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The Ubyssey Feb 16, 1973

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Array Dorms ask open books
By DAVID SCHMIDT
Residence students
demanded Thursday the
administration open the
housing books to students.
The resolution came at a
meeting attended by 30
representatives from all
campus residences. It
accompanied an
announcement that meetings
have been arranged between
residence student leaders and
education minister Eileen
Dailly, rehabilitation minister
Norman   Levi,   and   premier
Dave Barrett for Feb. 22-23.
The resolution will be
presented to administration
president Walter Gage today
demanding the administration
release to students a detailed
residence by residence
statement of revenues and
expenditures of housing and
residence food services during
the last three years.
The resolution also calls for
release of the budgetary
projections for the next three
years including the
corresponding information on
residence food services.
Because of the meetings with
the provincial government, the
students have asked for this
information to be provided by
Wednesday.
"This is the first time
residence students have united
behind any issue," said Alma
Mater Society president-elect
Brian Loomes, who attended
the meeting.
"We can thank housing for
that," added Rosemary
Cairns, a member of the Gage
WE U8YSSEY
Vol. LIV, No. 36 VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, FEBRUARY, 16, 1973     v^^>*s     228-2301
—mark hamilton photo
MYSTERIOUS MASKED MAN disguised as Valentine's Day Cupid passes out candies to surprised
Strangers Wednesday near Wesbrook Hospital. There is no known connection between the hospital and
the goodies, distributed by CYVR radio jock.
residence   action   committee.
UBC information officer
Arnie Myers earlier told The
Ubyssey no official
recommendation for an
increase has yet been made.
"Rohringer has told us he
needs a 9.75 per cent increase
to sustain his costs and has
proposed this as an increase.
However, this is not an official
recommendation. A special
meeting of the board of
governors will be held later
this month when the
administration will make a
recommendation. What this
recommendation will be we
don't know yet."
Myers said the
administration would release
the relevant figures when they
have officially made their
recommendation.
Derrick Booth, Acadia Park
residence association
president and chairman of the
meeting, told students "Gage
indicated as a member of the
administration     that     the
administration has already
returned several proposals to
Rohringer and would only
recommend an increase when
they are satisfied with both
figures."
The meeting then selected a
committee to meet with the
board of governors when the
housing increase is officially
recommended.
The committee of 10
students,- two students from
each residence, will present
one brief, which will be put
together from separate briefs
presented by students from
each residence.
John Aslin, past-president of
the Place Vanier residents'
association, presented the
results of a survey taken on the
issue in Place Vanier. It
showed 65 per cent of the
students would return next
year if there is no increase but
only 27 per cent if there is an
increase.
Lean times
ahead
By MIKE SASGES
Administration president Walter Gage said Thursday he is
"disappointed" with the provincial government's $100 million
operating grant to the three B.C. universities.
And a smaller operating budget, said Gage, will principally
affect new courses planned for the 1973-74 year.
"The first thing we will look at will be the new courses
senate has approved over the last year," Gage said in an
interview.
"Some of them (the new courses) may be vital and some of
them may not be," he said.
The operating budgets for UBC, Simon Fraser University
and the University of Victoria will be increased by only $6.5
million to $100 million, premier Dave Barrett said Friday in his
government's first budget.
The last increase under Social Credit administration was
$7.5 million.
Andy Soles, assistant to the superintendent of post-
secondary services, said Thursday he believes decreasing
enrolment caused the provincial cabinet to allot the small
increase.
Gage said he expects new courses replacing old courses will
remain unaffected, but a more careful look at the budget for
totally new courses will be necessary.
A new course like women's studies may not face an
operating decrease because a number of departments will be
budgeting it, a UBC information office spokesman said.
"But an increase of $6.5 million with rising costs and wages
doesnt leave you with much room," said Gage.
The financial advisory board, composed of representatives
for the three universities and from the provincial education
ministry, will meet soon to recommend the division of operating
funds, UBC rep Richard Bibbs said Thursday.
But Bibbs, a board of governors member, refused to
speculate how funds will be divided. Traditionally UBC has
received the greatest amount because it has the largest
enrolment.
Gage said he expects the government's grant for UBC's
capital budget will remain at $6 million.
BoG tables pool plan till site chosen
The board of governors
Monday tabled a request by the
Alma Mater Society to collect
the $5 swimming pool fee
scheduled for next fall until the
AMS fulfills the site
requirements of the
referendum which approved
the fee.
The Oct. 6 referendum in
which students approved the $5
levy towards construction of
the $2.8 million covered pool,
also required the pool be built
in the vicinity of SUB.
Although the board has not
been officially notified, the
pool site will probably be the
Empire pool parking lot south
of SUB, AMS vice-president
Gordon Blankstein said
Thursday.
Without board approval the
$5 levy to meet the pledged
$925,000 student contribution to
the pool, could not be collected
next fall.
Blankstein, who has directed
the pool planning said the
board move presents no
obstacle to the project.
He said he expects the board
to be satisfied by Tuesday
when the site will be definitely
established.
Blankstein said the board's
move arose because the AMS
Union application rejected
The Canadian Union of Public Employees'
application to obtain collective bargaining
rights for UBC medical research assistants has
been rejected by the B.C. labor relations
board.
The board said in a statement it was not
satisfied that a majority of the research
assistants were members in good standing of
the union.
Under the regulations, any group applying
for certification by the board must have 50 per
cent plus one of its members in the union before
certification will be given.
CUPE officials could not be reached for
comment about whether or not another
application for certification will be made,
although a spokesman for the research
assistants indicated Thursday there was some
opposition to unionization of their group.
did its planning through its own
ad hoc committees rather than
the university's established
building procedures. The
administration is therefore not
as well informed as it would
normally be, he said.
He said although the
administration originally
preferred a south campus site,
it was made clear only a site
near SUB would be acceptable
to the AMS.
"I think the Empire site is
now accepted," he said.
Blankstein said the pool
should be completed within two
years of the start of
construction, hopefully in the
month of September. Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, February 16, 1973
Fee boycott ends
GUELPH, ONT. (CUP) —
The Ontario Federation of
Students cancelled its fee
strike at a general meeting
held here Feb. 10 and 11,
instead deciding to hold a
province-wide moratorium of
classes March 13.
OFS organized a province-
wide boycott of second term
fee payments to protest the
provincial government's
imposition of a $100 increase in
tuition and a $200 increase in
the student aid loan ceiling.
The fee strike began Jan. 1.
The OFS executive report
revealed the fee strike failed
totally at some universities
and at others, such as Carleton
University in Ottawa, students
must soon pay their fees or be
expelled.
OFS employs only two full-
time people and was not able to
co-ordinate the strike, a
spokesman said. Other
executive members could not
devote sufficient time to the
strike because of classes and
work with their own student
councils.
Instead of the fee strike, OFS
will publish a newspaper on the
educational cutbacks and a
leaflet outlining the reasons for
cancelling the strike.
OFS is requesting its
member student councils to
organize a one-day
moratorium of classes March
13. Seminars and discussions
will then be held on the
cutbacks, the recently released
Wright committee report on
post-secondary education and
why the fee strike was not
successful.
The Feb. 10 session of the
OFS meeting was aborted by a
bomb threat. University of
Guelph campus police cleared
the building where the meeting
was being held. The OFS
chairperson asked delegates to
reconvene in another building
but no one attended.
The general meeting
revealed a deep split between
militant   and   conservative
the commission's final report,
but most agreed that a stand
should not be taken on the
report itself but rather on
legislation which may arise
from it.
OFS also struck a committee
to investigate the possibility of
unionizing students under the
Labor Relations Act.
elements    in
organization
disagreement
moratorium
the    student
with    strong
about     the
and    divided
reaction to the COPSE report.
Most delegates had not read
Women's play\
Rites, a play by British
playwright Maureen Duffy,
will be performed for the last
time tonight at 7:30 in the SUB
auditorium.
This is a play by a woman
about women performed by
women, an excellent work
which coldly undercuts both
the rhetoric of the women's
movement and the rhetoric of
the traditionalists.
Rites is sponsored by
women's studies as part of
women's week and is directed
by Svetlana Smith. Admission
is 25 cents.
Ministry falls from grace
By GARY COULL
The Anglican-United Campus Ministry is in
danger of closing this year unless grants from
the Anglican and United Churches are
continued, AUCM minister George Hermanson
said Thursday.
Hermanson said the two churches entered a
jointly funded experimental program three
years ago giving $21,000 annually to the AUCM.
The grants pay the salaries of Hermanson and
another minister, Peter Fribley.
The experimental period ends this year and
the churches are now evaluating AUCM's role
on campus to decide whether to continue
funding.
A representative from the Anglican Church
consultant committee on campus ministries is
scheduled to be here Monday to hear opinions
from the campus community and evaluate the
success of the AUCM.
Hemanson, meanwhile, called the situation
serious, and said churches are in difficult
financial positions.
"The evaluation will decide whether or not
the campus ministry is a good use of the
churches' money," he said.
Any drastic cut in the grants would result in
the closure of AUCM, he said, but added the
Lutheran Campus Centre, where the AUCM is
located, would remain open.
It is UBC administration policy not to
contribute funds to religious groups and
individual contributions would not be enough to
carry two ministers and AUCM's programs, he
said.
Hermanson said the aimof the group is for
people "to develop a faith which relates to what
happens around them."
Closure of the centre would affect about 700
persons who have taken part in AUCM
programs.
Hermanson said salaries, office expenses
and program money to provide speakers,
education and Christian-Marxist dialogues are
paid for by the churches and individual
contributors.
Hermanson urged students who wish to see
AUCM continue at UBC to come to the
Lutheran Campus Centre, corner of
Wesbrook and University Blvd., and submit
their views to the representative, who will be
there all day Monday.
HONG KONG CHINESE FOODS
Just One Block from Campus in the Village
WE SER VEAU THEN TIC CHINESE FOOD
A T REASONABLE PRICES
EAT IN - TAKE OUT
We have enlarged our dining room to offer you
better service at no increase in prices!
Open Every Day from 4:30 p.m. to 11 p.m.
5732 University Blvd. Phone 224-6121
TUXEDO
RENTAL & SALES
+ O.B. & S.B. Tuxedos
+ D.B. & S.B. White Coats
+ D.B. 8. S.B. Suits
'+ COLORED SHIRTS
Parking at Rear  •
BLACK & LEE
Formal Wear Rentals
631 Howe
688-2481
■Ml
APPLICATIONS FOR GRAD CLASS FUNDS
ARE NOW BEING ACCEPTED
Applications must include:
(1) The name of the group requesting funds
(2) The name of the project
(3) The amount sought
(4) A 100 word description of their project and of the planned
allocation of any funds granted.
DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS - WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 12
P.M. Submit to room 228 - SUB or mail to Box 118 in SUB.
FILM AT HILLEL
Saturday, Feb. 17 at 8:30 p.m.
"Tales and Legends
of the Jews
Told by ELI WIESEL
—author of "Night"; "Beggar in Jerusalem"
—survivor of the Holocaust
CAMPUS COMMUNITY INVITED
SUB FILMSOC PRESENTS
"Canadian
cinema has
come of
age"
—Village
Voice
a film by CLAUDE JUTRA
with
JACQUES GAGNON • JEAN DUCEPPE
OLIVETTE THIBAULT
TONIGHT
"Eloquent! One of the finest films      ~        ~, r\   \   \
released in the world in 1971!" Une inow Un|y|
—Toronto Star n+   Q-3fl
Saturday
7:00 &
9:30
•
Sunday
7:00
SUB
AUD
50c
SOUTHSIDE
* w.
1
PARTS • SERVICE • SALES
Marine Drive near Cambie      324-4644
FREDERIC WOOD THEATREI
MACBETH
by William Shakespeare
MARCH 2-17
8:00 p.m.
(Previews—Feb. 28 & March 1)
fsfudenf Tickets: $1.00   |
Box Office - Frederic Wood Theatre - Room 207
jSupport Your Campus Theatre! Friday, February  16,  1973 J
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
Slates split—left, right, centre
Superior qualifications,
the necessity for executive
leadership and harmony, or
dedication to radical politics is
the choice facing students
between three slates
contesting Wednesday's
elections for Alma Mater
Society vice-president,
treasurer, external affairs
officer and ombudsperson.
The Students' Coalition
candidates are emphasizing
their qualifications for the jobs
while de-emphasizing political
differences with members of
the rival Democratic Students'
Caucus elected to four
executive positions Feb. 7
The   DSC   candidates   urge
their election to preserve
executive harmony and
leadership and attack the SC
for mystifying the work of the
executive to enhance their own
qualifications while adopting
the DSC's political stands out
of opportunism.
The      Young      Socialist-
affiliated    socialist    slate
present themselves as the
group most devoted to
changing the university power
structure and claim both the
DSC and SC are committed to
the AMS' administrative role
and working through proper
channels.
Independent   ombudsperson
candidate Amarjeet Rattan
DENNY'S WORKERS waited anxiously outside the courtroom
Thursday as the restaurant owners successfully applied for an
injunction to limit picketing of the premises to employees.
Fourteen former employees had previously been picketing the
—kini mcdonald photo
building after walking off the job Monday to protest rules
prohibiting their friends or relatives from sitting for more than 20
minutes at the counter and stopped employees from eating there
on their days off.
says his main qualification is
one year's work with
Speakeasy. He rejects slate
affiliation as being unfitting to
the independent role the
ombudsperson must play.
SC vice-presidential
incumbent Gordon Blankstein
said Thursday the main reason
students should vote for him or
the other two SC candidates —
John Wilson, treasurer and
Bonnie " Long, external
affairs — is their superior
qualifications.
Meanwhile president-elect
Brian Loomes of the DSC
Thursday denounced the SC
platform as misleading and
dishonest.
"They say they support the
fight of student tenants against
the 10 per cent rent increase,"
Loomes said. "Where have
they been while we've been
helping the residents
organize?"
