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The Ubyssey Feb 19, 1985

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Array (Jrek toiatj!
VANCOUVER, 1922 . . . Great Trek marches
Campus gathers today!
Trekking is a long UBC student tradition
which pots out results
The first Trek resulted in the present campus
By ROBERT BEYNON
On a Saturday in October, 1922
most of UBC's 1,176 students
marched across downtown Vancouver, drove out to Sasamat and
Tenth and then trudged along a dirt
logging road to UBC's present campus.
Once there they posed on the
skeleton of the present Chemistry
building, gave speeches,  cavorted
for a movie camera and took
photos.
The march was a symbolic gesture protesting the provincial government's failure to build a Point
Grey campus in 1908. UBC students
were, at that time, studying in attics, tents and a church basement at
a site near present-day Vancouver
General Hospital.
In the spring of 1922 the student
society organized a petition and gathered 15,000 signatures over the
summer — but the government
wasn't impressed. The students reorganized, planned, and gathered
another 41,000 signatures.
Shortly after the initial trek in
November, student leaders went to
the legislature and presented premier John Oliver with the petitions. A
week later he and his government
voted $1.5 million for immediate
construction of the Point Grey campus.
This initial, successful campaign
was the result of a half year of hard
work and coordination by the student's Publicity Campaign Committee who organized "the Pilgrim-
See page 9: PETERSON
University's problems pressing very hard on all occupants
By PATTI FLATHER
Don't understand what all the
fuss is about this here cutback
stuff? Why there's a Great Trek today?
You're not alone — the public
schools are making their case loud
and clear against funding cuts, in
the media especially, but where are
the voices for post-secondary
education?
Here's what the Great Trek starting at UBC today will focus on —
funding cuts, accessibility to post-
secondary education, and threats to
university autonomy.
The recent restraint wave by the
provincial government began in
1983, when universities received no
funding increase. In 1984-85 there
was a five per cent cut on average to
UBC, the University of Victoria,
and Simon Fraser Unviersity. A
similar cut is expected for 1985-86,
says UBC's president.
The cuts have led, predictably, to
deficits, but the B.C. Universities
Act forbids universities from running deficits so something has to
give. UBC has responded in various
ways.
Tuition went up a whopping 33
per cent last year and may increase
10 per cent this year.
Due to across the board cuts
many classes are larger, and there
are fewer offered.
There are less assignments
See page 9: PROGRAMS
Students, onions, faulty
unite in straggle
People meet at UBC clock tower, then
march downtown to Robson square
If you haven't heard about the
Great Trek until now, you can still
check it out today.
Here's what's happening. At
12:30 p.m., students, faculty and
staff will gather outside UBC's
Clock tower. Media will be there.
Great Trek committee co-chair
Philip Resnick says if students
don't have much time due to
classes, this event will be short and
easy to attend.
At 1:15 p.m. people will move on
past the bus loop and walk along
University Boulevard to the university gates at Alma and Tenth
Avenue. Marchers will stick to the
sidewalks, said Resnick, because
the Provincial government owns the
boulevard and their policies are being protested.
At the Gates there will be some
chartered buses available to take
students   to   a   downtown   rally.
Others will take public buses, and
some small groups will walk the 15
km to Robson Square distributing
leaflets and Ubysseys. The groups
must be small, said Resnick,
because groups of 30 or more need
a parade permit.
There will be another rally at the
Vancouver Art Gallery plaza at
3:30 p.m., where representatives
from Simon Fraser University and
other post-secondary institutions
will show up. SFU is holding a
similar trek today.
There will be speakers downtown
and more media coverage. "The
people we want are the rnedia. The
media will be there," said Resnick.
Many UBC groups have supported the trek, including the Alma
Mater Society, the Teachers
Assistants Union, almost all
undergraduate societies, the
Graduate Students Society, and the
faculty association. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 19, 1985
IfJnPi^  a* /. n^v.-i
ULJ
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Afterwards, fill in the research
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Be sure to bring your driver's
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So sign up today.
Approximate total
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Winners must answer
a skill testing question. Tuesday, February 19, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Board may violate decision on fees
By REN ATE BOERNER
The UBC board of governors will violate
an agreement made with the Alma Mater
Society in 1968 if it imposes a $32 athletic fee
on students as proposed at its last meeting.
A clause in the April 3, 1968 referendum
on athletic fees states that "the student
athletic fee will neither be increased nor
decreased without a referendum."
"The university understood all implications of this and agreed by a formal letter,"
said student board member Don Holubitsky
Monday. He added Neil Risebrough,
associate vice president student services and
the prime mover behind imposing the fee, is
aware of the 1968 agreement.
Holubitsky   charges    that    UBC's   ad
ministration is "talking out of two sides of
their face," by claiming athletics is a priority
while trying to make students pay for it. The
board cut the university contribution to
athletics 10 per cent for 1984-85.
Risebrough could not be reached for comment Monday.
Under the proposal which came before the
board's Feb. 7 meeting and will be voted on
at the March 7 meeting, athletic fees will
jump from seven dollars to $32 for all
students enrolled in nine or more units. The
fee would support intramurals, recreation,
intercollegiate teams, and a capital fund for
building facilities, said Holubitsky, adding a
major priority would be reinstating teams
dropped due to cuts.
But Holubitsky said he board has proposed no management structure to administer
the hundreds of thousands of dollars the fee
would raise annually. He said a student
referendum should be held instead.
The proposed fee cannot be justified by the
high fees at other Canadian universities, he
said. This is because other campus administrations have paid for athletic facilities,
he said, while at UBC all athletics facilities
except the Osborne gym have been student-
financed.
If the fee passes, student contributions to
athletics will increase from 35 to 70 per cent
while the university portion goes down, he
said. "1 think this will be voted in over stu
dent objection and without regard for student control."
Alma Mater Society president Glenna
Chestnutt said the AMS opposes the fee,
which she said sets a precedent for the board
levying student fees without students voting
on them. The AMS will also push for a
strong athletic funds management board, she
said.
Rebecca Turner, arts 4, said it is a lot of
money and "since I'm not involved in
athletics at all it seems like a fairly large
jump."
Peter Papac, commerce 2, said the board
should say exactly what the money is for. "If
it's for tennis courts or something, I'm
definitely against it."
Engineering, has high unemployment
Unemployment low in arts
GO AWAY, can't you see
I'm being serious here?"
rory a photo
By CHARLIE FIDELMAN
Unemployment rates have increased for graduates of many UBC
programs but are surprisingly low in
arts, a survey done by UBC's student counselling and resources centre shows.
The highest unemployment rates
according to the survey, last done in
1980, were for graduates of
agriculture, nursing, and accounting with rates of 23.3, 25.8 and
22.6 per cent respectively. The
survey found in 1980 only four per
cent of agriculture graduates and
4.5 per cent of accounting
graduates without jobs, while every
graduating nurse found work.
Counselling centre director Dick
Shirran said, "We're trying to give
people a realistic idea of what
students do with various types of
degrees." The survey documents
the post-graduate activities of nearly 90 per cent of the 3,777 1984
graduates from 21 faculties and
schools.
Other hard hit faculties were
forestry and applied science, with
unemployment jumping to 21.1 per
cent   from   1.6   and   .9   per   cent
respectively in 1980. Commerce
graduates, who only had a 2.8 per
cent 1980 unemployment rate, now
face 17.4 per cent.
Shirran attributes the high
unemployment rates to the
economic recession. But he said he
must be cautious generalizing from
the survey because trends in
employment are cyclical. "Students
have to be careful not to give up in
their field and not to react too
quickly to surveys such as this
one," said Shirran.
Aris had a surprisingly low
unemployment rate in the survey —
8.8 per cent — which is actually an
increase from the 1980 rate of 3.2
per :ent. Graduates in dental
hygiene, rehabilitation medicine,
pharmacy and landscape architecture all found jobs.
Asked if arts students have better
employment prospects, Shirran
said: 'The survey means graduates
of ergineering, applied sciences,
and forestry wait around for a job
in their field but arts graduates take
just about anything."
Community relations spokesper-
Smith will not discuss letters detail
By ROBBY ROBERTSON
The possible elimination of entire
UBC programs, departments, and
schools is a topic vice president academic Robert Smith refuses to dis-
cusss, although it is his plan.
Smith said Monday he sent letters
to each of UBC's 12 faculties as
part of "the first stage of a very
complicated budget planning process." At stake are programs unique to the B.C. university system.
Although he said the letters were
not confidential, he refused to discuss areas that could be eliminated.
Smith also refused to discuss the
logic behind his letters, which concern the possible elimination of certain programs. And he denied that
this information could be of relevance to students in planning their
academic futures.
"Nothing whatsoever has been
done to anyone," Smith said.
Geophysics and astronomy head
T.K. Menon said he thought Smith
was not aware of important facts
about his department.
"There is no geophysics or astronomy anyplace else in B.C. In
terms of research, we are one of the
largest facilities in North America.
We get more money from outside
than from the university," Menon
said.
"Certainly with the B.C. mining
industry, oil industry and all that,
to not have a department of geophysics and astronomy seems
strange."
Menon said he thought it strange
that oceanography, another science
faculty department, should have to
justify its existence. "It looks pretty
ridiculous for someone on the west
coast to have to go to Alberta to
study oceanography," Menon said.
Science   dean   C.V.    Finnegan
Pedersen worried about tuition
By PATTI FLATHER
UBC's administration has proposed a 10 per cent
tuition increase for next year. If the board passes the
hike at its March meeting tuition will have gone up 43
per cent in two years.
UBC president George Pedersen, speaking to student senate caucus Monday, said he is only "a bit worried," tuition is becoming so costly that more students
won't come to UBC.
Referring to the study on why so many first year
students who were accepted did not register last fall,
when tuition increased 33 per cent, Pedersen said few
people did not show up for financial reasons.
