engel, 20, on drums. Together they create
a sound which is as full and as loud (if not
louder) as that of most groups twice their
size-
One of the largest distinguishing factors
about the TE's is their background. They began musically as a quartet in Reno in 1965, and
in ^66 they went to Germany. When they
arrived in Europe there was very little in their
favor — no contacts, no money, no knowledge
Of German* nothing but a driving desire to play.
For a year and a half they played the club circuit from Gelnhausen to Munich, entertaining
audiences often composed predominantly of
American GI's. They were underpaid, usually
underfed, playing eight hours a night, seven
days a week in a gambftjadnch they ikjw describe as a strenuous anasaKlBj*fl---|_t a-ue"
musical education.
They stayed in Germany until t^eir/
ing permits expired, at which time tney
to eastern Canada, leaving their fourth
ber, Andy Suttles, behind. Andy was extrl
to Japan, his birthplace, and now, over a]
later, he is still in the process of gaining jig
to Canada to rejoin the group. The ot_
boys came across Canada looking forj
settle and work. As their drift nor
overdue they could not, and did Jiot
return to the States.  They becj
that Vancouver has potential
capital of the world, and acca
here and began playing local ck
certs.
Andy had been their leatf singer "*
a strong rhythm guitar. Thi ci{wiouS
tage posed by his separatapn worn
became just one more obatacle\to Qiret
. The remaining three workad determined!
create a new and unified somnd, apnces
on vocal harmonies and profBpient\jnst*j.
alization.
, Early in 1968 they purch^i
"Tomorrow's Eyes Farm"
live in Langley. Their accuri-Ula
went towards building a recordmfst-JS
property so that they could practise
to use their musical knowledge. They mil
the 25 by 40 foot studio entirely themsel\
from the laying of the foundation to the carpet-
ipg of Jhe floor. Now they are awaiting the
arrival of a Sculley recorder which will enable
them to cut their own tapes and further develop
their sound. Future plans for the studio include
possible use for other musical groups on an/
hourly or daily rental basis, affording practice
and recording opportunity which is sorely lac*
ing in Vancouver to date.
In the year since they arrived here To»
morrow's Eyes have played gigs in local nightspots such as the Village Bistro, Retinal Circus, and River Queen. Owner-manager of the
Bistro, Mark Derrick, rates them as "undoubtedly one of the most popular groups" to play
his club. He commented on their ability to
adapt to and captivate their audience, attributing this to the "continental style which they
probably developed while playing in Germany."
He described their performances as being "like
a big party".
Their manager, Jim Allan, reports that
they are heavily booked for concerts and
dances at high schools and auditoriums throughout the city, and they recently played at a special fashion show at the Canadian National Institute for the Blind. Out-of-town gigs have
included tours of coastal and interior cities of
B.C., a week at the infamous Zorba's in Edmonton and Garth's Grotto in Nelson. Later this
year they hope to make a cross-Canada tour,
playing all the major cities from here to Montreal, and then to return to Germany for another
two month stint.
The TE's select their material from among
what they consider to be the most potential and
meaningful songs of their contemporaries: the
Beatles, the Association, the Cream, etc. Many
of their songs are noticeably rearranged and
often improved from the original renditions.
They achieve a great range and variety of intensity and sound, striving to perfect their
harmonies and to project them in the context
of tight instrumentalization and improvisation.
For example, the vital drive behind their version of the Cream's Sunshine of Your Love
reaches out and draws the audience into its
violently reverberating mood. Then the group
switches into Sing Halleluia, an old negro spiritual which begins peacefully enough but builds
to a sOul-piercing climax. Jimmy is consistently
skilful in his guitar lead, 6ana is quick and
complementing on his bass, and Tary is frenzied, enthusiastically earning his title as "the
mad dru,      _	
is the next step for the
writing songs throughout
been together, but have
■arrange and work from other
v^Wle in the process of devel-
'uwjpistakable sound. The ar-
er and the imminent re-
urth member will be the
rms of their own writing.
4  the studio  fully
Origi
TE's. Th
the yea
preferred
people':
oping
rival 0!
•-union
liberating fa
With   Andy
Ujipped they
jwar
iheir o
To:
fame.
iei{   J-ftost
fricata rhytl^
fir half-b_»ther
icljMpd mater
jing more and more
g songs entirely of
t merely play, they
on stage is well-
ission ticket. Be
! Listen for their
around town, you
ie peak of musical
^ERIE HENNELL
started  recording
_le   influence   was
land its more popu-
arall. The first songs
original!* done by rhythm
_ch j&JhaMiracles, Shirelles,
. IsIejiBWhers, and Chuck
sy went back  to
never really left
Sid rock and roll
characteristics
iplicity.
rock   and  roll
biggest influences
the Beatles (they
'as writing several
fteir own along his lufes), Little Richard, is
k.at IssS^Tln this^ex-minister's own words,
it on yqj-f and let it all hang out."
P.L.
PETER LINCOLN
'•■       '• *
Sr. Page Friday:
lrew:
are is great, but cynical sarcasm is
Love,
LEO TOSCANELLI.