DSC treasurer candidate
Svend Robinson said the SC
has been mystifying the work
of the executive.
"They're just a bunch of
technocrats," Robinson said.
"They've helped make the
AMS the complicated
bureaucracy it is and now they
claim only they can run it."
Robinson said for the
executive to present any kind
of unifted program next year it
should not be split between
slates.
SC candidate Wilson said he
sees no basic problem with the
DSC if elected. The executive
has certain political jobs and
others which are business-
service oriented, he said.
Socialist presidential
candidate Coreen Douglas said
her slate, if elected, would not
concern itself with the
adminstrative aspect of the
AMS.
"Over the years we've been
devoted more than any other
political group to women's
rights, student's rights and
people's rights and that's what
we'd fight for."
Ceasefire indicates U.S. defeat — Willmott
ByPHILMAGNALL
The Vietnam ceasefire
agreement is a clear indication
of American defeat, according
to Bill Willmott, a UBC
anthropology and sociology
professor.
Wilmott and guest lecturer
Sheldon   Simon    addressed
about 30 people at
International House Thursday
in a discussion entitled:
Peace — Where Now?
Both agreed the present
situation in Vietnam
represents more of an
American loss than a peace
settlement, and the ceasefire
exists "in name only."
Simon, however, said the
North Vietnamese have made
several concessions which few
expected them to do.
A very significant compromise, he said, was allowing
a political settlement before a
military one, a repeat of the
Council boos rent hikes
By LEN JOHNSON
Alma Mater Society council voiced
unanimous disapproval of proposed rent hikes
until students are informed of the reasons for
the increases.
In a meeting Wednesday council voted to
urge the board of governors to open its books
for examination so students may determine if
the increases are necessary.
In another motion, council voted to oppose
any rent hikes for students without disclosure
of finances and to support students who are in
opposition to increases.
Council was acting in response to an
announcement by housing director Les
Rohringer that residence fees would be
increased 9.75 per cent next September.
Grad student representative Stan Persky
said there is reason to believe money is being
wasted. He said there are students in Acadia
Park who are competent enough to examine the
books and determine if this is the case.
Persky said without information about
expenditures students were pressed into
making false claims the administration could
easily disprove.
Council also moved that undergrad society
fees be considered permanent unless they are
challenged or asked to be increased.
Under the present system, undergrad fees
must be approved by council each year. The
motion will be put before the students in a
referendum March 7.
Council also voted not to grant an extra $260
to The Ubyssey for an extra edition of the paper
Feb. 26. Ubyssey co-editor John Andersen had
requested the money to put out a special edition
announcing results of the second slate AMS
elections, being held on Tuesday and
Wednesday.
There will be no paper Feb. 23 because of the
mid-term break.
1954 French Indochina
solution, he said, when the
North Vietnamese "were badly
burned."
Willmott countered that the
Americans negotiated far
inferior terms than those of the
French in 1954, having, for
example, only 60 days to
remove their troops as opposed
to the French plan of 300.
As well, the 1954 settlement
required north and south
factions to return to their
respective halves of the
country, whereas the current
ceasefire allows soldiers to
stay where they are.
Although in basic accord on
most points, Willmott and
Simon have different opinions
about what will happen in the
long run.
Simon said he expects to see
the two halves of Vietnam
.remain separate, as in the
past.
South Vietnam has some
1,100,000 men available for
defence, and with American
aid allowed by the ceasefire, he
considers the military a strong
deterrent to renewed
communist attack.
In the temporary political
set-up, South Vietnam has
considerable  veto  powers  in
government matters, which
Simon expects Saigon will use
extensively.
He claimed that although the
Vietnamese are not really in
support of either of the present
governments, they prefer the
"less onerous" Saigon control,
especially since the Viet Cong
adopted widespread terrorism
as a weapon.
Willmott said he forsees a
fairly rapid unification under a
communist government
instead. A large factor, he
feels, is the basic view of the
people that Vietnam is one
country, not two.
On the question of Canadian
involvement, Willmott
expressed "disappointment"
with groups protesting the
observer force, calling it a
"non-issue." Both agreed the
possibility of Canada sending
in more troops was extremely
remote.
Greetings
Hi jocks! Stay tuned for our
special Tuesday sports issue.
Yeah, ho kidding, the whole
paper devoted to all aspects of
sports at UBC. Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, February 16, 1973
One more time
THS UBYSSEY
FEBRUARY 16, 1973
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year by
the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial
opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian University Press. The
Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review.
The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located in room 241K of the
Student Union Building.
Editorial  departments, 228-2307; Sports, 228-2305; advertising,
228-3977.
Co-editors: Jan O'Brien, John Andersen
Oh, oh, they quacked, the poet's back. Ryon Guedes wasn't ready and
Ken Dodd thought it odd. But David Mars said no matter to Len Johnson's
objecting clatter. David Schmidt thought it fit but Jan O'Brien felt like
cryin'. Sandy Kass said what a joy when Gary Coull played with his toy. It
is quite funny, Phil Magnall said, and Vaughn Palmer rolled over dead.
Camille Mitchell called the event a gas when Mark Hamilton caught a bass.
Mike Sasges played reporter which Kent Spencer thought quite in order.
Sondra Marshall Smith for sure, could by Roger McNeill be cured. Lesley
Krueger thought it super as drunks prepared for Saturday's whooper.
Simon Truelove said not to forget the best party to happen yet. Kini
McDonald rolled on the floor, when told to see the address on the door.
A
Elections never seem to end. All year
we've been talking about elections.
First there was the provincial election,
then the federal fiasco, then the civic election, then the first slate Alma Mater Society
executive election and now there's the
second slate AMS executive election.
To be quite frank we're tired of writing
editorials about elections but we've never
been known to shirk our duties (heh-heh) so
here goes another.
We think students made a good choice
on the first slate electing the Democratic
Student Caucus candidates. They voted for a
group of people who indicated their willingness to integrate student services and politics
without ignoring either.
And the new executive seems determined to keep their campaign promises. In
the short time since the election they have
become involved in one of the more important issues on campus, the proposed residence rent hike, by supporting and
encouraging the students organizing opposition to the increase. This support has ranged
from leaflets to attendance at meetings.
The Students' Coalition in the form of
the current executive had every opportunity
to initiate action at students' council and in
the residences but did not act until Wednesday's council meetings.
The SC election platform again stresses
service before politics although they have
been making some unconvincing noise about
politics.
For example they now claim they sup
port the students fight against the proposed
rent hike yet they have done nothing but say
they support-them.
They're all for student representation on
faculty committee but again they have done
nothing except reluctantly pass a motion at
council supporting the arts undergraduate
society  in their struggle for representation.
The other slate, The Young Socialist
cum Socialist slate, have taken on some
pretty big projects including abolishment of
the board of governors and abortion laws.
While we agree with their objectives we're
not certain how realistic they are being.
They stress politics before services.
That puts the DSC in the middle as the
only group integrating politics and services.
In an earlier editorial we briefly talked
about the dangers of a split executive pointing out that it could result in bickering,
in-fighting etc.
We did not intend to suggest that this is
the only reason people should vote for the
DSC but it is something people should
consider. A split executive would probably
mean more energy would be spent in compromising and arguing than in implementing
a coherent program.
The AMS student council will provide
opposition and act as a check to a single-
slate executive. The executive must present
their budget to the students council and
receive a two-thirds majority before it can be
passed.
At any rate don't forget to vote either
Tuesday or Wednesday.
Letters
Misleading
Due to a number of
inaccuracies and misleading
impressions that have arisen in
recent Ubyssey articles on the
proposed 9.75 per cent rent
increase for all student residences,
the Acadia Park action committee
would like to inform students of
the actual events that have taken
place.
1. Representatives of Acadia
Park and Acadia Camp were first
informed of the proposed rent
increase by the director of
housing, Lesley Rohringer, on
Jan. 25, 1973.
2. This proposal was reported
to the residents of Acadia Park at
a general meeting of the Acadia
Park Tenants' Society, Sunday,
Jan. 28. The tenants decided at
this meeting to oppose any rent
increase. They agreed to circulate
a petition and to present a brief to
the board of governors. An action
committee was formed at this
time to deal further with this
issue.
3. The board of governors
invited Acadia Park and Acadia
Camp representatives to present
briefs at the board meeting of
Feb. 6. Housing was also to
present its proposals at this
meeting. The representatives who
presented the briefs were James
Arthurs (not "Authos") and
Svend Robinson (not a grad
student) from Acadia Park, and
Maureen Moore and Stephen
Foster from Acadia Camp. It must
be emphasized that while
housing's Rohringer was present
when students presented their
briefs, the student representatives
were     not     allowed     to    hear
housing's brief. Due to the in
camera nature of the proceedings,
the recommendations of the
board were unknown by the
. students.
4. The same night, at a general
meeting called by the Acadia Park
Tenants' Society, Arthurs
reported on the board's reaction
to the student briefs, and
Rohringer presented housing's
position. He informed the meeing
that the matter had been referred
to the financial committee of the
board for a complete review.
Bruce Yorke, of the Vancouver
Tenants' Association, was also
present and took part in the
discussion. The general feeling of
the meeting was that housing's
explanation was inadequate, and
it was decided that the action
commitee would formulate
proposals for action to be brought
up at a further meeting of the
tenants.
5. On Thursday, Feb. 8, at a
general meeting of over 100
Acadia Park tenants, it was
reported by Robinson, following a
discussion with bursar Bill White
on Wednesday, that the board was
meeting on Monday, Feb. 12 to
continue unfinished business.
Robinson also reported that the
matter of the rent increase was
not to be referred to the financial
committee of the board as
previously stated by Rohringer,
but that, in fact, the board was
going to rule on the matter at a
special meeting later in the
month. The general meeting
unanimously ratified the
proposals of the action commitee
which were to:
a. send    a    delegation   to
bursar White  on Friday
morning to present a
letter requesting that he
ask the board to open
the financial books of
housing.
b. send a group to the Feb.
12 meeting of the board
to support this demand
c. send a delegation to
Victoria to meet with
ministers Eileen Dailly
and Norman Levi and
with premier Dave
Barrett.
Rosemary Cairns, a
representative from the Gage
towers, told the meeting that a
number of students in Gage were
also upset at the sudden rent
increase and might want to take
part in any further action.
Members of the newly-elected
Alma Mater Society executive
were also present at the meeting
and expressed their support.
6. On Friday, Feb. 9, a
delegation went to present the
letter to bursar White. Two
members of the delegation, Tern
Hoen and Svend Robinson, met
with White. White agreed to
present to the board on the 12th
the request that the board open
the financial books of housing. He
also stated that housing's
presentation to the board could
not be made available to the
students.
7. On Sunday, Feb. 11,
Rosemary Cairns of the Gage
towers organized a meeting of
single residents from Totem Park,
Place Vanier and Gage which was
also attended by representatives
from Acadia Park and from the
AMS executive-elect. All of the
preceding information was
presented to the meeting by the
Acadia  Park   representatives.   At Friday, February 16, 1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
Letters
the meeting, action committees
were formed for the three single
student residences.
Representatives of these action
committees agreed to meet with
the Acadia Park action committee
on Thursday, Feb. 15. It was also
stated at the meeting that as many
as possible should go to the board
meeting on Monday, Feb. 12.
8. The culmination of all the
above action was the Feb. 12
meeting of the board attended by
a representative delegation of all
student residences supported by a
lobby of more than 100 tenants
gathered outside the board room.
After gaining entry, the delegation
was informed by the board that it
was still awaiting the
recommendations of the
administration which was
presently considering housing's
proposal. The delegation was also
assured that the administration's
recommendations would be made
available to the tenants'
organizations before presentation
to the board and that the tenants'
organizations would be invited to
present further briefs if
administration's recommendations
are to include a rent increase. The
board also assured the delegation
that "relevant" financial
information would be made
available to the tenants',
organizations.
We trust that this account will
clarify what the situation has been
to date.
Acadia Park action committee
Inaccurate
The editorial in the Feb. 9
Ubyssey was somewhat misleading. Firstly, the building of Gage
Towers was not a blunder.
Secondly, regarding student
affairs in residences, political
types have not been discouraged
from running for student council;
dons generally have very little
influence over student councils;
and members of the student council very rarely become dons. Some
do become resident fellows because they are usually the most
actively involved people in residence affairs. (Isn't it in The
Ubyssey that I always read about
student apathy?) Your sources of
information are very inaccurate.
In order to convince everyone
that something must be done
about the proposed rate increases,
you seem motivated to discredit
all those connected with student
affairs in the residences. I'm sure
you are quite capable of making
your point without resorting to
such tactics.
What is at issue is a proposed
9% per cent rent increase in all the
residences, and this many believe
to have been caused directly by
the construction of Gage Towers.
Thus, the argument is that Totem,
Vanier and Acadia will be subsidizing Gage Towers. For a residence to have its rents raised 10
per cent within one year of construction does seem somewhat
absurd and $933 seems like an
exorbitant figure for eight months
room and board in Vanier and
Totem. With wage demands and
prices in general rising at their
present rates an increase in rents is
inevitable. The question is does
the 9% per cent represent an
increase merely in operating costs
or has there been a miscalculation
of Gage Tower's costs? Assuming
just for the moment that 9% per
cent is the minimum possible in
crease, why are they across the
board? Surely the operating costs
and overheads are higher in Totem
than they are in Acadia.
Unfortunately, these questions
cannot be answered until 'the
books' are opened to the public.
It is a board of governors's ruling
that they remain closed. The main
argument behind such a ruling is
probably that to open university
business books would be to expose figures to competitors. This
would seem to be applicable to
the bookstore, but residences have
no real competitors. To see all the
figures relevant to the rent increases would certainly prove to
be interesting!