The study found 30 per cent of "no-shows," cited
financial reasons. At UBC no-shows increased 17 per
cent.
But Pedersen added: "I'm sure there are lots of
students precluded from coming for financial
reasons." He said he is more concerned about the lack
of student aid than about tuition.
Pedersen said the increase, which comes as UBC
faces another potentially large deficit due to govern
ment cutbacks, is not unique because other institutions
across the country will also raise fees.
But Don Holubitsky, student board of governors
member, said "They said that last year and tuition fees
went up about five per cent in the Prairies and Eastern
universities." He said high tuition fees increases
elsewhere are unlikely.
Holubitsky said the increase may be a mistake
because there were so many first year no-shows. "It
may be counter-productive to the university in financial terms. We may lose money."
Another increase will have two effects, said Holubitsky. It will decrease accessibility because student aid
has also been reduced. And it will make UBC's professional faculties very expensive at a time when the quality of education at UBC is declining, causing the good
students to go elsewhere.
If the increase passes at the March 7 board meeting,
UBC's professional faculities will be 40 per cent more
costly than in Ontario, and more than double the cost
of prairie programs, he said
denied he had gotten a letter from
Smith, which mentioned the possible elimination of the departments
of astronomy, oceanography and
geophysics. "I know nothing about
it," Finnegan said and then hung
up.
Acting oceanography head Alan
Lewis said he knew of the letter,
which Smith said he wrote, but
could not talk about it. "I was requested not to tell you anything,"
he said.
Architecture director Douglas
Shadbolt, asked to justify his department's existence, said that it is
unique in the province as well.
"The size of the school has been cut
from 220 students to 175 over the
last three to four years," he added.
Other areas Smith mentioned
could be eliminated include:
• the school of family and nutritional sciences and the religious
studies department in the arts faculty,
• the department of administration, adult, and higher education in
the education faculty, and
• the history of science and
medicine program in the medicine
faculty.
All of these fields of study are
unique within the B.C. university
system.
Smith said the letters represent
only the first step in the downsizing
process. But medicine dean William
Webber said the questions are still
important.
"One has to assume that because
he asked specific questions, he has a
pretty clear idea of what he's looking at," Webber said.
son Jim Banham said despite
dent enrolment in these areas is still
steady. "Arts people often don't
see their education as job training,
instead they are learning something
out of sheer interest."
"They'll take jobs in areas not
aligned to their majors in the hope
of eventually getting to their interests," he added.
English graduate Eric Eggertsori
said Monday he is looking for work
anywhere in Canada. "I'd rather be
working in Yellowknife than be on
welfare in Vancouver," he said.
Eggertson said when he started
UBC most of his friends vvere entering applied sciences and thought he
was crazy to go into English. But
Eggertson said now his job prospects are as good or better than
those of his engineer friends.
Steep differential
fees for foreign
students planned
The board of governors votes
March 7 on a proposal to make
foreign undergraduate students pay
2.5 times the regular tuition, but the
motive behind the proposal is not
money, a student board of governor
member says.
"In terms of this being a financially necessary move there's no
justification for it," said Don
Holubitsky Monday. "The only
justification is a policy statement.
It's a redneck policy."
Uninformed peole in B.C. who
fear UBC is being taken over by-
foreigners are putting pressure on
government and public bodies,
Holubitsky said, adding he thinks
the board will think carefully before
passing the increase. Foreign
undergraduate students now pay
1.5 times what Canadian students
pay.
But Holubitsky said UBC is
under pressure from Simon Fraser
University to raise the fees. Last
year UBC and SFU both considered
differential fees 2.5 times the normal, but at UBC's meeting the day
before SFU's, UBC decided to
make them only 1.5 times higher.
SFU "chickened out" and settled
on 1.75 but wants UBC this year to
raise its fees again so there will be
more support when SFU does,
Holubitsky said.
There are only 294 undergraduate
visa students at UBC, four per cent
of UBC's undergraduate population, said community relations
spokesperson Jim Banaham. Ten
per cent of SFU students are visa
students, said Holubitsky.
UBC assistant registrar Peter
Hennessy said foreign students pose
no financial burdens on B.C.
because when they come through
immigration they must have at least
$10,000. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 19, 1985
Alumni raises funds
UBC's Alumni Association is in
the midst of a campaign to raise
$334,000 from alumni for an endowment fund guaranteeing money
for student aid.
Alumni spokesperson Pat Pinder
said Friday the association has raised $271,000 from alumni. Alumni
donations will be matched dollar
for dollar by both UBC's administration and the Vancouver
Foundation, she said.
The alumni hopes for a one
million dollar endowment fund providing $100,000 in scholarships annually for students Pinder said.
The alumni awarded $100,000 to
students at a Jan. 23 reception.
Some of the scholarships and bursaries included 35 Norman Mackenzie scholarships for different B.C.
regions, worth $1,250 each.
Louise Grant, Alumni scholarship and bursary committee chair,
said at the reception: "The
economic difficulties facing today's
students coupled with increases in
tuition fees make scholarships and
bursaries increasingly important.
One of the Alumni Association's
major priorities is to increase its aid
to students."
Pinder said students wanting
more information should contact
the awards office.
PANGO PANGO (UNS) — Tension struck this usually placid tiny
island kingdom of hairy puce blorgs
as self-appointed dictator Chatti
Blather denounced the Daily Blah
Monday after finding less than
overwhelming support for the Tuesday paper.
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Government harms education
By VICTOR WONG
Provincial government policies
on universities and special economic
development zones may do the province more harm than good, according to two papers released by
the B.C. Economic Policy Institute
Monday.
The first study, written by UBC
economics professor G.C. Archibald, says the current provincial
policies are undermining the quality
of university education in B.C. The
study, written before University of
Victoria president Howard Petch
said government officials told him
cutting   certain   programs   could
Expo creates cheap
student employment
The vast majority of jobs at Expo
86 will pay minimum wage, the
B.C. Federation of Labor president
said Friday.
Art Kube said most jobs the
megaproject provides in areas ranging from catering services to ticket
sales will pay $3.65 per hour. Kube
said he did not know exactly how
many jobs Expo would create or
what the wage distribution would
be.
Kube added Expo will not benefit
workers, and only students living at
home will be helped by such wages.
"How will the student be able to
pay tuition and living expenses for
the year when they can barely earn
enough money to survive the summer?" Kube said.
"This is supposed to be an
economic boom for everyone in the
province yet the worker is being left
out," he added.
B.C.'s unemployment rate is second highest in Canada. Kube said
the federation will attempt to
organize Expo workers into a
union.
The Canadian Federation of
Students supports the federation's
attempt to improve student wages,
said Donna Morgan, CFS Pacific
executive officer. She said the CFS
did a study last year which found
the average student would need to
earn $15 an hour for the summer to
cover school year costs. These range
between four and five thousand
dollars for students not living at
home.
Brad Philley, Expo public relations officer, said he would not
comment on Expo wages yet and
did not know when the facts would
be available. "Wages and pricing
are being done by private companies and I do not know when they
will be made public."
mean budget increases, suggests the
B.C. government might attempt to
influence university spending policy
in the face of severe cutbacks.
Archibald's study states that
although federal funding for B.C.
universities increased by $30 million
over the past two years, provincial
university spending fell by $47 million over the same period. "The
federal government, of course, has
no say in university policy, and Victoria is demanding a bigger say,"
Archibald writes.
Archibald suggests current government policy is moving toward a
more centralized control of universities.
He defends tenure by saying it
protected professors against politicians and their own peers. "One has
to conclude that academic tenure is
like democracy; it is certainly not
perfect, but no one has yet invented
anything better."
The second study, written by fellow economics professor David
Donaldson, says the creation of
special enterprise zones, with economic incentives such as tax concessions and restricted trade union activity,  would confer  little if any
benefits to B.C. "The gains would
be small, but the costs would be
high," Donaldson said in the faculty club at a press conference releasing the two studies.
Donaldson says in his study any
employment creation in such a zone
would be minimal, since B.C.'s
high wage scale would encourage
foreign firms located in the zone to
use automated production methods. He suggests such costs coupled
with cutbacks in education will reduce the average skill levels of B.C.
workers. "Our children would miss
out on becoming skilled workers,"
he said at the press conference.
Donaldson said the papers had
not been sent to Victoria but would
be mailed this week.
Herbert Grubel, a Simon Fraser
University economics professor
who wrote a pamphlet on special
enterprise zones for the conservative Fraser Institute think tank, said
the latter paper relied on questionable assumptions. "The whole
thing depends on what they're going
to do in the zones, and how does he
know what they're going to do?" he
said. "I find it interesting that he
doesn't know the facts, yet he
knows the consequences already."
COSMIC TRIP FASCINATING for student painfully trying to escape reality of existence. Oh! She's succeeding
Programs to be sliced haphazardly
—eric eggertson photo
hear the snores?
By PATTI FLATHER
Program cuts will definitely be
made next year but how decisions
will be made is a subjective exercise,
UBC's president told 25 student
senators Monday.
"This is not a totally scientific exercise," said George Pedersen in
SUB 205, referring to the cuts. He
said he did not see how program
cuts could be avoided if faculty
receive a "very modest" increase,
the first in two years, even if tuition
rises 10 per cent.
Pedersen and senate budget com
mittee chair Geoffrey Scudder
discussed how decisions to cut will
be made, but it became clear the
decisions reshaping UBC will be exclusive and confidential.
ANALYSIS
Senate budget committee last
year developed a vague set of
criteria by which cuts would be
made. Programs were theoretically
divided into core, core-related, and
non-core, with the latter being cut
first.    But   the   committee   never
Arms race devastates economy
By JAMES YOUNG
The arms race, both nuclear and
conventional, may result in a devastating breakdown of the Canadian,
American and world economies, a
Vancouver journalist said Saturday.
"The figures show that our economy may collapse even before we
run into a nuclear explosion," said
Geoff Meggs, editor of the union
paper, The Fisherman, at the annual general meeting of the Vancouver Peace Assembly.