More  Yippies
(Continued from pf 2)
door, that they would be safe?;" When the voting came the Mafia plank won and any possible unity was shattered. Thus the voting for
President and Vice-President was in reality
an anti-climax. The young dissenters nominated
a Mark Rudd-Paul Krassner ticket while the
gangsters nominated the expected ticket of Joe
Bonanos and Lucky Luciano. Several delegates
still hopeful of a compromise had started a
movement for a Mario Savio-Meyer Lansky
ticket which would prove agreeable to all
ethnic and crime factions and were in the process of nominations when the warehouse door
flew open and several men in blue police uniforms ordered the delegates to line face forward along the warehouse walls, their hands
above their heads and not to turn around.
There was a brief burst of gun-fire, silence,
and then a voice, "It'a with a heavy heart . . ."
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Friday, September 20, 1968 pf 7even
BY NETTIE BUCKLES
I had a letter from a retiring
high school principal in Pouce
Coupe. He asked me to print
a few words of advice and expostulation to our wonderful
little first year students here
at UBC.
This morning, <he said) as
you step into your busy scholastic beehive, try to remember
that the whole psychology of
schooling has been created for
this period. Your formal education was no random experience — each hesitant foot was
carefully tied to the closest
rung.
For truly, "two roads diverge
in the wood". Or, as a contemporary statesman sometimes
puts it, "This is not the end. It
is not even the beginning of the
end. But it is, perhaps, the end
of the beginning."
In graduating, you have
reached the peak of your first
mountain. But the road is stony
and beset by ill weather. And
, you are wrapped in lowlying
clouds, beaten by lightning
rods, harried by hailstones,
blinded by blizzards, and wet
* by precipitation.
You are hemmed in by ogres;
great chasms bespeckle your
dreams, and from within, temp-*
ests torture. Yet you have with-
J in your bosom a candle. High
school has equipped you physically and mentally, anyway. It
has taught you to mellow
through life towards its omega.
It has prepared you for life's
role, for "all the world's a
stage," as a contemporary
statesman once put it. It has
- taught you to sew your costume, and learn your script by
heart. And, if your tongue
should falter, it lies waiting in
the wings to give you a helping
hand.
And so, in hopes that, if
occasions arise, and they will
Friday, September 20, 1968
arise, when you slip in your
mountain-climbing or in giving
your lines, you will pop up
again with the rallying cry,
"Yeah school!" I will leave you
with these words: "No excellence without great effort", "A
man's reach must exceed his
grasp or what's a heaven for",
and "Know thyself, but never
be too satisfied, for this is, perhaps, the end within beginning."
And thank you, Mr. Elm, for
helping our young folks over
their first campus mountain.
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II Friday, September 20, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 15
Library man castigates
education faculty structure
By JOHN GIBBS
Library cataloguing division head J. McRee
Elrod called Thursday for the end of the faculty of education as it eyists now.
"The education faculty should be no more
than a group of advisers who counsel and teach
a method course to prospective teachers," Elrod said in an interview.
Elrod, a teacher with experience from
Georgia to Korea, explained his views in a-16t:
ter to the chairman of the committee on the
future of the faculty of education (COFFEE),
George To'mkins.
He said the faculty should not teach courses
that are offered by other, more specialized,
faculties on campus.
"Why is the faculty of education teaching
biology?" he asked. "What would the faculty
of medicine say if the faculty of education
started teaching school doctors? I think the
biology department should react likewise."
The letter said that prospective teachers
should take their courses in the specialized
departments with a method course and a period
of apprentice teaching before getting a degree.
He said this would raise the standard as
many who now enter the faculty do so because
they can't pass standard academic courses.
The suggestions came from a "beefing
group" formed during the summer, consisting
of his wife and. friends.
"They were mad because they were taking
a course in the faculty of education from a professor who didn't know her subject," Elrod
said. "The system that supports this is wrong."
Elrod also said the present system of having student teachers go to a school for a few
days a month is inadequate.
"Academic isolation is no good, you have to
become involved in the community," he said.
He said they should be given a whole semester to work with established teachers as apprentices.
"Teachers should be in the community of
the children they teach, if they are to be effective. You have to know the parents; go to
their churches and meetings; drink in the same
pubs if that's what the parents do."
STUDENT POWER
From p. 1
trol in their own lives, and this
has got to change," he said.
He added that the function
of the university in society is
to develop citizens, but that
capitalist society is the one that
is killing people in Vietnam,
building ghettoes, and producing many hang-ups among its
members.
"If you want to know who
controls this capitalist society,
look at who controls the -university," said Mate. "It's the
board of governors, which is
made up of big businessmen."
Mate criticized student council for making the situation
look too simple and pretending
that nothing much is wrong.
"I cannot consider Dave
Zirnhelt part of the same student movement 1 belong to,"
he said.
He said what is necessary for
student revolution is to understand that students aren't talking only about systems but relationships and who they really are.
"The real struggle must take
place within each one of us,"
he said. "But this can take
place only in the context of the
larger social struggle."
"What we don't need," Mate
added, "is campus personalities
who focus attention on themselves to the detriment of the
general movement. We don't
need any Loneys, Perskys or
Mates."
Linde said the immediate
question students should ask
the university is why they
don't have a place to hold rallies such as Thursday's.
"Student council isn't prepared to let the thing happen
in SUB," he said. "What are
you going to do about it?"
Another problem he discussed was how council doesn't
truly represent students.
"The AMS represents nobody," he said. "If we really
want something done, we need
a student base."
Loney said that unless students take a united stand, issues won't change.
"The rivalry between the
engineers and the arts faculty,
or   between   UBC   and   SFU
never helped anything." he
said. "Unless we can start
talking to each other without
this barrier, we can't get any
progress."
