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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Nov 5, 1968

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Array PROVOKING SERIOUS THOUGHT with his finger in the air is Les Horswill, chairman of Friday's AMS sponsored meeting on crowding and student limitation.
$?&>:, J-^JKi***-^  ^^■Am^-'S^Vd'. s* <'TS.- "•■>-
Meeting urges
enrolment cut
By NATE SMITH
Students must demand immediate limitations on UBC
enrolment and begin a political campaign against the Social
Credit government, says AMS president Dave Zirnhelt.
Speaking to 400 students at a rally Friday, Zirnhelt
asked: "Do we continue to support universal accessibility
to an overcrowded institution or do we cut enrolment
until resources are sufficient?"
The rally outside SUB was sponsored by the political
education subcommittee of the AMS.
"We want an administration decision on enrolment
this year," said committee chairman Les Horswill.
"This can't be the institution which takes up the slack
for government inadequacies."
Horswill proposed an enrolment ceiling of 25,000
students.
Geography prof J. D. Chapman said no new students
should be admitted until financing is adequate.
"If you tell people their Johnny or Bobby won't be
able to come here they will force the government to change
its priorities," he said.
Economics prof David Bond proposed that enrolment
be limited to 20,000, with both new and old students being
admitted by random selection.
"If people realize that students with 101 per cent
averages might not be able to come back they will put
pressure on fuzzyhead (Premier Bennett)," Bond said.
Zirnhelt opposed Bond's random enrolment method
and said the restrictions have to be placed on first year
students only.
"I'm just being pragmatic," he explained.
"You're being very pragmatic, Dave," Bond replied.
Bond said students must ask the opposition parties
for explicit policy and then work for them in the next
provincial election.
"Bennett won't react unless he's kicked," said Bond,
"and I propose to give him a good size 13."
Zirnhelt said the AMS has $14,000 which could be
used for political action if freed by council.
Horswill said meetings between student and faculty
representatives will be held this week to prepare a joint
position.
mmm.
Council does about face,
accepts Linde's revisions
Student council Monday
atoned for its famed irrelevancy by accepting vice-president Carey Linde's proposed
constitutional revisions.
The revisions, shabbily considered in two Sunday meetings
are as follows:
—to enable undergrad societies to levy their own fees;
—to implement the commission structure; and
—to  replace the  present
weighted  vote   system   by
representation  by   population.
Once again, it was the first
issue    that   caused   the   most
trouble.
The opposition was represented by Alma Mater Society
treasurer Donn Aven who expressed fear the revision would
be taken advantage of and put
to bad use.
"As it stands, the proposal is
open enough to allow small
societies to spend monies unwisely," said Aven.
"I can't agree with the possible uncontrol of spending."
Peter Braund, law representative, agreed there were problems such as "the need for a
central union going down the
drain if enough societies become financially independent,"
but said the good issues outweighed the bad.
"Allowing the undergrad
societies to levy their own fees
would permit for the first time
those societies with enough guts
to get sufficient funds to further projects the AMS can't
support from here," said
Braund.
Exernal affairs officer Tobin
Robbins said the undergrad
societies weren't the only function the AMS had.
"Besides," he added, "the
universities of Toronto, York,
and Manitoba have this system,
and not only does it work well,
but the central government remains strong."
Linde again emphasized the
AMS "can't act as mother and
father to undergrad societies
on campus."
"One of the greatest points,"
he said, "is with more money
in the undergrad societies,
more students can get involved
in undergrad affairs."
Council voted to submit the
revisions to a referendum,
which will be held soon.
The revisions will appear in
full in The Ubyssey in subsequent editions.
Back your favorite fascist,
vote in SUB lounge today
mmmmmmmm
"America owns 65 per cent
of Canada. Uncle Sam owns
you."
So say the posters which will
appear on campus today urging
you to vote on your official
colonial subjects' ballot in the
American election.
Also on the posters is a quote
from the Nov. 1 Time magazine reading "Not vote in 1068?
Millions of foreigners will gladly take any non-voting American's place at the polls. A mere
two per cent of the world's
population is about to elect a
president whose every move
affects the other 98 per cent."
To alleviate this situation
election booths are being prepared to give Vancouverites a
chance to vote without the
responsibility of possibly electing a fascist.
Polling booths will be located from 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. in
SUB lounge and from noon to
3 p.m. outside the U.S. consulate, 1030 Georgia.
On the ballots are the three
" straight"    candidates   Hum
phrey, Wallace and Nixon, as
well as Pigasus and Eldridge
Cleaver.