Speaking to 60 people at the Indian Centre of Vancouver, Meggs
said high technology, often related
to military production, is already
having negative effects on the Canadian economy.
"Who is deciding that we're going to spend all this money on a
Canadarm when we don't have reforestation?" he asked.
"Why is it that we're so interested in throwing satellites into space
and building microchips in Sidney
when we don't have a salmonid en
hancement program and can't even
save our own fishermen from
drowning off the west coast?"
Meggs warned against further
Canadian involvement with American military markets, as promoted
by Pentagon officials during a
cross-Canada tour in December.
"They are increasing the amount
they buy from us for two reasons:
one is to accelerate the integration
of our economy with theirs and the
second is to tie us more tightly to
their military plans," Meggs said.
See page 6: PROFIT
publicly defined what programs fit
these three categories.
According to Pedersen Monday,
vice president academic Robert
Smith then worked closely with
four deans representing fine arts,
medicine, the natural sciences and
engineering, and the social sciences,
and wrote a confidential report using the senate committee criteria.
This report is still not public.
Pedersen admitted under senator
questioning: "It's a difficult issue,
knowing who should make that
decision (what to cut)." But apparently Pedersen has decided, and
the main actor is Smith.
Pedersen said the letters Smith
sent to all 12 faculties recently singling out specific programs as
needing justification do not represent final decisions. Responses to
the letters will be used, said
Pedersen, by the administration
and the senate budget committee
when deciding cuts. Again, the letters are not public although The
Ubyssey has been leaked copies of
two of them.
Scudder said the next stop is for
Smith to "put his ideas together."
Privately again, of course.
The ideas of Smith and the
budget committee must eventually
become public because any program cuts must go through senate
and the board of governors. Both
Scudder and Smith said Monday
judging quality and programs will
be very hard, especially with the
humanities.
"Quite honestly that's toughest.
When you try to start judging the
quality of fine arts against the quality of chemistry, that's hard," said
Scudder. Scudder said anything
anyone thinks might be
"non-core," whatever it is, is being
scrutinized closely.
The time frame on public debate
regarding cuts may be short,
though. Pedersen told the senators
he expects the provincial government budget for 1985-86 in mid-
March. "We must implement this
on the first of April," he added.
If there is a deficit, then programs will have to be cut and faculty fired effective April 1, he said.
Unless cuts are made retroactive
after this time, it is hard to see how
there can be real public debate in
two weeks. But Smith, the budget
committee, and deans have been
debating the priorities privately for
much longer, and it seems possible
their decisions will escape close examination.
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THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 19, 1985
George woos business
UBC's president is taking the
university's case to downtown
businesses today in a luncheon address, while UBC will be rallying
near the Clock Tower against
education cutbacks.
George Pedersen will speak on
the role universities can play in the
economy at 1 p.m. at a $20 per head
luncheon in the Hotel Georgia
Ballroom, said Margaret Nevin,
UBC vice Monday. Pedersen will
address the society for Corporate
Planners, the Association of Professional Economists, and the Institute of Management Consultants,
she said.
"Dr. Pedersen will be talking
about the important position the
U.S., Japan are now in because of
the massive investment in research
they're making." Nevin said these
two countries are at the forefront of
the information and technology
race becaue they are concentrating
on improving their high tech industries and educationg highly skilled personnel.
Pedersen will also discuss the effects of provincial government
restraint at UBC and the role UBC
can play in a provincial economic
recovery, said Nevin.
Profit motive in arms race
From page 5
And under the burden of military
spending, the American economy
could collapse like a house of cards,
Meggs said.
"Defense money, spent on guns
and armaments is dead money: not
one cent of goods are brought onto
the market by military expenditures."
The strong American dollar and
the low rate of inflation are temporary phenomena, effectively devaluing foreign currencies and exporting inflation to Canada and other
trading partners, he said.
The Third World is most severely
affected by the arms race which intensifies existing conditions of scarcity and contributes to their mili
tarization.
Meggs said the profit motive is a
factor in the continuation of the
arms race. The average rate of profit for companies dependent on
military production was 16.5 per
cent in the period 1976-78, while
profits in civilian production were
10.5 per cent, Meggs said.
Another factor is the overlap between leaders of industry and the
military.
"In 1969, there were 2,077 retired
Pentagon employees, and I'm talking about people like generals and
above, who were employed by arms
manufacturers. So there's a complete overlap between the military
leadership of the U.S. and its industrial arm."
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International House Board
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Land Use Committee 1 position
Men's Athletics 3 positions
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Sherwood Lett Memorial 1 position
Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre     1 position
Traffic & Parking 4 positions
United Way Campaign 1 position
Walter H. Gage Memorial 1 position
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Women's Athletics 1 position
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February 20
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228-4741 Tuesday, February 19, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
- .%   *v-
-sf-
By KEVIN KROCHAK
Reprinted from the Manitoban
Canadian University Press
Buddy Loyie
| is a soft-spoken
which belies his passionate
[ concern for native people.
His voice rises noticeably as
he talks about the inequities
in native education.
"Granted, in the past few years
some strides have been made," he
says, hands chopping the air in emphasis. "But there's still a long way
to go before you can call the native
educational system equal to
anything found in a white middle-
class neighborhood."
The problem with education is
not funding, says Loyie, a native
student advisor at the University of
Manitoba, but a lack of real direction and leadership. Loyie, who has
been an advisor at the U of M In-
dian-Metis-Inuit Students' Association since 1981, says the native education dilemma is familiar to all reserve councils whenever they receive
government support.
"Take housing, for example. The
band council is given a certain
amount of money and told to build
five houses. The trouble is that
there is really only enough cash for
two houses. The result is five substandard homes that'll deteriorate
quickly and end up costing everybody more in the long run."
As in housing, the emphasis in
native education is on quantity and
not quality, says Loyie. Native students are passed from grade to
grade almost as a reward for just
showing up, and when follow-up
studies are done, the findings are
tragic: high school graduates with
grade four reading levels, astounding illiteracy levels among the
young, and another generation of
native people growing up unprepared for the future.
"Lots of time, too, (native) students, particularly in the north,
who get an inferior education, may
have grade 12, but that wouldn't
give them an equivalent to grade 12
here in Winnipeg," says Loyie.
"They may have it down on paper
. . . maybe they're passed (from
grade to grade) in small places because they (the teachers) don't
know how to deal with them, or
don't want to deal with them.
Maybe they have teachers in the
north that just don't give a shit."
Those native students who do
make it through high school and into university find it's no picnic
there either. Their numbers may be
rising quickly, but native students
at Canadian universities are still finding the whole experience a difficult
one, says Loyie.
"There's a lot of northern students that are just lost when they
come here," says Loyie. "They
don't know what the courses are,
they don't understand how the system works, and they don't know
what the slots mean. They don't
know where their classes are, and
they don't know where their books
are, everything."
Loyie says a good part of his job
is "just orienting them (native students) to the first day and then afterwards,   seeing   that   they  don't
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to post-secondary institutions, especially non-status Indians who do
not receive government assistance.
Jerry Ameis has seen first-hand
the issues which confront native
people, including the problem of
low-quality education. He spent
five years as a social worker in Winnipeg's core-area, home to one of
Canada's largest urban native
populations, and a year as a teacher
on the Peguis Indian reserve in Northern Manitoba.
Ameis describes the native educa-
"When I went to Simon Fraser
University in Vancouver - I went in '66 -
there were four Indian students," he says.
drop out, that they're not alienated
by the environment that surrounds
them."
There are more than 350 native
students at the U of M, says Loyie,
and the vast majority are status Indians, which means the federal government bears the cost of tuition,
books and residence. Status Indians
may face problems at university,
but much greater are the worries of
the non-status university student,
says Loyie.
Loyie says non-status Indians
must rely on student aid, or the special Access program at the U of M.
"If it weren't for the Access program at the university, you could
count the number of non-status Indians on campus on one hand,"
says Loyie.
Status Indians have the right to
an education, as well as other
rights, guaranteed to them by the
federal government under treaties.
"When I went to Simon Fraser
University in Vancouver — I went
in '66 — there were four Indian students there," he says. "You could
count them on your hands, and
now there's 400. And that's happening right across Canada. . . And
I bet you, and I'm just guessing,
that it's going to change the way Indian Affairs looks at how they fund
students."
Loyie thinks the federal government may look at changing its open
policy for funding all status Indians
who want to go to university because of the jump in native students
attending. He estimates the enrolment jump has increased the government's cost "a thousand times."
Loyie says more bursaries are
needed to accommodate the rapidly-rising numbers of natives going
tion situation as one of "disrupted
culture." Whether on the reserve or
in a city ghetto, native people are
forced into a position which demands they renounce their heritage
in order to survive. This is especially
true of non-status Indians, who
make up the vast majority of natives living in urban core-areas.
During his years in the city,
Ameis spent time working directly
with poor children, both native and
non-native, who had, as he described it, "little past and no future."
More than half of core-area
students come either from single-
parent homes or homes where the
parents are unemployed. More than
65 per cent of urban native
studensts drop out of school before
tenth grade, says Ameis.
He says that economics and education are inherently linked for native people. With little economic independence, Ameis says native people are forced to accept lower education standards. Only employment
and stable, humane living conditions for inner-city natives can
"break the cycle of despair" which
perpetuates the problem.
Reassessing the distinction between status and non-status Indians
would alleviate part of the education problem, says Ameis, adding
the difference between the two is
wholly arbitrary and unfair. Ameis
knows of one native at the Peguis
reserve who is considered status
despite his red hair. Some natives
are considered status though they
may.speak no Indian tongue, while
others who can speak their native
language are viewed as non-status.