Loney wondered why the engineers aren't supporting those
working for academic reform.
"The engineering faculty is
the only one running their faculty in a democratic manner,
so they should be the first to
want democracy in the university."
Once the speakers had finished, the rally was opened to
discussion and questions.
Engineering representative
Fraser Hodge answered Loney
by saying that "if there wasn't
this rivalry between the departments, this goddam university would be no good anyhow.
"There are little things in
each faculty that are no goddam good," he said. "On these
things the engineers are willing to work with the whole
university to help change, but
we're not giving up our spirit
or our stunts."
Students protest funds
TOKYO (UNS)—A dozen helmeted students occupied the
office building of the Keio medical school here Thursday protesting the school's acceptance of research funds from the U.S.
Army.
Armed with wooden staves, they barricaded the entrances
to the building with desks, chairs and benches. The students
claimed research conducted with the U.S. Army aid was linked
to medical studies contributing to the "agressive U.S. war" in
Viet Nam.
Authorities feared the administration of the school would
be paralyzed if the students prolong their occupation of the
three-storey building which houses the school's secretariat and
medical prescription  offices.
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THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, September 20, 1968
VILLAGE   & UNIVERSITY
SHOPPING PLAZA
Nearby Firms Provide Special
Service For Travelling Students
Travelling this year?
If so, the first place you should
head to is the World Wide Travel
office in the Village.
The office, managed by the
charming and knowledgeable
Mrs. Lina Rogers, can easily set
you off on the right road.
comprehensive
they    arrange
the   prospective
With    their
travel    service,
everything  for
travellers.
Passports, traveller's cheques,
visas, hotel accommodation, and
plane, boat, and bus tickets come
easily to Mrs. Rogers and her
staff.
The office is now in its second
year at the strategic intersection
of University Boulevard and Allison Road.
Mrs.   Rogers   says   the   office
arranged European tours for approximately  1,000 students last
year—including the Alma Mater
Society's charter flight.
And, in addition, there -were
probably about  another   1,000
who had trips to other parts of
the   world  arranged  by  World
Wide.
The agency will do more than
just make regular arrangements
for the traveller. It can also ar
range such exotic-type trips as
a trophy - hunting safari to
Africa, said Mrs. Rogers.
"We'll arrange a trip anywhere — the further the better,"
she said.
And World Wide's service
doesn't always end when its
client returns from his trip.
Mrs. Rogers said one student
returned to Vancouver with a
bill from a Greek hospital which
he had been in after an accident
during a European tour arranged
by her office.
The agency got the bill translated for the student's Canadian
insurance company.
"Just part of our service,"
says Mrs. Rogers.
For students travelling a little
closer to home and looking for
a place to get their car serviced,
there is the Home service station
at 2180 Allison, just off University Boulevard.
Students can drop off their
car at the station for a lube and
oil and any needed mechanical
repairs while enroute to classes
in the morning and it can be
ready when he leaves the campus in the afternoon.
Arid,   says   operator   Larry
Brownlee, if he's late when he
drops his car off, we'll even give
him a lift to his class.
Brownlee, who says about one-
third of his customers are students, has operated his UBC
station for 20 years.
While students don't get a discount at the station, they do get
fair prices, he said.—Advt.
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THE     UBYSSEY
Page   17
TOMORROW'S EYES played yesterday  noon   in the Education  Lounge  as  part of the Ed.
Queen ceremonies.
Manitoba, Toronto councils
reject token senate offers
OTTAWA (CUP) — Two university student councils Wednesday rejected administration offers to restructure university government.
The University of Manitoba student union
refused to send seven student senators to the
university's 90-man academic senate because
the administration didn't accept student demands.
At Toronto, student council declined to
accept administration president Claude Bissell's offer of two seats on a commission to
examine university government.
The Toronto council came back with a
counterproposal of a new commission made up
of four elected faculty members and four
elected student members with ex officio administration representatives.
At Manitoba the student union set the following conditions to their acceptance of the
seven seats:
1) That council determine the method of
election of student senators,
2) That students be guaranteed seats on
the board of governors,
3) That senate and board meetings be
open to the public.
(Two representatives of council walked out
of senate Wednesday when a vote to open the
meeting was tabled.)
But the Manitoba administration apparently does not accept the union's right to reject
the seats. In a letter to student president Horace
Patterson, administration president Dr. H. H.
Saunderson said that if council rejects the
seats, he would expect someone else to take
them.
Thursday Saunderson was to meet with student leaders of the various faculties. Observers
say the meeting, closed to the public, may produce a mechanism bypassing council.
Saskatchewan arts, science dean
resigiC over loss of confidence
REGINA (GUP) — The dean
of arts and science at the Uni*.
versity of Saskatchewan's Re
gina campus resigned Thursday, saying he had lost confidence in the administration of
Brandon boycott dies,
reform committee struck
BRANDON, Man. (CUP) — The Brandon University boycott
threat died Wednesday night when a mass meeting of students
voted to set up a committee to recommend changes in senate
committees.
Student leaders had earlier called for a boycott of classes
starting Thursday if the senate did not grant students more
representation on senate committees dealing with discipline and
adult admissions.
About 450 out of 850 students at the university decided to
accept the recommendation of an ad hoc committee that another
committee be set up to review all existing senate committees
and suggest possible changes.
The reviewing committee of 11 members will include four
students and is to report by Oct. 25.