Residence rates are at present
subsidized by summer conventions and without these additional
revenues the rates would be considerably higher. Of the 25 university residences in Canada, UBC
(on the basis of room and board
costs applicable to Totem and
Vanier) ranks 16th. Of course,
there are differences in Facilities
and services but it is cheaper than
the 'average residence'. Furthermore, UBC residences are not
subsidized by the province, yet
room and board at UVic's residences which are subsidized, will
cost one cent more a day next
term.
UBC housing's policy has been
to subsidize residence rates
through summer conventions.
With the building of Gage Towers,
1,400 beds have been added and
of course, it is very difficult to
increase conventions by that
much within one year. However,
it is housing's aim that within two
years, convention revenue will
have increased to the extent that
they will be able to subsidize any
further rate increases to the student. These are estimate projections which one can easily scorn,
but I feel Les Rohringer and his
'gang' are more sincere in their
aim to help students than they are
usually given credit for. I am also
sure that if they were purely
profit motivated they would not
be involved with UBC residences!
Student housing is rapidly
becoming a luxury. There is a
belief that if rates continue to
rise, occupancy will fall noticeably thus causing further rate increases. The residence budget is
presently based on 99 per cent
occupancy in single rooms and 97
per cent in double rooms (not 97
per cent and 99 respectively as
reported in Friday's Ubyssey). I
know of very few single rooms that
are vacant in Totem Park. Furthermore, the report that 'low
occupancy in Totem Park is causing a strain on the residence's
budget' is totally unfounded.
Occupancy has fallen by nine per
cent but this is an annual occurrence. Many people do not like
residence atmosphere but live
there for three months before
deciding to move and Christmas is
always the easiest time to do so.
In fact, if someone was to check
their sources they would discover
that less people moved out this
year than at the same time last
year. Increasing the rates is unlikely to have a significant effect on
the occupancy — at the beginning
of the school year there were
some 250-300 people trying to get
into residences, some of whom
slept overnight outside Housing's
offices.
So the fact remains that those
planning on living in residences
next year" face a 9% per cent
increase. The answers to questions
such as 'should Acadia be receiving the same increases as Totem
and Vanier' and 'are all three
subsidizing the mortgage payments incurred by Gage Towers'
can only be revealed by opening
the books. This, I think, can only
be authorized by the board of
governors. I'm sure there are
many complications to this action
which I am unaware of but it
would seem to solve a number of
problems. Meanwhile, those presently living in UBC residences
aren't receiving as raw a deal as
they might think. In comparison
to most Canadian residences they
are at least on par if not better
off. There always remains the
final solution to those who do not
wish to live in these concrete
monoliths whether because of living conditions or because of high
rents — move out; but negative
arguments carry little weight, and
quite rightly so.
I would like mention one further issue which is sure to be
raised in the near future. Many
Canadian residences are partly
subsidized by tax payer's money
- why not UBC? The argument is
that most residents' homes are
outside of Vancouver and the
Lower Mainland and thus they are
at a disadvantage to those students living close to the university. Unfortunately, it has not
been UBC housing's policy to rely
on any form of government subsidization in the past, and now, at
a time when this might help, it is
becoming increasingly difficult for
universities to obtain more government grants. The problem is
that higher education has been
shown to be a form of regressive
taxation which, in effect, means
that the poorer families are paying
for education of the children of
richer families. In these circumstance's, the government is unlikely to increase subsidization of
university education (at present
students pay less than 25 per cent
of their educational costs). As a
university department, housing
can only increase its share of the
cake at the expense of other
departments; and can you imagine
the ensueing controversy?
Finally, I would like to say
that it's pleasing to see an Alma
Mater Society council (elect!) at
last taking an interest in the
'affairs' of the residences. 3,354
people voted in last week's elections; some 4,000 students live in
the university residences (where
separate voting polls are set up). I
should think a sizeable proportion
of the votes can be attributable to
residence students. I do hope,
however, that they keep their
objectives within realistic limits.
Lindsay Gordon
president Totem Park
residence association.
Our source, who lived in residence for two years, claims it is
you who is inaccurate regarding
paternalism in residence. Two
examples come to mind: Dennis
Boyd and housing rep Keith
Davis. After serving one year in a
student council position Boyd become a don and housing rep on
council where he used his position
to influence action taken by the
residence councils. Davis moved
into the housing administration
office. However, residence councils may have changed. „ ,
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IMPORTANT
There will be an AMS election for the following
positions, Tuesday, February 20 and Wednesday,
February 21:
EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
OMBUDSPERSON
VICE-PRESIDENT
TREASURER
Polls will be open as follows:
Wednesday, February 21,
10:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.
Buchanan
Angus
Electrical Engineering
SUB South
SUB North
MacMillan
Main Library
Sedgewick Library
Woodward Library
Gym
Advance polls will be open as follows:
Tuesday, February 20,
11:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.
SUB
Music
Law
Sedgewick
Civil
Buchanan
and from 5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Place Vanier, Totem Park, Gage
Bring your A.M.S. card!
It is not obligatory to sign the voting list in consecutive order.
Remember—You can vote
TUES. or WED, Page 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, February 16,  1973
Letters
Open
This is an open letter to he
staff of The Ubyssey, and to
whoever it may concern, especially to the apathetic majority on
campus (judging by the turn-out
at Wednesday's election).
I was horrified and trembled
with fear when I read the editorial
in The Ubyssey last Friday. To
refresh the memory of my fellow-
students I would like to quote
from part of the editorial:
"A split executive would
degenerate into internal bickering, back-biting and in-fighting.
In fact, it might even get less
done than this year's executive.
To facilitate good politics and.
good administratiop progressive votes will be needed in the
second slate election. In other
words The Ubyssey staff again
urges people to vote for the
DSC."
Fellow students, just imagine,
our self-righteous champion of
anti-discrimination staff of The
Ubyssey openly, discriminately
urges my fellow students to vote
for DSC. I do not wish to question their rights. But my fellow
students, let us analyse their statements a little. It is obvious that
what they are trying very hard to
promote is a "single party government" in the Alma Mater Society.
What their "good politics and
good administration" essentially
means is that they want the DSC
to run the AMS government without any opposition and with total
freedom in whatever actions they
wish to undertake. My fellow
students, just look at the world
around you, especially at the
communistic countries. Then try
to compare and constrast the type
of government the staff of The
Ubyssey has strongly advertised.
At this point I would like to
share with my fellow students a
recent experience I had with the
staff of The Ubyssey. Lately, I
have taken an interest in writing
letters to The Ubyssey's letter
section to express my opinion on
various matters on campus. However, all the letters never seemed
to get printed. This aroused curiosity to find out why this was so.
About two weeks after I submitted my first letter, and found that
it was not printed, I went to The
Ubyssey's office to inquire about
the why's. I was told that they did
not have enough space. Sure
enough, I agreed with that. So I
waited for another week and yet
it was not printed. I went in to
inquire again. This time I was told
that they had not typed up the
letter yet because they were busy.
Sure enough I agreed with them as
I understood the heavy course
load they carry. Another week
passed and it was the same. I went
in   again  and  this  time  it  was
"..   Er " Well, after about
one and a half months it was
finally printed. At that point I
had almost given up hope. It sure
was encouraging when the letter
was printed.
Lately I have submitted
another three letters to the letter
section. All the letters were hand
written, as I did not have a secretary or a typewriter, or to be
more exact, I do not know how to
type. The same old result. All the
letters were not printed. So I went
in a few times to inquire. The
following are what I have unfortunately found out why my letters
were not printed. I sincerely hope
my experience will be beneficial
to all my beloved fellow students:
(1) The editor may think
that what you have written may
have been unimportant.
(2) The editor has the right
to edit (or censor) all letters.
(3) All letters that are not
typewritten will be printed very
much later or may not be printed.
The first two points are within
the rights of the editor, I do
strongly agree. But whether an
issue is important or not is a
matter of opinion. Also when we
have a partial editor, I believe that
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TOPIC: "Canadian Diplomacy - Yesterday and Today"
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.UPPER LOUNGE, INTERNATIONAL HOUSE  12:30-1:30
ALL WELCOME!
many of the letters that are not
appealing to the editor may be
suppressed, i.e. they will not be
printed.The last point really puts a
burden on my mind. It saddened
me to think that the editor cannot
read a handwritten letter. I cannot
imagine that a person who has
gone through 12 years of high
school and maybe a couple years
of university can be illiterate.
My only advice to the editor is
that the policy regarding letter
writing be printed in the next
issue of The Ubyssey, for example, the content, the format etc.,
so that it will save the editor of
lot of time as he or she will have
nothing to edit then.
Lastly, I wish very much that
this letter be printed as soon as
possible now that it is typed.
Thank you.
Bin-Siew Lim
engineering 3
The Ubyssey welcomes letters
from all readers.
Letters should be signed and, if
possible typed. All letters are
typed for the convenience of the
printers.
Pen names will be used when
the writer's real name is also
included for our information in
the letter, or when valid reasons
for anonymity are given.
Although an effort is made to
publish all letters received The
Ubyssey reserves the right to edit
letters for reasons of brevity,
legality, grammar or taste.
m£mSSth
BREWSTER MtLOUD
Geesus
Dear George
It's not that I think I'm a
beauty or anything like that -
but I really felt I must answer
your "poem" in The Ubyssey last
week. I've entitled it
Geesus, George!
In four square walls, do you
reside
Safely cloistered from the ugly
outside?
Replete in the plate of intellectual
perfusion
The ugly about you is just an
illusion!
With   others   around  you  there
must be
Some
In those sterile cells so like the
tomb
Are they also, like you, too
Waiting?
Mindfully, endlessly
Incubating.
Apart from the pulsing, living
masses
Seething   and  swarming  to  and
from classes
Intellectual hierachy in
hibernation
Collectively craving
illumination
Masters  of mental masturbation.
You too, someday, will come!
love and kisses
the ugly monolith (SUB)
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THE       UBYSSEY
Page 7
Candidates9 statements
The candidates of the Socialist slate
are active supporters and members of
the Young Socialists. But because of an
undemocratic clause in the constitution
which prevents political clubs from
running in the elections under their
own name, we cannot run as a Young
Socialist slate. We are running as the
Socialist slate because we feel the most
important question is that students on
this campus have every opportunity to
hear our program and to vote for us if
they agree with this program, but we
are continuing the campaign for the
removal of the undemocratic clause.
We are running to convince students
of our socialist ideas and because we
think an Alma Mater Society should be
organized to lead and work together
with students in mass, democratic
decision-making and action for our
common interests.
We are running:
1) For parity with power — to turn
this university into its opposite — from
an institution run by and serving the
interests of big business into an
organizing centre for social change. We
Gordon Blankstein
(vice-president)
If re-elected, I plan on setting up a
recreation council to coordinate the
activities of undergraduate societies,
special events, residences and
extramural sports so that students
have an opportunity to view as many
diversified events as possible. I will
continue to work on making recreation
UBC free to all students next year as
well as continuing my negotiations with
the university for the purchase of food
services to lower prices and raise the
quality of food being served to
students. Costs of construction on the
new indoor pool are rising from
$100,000 to $200,000 per year or $300 to
$700 per day and I feel that with my
background as chairman of the indoor
pool committee I am qualified and
desire to continue work in this area.
Please support Students' Coalition and
myself and vote Tuesday, Feb. 20 and
Wednesday, Feb. 21 — it's your money
we work with.
John Wilson
(treasurer)
The   Alma   Mater    Society    is    a
dynamic organization which has both
As in the first slate election we, the
Democratic Student Caucus
candidates, have decided to issue a
collective statement.
The members of the DSC wish to
reaffirm our support of such policies as
the democratization of the university
through student representation,
women's rights on campus and in
society, and meaningful services and
events for students.
We are very concerned about the
recently proposed residence rent-
hikes. The administration has not
justified these increases and refuses to
open the books to student
representatives. Our group actively
supports the efforts initiated by Acadia
residents who oppose these increases.
There is a viable alternative —
administration subsidized housing, a
solution already implemented on many
Canadian campuses. If elected we will
begin negotiations to implement this
policy.
We believe that students do have a
role in the running of the university.
This role has been for a large part
ignored by the administration, and we
must organize to have our voices
heard. The ministry of education will
soon announce its commission of post-
secondary education which will revise
the Universities Act. We will establish
a student committee to prepare a brief
for the commission, in order to obtain a
meaningful revision of the act. Another
important aspect of student
representation is having students on
the board of governors.
want to abolish the board of governors
which is made up of the big-business
representatives of MacMillan-Bloedel,
Rayonier, etc. The power of decisionmaking on all matters at all levels of
the university belongs in the hands of
the students, faculty and staff who
work here.
2) For a women's liberation
university — full and immediate
implementation of the UBC status of
women report; 24-hour child care;
preferential hiring and admission
policy for women;  a  department of
women's studies, open to the
community and under the control of the
women who use it; repeal of the
abortion laws and the establishment of
abortion and birth control clinics and
research.
3) For an anti-war university — end
campus war research; withdraw
Canadian troops from Vietnam; U.S.
out of all of S.E. Asia; self-
determination for the Vietnamese.
4) For free tuition and a living wage
for students — education should be a
Socialist slate
Coreen Douglas
(vice-president)
Marilyn Smith
(ombudsperson)
Stuart Russell
(external affairs)
political and administrative
responsibilities. The executive of the
AMS should represent these dual
purposes.
The AMS has assets of $12 million
and an annual cash flow of about $2
million. The purchasing of food
services and the resulting ability to
attract more convention business
during periods when the building is
seldom used by students, such as the
summer and Sundays, would allow the
AMS to generate internally the funds
required to support its many activities
WITHOUT a fee increase. (P.S. There
Bonnie Long
(external affairs)
Student politics at this university
must depend on both the
characteristics of the individual
students involved, and their
interactions with other council
members, UBC students at large, and
faculty, staff and administration.