Curtis Fontaine, of Winnipeg's
Native Clan Association, is more
optimistic about the state of native
HILLEL HIGHLIGHTS
Tuesday-12:30
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One Woman's Perspective
Wednesday—
Torah Study Cancelled
12:30 Have lunch with Amos Gilboa
"Opportunities in Israel"
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224-4748
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education. He points to several literacy programs as examples of tangible progress towards better native
education. Fontaine admits, however, that issues like more native
teachers and counsellors are pressing ones.
"I would like my child to be able
to have a positive role model which
might help him feel more proud of
his heritage," says Fontaine.
The Knowles Centre in Winnipeg
houses and educates core-area
children, many of them wards of the
Children's Aid Society. Knowles
counsellor Allisson Cancilla says the
situation there is aggravating because although almost half the students are native, there is not one
single full-time native social
worker. She says this leads to problems because most of the kids at
Knowles have a hard time relating
to their own culture and feel alienated, which is difficult for white
social workers to comprehend.
Richard Hart is an example of the
best of both worlds: he is educated
in the modern sense and still prizes
and takes pride in his native heritage. Hart is the president of the In-
dian-Metis-Inuit Students' Association at the U of M and is heavily involved in setting up events and programs for native university students.
Hart and the IM1SA play an even
greater role as the focal point for
native students while they are going
to school. Hart says many have
rural backgrounds and are ill at ease
in the city. IMISA helps them adjust. The native student organization is also a good model for what is
needed by native people across the
country — a body which helps them
conscientiously assimilate the dominant Canadian culture without being overwhelmed and destroyed by
it.
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THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 19, 1985
Socreds receive
Feb. 14 visit
&&
VICTORIA (CUP) — It was anything but Valentine's day for the
600 people who gathered on the
front steps of the B.C. legislature
Thursday to protest.
Speakers denounced what they
called the governments "immoral"
lack of funding for education and
warned the cuts could ruin job prospects and the provinces economic
well-being for years to come.
"The issue we must all face at
this time is a question of
priorities," said Carol Pickup,
greater Victoria school board chair.
"The government says it doesn't
have enough money. Baloney. Their
priorities are all cock-eyed."
NDP universities critic Lome
Nicholson urged the crowd to keep
fighting.
"We cannot let this government
turn B.C. into a Third World province.   We   need   a   well   educated
youth for the challenges of tomorrow and we deserve nothing less,"
Nicholson said.
One protester carried a sign
which read: "Let's make education
a mega-project."
The demonstrators included university and college students from
Vancouver, Victoria, Nanaimo and
Williams Lake, as well as a sprinkling of local high school students.
Protesters shouted for cabinet
ministers to address them throughout the 90 minute demonstration,
but to no avail.
Universities minister Pat McGeer
said after the protest he was in his
office at the time and had not been
invited.
"I didn't even know they were
here," McGeer said.
McGeer said university students
are "getting a terrific deal."
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Tuesday, February 19, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
Programs will be cut and faculty will be fired
From page 1
because there are not enough people to mark them. The special
education department has been cut,
though not officially.
This year programs will be cut
and faculty will be fired. The administration has sent letters to all
faculties asking them to "justify"
certain programs.
Other universities and colleges
have experienced similar cuts. The
Kootenays were devastated when
the Socreds eliminated David
Thompson University Centre last
year and cut Selkirk College 10 per
Peterson dished out
despite Wacky's views
From page 1
age" as they called it.
To commemorate the building of
the campus the students constructed the rock cairn which lies between
the Chemistry building and the bus
stop cafe. Its inscription reads "TO
THE GLORY OF OUR ALMA
MATER STUDENT CAMPAIGN,
1922-23."
In the years to come the march
became legendary and people called
it The Great Trek.
The story might have ended there
but in 1956-57 — driven by overcrowded classes and residences —
the student society again organized
a Great Trek of sorts.
Despite the crisis, there was no
trek proper and most of the events
organized were moderate failures.
One rally ended in a snowball fight.
Following student petitions,
education minister Leslie Peterson,
now a UBC board of governors
member, agreed to provide $5 million in funds if UBC could match
this money with private funding,
despite earlier statements by then
premier W.A.C. Bennett. Peterson
later upped the matching funds to
$10 million. And so ended a rather
belated second Great Trek.
A third Great Trek was attempted in 1982 to publicize the plight of
post-secondary education in B.C.,
but few came.
Today could be the third Great
Trek if successful. And if history
teaches any lessons, it could influence the provincial government.
Then again, it may not.
University Christian Ministries
presents:
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Thursday, February 28
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Also at North Burnaby & Coquitlam
cent. SFU is cutting arts severely
and creating a new applied science
faculty in the hopes of attracting
government financial rewards.
Students' accessibility to post-
secondary education is also a major
Trek issue, especially since B.C. has
the lowest participation rate in
Canada for 18 to 24 year olds.
The provincial government
abolished student grants last
February, making the student aid
program all-loan. Poorer students
face going thousands of dollars in
debt for a four year degree. And
with B.C.'s unemployment rate the
second highest in Canada, there is
no guarantee of a job to pay off the
debt.
The cost of education is rising as
tuition fees are raised far above the
inflation level. Last year at the three
B.C. universities there was a sharp
rise in "no-shows" — students who
were accepted but did not register.
At UBC alone the number of "no-
shows" increased 17 per cent. A
joint universities study found 30 per
cent of these people could not afford the costs.
The Trek also addresses university autonomy and potential threats
lo what autonomy there is. UVic's
president recently revealed that provincial government officials have
told him to cut certain programs
disliked by the government.
If UVic eliminates anthropology,
sociology, political science, and
music, the government told UVic it
may not get such a severe funding
cut. This is clearly pressure by a
government trying to set university
priorities.
Supporters of post-secondary
education will be taking their case
to the public and media today, to
try and influence the government
before it announces next year's
budgets, probably next month.
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DAL GRAUER
MEMORIAL LECTURES
UTA BIRNBA UM
An outstanding European stage director and newly appointed Professor of
Theatre at the University of Hannover, Germany, Mrs. Uta Birnbaum will
condust workshops for Theatre and Fine Arts students, as well as present 2
public Dal Grauer Memorial Lectures. Mrs. Birnbaum is at UBC at the invitation of the Departments of Theatre, Germanic Studies and Slavonic
Studies, and the Program in Comparative Literature to participate in their
week-long symposium
ARTIST AND SOCIETY: THE EUROPEAN EXPERIENCE IN THE 80s
Monday, February 25 — 8:00 p.m. in Buchanan A-104
"The Role of the Modern Theatre in East and West,
Using the Story of a Director as an Example"
Tuesday, February 26 — 3:30 p.m. in Buchanan Penthouse
"Alternative Theatre in West Germany: Some Personal Experiences"
(Talk and Discussion. Coffee will be available at 3:00)
Enquiries R. Rumley 228-5675
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THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 19, 1985
A^ki^VM
Join
wiH f  i'ih ',    tv>.' ",'t
Letters
Don't join the Great Trek. Because if you do, you will
endanger your chances of becoming a used car
salesperson. Or it could blemish the beautiful resume
that will land you a posh job as a screwdriver seller in
Burnaby.
And who would pass up the status of going to the
most expensive school in all of Canada?
It is obvious to all that superficial, irrelevant programs
such as those offered at UBC get you nowhere in a
Social Credit province. What we need is more
unemployment.
We don't need any profs, they need us. We pay good
money, and we expect to get the worst profs around.
Instead of reading books, we should eat coal,
because that is what they are giving us.
Heck, if the government really had any sense, they'd
plow the whole university and make it into a parking lot
for Expo.
So if you're fed up with well-funded rampant education like we are, then don't trek. It's the only sane thing
to do.
Editorializing
Grad disgusted by Ubyssey
Applications for the pompous
and august position of Ubyssey collective member are invited. The
Ubyssey will be receiving applications for the positions of city editor,
news editor and entertainment
editor until Feb. 27.
Applicants should be cheerful,
witty, talented, sharp and able to
frighten with a look. Gumbies need
not apply. In fact anyone who can
be twisted around like a rubber
body with a wire skeleton need not
apply.
I am disgusted with the Ubyssey's
coverage of an editorial on the
engieers' annual degradation of
women, the Lady Godiva ride. The
question to be addressed has
nothing to do with "freedom of expression"; at issue is the fundamental question of how women should
be represented, and more immediately, how they are treated in
this university and this society.
The Lady Godiva ride is not only
objectionable, it is intolerable, for
it encourages people — men and
women — who think of women as
objects ("fun" ones, as EUS vice
president Ginny Balcolm implies).
The fact that the Engineering
Undergraduate Society secretary is
able to state that a bat, beaver, and
woman are interchangeable as
emblems proves the point; if Rob
Lazenby cannot understand the differences betwen women and bats,
he degrades not only women but
men as well.
As a woman, I resent being the
object of his "zest and innovative
involvement," (incidentally, Rob,
sexism is far from innovative). He
can play with a bat instead.
As we all know now, thanks to
the Ubyssey's in-depth and "objective" coverage, the engineers are
not interested in innovation, but
rather, "tradition."
However, simply because sexism
has time on its side, does this make
it valid? Rather, its long history
points to the fact that it is high time
responsible individuals put a stop to
such practices. —Ah, but it is
argued that some women "don't
mind" the Lady Godiva ride!
Since when does an XX
chromosomal pattern make you an
expert on sexism, particularly when
almost everything in this male-
dominated society encourages you
to accept it?
Such logic is analogous to asking
a woman who has had nothing but
trash to eat for a lifetime if she
minds it — if the answer is "no",
perhaps it's because she has no conception of what else the menu could
offer!
This is not a theoretical debate,
but one, which involves actual
events and people. To see that the
AMS tacitly condones this act —
thus allowing it to become a spectacle for engineers and those of a
similar sexist ilk — is disgusting,
and the Ubyssey should state this in
unequivocal terms if it stands for
women's rights.