The senate refused to give students more representation but
the ad hoc committee proposal staved off the boycott.
The mass meeting also organized a fund-raising committee
to help provide money for four African students who lost their
The money for the students, who have been active in the
The money for the studetns, who have been active in the
protests here, was apparently not available because adverse
publicity held back donations to their scholarship fund.
The unrest here started with the Sept. 12 expulsion of a
student for threatening to throw a fake explosive at guest speaker
Laurier Lapierre Sept. 11.
Since then about 60 students have been picketing daily
around the administration building protesting the explusion and
demanding a greater role in making academic decisions.
the university and the future of
the Regina campus.
In an address to the faculty
council, Dean Alwyn Berland
cited three reasons for his loss
of confidence:
• "The consistent refusal of
the university administration
to make clear to the public
and to the faculty and students
of the university its position on
the importance Of university
autonomy during last year's
crisis with the provincial government." (The crisis concerned
attempts by Saskatchewan premier Ross Thatcher to gain full
financial control over the university).
• "The academic autonomy
of the Regina campus has been
blocked." <U. of S. has campuses at Regina and Saskatoon, but
only one administration, located in Saskatoon, for major decisions).
• "The Regina campus
lacks proper physical facilities."
Berland had first submitter
his resignation last February
but held it back after he was
assured there would be action
on these problems.
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THE CONNECTION (1961) Shirley Clarke
THE CONNECTION is the award winning adaption of tht Jack Gelber play
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"Obie Awards", taking three first prizes.
THE CONNECTION, under the brillient direction of Shirley
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"Fascinating as an exhibit of bravura filmmaking. As in
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"What she has done is to treat her material with such
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2381 E. Hastings (at Nanaimo) Page  18
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, September 20, 1968
The political scene at SFU
By GEORGE REAMSBOTTOM
BURNABY — Students at
Simon Fraser University may
have run into their most difficult test yet — power.
Students running on the radical student power slate here
have taken by acclamation
three of six first-slate executive positions on the students'
council.
The other three positions, including the student presidency,
are being contested today.
Second-slate elections are next
Friday.
Student president candidate
John Conway is leading the
student power group which is
contesting every council position. The radicals are expected
ot win evlery position easily
except the presidency which is
being contested by Conway and
SFU ombudsman Rob Walsh.
KEY ISSUES
Posters, banners, pamphlets
and vigorous public speaking
campaigns by both Walsh and
Conway have pinpointed the
key issues of contention at the
university.
The real question isn't what
is wrong but, rather, how far
to go in doing something about
it.
Radical Conway draws almost no lines in terms of confrontation. Liberal Walsh consistently stops far enough to
the safe side of Conway to
make his position clear.
It's somewhat peculiar that
on this campus Walsh sounds
middle-of-the-line while on
most campuses he would sound
clearly radical.
He says that if the board of
governors here doesn't hand
over control of academic affairs to the senate and joint-
faculty then students should do
whatever is necessary to force
the board to reverse its position.
However, he adds, we should
do it in a certain, sensible manner. First, we present written
demands, consult with senate
and faculty members and work
our way through the formal
procedure which exists for
bringing about change.
Navy, ROTC
plagued by
firebugs
SEATTLE (UNS) — A fire
at a naval Reserve Officers
Training Corps building on the
University of Washington campus Wednesday night caused
an estimated $45,000 damage
to the building.
Fire officials believe the
blaze was deliberately set. A
witness said a group of young
bystanders chanted while it
burned: "This is number one,
the fun has just begun — burn
it down, burn it down!"
Fire chief Gordon Vickery
said the blaze, attended by
eight engine companies and
four ladder companies, "was
set, but we don't know how
yet."
Similar fires have destroyed
or damaged ROTC and Navy
buildings at University of California at Berkeley and at Stanford University, Palo Alto,
Calif.
Only as a last resort, he
points out, should we employ
confrontation tactics such as
strikes, boycotts and sit-ins.
Conway says to hell with the
committees and formal procedures. These committees and
procedures, he claims are stalls
and traps.
He emphasizes students when
they have a demand must go
straight to the source of power
at the university, i.e. the board.
Another distinction between
student power advocates and
other candidates, all liberal, is
their attempt to relate student
problems to societal problems.
Conway stresses that student
housing, employment, and high
cost of living problems are
simply a reflection of larger
social issues.
Walsh wouldn't have students involved in off-campus
affairs which do not directly
affect students, and he underlines the word, directly.
OLD ISSUES
Other issues are curriculum,
teaching methods, evaluation
of work, conditions of study,
fees and the old faithfuls such
as food services and cost of
text books.
Again, radicals want equal
or better control over these
conditions while liberals want
more representation than they
now have.
Perhaps the key question is
whether or no student power
representatives can execute
their demands once they are
elected.
Some of the student power
slate's most vocal critics have
been other radicals who say
the radicals have not built a
ground roots movement at
Simon Fraser.
They argue that winning the
second vice-president, Patricia
Hoffer; and, ombudsman, Ace
Hallibaugh.
election has become more important    than    educating    the
"depoliticized" students whom
radicals like to talk about.
GRASS ROOTS
Without a grass roots movement behind them, they question, would the radicals not
have to work within the framework of the existing student
and university government system?
It is likely many of these
questions will be answered this
school year.
First-slate positions won by
acclamation were: activities coordinator, Simon Holwill.
Positions being contested today besides presidency are:
secretary, Judi Bell and James
McAninch; and public relations officer, Guy Pocklington
and Greg Rahn.