Election of one slate of officers may
produce a unified council which is
strong in carrying out its programs,
Students9 Coalition
has not been an activity fee increase
since 1949.)
I have had experience in the AMS as
an assistant treasurer and currently as
treasurer of Open House, as well as
experience in other organizations in
addition to my commerce education
and business experience. A firm
financial base is needed to support
AMS politics — I feel I am the
candidate best qualified to meet this
challenge.
Please vote Feb. 20 and 21.
Thank you.
Further, we support the National
Union of Students and will work to
make this an effective body for
students across Canada. We fully
realize the necessity of full student
participation to bring meaningful
changes to the university. Only with
equal decision-making power will
programs such as interdisciplinary
studies, part-time status, and
curriculum requirements reflect the
actual needs and desires of students.
but also eliminates one of the primary
bases of the democratic system, the
necessity of considering alternate
points of view.
In the Alma Mater Society, reason,
co-operation, and work should be the
means by which student goals are
achieved, whether they are student
representation on all faculty
committees, or improvement of
campus food services. When these
means prove to be unproductive, I will
support students in more militant
action.
I believe that Students Coalition and
Democratic Student Caucus candidates
concerned with students' problems and
their participation in various area such
as residences, services and athletics.
Gerald de Montigny (for external
affairs) has been actively involved in
working for student representation and
organizing research on educational
issues with the provincial government.
A major concern of the external affairs
officer is to establish a viable liason
between UBC and the minister of
education, the NUS,  BCASU and to
Democratic Students9 Caucus
Dawn Hasset
(vice-president)
Svend Robinson
(treasurer)
Finally we state emphatically that our
concern for politics does not override
the need for good administration. When
we say full financial support for clubs,
athletics and undergraduate societies,
we mean it! Each of us is concerned
and committed to the office we are
running for, and we also feel that we
have the necessary requirements for
them:
Dawn Hassett (for vice-president)
has extensive experience in business
administration and the technical skills
necessary. As a member of the student
committee for representation she is
Charlene Moriarty
(ombudsperson)
Gerald de Montigny
(external affairs)
establish student participation in order
that students have an effective voice in
those areas that affect the university,
e.g. the provincial government's
rewriting of the Universities Act.
Svend Robinson (for treasurer) as a
member of senate and past student
councils, is actively involved in all
areas of university life. The priority of
the treasurer is to make sure that the
students' money is handled efficiently
and economically. He will work closely
with undergraduate societies, clubs
and athletics to insure adequate
funding of their programs. He will also
right — not a privilege for those who
can afford it. We oppose such measures
as the residence rent hikes which can
only act as roadblocks to students
attending university. If the business
world needs our skills so badly, let it
pay the costs. Tax the corporations for
the cost of education.
5) For a relevant campus press - The
Ubyssey has not reflected many of the
struggles on campus and in society as a
whole. It has remained hostile to the
movements for social change such as
the anti-war and- abortion law repeal
movements, and has frequently
refused to print articles or even letters
from them. We think a student paper
should work together with the AMS to
educate about, advance and lead
student struggles.
While other candidates may be
running a one-shot deal, the Socialist
slate will be campaigning 365 days a
year ... as leading participants in the
movements for social change and a
socialist Canada.
Vote for the real alternative — VOTE
SOCIALIST!
%'*"^; -    -i \
can and should work together to
produce improved services from a
sound political base, and that the
experience of Students Coalition
candidates can only benefit next year's
council.
I hope to further the programs begun
this year under external affairs,
planning to work especially in the
areas of off campus housing, working
with the Vancouver Tenant's
Association, and putting pressure on
government and other sources in order
to maintain tuition and residence fees
as nearly as possible at present levels.
The increasing problems of
inadequate, over-priced housing, and
just making it through the year
financially, in light of present summer
employment shortages, only increase
the difficulty in obtaining any kind of
real education at this university.
It is important for AMS business to
be discussed beyond the council
chambers 'or the Pit, therefore
improved communication between the
council and the student body, as well as
between the university and the real
world outside the gates, should be
priorities of external affairs next year.
I urge you to vote for a balanced,
experienced slate of candidates on Feb.
20 and 21, but more importantly, I urge
you to get out and make sure you
exercise your right to vote.
see that funds are available for new
and expanded AMS programs, such as
speakers and education.
Charlene Moriarty (for
ombudsperson) has the experience of
sitting on the women's grievance
committee, and in the women's action
group. Given this involvement, she is
concerned about and capable of
working with students in their day-today struggles with the administrative
bureaucracy. The ombudsperson will
be available to students in order to
bring their grievances to the attention
of the AMS.
As AMS executive we will provide an
uncomplicated approach to student
government. The Students' Coalition
limited student involvement in the
decisions of the AMS through their
technocratic approach, especially in
the area of services.
The committment of our caucus is
already manifest in the action of those
elected in the first slate election by
active involvement in the rent-increase
issue and support for groups working
both on and off campus.
We believe that a unified executive is
a good thing in order to present a
coherent program to the AMS council.
It is the council that provides a
representative 'check' on the
executive.
We once again ask you to give the
DSC the opportunity to present our
policies and help implement
substantial changes in the lives of all
people at this university.
See page 14: INDEPENDENT Page 8
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, February 16,  1973
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SINCE 1898
OUR 75th YEAR
National Thist
]© oud®od@£7 Kn@ma(u©tf§ Page Friday
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for that smart look in glasses
look to
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Student Discount Given
WE HAVE AN OFFICE NEAR YOU
That's what the Paulists
are ail about.
For more information write:
Father Donald C. Campbell,
Room 103CA.
Paulist Fathers.
647 Markham Street
Toronto 174, Ontario
THE JOY OF LIVING
IS IN THE JOY OF
Giving
Praying
Working
Sharing the joys
the laughter
the problems
the success
and failures
knowing that where
there is human need
in the cities,
the suburbs,
in parishes,
on campus
the Paulist is there
helping
counseling
rejoicing
in the presence
of the good
and in
the signs of hope
around us
Polish Mime Theatre Ballet is coming to the QET for two performances Feb. 25 and Feb. 27. Compair
won awards from France, Sweden and the Soviet Union.
Movies
Mass appeal
I have now gotten down to the bottom of my list of
Christmas movies. The only real similarity between The
Mechanic and The Poseidon Adventure is their unabashed
grovelling for box office appeal. Neither has any artistic
pretentions whatsoever. They are both products of that age-
old contortion — bending over backwards to give the public
what it wants. Both have been playing here for the last eight
weeks, so apparently their efforts were successful.
The   Mechanic,   directed
Charles Bronson.
by   Michael   Winner,   starring
In The Mechanic, Charles Bronson is a hit-man for the
mob. His life consists of lounging around his luxury house
until a package arrives. The package orders him to kill
someone. He then goes out and exercises great care and
artistry in bumping off his unsuspecting victim. After the
murder is spectacularly completed, he rewards himself
with a visit to a classy prostitute; then the cycle begins
again.
The film develops a tiny bit of interest when Bronson
takes on an apprentice who turns out to be more than he can
handle. But the thing that I hated about the film was not its
dullness, but its complete moral paucity.
How can anyone get any satisfaction out of watching a
film like this? Bronson and his apprentice are the worst
kind of human scum: men without any moral standards.
And the men they kill are clearly no better. The whole film
is an unrelieved picture of a level of existence that is
despair incarnate.
This material could have been used to make some kind
of statement. But the point of The Mechanic seems to be
that because these pathetic creatures are tough and drive
fancy cars, We peasants should think their lives are groovy
and exciting.
Maybe the movies are destroying our morals?
The Poseidon Adventure, directed by Ronald Neame,
screenplay by Stirling Siliphant and Wendell Mayes, based
on the novel by Paul Gallico, starring everybody.
The Poseidon Adventure is more standard fare. A
luxury liner turns upside down in the middle of the
Mediterranean. A gallant group of hardy souls who are
trapped in the overturned liner decide to save themselves
rather than wait for help. Led by a dynamic radical
minister (Gene Hackman), they make their way to the
bottom (now the top) of the ship.
The effect a story like this will have on film depends
entirely on the way it is played. It can be a tight survival
drama, or it can be a melodramatic potboiler.
Obviously the makers of the film decided that the
second possiblity would sell better. They have coldly
constructed the characters and the events of the film to
have a maximum mass appeal.
The group of survivors includes a bright-eyed all-
American boy, an aging Jewish couple on their first trip to
Israel, a policeman (Ernest Borgnine), his ex-prostitute
wife (Stella Stevens) and a lonely, eccentric little middle-
aged bachelor (Red Buttons) — among others. Every
member of the audience can find someone to identify with,
and if the adventure slows down, the many human dramas
within the group should keep your interest high.
The film comes complete with touching scenes between
the two old folks (will they make it?), fiery confrontations
between Hackman and Borgnine, pathetic whimpering
from Carol Lynly, earthy commentary from the ex-
prostitute, and breath-taking drama as the water always
rushes up behind them.
You men will just love the tense adventure and the bare
thighs of the girls (who were either conveniently wearing
hot-pants, or were stripped of their long evening gowns).
You women will thrill at he
you'll wonder if the bachelo
The film makes two ver
if you are ever in a major d
flood, shipwreck, etc.), sti
listed as "starring" in the <
hardships, but they have ;
towards the end (and they i
yours). The second point is
sensible shoes.
Oldl
Nostalgia is dangerous,
and deludes us. It is a deli
deception. Nostalgia is thi
Pinter's Old Times, and De
the characters enmeshed
illusion.	
Old
By Ha}
Directed
at the '.
Old Times is staged in
first act and a bedroom in t
to the set. Furniture is spt
upraised wooden platform,
room. Beyond . . . nothingi
and the characters, str<
isolation; that what we
detached from any concrel
light accentuates the surre;
imbues in his dialogue.
Time is a prominent fi
Gerussi) and Kate (Anni Le
(Patricia Gage), Kate's roc
Pinter pays little respect
during this "autumn eveni
and eras. The upcomin
conversation in the beginni
Anna refers back to it. We n
Conversations abrupth
to one another with long pa
is synonomous to the bla
conversation we are heari:
from our time-machine sea
than the pace on stage.
The play subtly shifts b
recreating scenes between
giddy, young working girls
juxtapositions are smoothl
masterful direction.
The pauses perform a du;
device on stage, and Kerr r
a non-action play, It is a p
pregnant pauses are cnani
and expression. Long ani
sprawling body postures,
communicate a myriad of
The    frequent    gaps
unsettling  silences  of  su
skewed   dialogue   betweer
communication, instead w
missing each other, then
Monologues burst forward
characters are dangling, lo:
Taylor and Gage handle tl
The unspoken  tensions
executed. Anna and Deely
which builds into a frenziec
ignored by Anna, who cor
grimaces and averted eye:
"There are things 1
happened," Anna says. "As
How much of the characti
Page Friday, 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, February 16, 1973 ternationally known, and has
iry the whole thing is, and
finally found his true love,
ent points: The first is that
;r of any kind (earthquake,
ase to the people who are
;s. They go through a lot of
d chance of being around
ust sacrifice their lives for
romen should always wear
—David MacKinlay
12
mes
chimera of the past eludes
web entrapping us in self-
i thread weaving through
lis wife Kate and Anna are
i world of half-truth and
»s
'inter
>m Kerr
wuse
ooms; a living-room in the
cond. There is no backdrop
/ arranged upon a slightly
:h marks the contour of the
Blackness shrouds the set
ig infinitely. It conveys
watching is "floating",
ysical plane. The dim half
c atmosphere which Pinter
in the play. Deely (Bruno
ylor) are the hosts for Anna
ate from twenty years ago.
:onventional time passage
We catapault over events
inner   is   the   subject   of
f the play. Somewhat later,
see it.
rt and finish, unconnected
in between. This technique
t: these are snatches of
>its and pieces we pick up
ich is set just slightly faster
to twenty years ago as well,
and Anna, when they were
.,ondon. Pinter's tricks and
egrated under Tom Kerr's
rpose. Silence is a powerful
pulates it well. Old Times is
of words and emotion. The
I with nuances of behavior
dw exhalations of smoke,
lk and frozen expressions
:r thoughts and feelings,
ween conversations are
se and anticipation. The
laracters is never direct
run off at slight angles,
shing into the black void,
ly to die unnoticed. These
ennui and fantasy. Gerussi,
tuation superbly.
I anxieties are brilliantly
/e a battle of song singing
ak. Deely's crude jokes are
s her disgust with fleeting
member that never had
link of them, they happen."
old times are actually old
Bunraku, Japan's classic puppet theatre, called "one of the
unique art forms of the world," is also coming to the QET
for performances on March 1 and 2. They will feature
performances by Monzaemon Chikamatsu.
times? To find the answer to this question, we must sift
through the layers of falsehood and fantasy in the play.
Deely contradicts himself several times. He has been to
Sicily, and he-hasn't. He never met Anna before, and yet he
has. And if he did meet her before, she was in a tavern or at
a party where he was looking up her skirt.
What was Anna saying about old times? We, the
audience, are shown what she means as truth, reality,
fantasy and falsehood merge as one and are
indistinguishable. Truth is fashioned out of fantasy and
reality encompasses the full spectrum of time. Pinter's old
times are all times, and are no less an illusion. The meaning
of my plays, the playwright once said, is anything you
decide upon. I will not attempt to unravel Pinter's
mysteries. I saw an eloquent presentation on the illusion of
life and the unreality of truth and fiction.
—Stephen Morris
Visions
Sub-stance
She squats on the plain like an Arab taking a pee. As low
as a snake's belly. As wide as the Fraser River at Spuzzum.
As boring as all of UBC put together.
She squats. She waits. Like a desert for rain. Like skiers
for snow. Like Ada for Ardour. Unloved and unlovely; old
Sub. Shed a tear for me and thee.
Poor old Sub. Rejected. Dejected. Banned and bombed.
What sorrows are thine, thy sorrows are mine.