Pat Paulsen was omitted
from the ballot through an
oversight.
There are only 1500 ballots
being printed, so hurry to the
poll.
"People could make up their
own ballots if ours run out
though," said John Mate, organizer of the vote-in.
"Results will be handed to
the U.S. consulate," he said. Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  November 5,   1968
— John frizell photo
OLD GRIZZLY BEAR, Karl Burau, is pictured here diving for salmon in Empire pool. The plunge
was fulfilling his part of a challenge he issued claiming students were physically unfit.
CUS   irrelevant' to UBC
claims campus committee
A special committee of the four campus
political clubs has called the Canadian Union
of Students 'irrelevant' to students at UBC.
A resolution unanimously endorsed by the
committee states that because the present
policy and practice of CUS is not supported
by the majority of UBC students, CUS is irrelevant.
Committee member Kent Pearson, a past
president of the campus Liberal club, said
money is one of the big reasons he wants to
get out.
"This year our fees will be in excess of
$13,000 and will reach $20,000 next year," he
said.
Pearson added that education is a provincial responsibility and CUS is not really necessary.
"We want to stop this situation that exists
where the CUS executive have expensive business accounts to fly around the country and
have conferences with each other," he said.
Pearson said the committee plans to submit
the issue to students on a referendum as soon
as possible.
The UBC Conservatives, Liberals, New
Democrats and Socreds were represented on
the committee, which was chaired by Stuart
Clark, arts 3.
It was set up in early October to discuss
the relevance of CUS to UBC students, and set
forth its findings in a report released late last
week.
A number of meetings were held at which
advocates for and against CUS debated the
issue.
CUS finances were examined and CUS
president Peter Warrian appeared before the
committee to argue for the national organization.
Meanwhile the commerce undergrad society's external vice-president said Comm. US
meeting will put the matter of withdrawing
from CUS to a vote shortly.
"Most of the commerce undergrad council
is in favor of withdrawing," said Bob Drury,
comm. 3. "If we vote to withdraw, we will forward our recommendations to the Alma Mater
Society executive."
Drury claimed in an interview that CUS
is an eastern-based organization which doesn't
serve B.C., and that so many members have
withdrawn from CUS that it no longer represents the Canadian student population.
He said CUS is national while UBC seeks
funds on a provincial level, and that UBC's
problems are provincial, not national.
He added: "nothing has been done by CUS
to promote greater student communication between UBC, Simon Fraser University and the
University of Victoria.
"I just don't think we're getting our $13,000
worth," said Drury.
Magazine and music orgy
takes place daily in SUB
By   JAMES  CONCHIE
Workers of the world unite!
Fascists arise!
Depending on your tastes you
can now relax reading the
Peking Review while listening
to the songs of Leonard Cohen
or go into quivers of ecstasy
reading Time to the sweet
strains of Mantovani playing
the Battle Hymn of the Republic.
SUB's listening and reading
rooms, which opened on September 23, have something for
everyone.
toe through the Canadian
Journal of Commerce or the
Financial Post; engineers can
practice their figures in the
latest copy of the Engineering
and Mining Journal or Playboy.
Education students can follow their finger through "This
magazine is about schools," or
Punch. And finally, the less
literate can look through the
pretty pictures in Cece Bennett's Beautiful British Columbia.
These are only a few of the
over 125 periodicals the reading room has on order.
Commerce students  can tip- The listening room, with 10
turntables and two tape decks,
also offers great variety to the
student with time to spare.
Lots of time, that is. The
line-ups for turntables are very
long.
A rapidly expanding collection of albums, including everything from jazz through Ukrainian folksongs to classical music,
is available to the student
body. The facilities may also
be used to listen to your own
records.
And finally, a w o r d from
SUB cultural supervisor Fred
Flores: "Please stop stealing
the center folds from Playboy."
Film Society  Presents
Michael Caine in:
"FUNERAL IN BERLIN"
NOVEMBER 7 - 12:30, 3:30, 6:00, 8:30
NOVEMBER 8 - 6:00, 8:30
OLD AUD. - 50c
Mcdonald, currie & co.
CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS
Representatives from our firm will be on campus on the
following dates to interview students for positions available
in offices of our Firm throughout fanada.
Monday, November 25: Tuesday, November 26
and Wednesday, November 27,1968
These positions are available for the graduates in
Commerce, Arts, Science, Engineering and Law.
Further information and arrangements for interviews
are available through the Placement Office.