RAINCOATS
CROYDON
$1995
Regularly to $29.95
Manufacturers Clearance
UNITED TAILORS
BRITISH  WOOLENS
BUSY"B"
BOOKS
Used  University Texts
Bought and Sold
146 W HASTINGS
Opposite Woodwards
681-4931
The Finest Service!
Upper Tenth barker
MEN'S HAIR STYLISTS
Appointments - 224-6622
4574 WEST 10th AVE.
CMO VHNNI s
COIFFURES
549 Granville
MU  1-4649
Open Fri. til 9
Specializing in
All phases of
modern hairstyling . . .
to the demure . . .
from the sophisticated
3543 W. 4th Ave.
733-8646
Tony Barbieri
Winner of
1968 Gala
Hairstyling   Award
The New York Life Agent on Your
Campus is a Good Man tol&iow
Serving Canadians for Over 7 70 Years
Total Assets in Excess
of $9,500,000,000
800-535 THURLOW ST., VANCOUVER 5, B.C.
68.S-7364
Paul J. Nicholls
Casey Juricic
Raymond Mikhail
*;.,-_.   .. -TEBc '"yVr.
John H. N. Richards Friday, September 20, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page  19
— dick button photo
JAY DAHLGREN AND ANN COVELL listen to  coach  Lionel  Pugh  on   UBC's   new  track   near
Wolffson  field.
Two Olympic-bound athletes
training on new UBC track
UBC's new asphalt track is
getting lots of use from two of
Canada's best up and coming
track and field athletes.
Jay Dahlgren and Ann Co-
veil are conducting daily workouts at the track in preparation
for their journey Sept. 29 to
the Olympic Games in Mexico
City.
Both these athletes qualified
for Canada's 28-member track
and field team by winning
their events at the Canadian
championships during the summer. Miss Dahlgren, the Canadian record holder in the javelin, won her event as expected
but Miss Covell's win came as
a surprise to many people.
'Miss Covell is a petite 18-
year-old sprinter from (Delta,
who was completely unheard
of (except on the local scene)
— dick button photo
DON FIDLER starts the hockey season off on his left foot
as he practises in Thunderbird Arena. Interested players
should contact coach Bob Hindmarch at War Memorial
Gym.
until she defeated SFU's favored Jan Maddin in the 400-metre
event at the Canadian finals.
Her time of 55 seconds does
not qualify her as a threat to
the Olympic record, but considering that she is just starting up the international ladder
she has many good years ahead
of her.
Miss Dahlgren, a former Del-
brook high school student and
now a UBC bookstore employee, has been competing at
the international level since
1966 when she qualified for the
Pan-American games.
Both girls will get a small
taste of international competition at a preliminary Olympic
meet to be held in Voctoria on
Sept.  28.
After this meet they will
leave for Mexico to spend a
month at the Olympics.
Both young ladies train all
year round and upon returning
from Mexico they will return
to their regular routine in prep*.
aration for future meets.
IMiss Covell, who is a student
at UBC, will return to her
studies and work with the UBC
cross country runners.
**-*-'---s''-*-B-_^-aB-S-a__ra-a-^-^-^-a-s
PANGO-PANGO (UNS) —
Editorial blorgs today ran
screaming from the editorial
room because the made-in-
Pango-Pango typewriters refused to type.
__KN?E BfiL CU3*lom ®w>1 s^™"*8-
JL,     '   .      «*3&
3^Uproadttgy-758-0033
TUXEDO
RENTAL & SALES
GARMENTS TO CHOOSE FROM
e Full Dress (Tails)
• Morning Coats
• Directors' Coats
• White & Blue Coats
• Shirts & Accessories
• Mail  Orders  Invited
(Downstairs)
E. A. Lee Formal Wear
623 Howe MU 3-2457
FACTORY
TRAINED
. . our mechanics that is
Specializing In Repairs To:
MERCEDES-BENZ - VOLVO
& VOLKSWAGEN
We have all the
equipment to fix
most of the repairs
to your car . . . right
on the premises
FULLY GUARANTEED
Very reasonably priced too!
AUTO-HENNEKEN
Specialized   Service
8914 Oak St. (at Marine)
phone Hans — 263-8121
DUTHIE  BOOKS
is back on  Robson  Street
At 919 ROBSON - 684-4496
as well as
4560 W.  10th Ave. - 224-7012
and
670 Seymour St. — 685-3627
DUTHIE  BOOKS
Be sure of your
'Good Numbers
THEY'RE ALL IN BIRD CALLS
(The UBC Student Telephone Directory)
Order  The  1968   Issue
Now!
ONLY-75c-ONLY
UNIVERSITY BOOK STORE
AMS BUSINESS OFFICE, BROCK
PUBLICATIONS OFFICE, BROCK Page 20
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, September 20, 1968
TWEEN CLASSES . .
B and B Review
in science room
SCIENCE
UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY
Science anti-calendar —
"Black and Blue Review" —
available at Science common
room — Ma. annex 1119.
CURLING CLUB
Important meeting Tuesday,
Sept. 24, noon, Bu. 106. Sign
up for curling.
VARSITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Come to corn roast tonight.
Everybody welcome. Meet
in front of Brock, 6:30 p.m.
VARSITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Butcher will speak of what,
what, what, so what on VCP-
UBC at Angus 110, noon.