Dat ol' student union
Wo wo wo
She gimme de blues
Inside, bankers banking, bowlers bowling and barbers
barbering. Students everywhere, chatting, sleeping,
walking and eating. In the cafeteria the sweet sultry Sues
woo the lusty, musty jocks. Flutter, laughter, pitter, patter.
Little hearts, nay prithee pox. Dapperwit has got an
erection. His jockey shorts are straining to conceal it. But
bloody hell, Arabella's seen it.
We leave the students to each other and try to find the
common factor. What binds us to this sinking ship, what
manner of chains, what manner of whip? We are, we are,
we are the UBC student. We demand a place to carry on the
movement.
And so Sub was born. But coming down like the wolf on
the fold, the creditor demanded his pound of flesh.
Somebody had to pay for all those obscure corridors and
mystic staircases. And you, dear reader, while you drink-
bottled beer in the Pit, remember that in this vale of tears
and impermanence, nothing lasts so long as monuments
and financial commitments. Long past the time when you
and I have ceased to walk hand in hand this dusty earth,
she'll still squat in the plain. Waiting for rain.
Our leaders, in their wisdom, have taken away the
newspapers and magazines. One wanders through Sub,
dreamlike, imagining departure notices, the campus cop as
custom man, airplanes landing on the acres of concrete. Or
rows of lurid groceries and the vulgarity that is CYVR
tuned to a mellow pitch, checkout number three ringing up
its karmic toll.
The association with the university often seems, alas,
merely physical.
Oh Sweet Sub, your infinite charms do gladden me in
the days of my youth. Sweet, sweet Sub, I want to rest, my
head grows weary. 0 rock me in the cradle of your bosom.
Walking through your pinball maze of jostling students
and cooking smells, I treated myself to a milkshake
yesterday. Yo soy un hombre sincero.
No captains walk along your roof and the sundeck fills
with rain. I had a vision of the New Jerusalem but I was on
my way to a canoe club meeting and I forgot it.
I read much of the night and go to Sub in winter.
—Ed Cepka
BETTER BUY BOOKS
pays CASH FOR BOOKS
TEXTBOOKS, QUALITY PAPERBACKS, ETC.
LARGEST SELECTION OF REVIEW NOTES IN B.C.
MONARCH - COLES - SCHAUMS - & OTHERS
We Trade Used Pocketbooks and Magazines
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Friday, February 16, 1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 3 - *.;*& mwjwuinB^imwmiMft.^
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Page Four
THE       UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 4 Friday, February 16, 1973
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 13
Hot flashes
Casgrain
speaks
Quebec women's rights pioneer
Senator Therese Casgrain will
speak 8 p.m. Monday in a free
lecture sponsored by the UBC
centre  for continuing education.
Casgrain will talk about "A
Woman in a Man's World" in the
Vancouver public library auditorium, Robson and Burrard. She is
author of a book by the same
title.
She will speak on campus Tuesday noon in the SUB auditorium.
editor of the environmental magazine Survival, will speak Tuesday,
7:30 p.m. about nuclear power
and social decisions.
The free discussion, sponsored
by the B.C. environmental council, will be held at the H. R.
MacMillan Planetarium.
Sunshine
The Kitsilano sunshine neighborhood house is holding weekly
adult drop-ins with food, music
and games beginning Wednesday.
The drop-ins start at 6:30 p.m.
at the house. Seventh and Vine.
cast live interviews Monday from
10:30 a.m. to 12 noon with Alma
Mater Society vice-presidential
candidates.
Announcer Chuck Barton will
conduct the interviews.
Nuclear power   Stavenfiagen
UBC  nuclear physicist George
Griffiths   and   Gordon   Edwards,
Tween
classes
TODAY
UBC SKYDIVERS
General meeting noon SUB 213.
YOUNG SOCIALISTS
Vanguard forum with discussion
about UBC Status of Women report
8 p.m. 1208 Granville.
SATURDAY
cue
Car rally, Oakridge gas station 7:30
p.m.
voc
Evening at Whistler Mountain cabin.
MONDAY
NVC
Midterm ski trip meeting, noon SUB
111.
EL CIRCULO
Film on Brazil, noon Buch. 202.
REHABILITATION MEDICINE
Lecture and slides on China, 7 p.m.
IRC lecture theatre 2.
TUESDAY
GERMAN CLUB
Preparation  for" Open House, noon
IH 404.
WEDNESDAY
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
ORGANIZATION
Testimony meeting, noon SUB 224.
Study in
Guadalajara, Mexico
Fully accredited, 20-year UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA Guadalajara
Summer School offers July 2-August
II, anthropology, art, education,
folklore, geography, history, government, language and literature.
Tuition $165; board and room $211.
Write: International Programs, University of Arizona, Tucson 85721.
2002 W. 4th Ave.
(at Maple)
TEL. 732-7721
Mexican sociologist Rudolfo
Stavenhagen will speak at noon
today about the revolutionary
potential in Latin America.
The free lecture will be held in
Angus 110.
VP broadcast	
UBC  radio CYVR will broad-
China talk
The Canada-China friendship
association is sponsoring a talk at
8 p.m. tonight by Jim Endicott,
Canadian missionary in China and
former chairman of the Canadian
peace congress.
Endicott, once Mme. Chiang
Kai-shek's personal advisor, will
speak at John Oliver secondary
auditorium, 41st and Fraser.
Crete's end
Sinclair Hood, former director
of the British School of Archaeology in Athens, will speak 8 p.m.
tonight, about the destruction of
Crete.
The free lecture, sponsored by
the Archaeological Institute of
America, will be held in Lasserre
104.
The Creative Writing Department and New Arts I
Invite You to
A Poetry Reading by
William Empson
MONDAY, FEB. 19—8 p.m.
The Blue Room - New Arts I Bldg.
Faculty of Environmental Studies
York University
The Faculty of Environmental Studies at York University
offers a broad range of opportunities for graduate study of
man and his environments leading to the degree.
Master of Environmental Studies
Students pursue individual programs of study tailored to
meet particular needs and interests. Applicants must show
unusual interest and potential in the desired field of study.
Interested individuals
Professor David Morley of the Faculty will be in Vancouver
Feb. 15-16. Interested individuals are invited to contact him
at the Bayshore Inn.
If unable to meet with Professor Morley in Vancouver please
contact:
Gerald A.P. Carrothers, Dean
Faculty of Environmental Studies
York University
4700 Keele St.
Downsview, Ontario   M3J   1P3
CLASSIFIED
Rates:
Campus — 3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional lines, 25c;
Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines
35c; additional days $1.25 & 30c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 24] S.U.B.. UBC. \a». S.HC.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
Lost & Found
13
LOST: LADIES' GOLD BULOVA
watch; black leather strap.
Reward. Phone 224-9098 or 224-9715.
Linda.
FOUND: 5 TICKETS TO AGRICUL-
ture U.S. Spring Banquet on March
9th. Phone 278-5795.
FOUND: PAIR BLUE CONTACT
lenses in blue case. Left by hitchhiker in Datsun truck. Ph. 224-1688.
Rides & Car Pools
14
Special Notices
15
BOOK AND THESIS MANUSCRIPTS
edited by retired publisher for
grammar, syntax, punctuation, redundancy,   clarity.   263-6565.
DISCOUNT STEREO, EXAMPLE:
AM-PM stereo receiver, turntable,
base cover, cartridge, two speakers,
2-year guarantee, list $200, your
cost $125.00. Carry AKAI, A.G.S.,
Zenith color TVs at savings. Call
732-6769.
RENT WHISTLER CONDOMINIUM
near gondola. Day/Wk. Ph. 732-
0174 eves, or before 8 A.M.
FREE LUNCHEON AT FACULTY
Club to discuss campus-community
relations. Students or staff, having
a friend or relation interested in
visiting UBC for this meeting,
please call Gretchen Harper at
228-2721 today or Monday for invitation.
Special Events
15A
$75 FOR 75£
40 Bonus Coupons In This
Year's Bird Calls
AVAILABLE   NOW
BUY   YOURS  TODAY!
Bookstore and SUB
Travel  Opportunities
16
HIKING & CLIMBING TOURS TO
Nepal and East Africa. Also climbs
in the Alps and throughout Europe.
Ring 922-6394 any evening or weekend.
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
1972 PEUGEOT 304. PERFECT
condition. Still on warranty. Front
wheel, delight to drive. 9,000 miles.
$2,495.   684-0749.
1960 AUSTIN A-40, GOOD CONDI-
tion, needs brake work. Offers!
Allaia Major skis 205-cm. 224-9407,
4-7 p.m.
Motorcycles
25
Babysitting 8e Day Care       32
BABYSITTER WANTED FOR TWO
children (2 & 4 years) on campus;
afternoons, Mon.-Fri. if possible.
224-0878.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Photography
35
ittpt Hensi ano gutter
X     Cameras;
USED
CAMERAS
Nikon FTn. Body & Head.- 219.00
Nikon FTn. Black with 50mm
F1.4 Lens  369.95
Minolta SRT.  101
F1.7 with case    189.95
Miranda Sensorex  50mm
F1.8           155.00
Mamiya Sekor 528TD 48mm
F2.8 with flash    79.95
3010 W.  Broadway
Note our New Phone No.
736-8375
Typing
40
ESSAYS AND THESES TYPED —
Experienced typist. Mrs. Freeman,
731-8096.	
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING.
My home. Essays, thesis, etc. Neat
accurate work. Reasonable rates.
263-5317.	
TEDIOUS TASKS — PROFESSION-
al typing service. IBM Selectric —
Open days, evenings, weekends.
Call Shari at 738-8745.	
EXPERT IBM SELECTRIC TYPIST.
Experienced Thesis Typist. Specialize in Formula and Math. Reason-
able Rates. Mrs. Ellis, 321-3838.
FAST ACCURATE TYPING OF ES-
says and thesis. Reasonable terms.
Call Mrs. Akau, days 688-5235
weekends and  evenings  263-4023.
Typing—Cont.
40
YR. ROUND ACC. TYPING FROM
legible drafts. Phone 738-6829 from
ten a.m. to nine p.m. Quick service
on short essays.
TYPING OF ESSAYS, ETC., DONE
efficiently. 35c per page. Phone
224-0385 afjer 5:30 p.m.
EMPLOYMENT
51
Help Wanted
ESTABLISHED DIAMOND IMPOR-
ting firm requires 12 senior student
sales representatives for the UBC
Campus. Clean, Neat Dresser.
Good Sales Ability. 3rd or 4th Year
students with pleasant personality
and some sales experience. Fluent
in English. Excellent commission
structure. Include in your application a recent photograph of yourself. Mr. Mel Battensby, General
Delivery, Vancouver Postal Station
A, Hastings & Granville, Vancouver,  B.C.
WOMEN: PLEASE HELP CS SHOW
some Western hospitality to 150 engineering student delegates from
across Canada. We require 10 hostesses (preferably bilingual) for the
conference which will be held in the
Hotel Georgia from March 1 to 4.
Applicants should expect to spend
4 full days at the hotel—expenses
paid. Please apply to conference
co-ordinator at 228-3818 or Engineering Undergraduate Society office before Feb.   20.  1973.
LABORATORY INSTRUMENT RE-
presentative wanted. To call full
time on University, Government &
Hospital Labs and fill customer's
lab needs using recognized, quality
lines of equipment & instruments.
Knowledge of lab procedures &
instruments in the medical, chemical or biological areas is essential.
Some technical competency with
electronic equipment would be useful. Our company is, at present a
small marketing organization
handling exclusive lines from large
U.S. & European manufacturers.
However, we have some unique
capabilities and strength upon
which w© are basing our future
growth and development in Canada.
This opportunity would appeal to a
young graduate or seasoned Lab
Technician who wants a chance to
participate in a growing business
at an early stage of its development. Location Vancouver. Please
reply with complete resume to 85
Ridgehill Dr., Brampton, Ont. All
replies will be treated strictly
confidential.
Speakeasy SUB Anytime!
228-6792 - 12:30-2:30
TUTORIAL
CENTRE
For Students and Tutors
Register Now! 12:30-2:30
INSTRUCTION & SCHOOLS
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
FRTOTDAIRE ELECTRIC RANGE—
Double oven, best model, dusky
pink, 40" wide, A-1 clean. Wortli
$100—take it away for $20 (or may-
be $i:>).  261-1420.	
LADIES' KASTINGER SKI BOOTS,
size 8. Phone 224-9856. ask for Joy.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
Room & Board
82
ROOM & BOARD, $75. W. 63rd AVE.,
Vancouver. Phone 266-7420.
Communal Housing
85
2 ROOMS IN 3 BEDRM. DUPLEX
from March 1st. $70 month. Paul,
3994 W. 10th Ave. 224-7076.
Houses—Furn. & Unfurn.
86
S.F.U. STUDENT AND FAMILY
need furnished house or apartment
for July and August. Ma-ximum,
$350.   536-7429.
QCOOOCCOSOOSOSOQOSiOOGOC
Use Your
Ubyssey
Classified Page   14
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, February 16,  1973
Abortion forum hits gov't
By CAMILLE MITCHELL
The government of Canada is
guilty of denying women
control over their reproductive
systems, an abortion tribunal
decided Thursday.
Said the tribunal in its
indictment: "The presiding
committee of the women's,
tribunal on abortion,
contraception and sterilization
finds the government of
Canada, the provincial
government, the courts of the
land and the medical practice
guilty of denying women the
right to chose whether or not
they will bear children and we
state that these bodies will
remain guilty of the charges
until they remove all the
restrictions which deny women
control over their reproductive
systems."
The tribunal's decision was
met with loud applause.
"This tribunal is not
impartial," said Isolde Belfont
who compared it to a similar
forum philosopher Bertrand
Russell headed investigating
American war crimes in
Indochina.
"He did not invite Richard
Nixon, nor Lyndon Johnson.