The onus of protest rests not just
with women as the editorial implies,
but with all respnsible individuals
who oppose injustice; I assume this
would include the Ubyssey staff,
no?
The Ubyssey should address these
issues — perhaps by starting with its
editorial cartoon which parodies the
very serious issue that the naked
woman, an entertainment object
for the engineers, is objectionable,
by making her appear less objectionable than a "naked" horse
(again, can't you see the difference
between horses and women? You
on
and Rob should start a club
another planet!).
No, the issue raised by this event
is not one of "freedom of expression." Perhaps there is a grain of
truth in the editorial headline "Intolerance", because I am intolerant
of activities which feed into sexism
and oppression; this is an appropriate response when every
woman in this society is affected by
that oppression every day.
I am not asking for my right to
speak out against sexism — I am
demanding my right to eliminate it.
Laurie Monahan
graduate studies
Letters
Citizen protests
1 would like to extend my congratulations to the women and men
who protested the annual engineering undergraduate society sponsored "Lady Godiva" ride through
the UBC campus.
I graduated from UBC three
years  ago:  during my  four years
Peru abuses human rights
Two years ago a remote area
of Peru known as the Andean
Emergency Zone was placed under
direct military control. And since
that time, more than 1000 men,
women and children have "disappeared". Hundreds of others have
been killed while in the custody of
government forces, often after having been tortured.
Amnesty International has
recently launched a worldwide campaign to call attention to the continuing human rights abuses in Peru
and as a part of this campaign,
Amnesty UBC has organized
several events.
Monday Feb. 18 and Tuesday
Feb. 26, letter writing marathons
will be held in the SUB. Letters and
petitions are an important means of
pressuring governments who allow
the abuse of human rights.
We invite students to stop by and
sign a petition or sponsor a letter
during these marathons.
Because many human rights
violations occur only when they're
hidden, public concern can make a
difference.   Some  of  the   "disap
peared" persons have been released
in the past, but only after national
and international protests.
Please join Amnesty UBC's efforts to make the Peruvian govern
ment aware that the human right
situation in the Emergency Zone is
becoming an international issue.
Marianne Bissegger
for Amnesty LBC
Reject the Godiva Ride
What is all the fuss about? The
Engineers are iust having fun,
right?
Think about it.
They pay a dancer to strip for
them. They pay her to ride around
campus on a horse so that they can
shout at her, in front of as many of
their peers as they can bring along.
Is that how they see all women?
As a commodity, something to be
bought? Sort of like buying her dinner, expecting to take her home.
Maybe the Lady Godiva ride is
not offensive enough. Have you
seen the NUES letter — the cartoons and jokes about women? Can
it all be disregarded as insignificant,
just some good old boys having
their fun?
True, they represent an extreme;
they do not even represent all
engineers. But what is it an extreme
example of? Does it not alert us to a
more subtle problem — that men,
at lest in part, are expected to express their masculinity by displaying
at lest some disrespect for women?
Sure, there are men who do not
hold these views. So where were
they during the Godiva ride? If we
do not speak out about the blatant,
how can we expect to change the
subtle?
If we do not speak out, are we
not endorsing the subtle attitudes
and behaviour which in their extreme forms manifest themselves in
physical and sexual abuse of
women?
Meredith Woods
law 2
there, although the issue was hotly
debated in the pages of this
newspaper no protestors openly
displayed criticism of the event.
It appears this year, as always,
the engineers are offering their
pathetic defense of both their romp
through the campus and their use of
the symbol of the nude woman.
Much has been said about the
naked woman symbolizing the
"spirit" of the engineering faculty.
Rob Lazenby, engineering
undergraduate society secretary
says in the Feb. 8 Ubyssey, Lady
Godiva displays the "zest, in-
novativeness and community involvement" of his faculty crowd rejects EUS Godiva ride protesters.
I can't comprehend what he sees
as innovative about a naked lady in
the vicinity of the U'BC peninsula.
Hasn't he ever visited Wreck
Beach? He'd probably get a good
dose of zest from that experience.
As for community involvement,
half of the UBC population is comprised of women. The few female
and male protestors who bravely
chose to openly defy this annual insult to women showed, in my opinion, one heck of a lor more interest
in the good ot the university community then did those who turned
out to aa»v!s.
I.adv Godi\a
a symbol of
THE UBYSSEY
February 19, 1985
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Fridays throughout the academic year by
the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are
those of the staff and are not necessarily those of the university administration or the
AMS. Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is SUB
241k. Editorial department, 228-2301/2305. Advertising 228-3977/3978.
Patti Flather and Robert Beynon are very busy this issue making sure all the children have shoes for the Great Trek. The high-heeled crowd, Renate Boetiier, Erin
Mullan, Murray Johnson and James Young, are obviously going to have problems. Gordon Clark, Angus Fraser, Victor Wong and Bruce Cookson are going to
keep pace with their pointy black shoes while Monte Stewart, Hui Lee and Denise Coutts never leave home without their skates on. Sarah Millin. Peter Bagnall
and Ron/ Allen will be bounding along in sensible sneakers as Robby Robertson and Charlie Fidelman direct traffic in their flourescent army boots Cynthia Davis
dropped by barefoot to look around. The AMS rented a van stuffed with galoshes for everyone just in case.
faculty,  is a pathetic reflection of
that group.
Silent acceptance of the ride is a
sad reflection of the university community as a whole.
To the protestors, thank you,
and I hope your numbers will grow
if the ride proceeds next year.
Jennifer Gray-Grant
4209 W. 12th Ave.
Letters. We love 'em. We get a
kick out of funny letters, insightful
letters, stupid ones too. Please type
them triple space on a 70-space line
and address them to "Dearest editorial collective." We edit for brevity and style only. No sexist or racist
letters, please. Bring them to SUB
241K today. Tuesday, February 19, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
Gay/lesbian movement has vitality
By SARAH MILL1N
and PETER BAGNALL
The gay and lesbian movement is
not a sprint but a marathon, the
U.S. National Gay Task Force executive director told a dinner held in
SUB for the second annual B.C.
Gay and Lesbian conference.
"This movement will exact from
you all the patience you have to
give, all the energy, and several
lovers," said Virginia Apuzzo to an
enthusiastic audience of 140 Saturday.
Apuzzo, an ex-nun and educator,
has been committed to the gay
rights movement for 12 years.
"I have a lot of hope in it," said
Apuzzo, adding she sensed an energy and vitality in the movement.
Apuzzo characterized the gay
rights movement as a social change
movement and stressed the day-today work and the planning it requires. This is because opponents of
gays and lesbians have never been
better funded, Apuzzo said. Electronic preachers have access to mil
lions of people per week, and are
some of "the slickest, most media-
sophisticated people," she added.
"The Moral Majority has more
people on its staff in the state of
New York than the entire gay and
lesbian movement in the U.S."
The state of affairs in the U.S.
for homosexuals is quite serious,
she said. Since the AIDS crisis
there, the Mormon undersecretary
of health has been responsible for a
behavior modification program
aimed at gays in Utah. Apuzzo called U.S. surgeon-general Everett
Kopp "another sweetheart of the
New Right."
Leaning over the podium, one
hand on her hip and the other
brandishing a teaspoon for dramatic effect, Apuzzo told of her experiences at congressional hearings on
the AIDS crisis.
"In my opening statement, I said
that the response of the U.S. government was criminal." Because the
disease affects homosexuals, Haitians and IV (intravenous) drug
users, (40 per cent of the victims are
people of color), the American government has been slow to take action, Apuzzo said.
Apuzzo also stressed the need for
gays to work with other oppressed
groups to fight for civil rights. She
also stated that with sexism, racism
and homophobia, knowing one
does not always make you conversant with the other two.
Apuzzo told delegates they do
not have to be important political
characters to affect change. She
spoke of Rosa Parks, the black wo
man in Montgomery, Alabama,
who "sat down on a bus, and forced a nation to stand up." Parks refused to move to the back of the
bus where blacks were supposed to
sit, marking the beginning of the
U.S. civil rights movement.
WEXrCAR FIESTA
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"A YEE CHIHUAHUA " said the
BOHEMIAN. Fogg n Suds is having
another SUPERIOR Mexican Fiesta . . .
The best Fiesta under the SOL. Lots of
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THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
THE CECIL H. AND IDA GREEN
VISITING PROGESSORSHIPS
1985 SPRING LECTURES
JOHN GORDON
Dr. John Godron is Dean of the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies. He has
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education. Before joining Yale University last year, Dr. Gordon was Head of the Forest
Science Department at Oregon State University. He has also taught at Iowa State University
and the University of Glasgow, and was associated for several years with the U.S. Forest Service.
SUPER TREES: SUPER FOR WHAT AND FOR WHOM?
Wednesday, February 27 In Room 166, MacMillan Building, at 12:30 p.m.
FORESTRY EDUCATION: WHO CARES?
Thursday, February 28 In Room 166, MacMillan Building, at 12:30 p.m.
ALL LECTURES ARE FREE — PLEASE POST AND ANNOUNCE
Occasionally unadvertised seminars are presented.
Please call Mrs. R. Rumley at Local 5675 for information.
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WHAT A DIFFERENCE A NAME MAKES. Page 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 19, 1985
Security Intelligence Service to recruit arts grads
MONTREAL (CUP) — Canada's
top-secret spy service wants to
recruit university graduates,
preferably arts majors, into its
ranks.
The Canadian Security Intelligence Service is looking for
graduates with political science and
sociology backgrounds, a receptionist at CSIS's Ottawa office said.
"Languages are also good," she
said.
Most of the new spy service's
positions have been filled with people transferred from the RCMP
security service. But "a lot of people stayed with the RCMP, so there
are openings in every category,"
she said.
Research ai
arms technology
TORONTO (CUP) — Canadian
university researchers should think
"very hard" about the potential
military use of their research, says a
former United Nations ambassador.