PHRATERES
Actives who haven't signed
up, meet in Education lounge,
noon today.
NEWMAN CENTRE
Sunday, Sept. 22, 7:30, come
to a swingin' hootenanny, St.
Mark's lounge. Refreshments.
MIRKODA DANCE GROUP
Dancers wishing to audition
come to the Jewish Community centre, 41st and Oak, 10
a.m., Sunday. People with
experience in Israeli or contemporary dance welcome.
For information phone Judy
Hirt: 874-8903.
BOAT RACE
Friday, noon, — Education
lawn. Come and find out
out about it.
ALLIANCE   FRANCAISE
Come speak French. Meeting
today I.H. upper lounge. New
members welcome.
TOTEM PARK DANCE
Dance at Virginal Aorta to
Tomorrow's Eyes, Sept. 21,
9 p.m. Maids 75 cents; Makers $1.
LITERATURE  UNION
Students enrolled in English
and those interested in English lit. are to meet Wed.
noon, Bu. 106 to elect union
executive, student - faculty
committee on reform, and to
propose symposia and seminars regarding English lit.
for the coming year.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Karl   Burau,   Friday   noon,
Bu.   100: Why and  How to
study History.
AMS COORDINATOR
Meeting in Brock council
chambers, today, 1:30 p.m.,
bookings for meeting rm. in
SUB. Come prepared with
bookings you want.
VARSITY DeMOLAY CLUB
First general meeting and
elections Oct. 3. All Demo-
lays welcome. Room to be
announced.
ALPHA OMEGA CLUB
Speaking meeting of Ukrainian Varsity Club re club's
day. Bu. 223, Mon., Sept. 23.
PRE-LIBRIANSHIP
SOCIETY
Organizational meeting at
noon, Bu. 225. Old and new
members welcome.
EL CIRCULO
Anyone interested in participating in Spanish club
come to first meeting in rm.
400-402 at I.H., Monday
noon. Very important!
YOUNG SOCIALISTS
Paul Boutelle, black militant
from U.S. and the Socialist
Workers' Party candidate
for vice-president will speak
at noon today in Bu. 102.
UNIVERSITY CLUBS
COMMITTEE
Annual Clubs' Day, SUB,
noon to 2:30 p.m., Thursday,
Sept. 26.
SLAVONIC CIRCLE
Organizational meeting at
noon, Music Room, I.H. All
interested please attend.
SCIENCE  UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY
Science jackets, sweaters on
sale in Hennings lobby.
INTER-FRATERNITY
COUNCIL
Rush fraternities, registration in TV room, North
Brock, daily from noon to
2:30 p.m.
French dean resigns
to prevent repetition
PARIS (UNS)—The Dean of the Nanterre liberal arts college,
where the French student-labor revolt began last spring, has
resigned rather than face a similar crisis that may be building
up again.
Dean Pierre Grappin, 53, considered a liberal when he took
over the college in 1965, expressed regret at having to stifle
free expression during the academic uprising, led by Daniel
Cohn-Bendit and his March 22 Movement.
One of the Nanterre dormitories is being occupied anew by
about 40 "enragees", with political views similar to those of
Cohn-Bendit's original followers.
Last March Grappin sent "Danny le Rouge" to the central
administration at the Sorbonne for disciplining because of his
agitation at the Nanterre campus.
Cohn-Bendit showed up then with a crowd of chanting students, police were called, and the revolution was on.
In his letter of resignation, the dean, whose term would
have expired Dec. 31, said he countered actions of the dissidents
in March "for the same reasons that in other times I carried on
the fight against Nazism".
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students, Faculty & Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 75*, 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00, 3 days $2.50.
Rates for larger ads on request.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and
are payable in advance.
Closing Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Office, BROCK HALL, UNIV. OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
WHEN PLANNING YOUR NEXT
dance or party, book through our
agency. Exclusive agents for the
Boston Teaparty, Blue Crusade,
Witness, Exotics & many more, Dan
987-6721.
MEDDY'S PEOPLE AT PLACE
Vanier, Friday, September 20th. 9:00-
1:00. Residents $1.00. Non-residents
$1.35.
DANCE DANCE DANCE AT THE
Virginal Aorta featuring Tomorrow's
Eyes, Sept. 21, 9:00 p.m. Totem
Park Maids 75c. Makers $1.00.
Greetings
12
ALPHA TAU OMEGA PARTIES ARE
beautiful. (So are you, Fred). Thanks.
Michelle and  Suzanne.
Lost & Found
13
TRADED AT FRIDAY 13th MIXER
in Gym, grey green Hush Puppies
for blue grey casuals. Owner please
phone 224-1625 or 228-381&
FOUND IN PONDEROSA: LADY'S
white purse containing watch. See
Rosalind at the Bank of Montreal,
campus branch.
LOST—AQUA SOC PAPERS. PROB-
ably in Aqua-Sbc members car from
Wednesday pool session. Return to
Bu. 202.
FOUND—14   KT.  GOLD   EAR  POSTS
outside Wesbrook. Call 732-8306.
LOST: SMALL MULTICOLORED
change purse. Please notify Sheila
MacLean, Isabel Maclnnes Hall,
Fort Camp. 224-9047.
WOULD THE PERSON WHO FOUND
books in B-lot please phone AM 1-
6430 and leave message. Urgently
needed!