Neither have we invited the
guilty to attend," said Belfont.
Testimony was given by 25
persons who had suffered
under current restrictive
abortion laws.
Many said they had been
sterilized during abortion:
"The doctor said I was
irresponsible and that he would
not give me an abortion unless
I underwent sterilization as
well."
"I was very confused and
afraid at the time so I
consented," said one woman.
Another woman told of a
doctor's refusals to sterilize
her:
"My common-law husband
went to the same doctor and
was given a vasectomy with no
questions asked," she said.
Law student Diana
Davidson-Moore cited the
Criminal Code as "particularly
horrifying."
"Women are a form of
property. Abortion and
contraception laws were
devised in the 1800's when the
state and the church were
short of manpower," said
Davidson-Moore.
"Today an abortionist can
get a life sentence if indicted
and the woman who has gotten
an abortion can get up to two
years in jail," she said.
The panel recommended a
repeal of all sections of the
criminal code dealing with
abortion,   women   be   given
wider access to birth control
information and devices and
sex education be taught at an
early age.
From page 7
Independent
Amarjeet Rattan (ombudsperson)
The job of ombudsperson is to hear students' problems and
take immediate action to solve them. He is responsible for
investigating and alleviating any complaints the students have
against the Alma Mater Society. It is important to note that the
office of the ombudsperson is the only direct channel for hearing
students' grievances.
To do this job effectively, it is essential that the
ombudsperson be completely independent of any political group
within the university. An ombudsperson who is directly
affiliated with a political group will merely become a
mouthpiece — his first priority will be to serve the interests of
that group and the interests of the students will rate a mere
second.
As an independent candidate, I feel that I will be in a strong
position to represent the students' interests with the university
bureaucracy.
There has been a lack of communication between the
ombudsperson and students. Consequently, the duties of the
office have not been performed. In the coming term, I plan to
keep students informed by the use of a bi-monthly letter or
regular articles in The Ubyssey.
As a volunteer worker with Speakeasy over the past year, I
have been in a position to hear the views of fellow students and
have gained much experience in handling individual students'
problems.
I am certain that as your ombudsperson I will be able to
perform a duty that has been neglected and represent your
interests best.
Cdimerican
ollege of
Switzerland
Write:
Registrar
1854Leysin 12
Switzerland
A Co-ed Alpine Campus above Lake Geneva. Boarding.
Majors in General Studies, Modern Languages, Political and Social Sciences,
International Business Administration, Mathematics-Science, leading to
A.A., B.A. and B.Sc. Degrees. International student body, 2/3 from U.S.
1/3 from 30 different countries. Qualified faculty with extensive foreign
and U.S. teaching experience. Curriculum related field trips and tours.
Alpine and winter sports. Approved for VA benefits. High academic rating
with excellent transfer record.
The Anglican-United Campus Ministry
is presently evaluating its role at UBC.
Part of the reason comes from the questions of future
financing and future styles or direction. Because we believe
that all evaluations should be open we invite any member
of the campus community to submit their views about
AUCM.
Mr. Colin Proudman of Toronto will be at the
LUTHERAN CAMPUS CENTRE
all day Monday, February 19 to receive your views.
You are invited to come!
EVERYONE INVITED
frustrated fanatics, anxious activists, rampant revolutionaries,
even apologetic apathizers
Hear The Candidates For
VICE-PRESIDENT
TREASURER
EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
OMBUDSPERSON
debate and discourse in didactic drivel!
SUB BALLROOM
Friday, February 16, 12:30 p.m
THE VILLAGE RESTAURANT
Featuring the finest in
CHINESE AND CANADIAN CUISINE
Luncheons and Dinners
DINING ROOM
FULLY AIR CONDITIONED FOR YOUR COMFORT!
Mon.-Fri. 10 a.m.-9 p.m.
Sunday 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Closed Sat. & Holidays
TAKE-OUT SERVICE
5778 University Blvd.
224-0640
(54 block from Gymnasium)
SPECIAL FRIDAY
MIDNIGHT SHOW
WILL LEAVE
AUDIENCES
IN WIDE-EYED
AMAZEMENT!"
Donald Pleasence Carol Kane
and Doris Petrie
(Best Supporting Actress)
Varsitu
224-3730 •»
4375 W. 10th
1
SHOW TIMES
12:35, 2:40,
4:50. 6:55,
9:05
Vogue
vis (aKANVILLE
685-S434
If you steal $300,000
from the mob, it's not robbery.
It's suicide.
MATURE:
Very violent,
much swearing and
coarse language. i
R. W. McDonald, B.C. Dir
ACROSS)     _
ANTHONY QUINN
NOMINATED FOR 4 ACADEMY AWARDS-INCLUDING
BEST PICTURE, BEST ACTRESS, BEST ACTOR
GENERAL
Odeon
SB1 GRANVILLE
082-7468
w-
SOUNDER
W
• color
SHOW TIMES: 12:00, 1:45, 3:45, 5:45, 7:45, 9:45
Coronet
**i
851   GRANVILLE
685-6(28
MATURE:
Violence and
coarse language
R. W. McDonald, B.C. Dir.
'dirty    Mm
LI1TLE BILLY" fSP
MICHAEL J. POLLARD
SHOW TIMES:
12:15, 2:10, 4:05,
6:00, 8:00, 10:00
One complete show 8 p.m.  "ETER O TOOLE
Added Short:
BRAVE NEW NORTH
(White Pass &
Yukon Railway)
Dunbar
224-7252
DUNBAR >t 30th
Nominated for
Academy Award as
Best Actor.    "MLJiS
RULING CLASS
ADULT INTHTAINMINT Friday, February 16, 1973
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 15
Grad fees go to gifts
Grad fees are not being spent on
administration ceremonies, grad class council
•president Doug Wodroff said Thursday.
Wodroff told The Ubyssey that in the past,
graduates believed they were paying for the
baccalaureate and congregation ceremonies
with their $7 fee.
"Actually, aside from a few administrative
costs, the bulk of the money goes to the gifts
fund," said Wodroff.
"The grad council's job regarding the fund
is to allot the money to a deserving service
organization."
The selection will be by ballot at a March 8
general meeting of the grad class. Applications
for gifts should be sent to the grad council as
soon as possible.
The money, which this year may amount to
over $20,000, usually shared by two or three
applicants, in decreasing amounts.
"For example, if one organization applies
for $10,000 and receives the most votes, it will
get that amount," said Wodroff. "The next two
applicants will probably have to split the
remainder."
Wodroff said the grad council also acts as a
liaison between the administration's
ceremonies committee and the graduates and
to conduct the grad ball.
"We've sent out about 4,000 questionnaires
asking the grads for opinions and ideas on the
ball," he said.
"We also plan to have a special religious
service and tree-planting ceremony this year,"
he said.
The other members of the grad council are
public relations officer George Scott, treasurer
Paul Cooper, social convenor and gifts coordinator Ro-anne Johnstone and secretary Ed
Hughes.
Wodroff said the council is planning a
"greater scope of activities for grads,"
including guest speakers and special events.
JOEY GREGRASH
WILL
BE BACK
NEXT WEEK
IMflGE
661 Hornby St.     687-1547
1
Role frustrates women: poll
(CPS-CUP) — A recent
survey conducted by Redbook
magazine reveals nine out of 10
women believe women are
treated as second-class
citizens.
According to the survey of
120,000 women begun last April
married women who are
content with their roles as
wives and mothers support the
goals of female equality almost
as strongly as unmarried
women, career-oriented
women, or women dissatisfied
with their lives.
Seventy-four per cent of the
respondents said they do not
think full-time motherhood can
satisfy most women. However,
most of the married women
surveyed were currently
undertaking housework and
child care, and 76 per cent said
they were relatively satisfied
with this work.
According to the survey,
three women in four think the
media degrades women by
portraying them as sex objects
or mindless dolls.
Although most respondents
acknowledged discrimination
against women exists, they had
different ideas about
conquering it. Almost half said
a women who wished to
overcome discrimination must
do it herself, "working
individually   to   prove   (her)
at
4560-W 10th.
919 Robson St.
1032 W Hastings
670 Seymour
duthie
BOOKS
abilities and educate men".
The women's liberation
movement will not affect their
lives   directly,   most   women
said; however, they thought
their daughters will have
greater opportunities because
of it.
fc
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& SPAGHETTI HOUSE LTD.
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OPEN
Mon. - Thurs.
4 p.m. - 3 a.m.
Fri.-Sat.
4 p.m. - 3 a.m.
Sun.
4 p.m. - 1 a.m.
TAKE OUT ORDERS
HOME DELIVERY 738-9520     738-1113
mi-Lasagna-Ravioli-Rigatoni
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DINING
LOUNGE
FULL
FACILITIES
3618 W. Broadway(
(at Dunbar)
Montreal Trust
Retirement Savings
Plan.
Not only do you
beat taxes,
your investment can
be guaranteed.
That's right. If you like, Montreal Trust will guarantee
your in vestment plus a good rate of interest. (Just ask about
our current rate.) We do this with the GUARANTEED OPTION of
our Retirement Savings Plan. It's the one sure way we make sure
your retirement savings don't fluctuate with the stock market.
If you want a high rate of long-term interest and good security
of capital, there's the Income Option. The Equity Option is designed
for long term capital gains. And it's a good hedge against inflation.
We're flexible:
Whatever section you decide to place your investment
with — we'll send you — every 60 days — a statement showing how
much you have invested to date,plus, the current value of your plan.
There's no termination fee either. In fact, you can transfer
your investment to one or a combination of options with our Retirement
Savings Plan. You set your own objectives.
We don't charge sales commission. Administration fees and
commissions on some plans just don't give you the investment performance
others do — right away. Montreal Trust alone invests and administers your
funds. All we charge is % of 1% of the value of your plan annually.
And it's deducted from the income of your investment.
A guaranteed way to beat taxes:
We can show you how to lower your tax bracket now. The
money you save will build a retirement income the day you invest with us.
Sure all Retirement Savings Plans are tax deductible. But, at Montreal
Trust, we invest every dollar you invest in our R.S.P. Every
cent goes toward building your retirement income — right away.
That's one nice way to guarantee a tomorrow.
Interested? Call or write today.
The advantages of utilizing the maximum
tax-deductible contributions to an RSP.
Earned
Maximum
Tax
Income
Tax-Deductible
Contribution
Savings**
$    10,000
$    2,000
$        572
12,500
2,500
783
15,000
3,000
1,042
17,500
3,500
1,355
20,000
4,000
1,706
30,000
4,000
1,910
40,000
4,000
1,989
50,000
4,000
2,193
The figures apply to a married man, with 2 dependents
under  16 years of
age, who  is  not a
member of a
company pension plan.
Maximum   contribu
ion   for   members
of   company
pension plans is the
lesser of $2,500 or
20% of earned
income, less company plan deductions.
**These figures do not include calculations for:
Canada Pension PI
an Contribution, G
sneral Expense
Allowance   Deduction   and   Unemployment   Insur
ance Premiums.
■
r
UBC-1
Mail to: RSP Booklet, Montreal Trust,
I                  466 Howe Street,
.                    Vancouver,
B.C.
'   Yes.   I'm   interestec
:   Please send me
your booklet: '
1   Retirement Savings
Plans.
_J
§
Montreal Trust
We invest every dollar you invest with us.
In Vancouver call . . .
Cece Lill, Oakridge Shopping Centre Branch,  263-3211 and Ron Borgstrom, 789 West Pender St. Branch, 688-4411 Page   16
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, February 16,  1973
NEW
in Vancouver—the
INTERAUDIO
LOUDSPEAKER
Designed and built by the makers of the famous
BOSE 901 using the SYNCOM computer!
* Computer selected drivers * Precise computer matching of woofers
and tweeters to within +'/2dB. * Computer matching of crossover
networks to drivers * Long-excursion woofers with extra long voice
coils * Computer style wire-wrap of all electrical connections * Double
production testing of all components and connections * Five-year
warranty on both parts and labor.
Words cannot describe adequately the quality of sound reproduction of
these speakers. You must hear for yourself the INTERAUDIO
SPEAKERS in our
FEATURED PACKAGE SYSTEM which includes:
* 2 INTERAUDIO LOUDSPEAKERS
* PROCOM PR 1600. 180 watt AM/FM Stereo receiver.
(This receiver carries our 5 year protection plan.)
* GARRARD 72B. Automatic Changer
complete with base, top and SHURE
magnetic cartridge.
$698
See if you do not agree that this is an excellent
value     INTRODUCTORY SPECIAL
Creatm Saudi?
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1305 Burrard 685-0345
555 W. Broadway 876-4414
(Free parking at rear)
FINE
QUALITY
DIAMONDS
250.00 to 400.00
43.00
The sparkle of diamonds add their
own particular beauty to the
exciting textures of sculptured
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LIMITED
Registered Jeweller, American Gem Society
GRANVILLE AT PENDER SINCE 1904
V
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Warning:
By KEN DODD
UPS stands for Inter-institutional Policy Simulator. What,
you may justifiably ask, is that?
Well, UPS is a computer model that has been under
construction at UBC for the past three years, with the intent of
simulating human behaviour and patterns in the urban
environment of greater Vancouver.
In these three years the main effort regarding the project
has gone into building the model. This has involved analyzing
urban characteristics to form the overall perspective.
As well, a tremendous amount of data has understandably
been required and collected. The next two years of the project
are to be spent testing and refining the model. It is expected to
be ready for use by 1975.
The total cost of the project will total close to $2 million. At
the project's beginning in April: 1970 grants totalled $709,300
from contributors and joint administrators: the Ford
Foundation ($371,800); the city of Vancouver ($167,000); UBC
($120,000); and the Greater Vancouver Regional District
($49,000).
The balance of the funds have been provided through
increased grants from some of the original sources, though
most of the extra funding has been provided by the entrance of
the federal and provincial governments in the scheme —
especially the federal government.