George Ignatieff, now the
University of Toronto chancellor,
said universities have played an active role in the development of
weapons technology, including
nuclear weapons, chemical warfare,
and the "Star Wars" defence
systems, from research initiated
with no military intent.
Ignatieff said he is concerned
about the Reagan administration's
Star Wars proposal because it
means the destruction of monitoring satellites which verify arms control agreements. He said the universities' role in the development of
such a scheme is a disturbing one.
While universities have contributed to military research, the
chancellor said they have acted as a
spur   to   the   peace   movement.
The receptionist, who could not
give her name, said the service
wants recent university graduates to
fill these slots, even though they
won't be recruiting "the way big
companies used to do on campus
and talk to students."
The former Liberal government
invoked closure last spring to cut
off debate and pass bill C-9,
creating the new spy service. CSIS is
a civilian operation charged with
"investigating threats to the security of Canada" and has no law enforcement power.
Speaking to the House of Commons justice and legal affairs committee last May, Ted Finn, who has
since become CSIS director, said
those who want to be spies must be
21 years or older, interested in a
public sector career, and have a
university degree or equivalent.
"The individual ought to have an
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FOR ZONE BOUNDARY AND MORE FARECARD INFORMATION, PICK UP A BROCHURE FROM ANY
FARECARD OUTLET. AVAILABLE THE LAST 5 AND FIRST 5 WEEKDAYS EACH MONTH FROM:
AMS TICKET OFFICE, MONDAY-FRIDAY 10:00-5:00
Vancouver Regional Transit System
BC Transit Tuesday, February 19, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 13
AGM slower than usual
By VICTOR WONG
Four minutes, 39 seconds.
That's how long this year's
scarcely advertised Alma Mater
Society Annual General Meeting
took Friday.
Only 29 people came to the
meeting in SUB 206 which lasted
one minute longer than last year's
meeting, even though free beer,
wine and food was available. And
today's Great Trek march and rally
protesting education cutbacks was
not discussed.
Great Trek committee co-chair
Mark Reder said meeting organizers
would not address the issue. "1 was
hoping they'd give me a few
minutes to talk about it," said
Reder. But incoming AMS president   Blenna  Chestnutt   said  later
All staffers interested in walking
in a UBYSSEY contingent in the
"What the Heck" are faithfully requested to meet at noon in the Daily
Blah office. Trek for freedom, profits, and everything nice and cuddly. Be there — we need the exercise.
most people at the meeting were
council members who already knew
about the Trek.
The AGM requires a quorum of
10 per cent of UBC's daytime
students before the agenda can be
accepted.
Outgoing AMS president
Margaret Copping in her report
condemned current funding cutbacks and urged next year's executive to fight for student funding.
The report was unanimously rejected as a joke.
Items approved were the minutes
of last year's general meeting, the
1983-84 auditor's report, the appointment of Peat, Marwick, Mitchell and Co. as this year's
auditors, and last year's financial
statements showing the AMS with a
$340,746 surplus.
Duncan Stewart, external affairs
coordinator-elect, said the AMS
was aiming to have an even shorter
meeting than last year's under president Mitch Hetman. But Copping
denied this. "I'm not going to beat
Mitch's    record,    there's   just   no
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There was one small advertisement in The Ubyssey notifying
students of the event, and few if any
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228-4741 Page 14
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 19, 1985
%j&ati
TODAY
LAW STUDENTS LEGAL ADVICE PROGRAM
Students legal advice clinic, noon, SUB 119.
ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT
"The  Withering  of  the Welfare  State,"   with
British   economic   prof.   A.   J.   Culyer,   noon,
Angus 110.
INSTITUTE OF ASIAN RESEARCH
Lecture: "Sojourners and Strangers: Japanese
Families and the Dilemma of Living Abroad,"
3:30 p.m., Asian centre 604.
UNDERCOVER
Photo  session,   sign   up  for  new  game,   new
members welcome, noon - 2 p.m., SUB 119.
BAHA'I CLUB
Free  coffee and  tea  day,   noon,   International
House upper lounge.
JEWISH STUDENTS
ASSOCIATION/HILLEL
"Starting up in law," with Lisa Nemetz, lunch
available, noon, Hillel House.
IDIOTS AND NEANDERTHALS
SUPPORTING A NUCLEAR EVENT
Cruise "Pro-Test" rally, 11:30 a.m., SUB plaza.
OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS
Recovery  program  for compulsive overeating,
newcomers welcome,  noon,  Lutheran Campus
centre conference room.
PRE-MEDICAL SOCIETY
Lecture  oTl  clinical  research  with  immunology
head   from   B.C.   Children's   Hospital,   noon,
Woodward 1.
INSTITUTE OF ASIAN RESEARCH
Films: Ritual and Marastoon, noon, Asian centre
604.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration, noon, SUB 216.
UNDERWATER HOCKEY
Practice,   all  welcome,   equipment  provided,   7
p.m.. Aquatic centre.
EAST INDIAN STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Important general meeting, noon, SUB 213.
WEDNESDAY
AMNESTY UBC
Video: Ayacucho, place of the dead, noon, SUB
211
CHINESE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Heart Pursuit dance, 8 p.m.-l am., Anna belle's
UBC ENTREPRENEURS CLUB
General meeting, all welcome, noon, Angus 326.
JEWISH STUDENTS
ASSOCIATION/HILLEL
Hot lunch, noon. Hillel House
INTEGRITY IN ACTION CLUB
Guest Susan Maranda speaks on "The Awakening," noon, Buch B137
ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT
British   economics   Professor   A    J    Culyer   on
"Whither the Welfare State," noon, Angus 110
UBC ADVENTURE AND TRAVEL CLUB
"Fiji and the South Pacific," slide presentation,
noon, SUB 205
UBC ANARCHIST CLUB, LATIN AMERICA
SUPPORT COMMITTEE, SOCIALIST
EDUCATION SOCIETY
On Guard for Thee; Part III on Canada's nahona
security   operations   and   civil   liberties,    noon,
Buch A100.
UBC SPORTS CAR CLUB
Nominating meeting, 7 p m , SUB 213.
THURSDAY
SUBFILMS
Film: Tightrope, 7 p.m., SUB auditorium.
CUSO UBC
"Famine and Progress: Ethiopia," 7:30 p.m.. International House upper lounge.
MAYAKOVSKY
By Stefan Schutz
Translated by Tom Kempinski
Directed by Craig Duffy
FEBRUARY 27 - MARCH 2
Wed. - Fri. 8:00 p.m.
Sat. 5:00 & 8:30 p.m.
Student Tickets: $4
(Box Office - Room 207,
Frederic Wood Theatrel
DOROTHY SOMERSET
STUDIO
University of British Columbia
Res. 228 2678
FRIDAY
CHINESE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Car rally, 7:30 p.m., SUB loop.
THUNDERBIRD BASKETBALL
Canada West game vs Calgary Dinosaurs, 8:30
p.m., War Memorial gym.
THUNDERBIRD HOCKEY
Canada West match vs Saskatchewan Huskies,
will be broadcast on film nationally, 4:30 p.m.,
Thunderbird arena.
SATURDAY
CHINESE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Badminton tournament, 8:30-11:30 p.m.,
Osborne gym A.
AMS ROCKERS
Social Jammin' Night, liquid music enhancers 50
cents each, BYO instrument, 7:30 p.m., SUB
207/209.
THUNDERBIRD BASKETBALL
Canada West game vs leading Lethbridge Pronghorns, 8:30 p.m., War Memorial gym.
THUNDERBIRD HOCKEY
Last home game vs Saskatchewan Huskies, 7:30
p.m., Thunderbird arena.
MONDAY
AMNESTY UBC
Lecture   on   human   rights  violations   in   Peru,
noon, SUB 205.
PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Grad school seminar with guest Dr. Phil Smith, 4
p.m., Suedfeld lounge in Kenny
TUESDAY
INSTITUTE OF ASIAN RESEARCH
Seminar   with   Paul   Lin:   "One   country,   two
systems,"  on  China  and  Hong  Kong and  coexistence, 3:30-5 p.m., Asian centre 604
INSTITUTE OF ASIAN RESEARCH
Film on Little Mountain, Nepal, noon, Asian centre 604
Important Ubyssey
staff meeting, Wed.,
noon. Lots of things
to discuss including
elections for the new
collective, this
weekend's conference,
and special issues.
That's in SUB 241k.
THE VIDEO STORE
>95a
per day
VCR &2 FREE Movies
Monday to Thursday
Above offer available on
presentation of valid student
card and this advertisement
from the Ubyssey.
OFFER EXPIRES MARCH 28/85
4605 West 10th Ave
(at Tolmie)
t^g
UBC — SAY HELLO TO CANADA
A HOCKEY TELEVISION FIRST
FRI., FEB. 22—4:30 p.m.
THUNDERBIRD ARENA
TSN, Canada's National Sports Network will be televising
nationally the UBC — University of Saskatchewan hockey
game live from UBC's Thunderbird Arena.
Bring a sign, bring a towel, bring your friends and say hello to
all of Canada.
Come and watch hockey with intensity, as The Thunderbirds
fight to even their season record with the University of
Saskatchewan   Huskies.   T'birds   Bill   Holowaty  and   Rick
Almann continue to set team and league records.
Thunderbird Arena full facility lounge, $1.49 night special
Tickets   —   Adults   $3.50,   Students   and   Seniors   $2.00
UBC Students FREE with AMS card.
FUTURE UBC ATHLETIC EVENTS
Hockey — Sat., Feb. 23—UBC vs. Sask. 7:30 p.m.
Basketball—Fri.,   Feb.   22—UBC   vs.   Calgary,   Sat.   Feb.
23—UBC vs Lethbridge.
Fri.-Sat. Mar. 1/2 — C.I.A.U. Men & Women's National
Gymnastics Championships, War Memorial Gym.