FOUND. ONE LOVELY BLACK SIZE
34 slip at Alpha Tau Omega House
after Saturday's bash. Phone 736-
4421. Ask for Hormone. No questions asked.
Rides & Car Pools
14
RIDE NEEDED KINGSWAY AND
Gilly. Phone 433-9670. After 5 p.m.
Will  pay  or share  driving.
RIDE     NEEDED     FROM    4th    AND
Maple   for   9:30's.   Phone   733-9272.
RIDE   NEEDED   FROM   CAPILANO-
Highland area. Call Bob at 985-1708.
NORTH VANCOUVER RIDE WANT-
ed, to/from. Desperate, call any
time at  985-2743.
HAVE CAR — WANT PASSENGERS,
from Coquitlam or Burnaby (Doug-
heed Hwy.). Phone 936-5643 after 6
p.m.
RIDE   NEEDED,   No.   5   ROAD   AND
Cambie,  Richmond.  278-8274.
RIDE WANTED FOR 8:30's 1st AND
Commercial,    Larry,    253-0042   even-
 ings.   Vancouver  12.
RIDERS WANTED ALONG ROAD
from Marine at Victoria at 8:30 de-
parts at 5:30. Phone 325-1036.
RIDE WANTED FROM 21st AND
Dunbar for 8:30 classes, T.W.F.
Phono   224-0401   Ted.
RIDE URGENTLY NEEDED FROM
N. West - Burnaby area. 9:30's,
M.T.W.F. Please call Lorraine, 521-
4189.
DRIVER NEEDED. WEST VAN.
carpool. Park Roya] and British
Properties area for 8:30's, phone 926-
1805.
Special Notices
15
UBC BARBER SHOP (IN THE VIL-
lage) now with 4 barbers to serve
you better. Open 8 a.m.-6 p.m.. 5736
University Boulevard.
FRENCH ENGLISH BILINGUALS
desperately needed for psychology
experiment. Phone 688-5002 after 5
p.m.
68 — INVITATION — 69
A students' directory to entertainment at student rates. At the Bookstore; at HE and She Clothing Shop
(the Village); at Fort Camp, Totem,
Acadia canteen shops. $2.50.
HELP! FILM SOC NEEDS PROJEC-
tionists. Pay $1.80 per hour. If you
can run a projector or want to
learn, come to Brock 357 and announce  yourself.
Travel Opportunities
16
Wanted Information
17
ANYONE SEEING FRONT CHROME
wheels being taken off red '57 Chev.
in D lot on Thursday, Sept. 12.
Phone   321-1662  after   6:00  p.m.
URGENT: CATHERINE McNAUGH-
ton of Montreal, please contact
Krysia Mercer—office hours: 522-
3911 or at 1110 Cardero, Apt. 503.
Eves and weekends or call home.
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
1963 RAMBLER AMERICAN 4 DR.,
radio, standard trans. Leaving city.
Phone   325-5088.   $750.
'64 MONZA, 4 SPEED, RADIO,
maroon with black interior, buckets,
mechanically perfect. Call Rod, 733-
8285.
JAGUAR MK VII SEDAN CLASSIC
ca.*, rebuilt engine and running
gear. Phone 731-7975,  6-7 p.m.
FINANCIAL CRISIS MUST SELL
1958 Dodge. C-radio, heater, defroster. Any offer accepted. Excellent   transportation.   733-0909.
'56 ANGLIA, $150. '63 MERC VAN
$695. Ph. 738-7462 after 6:00 p.m.
'Make an  offer.
1958 PONTIAC, GOOD CONDITION,
snow tires included. Best offer over
$325. Phone 263-7119 after  6 p.m.
'60 VW FACTORY EQUIPPED CAMP-
er. Rebuilt engine. Custom tent extension. '60 sedan de Ville Cadillac,
power, air-conditioned. Call 228-2803,
after 6 p.m.  277-0647.
'66 SUNBEAM ALPINE, 1 OWNER,
31,000 mi.; convertible, green, excellent condition, radio, new tires. $1980.
291-2039.
'62 SPRITE; NEW TRANS., CLUTCH
and paint.  $850.  Call 732-8032.	
"ONE    OF    A    KIND."    1953    XK120
Jaguar.   Immaculate.  926-3163.
1957 RENAULT, NEW CLUTCH, RE-
built motor, transmission. Must sell.
$250. Phone George after 6; 263-0337.
'64 MG MIDGET EXC. COND. MECH.
sound and extras. See on campus.
Phone M.W.  at  224-9769.
'59 CHEV. BISCAYNE, 6 CYL., 4
door, radio, 2 new tires, completely
reconditioned engine, brakes and
clutch assembly. $500.00 or nearest
offer.   Guido,   922-7578.
'65  AUSTIN A60. EXCELLENT CON-
dition.   Call   738-8131.
1963 MERCURY COMET. EXCEL-
lent condition. Six cylinder, two door
sedan, standard transmission, radio.
New tires, $850.00. Phone 224-1772
after six.
IDEAL COMMUTERS CAR UBC
traffic—Mercedes 220S, good condition, semi automatic. 1959. Recently
overhauled. Well under $1000. Phone
733-6827   after   6   p.m.   daily.
Automobiles—Wanted
22
Automobile—Paris
23
Automobile—Repairs
24
Boats & Supplies
25
Motorcycles
26
•68    HONDA    175,    HELMET,   WIND-
shield. $540. 731-2270.
YAMAHA 100, 6000 MILES, TWO
helmets, new back tire, $300. Phone
John,  Room 550.  224-9713.