B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION
and
U.B.C. SPECIAL EVENTS
Present
The Fantastic Singing Rabbi
SHLOMO CARLEBACH
Don't miss the man who turned on more than 1,000
students when he sang on campus last year. What
began as a 1 hour folksong concert ended in a iVi
hour happening.
Tuesday, November 5
S.U.B. Ballroom 12:30 p.m.
Admission - 25c
EMPLOYMENT
INTERVIEWS
Representatives of Cominco Ltd. will interview
graduates  and   post  graduates   in
CHEMICAL, METALLURGICAL, MINING
and GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING;
in HONORS GEOLOGY and HONORS CHEMISTRY
for permanent and summer employment.
Graduate students in Electrical and Mechanical
Engineering are also invited to apply.
INTERVIEW DATES
November 5, 6, 7, 8
Further details are available at the
Student Placement Office.
Tcominco Tuesday, November 5, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
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— dick button photo
NO, IT'S NOT an addition to the fort, it's just another of the campus's creeping   cement  monstrosities.  This  one  is  masquerading  as the  new  administration
building, due to open early in the New Year. This one cost $1.8 million.
Info  overload'
tested in Hebb
A New York professor will head a multimedia "organic laboratory experiment" in
Hebb theatre tonight which is open to the public.
Dr. Vincent Giuliano, a former White House
consultant on science and technology, will head
the presentation entitled, "Coping with an information overrich environment."
A team of two technicians will create an
information overloaded environment using
films, slides and sounds.
The program, one of a series sponsored by
the Extension department, will take place in
Hebb theatre from 7-10 p.m. For more information phone 228-2181.
Papa Bear doctors
for charity in SUB
The Papa Bear's Medicine Show is coming
to UBC on Nov. 7 to play for Youth Resources.
The group will play in the SUB ballroom
for two hours starting at noon for only 50 cents.
All proceeds will go to Youth Resources.
Debate:
Freedom
vs. anarchy
Aid. Harry Rankin and
Tom Alsbury will waggle
tongues Wednesday in a
noon Oxford-style debate
at UBC.
Joining them on the
topic: Freedom and Not
Servitude is the Cure for
Anarchy, will be two
mystery UBC students. It
happens in the SUB conversation pit.
Alsbury and Rankin
will represent the affirmative side of the resolution; the students will
think negative.
The councillors agreed
to join the debate in the
stead of radio blabbermouths Jack Webster and
Jack Wasserman, who
cancelled their engagement.
'%A
Old Socreds resolution
gets young Socreds ire
The majority of UBC Socreds disagree with part of a resolution passed
Saturday at the B.C. Young Socreds
Convention, says the president of the
UBC Social Credit club.
The resolution was endorsed with
a standing ovation when read Saturday night at the B.C. Social Credit
league convention being held concurrently in the Bayshore. The Young
Socreds resolved that no student
should be compelled to join or contribute to any organization as a condition for attendance at university; and
any student who counsels student
riots or flagrantly disregards laws of
the land be suspended.
Dan Banov, UBC Socred president,
said Monday, "Although the club
members agree with the second part
of the resolution, they feel that membership in the Alma Mater Society
is necessary."
"The resolution was passed to condemn the faculty club sit-in and the
irresponsible students involved," he
said.
Michael Martinoff, UBC forth-year
arts student and past president of the
UBC Social Credit club, presented the
resolution to the B.C. Young Socreds.
Banov said most of the delegates
to the Young Socred convention were
not university students.
"Martinoff was understood to have
been referring to AMS membership
in the Canadian Union of Students,"
he said.
"But most of the delegates didn't
know the purpose of the AMS."
Robert Bennett, a UBC student
delegate to the B.C. Social Credit
league convention, pointed out to the
league convention that the AMS also
condemned the faculty club sit-in.
The resolution said "... by their
disgraceful behavior, ... (a few vociferous individauls) have damaged the
reputation of the entire student body Page 4
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  November  5,   1968
Published Tuescfays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university yean
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services
of Pacific Student Press, of which it is founding member, and Underground
Press Syndicate. Authorized second class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. The Ubyssey publishes Pag*
Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City editor, 228-2305. Other
calls, 228-2301 editor; Page Friday 228-2309; sports 228-2308; advertising
228-3977. Telex 04-5843.
NOVEMBER, 5, 1968
Ideas at large
By PETER  LADNER
Nothing is neutral.
Once you get that straight a lot of thing start to make sense.