Bah! Don't listen lo what these young pups tetl you about the Great Trek, The really big event in UBC's history was the Grey Trek, a little-publicized
event that shook the academic community when thousands of grey reats occupied the Faculty Club. Revolutionary, jhat's what .t was! Problem was,
the university president came into the dub for lunch and mistakenly hired 200 mutated giant test rats as professors. There has been a campus-wide
search since then, but most profs have already soaked up so many rads from the toxic waste dump in Subway, that it is impossible to distinguish the
bogus faculty from the real ones. But I know the answer. During the trek downtown, watch closely. Any professors who find their way through the
maze of traffic-congested streets to the rally are probahiy grey rats in disguise. THIS HAS BEEN A PUBLIC SERVICE MESSAGE FROM THE GREY
TREK COMMITTEE.
I
I
I
oft)
TUDIO
Free Graduation Photo Session
i
jv This is your invitation to have a guest sitting and see a complete I
I selection of colour previews without cost or obligation. This offer j
j  is valid to all 1985 UBC graduating students Phone now for an ap- ,|
j  pointment, 736-7281 or 731-1412.
I.
2111 West 16th Ave., Van., B.C.
clb
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders — 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional lines, .60c. Commercial - 3 lines.
1 day $4.50; additional lines, .70c. Additional days. $4.00 and .65c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 70:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications, Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C.  V6T2A5
.rv«
Charge Phone Orders over $10.00. Call 228 3977
COMING EVENTS
30 - JOBS
85 - TYPING
AMS
ART GALLERY
SUB, Mon.-Fri.: 10-4 p.m.
Steinke/Taylor
Feb. 18-Feb. 22
Rilae/Wientjes
Feb. 25-Mar. 01
PART-TIME work available at Video Store
located on Main St. at 25th Ave. For interview call Greg, 874-0112,
FIZZ ED AIRBAND
& DANCE
March 1, 1985
SUBallroom 7 p.m.
Tirf: $3.00
*Tix avail. WMGym, AMS Box Office 'Airband contest open to all
faculties across campus. Info &
registration forms avail. Rm. 301
WMGym or call 228-6175 days/263-
1204/nights. Bands are selected on
a first come, first serve basis.
SO ENTER YOUR BAND NOW!!
VANCOUVER EAST
PROVINCIAL
PROGRESSIVE
CONSERVATIVE ASSOC.
MEETING
Tuesday, Feb. 19
7:30-9 p.m.
Rm L5 Britannia
Public Library
Agenda:
1) new members
2) new constitution
3) elect executive
4)   select   delegates  for  leadership
convention (March 16 & 17)
40 - MESSAGES
LINDA! Happy birthday goof! Eat, drink &
be merry; we already warned the SUB
Love The Klub.
DAVID: I hope you'll have a theatre guide for
me. I'd en|oy having a drink afterwards
ANYA
PHYSICAL ENERGY. I've got your mind
and body. Now I wanl your heart, maybe
by April? Happy Valentine S ' E .  Energy.
EYEWITNESSES required for accident on
4500 block of W. 10th Avenue (on Valen
tine's Day) in which a cyclist crashed into
the door of a car parked facing east. Please
call Kartick at 228-4833/731-4354 or leave
message.
STUDENT HOUSING FOR
SEPTEMBER, 1985
Application forms and brochures for
new applicants to the student
residences are now available at the
Student Housing Office.
Reapplication forms for current
residents will be placed in their
mailslots on February 16, 1985.
The first day that student housing
will accept returned, completed applications in person is Friday, March
1st, 1985.
11
FOR SALE - Private
FOR SALE 71 VW van. Camper-
ized. New uphol., no rust, AM/FM radio,
gas heater. Good condit. Call 733-5774.
1976 DODGE Royal Monaco.
Automatic, power steering, brakes. Used
daily. $750. 321-0666.
FIND A TUTOR
BE A TUTOR
Register at
SPEAKEASY
Mon.-Fri.
9:30 a.m.-9:30 p.m.
SUB Concourse
(Phone 228-3777)
DOTS WORD PROCESSING offers reason
able rates for students for term papers,
essays & masters   273-6008 eves
UNIVERSITY TYPING-Word processing.
Papers, theses, resumes, letters. P-U & del
9 a.m.-11 p m. 7 days wk   2512064
WORD PROCESSING (MICOM). Student
rates S14 hr. Equation typing avail. Fast
professional service. Jeeva. 876 5333.
WORDPOWER - Editing & word proces
sing professionals. Thesis, term paper,
resume & form letter specialists Student
rates  3737 W. 10th lat Alma). 222-2661.
WORD    PROCESSING    SPECIALIST.    U
write,   we  type,   theses,   resumes,   letters,
essays. Days, evgs/wkends   736-1208.
EXPERT TYPING. Essays, term papers,
factums, letters, rnscpts., resumes, theses.
IBM Selec. II. Reas. rates   Rose 731-9857.
YOUR WORDS professionally typed - to
go. Judith Filtness, 3206 W. 38th Ave.,
263-0351 (24 hrs I Fast and reliable.
WORD WEAVERS - Word processing,
stud, rates, fast turnaround, 3 terminals.
Bilingual. 5670 Yew & 41st   266-6814.
TYPING: Professional presentations fot
proposals, resumes, etc. Competitive rates.
734-0650 (24 hrs.)
WORD PROCESSING SERVICES. Spell
ing, grammar expertise. Days, nights,
weekends. Call Nancy 266 1768.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING. Math, sciences,
languages, fine arts, litetature Will correct
grammar & spelling. 872 7934.
TYPING — Fast, accurate, reasonable rates.
734-8451.
PDQ WORD PROCESSING. Essays,
theses, reports, letter, resumes. Days,
evgs/wknds. Quick turnaround, student
rates. 731 1252.
WORD PROCESSING/TYPING. Student
rates. Ideal for students on North Shore.
Days, eves., weekends. 985-8890.
BUDGET TYPING       Lowes! rates,
$1.00 pet page and fast1!
Telephone 736-3008.
65 - SCANDALS
1975 RED VW VAN. 57,000 mis., $4,100.
263-8506 eves, or leave message.
ONE-WAY plane ticket to Toronto March
7, $120. Phone 931-3301.
25 - INSTRUCTION
LSAT. GMAT. MCAT preparation. Call
National Testing 738-4618. Please leave
message on tape if manager is counselling.
LET US PREPARE YOU FOR THE
OCTOBER 5. 1985 LSAT
on September 13, 14, 15, 1985
For information call free
LSAT/GMAT PREPARATION COURSES.
112-800-387-3742.
WHEN   WAS   THE   LAST  TIME   you   did
something that felt really worthwhile?
Volunteering provides that and more. Get in
touch with Volunteer Connections. Call
228-3811 or drop by Rm 200, Brock Hall.
GUFFER, what a beautiful year! It's spring
again — time to visit the beach for Swiss
picnics. CPK.
WORD PROCESSING by Adina. Discount
for all student work. 10th & Discovery.
Phone 222-2122.
SPEAKEASY has a typist registry. Find a
typist or be a typist. SUB Concourse. Drop
by 9:30 a.m.-9:30 p.m.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING. 25 yrs. exper-
ience. Reasonable, accurate fast. Phone
Richmond. 271-6755.
TYPING: Essays, theses, term papers,
mscps. $1.25/page. Call 228-8827 aft. 4
p.m.
80 - TUTORING
ESSAY WRITING counselling, also research
shortcuts. 224-1342 (24 hrs).
85 - TYPING
MINIMUM   NOTICE:
224-1342 (24 hours).
Essays   &   resumes.
RESUMES
There are resumes and there are resumes.
Employers find the ones we design and prepare
to be among the best. Why spend valuable time
reading all the "How To . . " books. Bring us
your basic information and we will design a
resume for you that wiil catch the attention of
your potential employer. Call today for an appointment.
WORDPOWER -222-2661 T^
Tuesday, February 19, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 15
UBC swim teams win Canada West championship
By HUI LEE
CALGARY — The UBC swimming and diving team was victorious
in last weekend's three day, five-
university Canada West Universities
Athletic Association championships
The women's team was led by the
performance of Barb McBain, a
first-year science student who won
both the 100m and the 200m
backstroke as well as leading off the
winning 400m medley relaty which
SPORTS
here. UBC won the women's competition while placing a solid second
in the men's division, en route to
capturing the overall title. Participating teams were from the
University of Calgary, the University of Victoria, the University of
Manitoba, the University of Alberta and, of course, UBC.
also included Jennifer Good, Sandra Mason and Anne Martin. Other
winners were Martin in the 500m
freestyle and Fiona Waddell in the
400m individual medley. There
were also numerous second and
third place finishes, including Nancy Bonham's victories in both the
lm and 3m diving events.
The Thunderchicks dominated
the competition from start to finish,
as indicated by the fact they finished with 536 points to second-place
University of Alberta's 386 points.
More importantly, a record 14
members qualified for the CIAU
championships at Brock University
two weeks from now. Including
those mentioned, qualifiers are
Ronda Thomasson, Brenda Jones,
Ira Leroi, Helen Chow, Jill
Christensen, Vickie Byman, Carlyle
Jansen and Melody Smeaton.
The men's competition was a battle for second place (behind the
University of Calgary) with the
University of Victoria. Though the
T-Birds only won one event, the
100m backstroke by Bruce Berger,
the team showed a tremendous
amount  of depth  by  finishing a
respectable second; the top three
finishers were U of C first with 530
points, UBC with 420 points and
UVic with 326 points.
Good performances by the whole
team in the finals and consolation
finals, such as Berger's second place
finishes in the 1500m and 400m
freestyles, diver Steve Donelly's
third place in the 400m individual
medley, were crucial in accumulating points since the team
lacks stars.
The men's team at CIAU's will
consist of 13 members: Berger,
Donelly, Steve Church, Calvin
Church, Mike Ball, Chris Bowie,
Andy Crimp, Geoff Grover, Greg
Lohin, Kevin Stapleton, Dave
Young, Ian McMillan and Craig
McCord.