HONDA 175, LIKE NEW, UNDER
3500 miles, $550, Phone 435-9958,
after  6.  Ask  for  Bob.
BUSINESS  SERVICES
Dance Bands
31
Duplicating   &   Copying
32
Miscelleous
33
NOW WITH APPOINTMENT SER-
vice. Upper Tenth Barber — Hair
Stylists, 4574 West 10th Avenue.
224-6623
Photography
34
Repairing—All Kinds
35
Rentals—Miscelleous
36
DUNBAR COSTUME RENTALS.
Children & adults. Reserve early for
Halloween. Also Scottish kilts. 5620
Dunbar. Ph. 263-9011.
Scandals
37
THE SMALLEST UBIQUITOUS
CAB   COMPANY
IN  THE WORLD.
224-5025
SCANDALS: ALL OVER THE PLACE
in SUB on Clubs Day, 12:30-2:30,
Sept.  26.	
HELP! FILM SOC NEEDS PROJEC-
tionists. Pay $1.80 per hour. If you
can run a projector or want to
learn, come to Brock 357 and announce yourself.
WE LOVE YOU, BRIGITTE. COME
again. The boys from Alpha Tau
Omega.
INSTRUCTION
Sewing 8c Alterations
38
Typewriters & Repairs
39
Typing
40
EXP.  TYPIST
738-7881
EXPERT IBM SELECTRIC TYPIST
— Experienced essay and thesis
typist. Reasonable rates. TR 4-9253.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female 51
HOLIDAY MAGIC COSMETIC Distributor requires women to work in
beauty and glamour profession. Free
training, highest commissions paid.
Part or full time. For interview call
Mr. Gilbert,   524-1811.	
GIRLS REQUIRED BY VAN. FIRM.
Sales dept., part-time, free training.
Echelon   Enterprises,   736-6223.	
YOUNG MOTHER TO BABYSIT —
weekdays, my home, outdoor walks.
732-7002.
Help Wanted—Male 52
ESTABLISHED GARDENING Business being surrendered by student
going east. Very lucrative, asking
only $20.00. 738-3252.	
WE NEED AN ENERGETIC YOUNG
man with Managerial experience to
build and maintain a sales force.
Only those who desire something
better,   need  apply.   Phone  321-2786.
Male or Female 53
HELP! FILMSOC NEEDS PROJEC-
tionists. Pay $1.80 per hour. If you
can run a projector or want to learn,
come to Brock 357 and announce
yourself.
Work Wanted 54
Instruction Wanted 61
Music 62
ELECTRIC BASSIST — ANY BAG —
can gig two nights a week. Phone
988-4564.
Special Classes 63
Tutoring 64
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE 71
CLOCK RADIO: WAKE UP TO MU-
sic instead oi an alarm. Good as
new. $25.00. Roger, 224-3771 or 224-
9660.	
BIRD CALLS
YOUR     STUDENT     TELEPHONE
directory.   Buy   pre-sale   tickets  for
75 cents from Bookstore or Publica-
tions Office, Brock Hall.	
VARSITY   SPECIALS
Students'  desks   from 14.95
New bunk beds    pair 29.50
Book cases    from 8.95
New   252   coil   Hollywood   bed
complete ._    49.50
We carry a ful] line of precision-cut
unpainted furniture at lowest prices
ever. -
KLASSEN'S
3207 West Bro^-iway RE 6-0712
(Beer bottle ty-'^e-in at rear of store)
YAMAHA A AIP;: TREM., REVERB
plus Ace-',one organ. Together or
separate. Offers! Ph. Pete, 738-3644
after  5: (W. j.	
SLR CAMERA E*pNTINA, TESSAR
2.8 pTus telelens, uWIity bag (leather),
lightmeter, filters, proxi lenses, battery flash, 2 years old, $95. 291-2039.
THE WORLD'S LARGEST SELLING
35 S.L.R. $40. Others $34, $25. Factory  prices.   Ph.   SiD   298-9110.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms 81 '
ROOM FOR RENT -- WITH USE OF
kitchen. On bus line near English
Bay.   Phone:   684-3697.	
HOUSEKEEPING ROOM AVAIL-
able. One girl can get ride with
3rd year student. Ph. 435-2708. Priv-
ate   entrance.	
QUIET ROOM FOR QUIET MADE
student, non-smoker, non-drinker,
near  gates.   Phone   224-3096.	
Room & Board 82
WANT GOOD FOOD? CONGENIAL
atmosphere and reasonable rates
still available on campus. Call in at
2280 Wesbrook Cresc. or phone Jim
at 224-9986.	
SHARING   ROOM   WITH   BOARD,
laundry, $85. Each for two students,
1556  E.   10th   or   phone   879-3718.
ROOM AND BOARD AT PHI DELTA
Theta  House.   2120  Wesbrook  Cres.
224-9073.        	
ROOM — BREAKFAST AND SUP-
per. $90 mo. 733-0984, 2466 W. 6th
Ave.
Furn. Houses & Apts. 83
HAVE FURNISHED APARTMENT
to share with another girl. Prefer
grad student, 732-8062 after 5.
GRAD STUDENT TO SHARE HOUSE
with three of same. Phone Bob or
Ken, 228-3089, 263-9603.
Unfurn. Houses & Apts.
84
Halls For Rent
85
Houses For Sale
86
Other Cities
87
BUY - SELL - RENT
WITH
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED

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