The project-was launched by professors Crawford Holling,
director of UBC's Institute of Animal Resource Ecology, and
commerce professor Michael Goldberg, who have both since
resigned. In the beginning they and their team of graduate
students and city planning department officials had very high
hopes and some of the reaction to the project was enthusiastic to
say the least.
UBC PReports of October, 1970 described the goals of the
project as:
"To build a computer model, a mastermind of the entire
Vancouver region. Its purpose will be to allow city and regional
planners to systematically test the most likely social, economic,
environmental and physical effect of policy ideas on the
Vancouver region.
"It will explore future consequences of changes in
population, transportation, land use, industry, recreation and
other factors on the region as a whole."
And the report stressed "the model won't formulate policy.
It will give the likely effect of policies submitted to it."
The laudatory article goes on to call the scheme "one of the
most critical projects undertaken so far for the survival of our
society."
Vancouver mayor Art Phillips, then an alderman, was the
strongest advocate of the scheme on council. He described
Vancouver as an ideal kind of city for such a project. It would,
he declared, aid city planners in helping Vancouver eliminate
the massive mistakes of other cities.
The organizers and supporters stressed the role it would play
in helping city planners, politicians, citizens' groups and anyone
else who wanted to use it help determine future urban trends
and policy. An UPS brochure lists the model as "essentially a
tool made for people."
The project organizers proudly stated that one and all could
contribute data to the building of the model and the public would
be allowed to use it upon its completion. The universal
accessability of the model was clearly underlined as the most
beneficial and essential feature of the model.
The model arose from attempts of the Rand Corporation-
moon simulation models of the early 60s. These early simulation
models went two directions, into making war models for
Vietnam on the one hand and urban models on the other.
Goldberg helped construct one of these early models in San
Francisco.
However UBC's model is said to be different in that its design
has been aided by land use planners and others beyond the
narrow discipline of mathematicians and computer
programmers.
But some people don't think the range of contributors has
been anywhere near wide enough, and have other serious
reservations about how the project will really be used, despite
the project's high intentions.
One of the most outspoken critics of UPS has been
Vancouver alderman Harry Rankin, who felt and still strongly
feels that the middle class biases of academics would make
such information totally irrelevent.
As well, he saw definite conflicts of interest involved. He
referred specifically to the fact Goldberg has done research for
Marathon Realty, the real estate and development arm of
Canadian Pacific.
"It is academic dribble as far as I'm concerned. The
information is loaded dice. If you are a Marxist, you build a
Marxist model — if you are a capitalist, a capitalist model.
"You don't study people at the university, you study them on
the streets. Overall grandiose schemes like these just don't
work. The project had no relevance when it was announced, it
has no relevance now and it will have no relevance in the
future."
Rankin also feels the project is even further tainted by the
inclusion of the Ford Foundation in the funding. The Ford grant
was released as part of its "national affairs of America" section
(as opposed to its "international affairs" section) which
consistently funds similar technocratic projects elsewhere.
Another vocal critic of the scheme since its inception has
been UBC philosophy professor Ed Levy. Levy actively
contributed to the workshop, the data collecting stage of the
initial year of the project, but more out of sceptical interest than
enthusiasm.
He sees several integral drawbacks in the overall scheme Friday, February  16,  1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  17
UBC growing a monster
ADVOCATES SAY
a computer simulation model will help avoid such a mess. Critics disagree.
that could have extremely serious ramifications on the future of
Greater Vancouver.
Levy does not doubt the sincerity of the participants but
believes they are naive in their expectation of producing a
technical solution to a largely behavioural problem.
Shortly after breaking his involvement with the project two
years ago, he wrote a brief summarizing his protestations. In it
he wrote: "It can be shown, I believe, that the construct they
wish to create and the assumptions they bring to their task are
fraught with consequences which tend to contradict their very
goals."
He sees major areas of danger in the makeup and
implementation of the project.
Firstly, and foremost, he feels despite the efforts of the
participants to make the model widely accessible, some groups
in society have the existing resources to make extensive use of
the models. These groups can derive information from the
project while other groups cannot.
The favored groups will be corporations such as Block
Brothers or MacMillan-Bloedel who can afford the computers
and technicians needed to make maximum use of the model.
He fears that such interests, supplied with such a massive,
centralized source of information will have their social and
economic dominance in our society even more enforced.
"It is a piece of technology to be used by those who already
have power," he said.
Secondly, he echoes Harry Rankin's criticism that the values
of those controlling the information will cause the models to be
basically "conservative," reflecting the status quo. In other
words, solutions that could be derived from the model's
projections would tend to solutions through existing channels
and institutions. Radical policies would more likely be
disvalued.
This, he feels, could have very serious effects on the nature
of our political processes. His reasoning is that the highly
substantiated word of the computer would be extremely
difficult to refute.
Levy also believes the inclusion of social factors such as
rates of juvenile delinquency and crime cannot be quantified as
can "hard data" such as traffic rates or sewage needs.
"How can you measure the quality of life?" he asks. "You
simply can't quantify beauty."
Unlike Rankin, however, Levy does feel some safe practical
use can come of IIPS — but on a far more limited scale than is
being proposed.
He feels proposals from such sub-models as transportation
requirements — "where the question why doesn't have to often
be asked" — can have definite worth.
But this qualified sentiment of the project has little approval
of those still closely tied to it — a fact especially evident from
the recent defections from the IIPS team of two key instigators.
Commerce graduate student David Baxter resigned last
May 24, because of increasing apprehension over the context of
the project and the type of people who were increasingly
dominating it.
"If citizens aren't to be fully involved at all levels it should
simply be a cold, hard technical research project and not make
these pretensions of being able to solve social projects," he said.
Baxter was enthusiastic at the project's start but this
enthusiasm waned as he found the earlier-stressed citizen
participation was just not to be. The critical test of the project in
his mind was the ability to get normal citizens involved on all
levels.
Despite the many efforts made to bring IIPS to the people he
sees this essential aspect of the scheme as having dismally
failed.
"The public must be involved in building the scheme if they
are to use it. . . the people must be right in there working with
equations," he said.
Because such a desired openness has not developed, more
and more specialists have been working on their own within the
project. Baxter fears the implications of such a development
that has seen the main "responsibility delegated to
mathematicians and computer programmers.
Baxter also fears that technological fascination will take its
toll. The graphs are overly impressive in appearance,
amounting to little more than a'subtle public relations trick.
Goldberg's reasons for quitting are similar. His resignation
will become effective March 31.
Goldberg sums up his feeling by saying "it used to be fun and
for the past year it just hasn't been fun anymore."
Goldberg is especially critical of "the tyranny of experts and
bureaucrats." He feels the mood of the project has changed due
to an increased amount of government intervention that has led
to "irrevocable compromises" that have changed the nature of
the project.
"It used to be a consensus partnership in which nobody had a
veto and everybody had a veto. It was based on trust."
Goldberg still has hope for the scheme, however. The focus
of this hope is a type of legal aid system that would educate the
public to the dangers and potentials of computer simulation
models. Such a system would be technically aware of IIPS and
would act in a similar capacity to legal-aid lawyers, helping
people use the model.
Upon his resignation he plans to act in this sort of capacity
himself, trying to change the model from without after being
frustrated within.
Baxter does not share Goldberg's faith in such a explanatory
process. He is more pessimistic.
"It's too late now. You want them to work with you as equals,
not help them."
Baxter has found his attitudes to have evolved a great deal
since the project's beginnings. He has lost any faith he had in
large scale technical solutions to our social and especially
urban problems. Instead his faith has switched to people.
He now shares Levy's fears that such projects as IIPS
"might lobotomize community organizations. I see no reason
why community organizations can't take care of their own
planning."
All in all, the IIPS story is a common one in our society. A
group of eager, technically-trained people are turned on by the
power of their accumulated knowledge and, in their well-
intentioned zeal to apply it, go beyond the boundaries where
their skills should be applied.
Eventually they realize the errors of their ways and leave.
Unfortunately, however, the spoiled fruit of their once loving
labor still remains to be nurtured in other hands and minds.
Minds that are not as bright. Minds that are not capable of
such evolution. Minds that are more easily and willingly
manipulated by the corporate power structure that controls our
society.
The instigators of IIPS thought they were constructing a
wonderful unicorn that would bring wonder and joy to all.
Instead it has emerged as a fire-breathing monster that
threatens to envelop us instead.
The cancer that is IIPS can still be stopped. Vancouver city
council can help do it, the UBC board of governors can help do it
and the federal government, in the form of the ministry of state
for urban affairs, can help do it.
Surely we're beyond such dreams of technological nirvanna.
IIPS is a dinosaur from another age, another time.
Let's take heed of the warnings of our time and make it
extinct. Sadly, my faith in the powers to be is not strong.
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«•«!• -< Page  18
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, February 16,  1973
Kashmir Curry Restaurant
For the Finest Food of India
STUDENTS!! We offer 10% concession on a full dinner. Groups
of 6 or more — 20% concession.
LIMITED OFFER - SO VISIT US SOON
Open every day 5 p.m. - n p.m. — Free Delivery of Complete Dinners
3934 Main at 23rd Phone 874-5722
In soccer:
Birds in cliff-hanger
1220 CLARK DR.
AT
WILLIAMS
TELEPHONE
254-8194
MANUFACTURERS OF
* CLUB JACKETS
* BASEBALL UNIFORMS
* TEAM CRESTS
* SOCCER UNIFORMS
LARGEST A THLETIC UNIFORM MANUFACTURER
IN WESTERN CANADA
COMPETITIVE PRICES - QUALITY WORKMANSHIP
SEE YOUR LOCAL DEALER OR CONTACT US DIRECT!
Second ranked Cliff Avenue
United of the Inter City Soccer
League will face UBC 1 p.m.
Sunday at Empire Stadium,
hoping to close ground on
Simon Fraser University, who
are three points in front.
However, the Thunderbirds
have other ideas.
Coach Joe Johnson has had
them practicing doubly hard
with a combined training and
running program. In addition
to their normal practices,
they're required to run up to
the gates and back five days a
week.
This probably makes them
the most fit team in the Pacific
Coast League.
The Birds are counting on
goalie Greg Weber to give Cliff
considerably   tougher   net-
Rip off
STUDENT-RAILPASS
The way to see Europe without feeling like a toil list.
Student-Railpass is valid in Austria, Belgium, Denmark,
France, Germany, Holland, Italy, Luxembourg, Norway,
Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland.
Eurailpass, Box 2168, Toronto 1, Ontario
Please send me your free Student-Railpass folder order
form. D
Or your free Eurailpass folder with railroad map. □
Name„
Streets
City	
Zone_
_Prov„
UBY 2
So you plan to spend the
Summer in Europe this year. Great.
Two things are mandatory. A ticket
to Europe. And a Student-Railpass.
The first gets you over there, the
second gives you unlimited Second
Class rail travel for two months for a
modest $135 in Austria, Belgium,
Denmark, France, Germany,
Holland, Italy, Luxembourg,
Norway, Portugal, Spain, Sweden,
and Switzerland! All you need to
qualify is to be a full-time student up
to 25 years of age, registered at a
North American school, college or
university.
And the trains of Europe are
a sensational way to travel. Over
100,000 miles of track links cities,
towns and ports all over Europe. The
trains are fast (some over 100 mph),
frequent, modern, clean, convenient
and very comfortable. They have to
be. So you'll meet usonourtrains. It
really is the way to get to know
Europeans in Europe.
But there's one catch. You
must buy your Student-Railpass in
North America before you go.
They're not on sale in Europe
because they are meant strictly for
visitors to Europe—hence the
incredibly low price. Of course if
you're loaded you can buy a regular
Eurailpass meant for visitors of all
ages. It gives you First Class travel if
that's what you want.
Either way if you're going
to zip off to Europe, see a Travel
Agent before you go, and in the
meantime, rip off the coupon. It
can't hurt and it'll get you a better
time in Europe than you everthought
POSSible. Prices quoted In U. S. dollars.
ED SOLTYSIK
ankle injury
back from an
minding than they've been
used to. Weber, a former
national team member, has
already shut . out the
opposition three times in eight
starts this year.
Cliff will face the Birds'
usual 4-2-4 defence, in which
there are four fullbacks
instead of two, which is more
common. Most soccer teams
play a 5-3-2.
Leading Bird goal scorer Ed
Soltysik, with seven, will be
back from an ankle injury
sustained in extra, off-campus
training.
Soltysik was taken out of last
week's 1-0 win over Inter Italia
unable to continue.
Cliff has beaten PCL leading
Victoria Gorge 2-0 in the early
part of the season.
Super-leagues flying
The hockey super-playoffs started Wednesday at the Winter
Sports Centre.
Last Thursday grads locked up 2nd place by beating
engineers 4-1. Pharmacy beat commerce as expected 6-3, and
P.E. beat law 5-3.
The final league standings are as follows:
W
L
T
Pts.
Pharmacy
4
O
1
9
Grads
4
1
O
8
Engineers
3
1
1
7
Physical Ed.
2
3
O
4
Commerce
1
4
0
2
Law
0
5
0
O
The rugby league started Monday, with 15 teams entered.
Almost half of these were entered by forestry and Dekes, so
they ought to dominate.
Schedules are available at the intramural office, War
Memorial gym 308, but it is too late to enter a team.
The awards banquet is on March 19 and the big track and
field meet has been moved from March 3 to 10 because of open
house week.
SKI SALE
VAL D'OR SKI BOOTS 50% OFF
PEDIGREE JACKETS 50% OFF
DOWN SKI JACKETS 25% OFF
SKI SWEATERS 25% OFF
SKI BINDINGS
TOQUES,
GLOVES,
SCARVES,
SKI MITTS,
ALL 25%
OFF!
ft***;***
North Western Sporting Goods
10th & Alma (Open 'til 9 Fridays)
LTD.