A few years ago our administration president, John MacDonald, told us the university should not be an instrument for
social reform. It must remain neutral, I believe he said, so all
sorts of ideas can prosper. But in the very act of staying
"neutral", the university is actively supporting the present structure of our society by training people to fit into it. The only
way a university can stay neutral is to stop functioning.
A lot of people also believe a newspaper can be neutral, or
objective. This too, is nonsense. Even if its editors tried as hard
as possible to be objective in their coverage, this is an impossible
task. There isn't room for all the facts about all the stories, so
as soon as you single out a few facts and a few stories as being
the most important, you're editorializing—with facts, even.
Many readers say The Ubyssey is a biased, slanted rag and
the downtown papers are objective, neutral wrappers. They are
only illustrating the law that "All readers are slanted and all
news is slanted. If both slant the same way, the news is called
objective. If they slant different ways, the news is called biased."
Elmer Q. Apathy says he's not neutral. He's not out to upset
anyone's applecart; he just wants to get his education and go
out and become a sales manager for Unsafeway. He says he's just
a neutral, responsible student going about his business and not
bothering anyone.
But he, too, has made a choice—to go the Unsafeway—
and he is committing his time, money, and his life to Unsafeway
and all its values. He is, consciously or unconsciously, pushing
the bits of society he controls in a very distinct direction.
Many people believe our physical environment is just a
neutral backdrop on which we act out our lives. But we just have
to look at the difference in the political consciousness and action
of students at Simon Fraser University and UBC to see how much
the buildings we move in, around and between, shape our lives.
And the classrooms. A few experiments last week with
turning seats into a circle instead of rows showed what an
essential part of our education the so-called neutral seating
arrangement is.
"Propaganda". One disgruntled observer of The Way It Is
Sunday night said the film they showed on revolution in the
U.S. was propaganda. But the CBC news is never called propaganda, because that's the way it is. In Russia it would be called
propaganda, just as Russian news is called propaganda in the
U.S.
Propaganda should be an outlawed word, because everything's propaganda — buildings, seating arrangements, news
stories in any paper, the length of my hair, the color of my socks,
the way I talk, the language I talk. Nouns are propaganda to
make us believe the lie that there are independent, isolated
objects in the natural world.
Yet "educated" people will cry loudly and fiercely for
objectivity when they discover people swaying students from
their "neutral" ways. A hysterical letter to the editor of the
Province Monday went so far as to say that all university
students had to agree with the pinko-anarchists if they wanted
to pass their exams. Even if that were true, what's so new about
having to believe in some else's "biased" opinions before you
can pass an exam? We all spent 14,000 "neutral" hours in grade
school doing that.
No objective, neutral exam was ever that. (Whose subjective opinion was it that those facts on the exams were important?)
But no one raises his emotion to panic level until so-called
emotial, subjective anarchists attempt to redirect the delightfully
"neutral" drift of our society.
Protesters blocking Dow recruiters bring this point home
beautifully. They say "we want it that way", and the university
spokesman says "the neutral university wants it this way this
way."
If we accept that nothing is neutral of objevtive, then we
have to agree that every action implies a choice.
And anyone who goes into the engineering faculty, the
rotary club or the faculty club without being aware of his
choice, his lack of neutrality, and the implications of it, is not
educated.
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EDITOR: Al Birnie
New*   John Twigg These worked, eegawd: Frank Flynn,
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Ass't   city    Alex   Volkoff      well,   Stu   Gray   rerote,   Muriel   Musco-
Managing   Bruce Curtis      vitch,    Erik    Brynjolfson    rote.    Nate
pCE"? diet" BUHO,*.; PoweH.^e Smitl*   is   Back*   Rlck   «""■*   bobbled
Sports   Jim Maddin Ton'*'    Gallagher's    basket-balls.    John
Without   Portfolio       Paul   Knox Frizell  and  Dick Button  picked.
Pago Friday   Andrew Horvat
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TEACH IN
BY RUDI SONNE
Plan for justified action
A consciousness for considering the problems of the university has generally been brought
about by the events of the past
week and a half. But the mood
that has been created is one of
frustration, confusion and pessimism with respect to what
can be done. The reasons for
such a mood are fairly obvious,
and they have been outlined
and commented upon in Friday's Ubyssey, but no discussion
has been directed towards
what is going to happen in
terms of achieving results.