UBC easily won the overall title
with 956 points, compared to defending champion University of
Calgary's 653 points. Calgary's second place showing broke a string
of Dinosaur victories which began
with the trophy's inception four
years ago. Coach Jack Kelso
believes that the team's depth will
be important in the T-Birds' performance at the CIAU Championships
late this month. The women's team
is currently ranked first nationally
and the men's team fourth,
although the third-place team was
the UVic Vikings. The goal at the
CIAU's will definitely be to win the
women's competition to be UBC's
second national champions this
year (the men's soccer team won the
CIAU title in November), and to do
well enough in the men's to
challenge for the combined title.
Vikings vanquished twice
BALANCE BEAM supports Jennifer Dong. The first year Thunderbird
finished third overall in Canada West finals at War Memorial Gym, enabling
UBC women's team to win title. The men were second. -rorya. photo
By MONTE STEWART
A sports editor's delight, the
topic can create headlines while
making or breaking a season for
some teams. Revenge did result last
Thursday but the men's basketball
team did not reap any benefits in
terms of championship opportunities.
UBC downed UVic Vikings 79-62
at War Memorial Gym. Pat West
led UBC with 28 points while Jage
Bhogal added 14 and posted 12 rebounds.
The T-Birds broke their five year
losing streak to the Vikes, perennial
national champions during the five
year span. However, the victory
would have been more meaningful
if the Thunderbirds were not mired
in second from last place in the
Canada West Universities Athletic
Association.
With a 2-6 record, the 'Birds have
little or no chance of making the
play-offs. They have been virtually
eliminated from the Canada West
play-offs with two games remaining
in the 10 game season.
The 'Birds' only hope of a post
season berth is to be selected as a
wild card entry in one of the
regional tournaments which lead to
the national finals.
Meanwhile, in an exhibition contest Tuesday, UBC downed
Western Washington Vikings 75-62
at War Memorial Gym. UBC,
displaying unusual cool, led from
start to finish.
Erik Lockhart and Dale Olson
paced UBC with 14 points apiece
Pat West and Aaron Point netted
12 each as the next highest UBC
scorers. Brian Paul led the
Bellingham-based Vikings with 12
points.
The T-Birds finish their season at
home this weekend. Friday,
Calgary Dinosaurs — a mere two
points ahead of UBC — will be the
visitors   at   War   Memorial   Gym.
Saturday, Lethbridge Pronghorns,
former cellar dwellers who now rest
atop the standings, will be UBC's
final opponents in conference play.
With two straight wins, UBC
would move into a tie with Calgary
for the fourth and final play-off
position.
Both Calgary and Lethbridge
have beaten UBC this season.
Hence, revenge will again be a key
motive.
Vikettes bounce Thunderbirds
The UBC women's basketball
team ended their season Saturday
night with a 67-49 loss to the
number one-ranked University of
Victoria Vikettes. Finishing with a
record of two wins and eight losses
in conference play, frustration and
disappointment were evident on the
faces of the UBC players.
Emotions ran high the entire
evening. At half time, co-captain
Janene Seabrook, on behalf of her
teammates, presented Delia
Douglas with a bouquet of roses.
Douglas, who was recently named
the Canada West Player of the
Week, was playing in her final game
as a Thunderbird.
Thunderbirds win but lose here
The inevitable happened last
weekend. Saskatchewan Huskies
swept a pair of games from the lowly Lethbridge Pronghorns, clinching the second and final Canada
West hockey league play-off berth.
The Thunderbirds, who split a
pair of games against Northern
Arizona last weekend, are now
eight points behind Saskatchewan
with only two games remaining.
Friday, Northern Arizona
Lumberjacks   defeated   UBC   7-6
begore a crowd of 2,242 fans in
Flagstaff, a haven for sun seeking
Canadians. Saturday, UBC downed
the Lumberjacks 9-3. Daryl Coldwell and Dave Brownie netted two
goals each for UBC. Renzon Berra,
Paul Abbott, Bill Holowaty, and
Graham Kerr added single markers.
This Friday and Saturday, the
'Birds wind up their 1984-85 season
with a pair of now meaningless
league games against Saskatchewan.
Dong dings as Thunderbirds win Canada West title
Jennifer Dong helped the T-Bird
women's gymnastics team win the
Canada West title last weekend at
UBC. Dong, a first year science student, finished third overall in the individual competition. The UBC
men's team, led by Mark Byrne's
fifth place standing overall, finished
second behind Calgary.
»      •      »
The Thunderbird ski teams will
be   attempting   to   defend    their
Jeannie wins
Jeannie Cockroft has reached the
upper echelons of women's high
jumping.
The UBC student recorded a personal best of 1.88m to win the high
jump competition at the Canadian
track and field championships.
Cockroft is now the second best
B.C. women's high jumper behind
Debbie Brill. Alison Armstrong of
Western Ontario holds the CIAU
high jump record with a vertical lift
of 1.79 metres, set in 1983.
Both Cockroft and Brill (a Canadian Olympic gold medalist), are
coached by UBC mentor Lionel
Pugh. Tami Lutz, holder of the
third best high jump in the CIAU
this year is, like Cockroft, a strong
candidate for the national individual high jump title.
regional championship of last
season this Thursday, Friday and
Saturday (February 21, 22, 23) at
the NCSA Regional Championships
at Blue wood Mountain in
Dayton, Washington. Both the
men's and women's teams' main
competition    for    their    regional
championships will include the College  of  Idaho,   Whitman  College
and SFU.
*      +      *
The UBC women's volleyball
team lost two straight matches to
UVic last weekend, watching their
play-off hopes diminishing in the
process.
Now, UBC's only hope of
reaching the CIAU finals is to earn
a wild card berth.
The UBC men's team closed out
the season with two straight losses
to the Vikings.
This weekend, Calgary and
Saskatchewan will be the sole participants in the Canada West
playoffs. Calgary will be the site of
the women's final while Saskatchewan will host the men's championships.
WOMEN'S ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION
NOTICE OF
ELECTION
EXECUTIVE POSITIONS:
* PRESIDENT * SECRETARY
* VICE-PRESIDENT MEMBER-AT-LARGE
NOMINATION DEADLINE:
MONDAY. FEBRUARY 25. 1985
ELECTION:
W.A.A. ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 1985       12:30 P.
ROOM 213 WAR MEMORIAL GYM
MANAGERIAL POSITIONS OPEN FOR:
M.
BADMINTON
BASKETBALL
J.V. BASKETBALL
CROSS COUNTRY
FENCING
FIELD HOCKEY SOCCER
J.V. FIELD HOCKEY SQUASH
GYMNASTICS SWIMMING/DIVING
ROWING TRACK & FIELD
SKIING VOLLEYBALL
J.V. VOLLEYBALL
"Nomination forms and manager applications available
Room 208 War Memorial Gym
Rent A Mountain
Bike This Long Weekend
or a tent, sleeping bag, stove,  kayak,  gaiter,  pannier,
roofrack,    rainsuit,    hiking    boot,    sleeping    pad,
backpack . . .
Miyata  Mountain  Bikes  in  three
sizes     for     $10.00/day     or
$19.007weekend    (including   the
mid-term break) plus great prices        -^^L
on   lots  of  other  great  outdoor      ==
stuff.
The rental shop is located in the cage
in Osborne Gym Unit 2 out near the
skating rink. It's open 1-5 p.m. Fridays
with  special  pre-holiday  hours this
week 1-5 p.m. Wednesday. Drop by
and   pick  up  a   price  list   or   rent
something for the weekend.
Phone 228-4244
k
E^
£ Page 16
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 19, 1985
1980s stressful
MONTREAL (CUP) — The head
of the Universite de Montreal's
overworked counselling office says
students of the 1980s are more anxious, more isolated and under more •
stress than were students of the
1960s and 1970s.
But Francine Boucher says this
isolation may be producing a new
kind of student, more independent,
having a "reinforced and
autonomous spirit."
The U de M's orientation and
psychological counselling service is
now so back-logged that a student
in distress must wait four months
for an appointment, she said. For
the past five years the service has
seen, on average, 5,000 students per
year. Five hundred of these come
strictly for psychological problems.
If the university hired more personnel for her office, Boucher said,
the service could easily help double
that number of students.
The disintegration of the family
and   the   impersonal   educational
system cause heavy stress, according to Boucher. Parents are no
longer playing a role in considerate
companionship for those under 18,
as they had done in the past, she
said.
CEGEPs and universities are too
large, with too "brutal" an environment, to offer any more protection, Boucher said. In these surroundings, students are struck by
"emotional emptiness, and their
dreams vanish," she said. They lose
faith in collective ideals, and fall
back on "sure and practical values,
even at the expense of their true internal capacities."
"There should be more emphasis
on finding ways of taking away this
solitude," Boucher said. "Schools
concentrate more on intellectual
than emotional development.
"Students need to fee! included.
They need to be able to talk to a
professor, which is no longer done
because classes have 120 students in
them."
JEE
kinko's copies
5706 University Blvd.
Vancouver, B.C.
V6T1K6
(604)222-1688
GOT A PROBLEM?
NEED TO TALK?
SPEAKEASY
UBC's First
Peer Counselling Centre
Mon.-Fri.: 9:30 a.m.-9:30 p.m.
DROP IN: SUB CONCOURSE
(no appointment necessary)
or phone 228-3700, 228-3777
WARNING: Health and Welfare Canada advises that danger to health increases with amount smoked —avoid inhaling. Average per Cigarette-
Export "A" Light Regular "tar" 10.0mg., nicotine 0.8 mg. King Size "tar" 10.0 mg., nicotine 0.8 mg.
Export "A" Extra Light Regular "tar" 8.0 mg., nicotine 0.7 mg. King Size "tar" 9.0 mg., nicotine 0.8 mg.

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