224-5040 Friday, February 16, 1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  19
TONIGHT
Jayvee basketball
6 p.m. at SFU — UBC vs SFU
UBC squash tournament
6:30 p.m. Winter Sports Centre
Canada West Wrestling
Championships
7 p.m. Winter Sports Centre
Canada West hockey
8 p.m. Thunderbird Arena — UBC vs.
Alberta
SATURDAY
Canada West Wrestling
Championships
11 a.m. Winter Sports Complex
Jayvee hockey
5:30 p.m. Thunderbird Arena — UBC
vs. SFU.
Canada West hockey
8 p.m. Thunderbird Arena — UBC vs.
Alberta
SUNDAY
Pacific Coast League soccer
1 p.m. Empire Stadium — UBC vs. Cliff
Ave.
Gunfight at
'Bird corral
It's showdown time tonight
at the Thunderbird Arena.
On the one side will be the
Thunderbirds, aiming for first
spot in Canada West
University Athletic
Association and the only playoff berth.
And on the other side will be
the University of Alberta
Golden Bears, aiming at
preventing the Birds from
accomplishing same.
The Birds must win both 8
p.m. games Friday and
Saturday night to stay in
contention for the title.
At the moment, the
University of Calgary
Dinosaurs hold down first
place in the standings with 15
wins and six losses. Four of
those losses have come at the
hands of the Birds.
Alberta is still ahead of UBC
with a 14-5 record; the Birds
are 13-7.
But even if the Birds take
both games from second-place
Alberta, in order to finish first
the University of Saskatchewan Huskies will have to
beat either Calgary or Alberta
in the final games of the
schedule.
Last weekend UBC beat the
Huskies 14-0.
Squash
happens
Play continues tonight in
UBC's Squash-Tournament at
the Winter Sports Centre.
The courts will be in use 6:30
to midnight tonight and 9:30
p.m. Saturday for the quarterfinals.
The D class finals will be
played 11 a.m. Sunday while
the C class finalists play off at
noon.
Following this match, there
will be a presentation of
awards to the winners.
Those interested in seeing
some good squash are
reminded that there is a large
seating area overlooking the
courts and that spectators are
welcome without charge.
PANGO-PANGO (UNS) —
Giant mutant fascist gypsies
have surrounded the jungle
headquarters of guerrilla
leader Bernardo "Crunchy"
Granola, and are demanding
he surrender, pull his pants
down, and act silly on national
television.
"I don't own a television",
said Granola.
Do Birds lack religion — or
ain't they in God's top 40?
g0r ^■■h I God was on the winning team's side as the Athletes in Action
" " ■■■■' ■ cruised to a 66-61 basketball victory over the Thunderbird team
Thursday.
The AIA, a touring team sponsored by the Campus Crusade
for Christ, displayed some impressive shooting and hot-dog fast
breaks to come out the victors in the noon hour game.
Gary Ladd was the standout for the AIA, as he picked up 18
points, shooting like he couldn't miss and passing through his
legs and behind his back to set up easy baskets.
The 'Birds stood up well against a team with a lot of talent.
UBC's Darryl Gjernes put on his own touring show moves as he
scored 23 points. He used good inside moves, faking and
pumping to score from difficult angles under the basket.
He also netted several baskets with his classic hook shot,
taking one giant step to the outside of his opponent while
stretching high in the air and just flicking his wrist to put the
ball through the hoop.
John Mills played better than he has of late as he picked up 22
points while the six-foot ten AIA forwards were towering over
him.
The AIA, while they are not the Globetrotters, are definitely
a powerful team. Their flashy ballhandling and quick passing
made for a fast, interesting game.
Their fast break was always beautifully executed as two
quick passes brought them out of their own end to score.
The AIA are probably the most talented team that has
played at UBC this season as they have beaten such U.S.
powerhouses as the University of Southern California and
Brigham Young University.
Some of their players such as Ladd and Dennis Dickens
could be making big money in the pro leagues instead of touring
with the AIA to spread the gospel.
At half-time the AIA give a soft sell sermon on Christianity
that was politely received by the spectators, the kick-em-back
charm school cheerleaders gave an unsyncopated slapstick
cheerleading routine that was enthusiastically received, and an
unidentified jock gave a political plug for the Students' Coalition
that was greeted with hisses and boos.
AIA captain Frank Harrison said at half-time that the AIA
team members never travel alone; Christ is always with them.
Perhaps these words gained a convert in UBC coach Peter
Mullins, who must have thought some time during his worst
season ever at UBC that God had forsaken him.
The 'Birds played for the latter half of the season without
starting guards Stan Callegari and Bob Dickson who were both
out with injuries.
Later on Mills was out with the flu and never did regain his
form. Then Jack Hoy sprained his ankle and was out for a
couple of games.
None of UBC's bench strength was able to fill in for the
regulars as well as they were capable of doing.
And to top it all off, none of the 'Birds could shoot
consistently during the season, even when they were getting
easy deep shots.
The result was that the 'Birds finished out of the play-offs
with an eight win, eight loss record in league play and a 10-16
overall record.
Maybe with some faith and prayer in the off-season the
'Birds will be able to do better next year.
Wrestlers meet
The Thunderbird wrestling team is hosting the first Canada
West Championships, starting 7 p.m. tonight at the Winter
Sports Centre and continuing all day Saturday.
Wrestlers from universities in Saskatchewan, Alberta and
B.C. will be competing in the two-day tournament.
Outstanding wrestlers entered are Ole Sorenson of the
University of Alberta and Taras Hyrb representing the 'Birds.
Both of these competitors attended the Olympics in Munich last
year.
Sorenson, in the 149 pound class in Munich, placed 18th out of
a field of 24, as did UBC's Hyrb in the 180 pound class. Both have
been the Canadian Collegiate wrestling champions in their
division for the past two years.
The winners in each of the 10 weight classes will advance to
the Canadian Collegiate Championships at the University of
Guelph Feb. 23-24.
The UBC heavies are led by Brian Westall, a former Western
Conference champion. At 230 pounds Westall is expected to
dominate the five other competitors in his class.
George Richey in the 190 pound weight class is likewise
expected to win a first. Richey faced what were essentially the
same opponents at the Calgary Invitational wrestling meet in
December and completely dominated his weight class.
Other standouts on the UBC team are Bob Ormond, Bruce
Grist, Bill Duncan, Pete Galdert, John Cipalato and Dennis
Tazumi. All members of the 'Birds are rated in the top three in
Western Canada and at least four are expected to place first.
Consequently, UBC is expected to end U. of Alberta's
monopoly of the number one position in Western Canada.
The wrestling starts 7 p.m. tonight and continues to 9:30 p.m.
Finals and semi-finals will get under way Saturday at 11 a.m.
and end approximately at 4:30. The action will take place at the
Winter Sports complex gym A.
—mark hamilton photo
THE ATHLETES IN ACTION put on an impressive display of ball
handling to defeat the UBC Thunderbirds 66-61 Thursday afternoon.
Jack Hoy and Darryl Gjernes look on as six-foot seven Dennis Dickens
of the AIA goes high in the air for a rebound. Page  20
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, February 16, 1973
'Gravel parking lot'
Erosion solutions pn
By DAVID MARS
The Point Grey beach is going to become a gravel
parking lot if the UBC alumni association convinces
the provincial government to accept its plan for the
area.
The Vancouver parks board a*nd the provincial
government are considering different plans to halt
the erosion of the Point Grey cliffs. All interested
parties agree that the erosion of these cliffs should be
arrested, but they cannot agree on the best way to do
it.
One plan, submitted by Swan Wooster
Engineering Ltd. and backed by the alumni
association, would cover the beach with gravel and
raise it to a level high enough to stop the eroding
action of the waves but would destroy the beach for
bathing purposes.
A second plan, submitted to the parks board by
professional engineer Ian Bain, would entail
constructing what are essentially parallel picket
fences, called "groins", perpendicular to the cliffs.
These timber groins would build up sandbars
roughly 500 feet apart, stopping the erosion of the
cliffs as effectively as the gravel beach-raising.
Bain's plan would not allow for road construction
in the area as originally proposed by Swan Wooster,
but Swan Wooster has continually revised its plans
under pressure from different groups.
The current plan calls for building up the beach
with pumped sand, covering the sand with three feet
of gravel and building a path between 30 and 85 feet
in width. But the proposed 3,700-foot-long
development is at least 1,300 feet longer than is
necessary to stop the erosion of the cliffs. It is the
same length as the allegedly scrapped road plan
dropped by Swan Wooster because of public
opposition to the road.
Only that section of cliffs bounded by the two gun
towers — 1,700 feet in length — is in serious danger
from erosion and another 700 feet may be affected,
Bain said.
Most of the erosion of the cliffs is caused by the
waves sweeping up to the cliffs and carrying the sand
and cliffs down in the direction of Spanish Banks.
The waves hit the beach and carry the sand
suspended in the water, dumping it on Spanish
Banks.
Bain's plan is designed to stop this littoral drift.
The Swan Wooster plan calls for periodic renewal
of the gravel deposits lost in littoral drift and storms.
Bain's proposed timber groins would be about 800
feet long and would be built up from about two to 10
feet in height. The sandbars created would stop the
littoral drift by reducing the force of the waves and
stopping any sand still suspended in the water.
This would allow sand to build up at the foot of the
cliffs and stop the erosion without requiring any
maintenance — a natural approach to halting the
WANDERING WRECK BEACH . .. noon hour stroll
BEACH IN AFTERNOON
. Mark Hamilton captures mood
erosion that would keep the beach suitable for
swimming and would cost a fraction of the Swan
Wooster plan.
The Swan Wooster plan would allow the beach to
be used at high and low tide by raising the beach
above high tide. It is doubtful that there is any great
demand for isolated gravel beaches at any time
when the building of the gravel beach requires
destroying a beautiful naturally sandy swimming
area.
The Swan Wooster plan would cost $250,000
compared to about $15,000 for each of a maximum of
five groins suggested by Bain. The Swan Wooster
plan would also require periodic maintenance to
replace the gravel lost by littoral drift.
The long-term maintenance costs of bringing in
gravel at low tide could easily approach the cost of
the entire maintenance-free timber groin proposal.
Sand usually builds up on the beach during the
summer but the heavier wave action in the winter
consistently removes this. Replacement of the sand
may be necessary as often as every two years.
Most of the opposition to the Swan Wooster
proposal has been based on the damage caused to the
beach but the engineering aspect has also been
subjected to criticism.
Swan Wooster has used the same approach at
Ambleside and Tsawwassen as planned for Point
Grey and they contend the plan will work. But there
are conflicting reports as to the real success of the
work done at Tsawwassen and Ambleside.
The major engineering objection is the lack of
similarities between Point Grey and the two sites
Swan Wooster has already worked at. The waves
have a 40- to 80-mile approach to the Point Grey cliffs
and there is no similar approach at either of the sites.
There is no provision in the plan for testing to
determine the suitability of the gravel bed for the
Point Grey cliffs. Swan Wooster essentially proposes
spending $250,000 of the provincial government's
money on an untested, unproven roadbed.
Each beach is so unique that the only way to test an
erosion control plan on it is to implement the
proposal on a small section of the beach. It is almost
impossible to apply the results of an erosion control
plan for a relatively sheltered beach to a similar
proposal for one that is exposed.
The alumni association is pushing the Swan
Wooster plan because of worry that its offices at
Cecil Green Park will fall into the ocean.
But Cecil Green Park is doomed regardless.
The association executive knew when Cecil Green
was occupied the location was temporary.
The association is now trying to get the various
levels of government to save its building at the
public's expense.
Neither Wooster's nor Bain's plan can save Cecil
Green Park because the erosion has gone on too long.
The alumni headquarters may remain indefinitely
but eventually the cliffs are going to have a more
natural slope of about 38 to 40 degrees rather than the
45 to 50 degree slope they now have.
•]»:•
sed
Cecil Green Park is right on the line where the
cliffs will be when the erosion is stopped and the
cliffs slope more gently.
Swan Wooster has argued the action of the waves
would bring sand and driftwood onto the beach and
provide a natural look, yet at the same time the firm
admits the gravel might have to be replaced
periodically.
Swan Wooster cannot stop the driftwood from
going onto the beach but the sand is not going to
settle on top of coarse pit gravel.
The sand washed up on the beach in the summer
will be washed away with the gravel in the winter.
The provincial government has halted work on
the beach until it receives the report of an American
engineer hired to advise the government. The main
question is not, however, an engineering question but
a question of policy.
Is the beach going to be prepared for the kind of
"development" that has taken place at Spanish
Banks or is it going to be allowed to remain the last
natural beach in the Vancouver region?
The Swan Wooster proposal is mediocre and the
Bain proposal is good and it does not take an
American engineer to tell the government that.
If the government stalls much longer any action
may have to wait until next year. The Bain proposal
would entail building one or at most two timber
groins initially and would take about one week.
It would cause very little disturbance to
swimmers no matter when it was done.
The Swan Wooster proposal would take about six
weeks to complete and would seriously interfere with
those using the beach while the work was being done,
as well as eventually permanently marring the
beach.
Cecil Green Park is doomed but the last natural
beach in Vancouver does not have to be.
Bain's alternative to Swan Wooster's gravel road
costs less money, would take less time to build, is
more suited to testing because it can be built in
sections, does not require maintenance and would
keep the entire beach in its natural state.
Work would only need to be done on at most 2,400
feet and, as Bain has said, the rest of the beach could
be improved by the judicious use of a bulldozer to
move boulders already there into a rough
breakwater.
In February, 1969 the parks board started
dumping fill on the beach to construct a highway,
under Swan Wooster's original plans.
The same month UBC students, faculty members
and citizens picketed the fill site, stopping the
dumping.
This action might be worth remembering if the
government decides to go ahead with their gravel
beautification plans.
BELOW CECIL GREEN ... the old fence tumbles away

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