Since part of the frustration
and sense of futility lies in the
fact that no one has clearly
articulated the issues and prob
lems of the university so that
they could be discussed intelligently in some depth and
breadth, the first and foremost
concern is the need to produce
well thought-out and comprehensive analyses of the specific
problems and issues that beset
us.
Following this, such an analysis of each issue is to be presented to the entire student
body for consideration and
deliberation. The essential medium for transmitting this information can be the Ubyssey,
although other means of communication can be utilized also.
Once this 'is accomplished, a
cultivation of campus-wide de-
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—reprinted from The Peak
bates vis-a-vis other teach-ins or
departmentally organized discussion sessions could take
place.
As a result of such debates,
a submittal from all the departments of the university of a
carefully prepared brief as to
the outcome of such debates
could then be compared and
evaluated.
Consequently, the results of
these evaluations would allow
a justified basis for formulating
concrete proposals -which could
then be subjected to the various
acceptable channels for student
and faculty approval.
The end product of this process could not be refused by
the administration for two
reasons: (1) because of the
nature of the process a proposal
for reform was arrived at, and
(2) because President Hare has
committed himself to precisely
this kind of proposition by endorsing the AMS brief to hold
the teach-in.
Aecntanr""- of tv-o D*"ooosals
could be easily started at the
departmental level via students
as a body in the department,
the undergraduate and graduate
associations and unions, the
various clubs, etc. If the AMS
is supposed to represent the
students of this university, it
should, especially in light of
its responsibility for the teach-
in, embark on a campaign of
this sort also. Indeed, a number
of independent groups have
already instigated organization
and research towards some end
with respect to university reform.
It seems then that a number
of possibilities are open. Perhaps if the emphasis on these
possibilities was on co-ordination th**-* natural outcome would
be a form of consolidation. The
efficacy of a concerted effort
could in fact be forseeable by
the end of this coming January.
LETTERS TO THE  EDITOR
Real issues
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
As a recent graduate of both UBC and UCal
at Berkeley, I read with concern of the incident
regarding the faculty club sit-in.
In my two years at Berkeley, student activism and protest became a very real thing to
me, as well as a powerful and acceptable medium of change when applied to salient, pressing
issues.
I also knew Jerry Rubin extremely -well,
and nothing is sadder than to see UBC students
led on an 'issueless, fools errand' to the faculty
club. Student power is too valuable to waste
on petty grievances.
Who gives a damn about the faculty club?
For God's sake, next time a legitimate, crucial
issue.
JOHN KERR
class of '65
Communication
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Much talking has been going on this week
'tween classes, among students, and between
students and professors. Undoubtedly this was
a good thing in itself, for apparently many
students just needed someone to talk to. Barriers broke down and some useful communication took place. The teach-in enabled us to let
off steam; we hope that this energy was and
will be channelled to do creative work.
I  hope we  all realize,  after  this  teach-in
experience, how important and valuable communication is. I believe that a crucial cause of
student unrest is that the system (the establishment, administration, courses, etc.) acts as an
authoritarian parent, guiding and restricting
us. We need a more flexible system. We need
more freedom, but we must be aware that
freedom entails less security! We must begin to
feel responsible for one another; we must continue communication; we must seek and give
personal guidance (on both a professor-student
and student-student basis) instead of suffering
under administrative guidance; we must (as
one professor pointed out to me) be compassionate.
Frustrations are not alleviated by merely
changing the structure of a society. I am beginning to realize that many students are suffering from a lack of direction, purpose and values.
One student told me that there are just no
answers to all the questions raised here. She
was quite frustrated about it. Perhaps it isn't
the function of the university — as an institution — to give answers. But it will may be the
responsibilities of professors and students to
attempt to find answers to the basic questions
of purpose and values which all of us are faced
with.
And I challenge all those who believe they
have answers to some of the questions causing
so much frustration and indirection, to communicate and to feel responsible for others.
To my mind, this issue of reform on the
personal level is as pressing as that of structural reform.
RUDIGER KRAUSE
arts 3 Tuesday, November 5, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
— dick button photo
WAITING FOR THE BUS ? Not on your life! They're waiting
for some unsuspecting male academic who will be seduced
into offering a  ride.
Marxist blabs
in ballroom
Canadian marxist historian
Stanley Ryerson speaks Wednesday noon in SUB ballroom
on French and English Canada.
Ryerson is editor of the
marxist quarterly Horizons, and
author of a recently published
book, Unequal Union.
Admission to the talk, sponsored by Special Events speakers' committee, is 35 cents.
Available at
UNIVERSITY
PHARMACY
5754 University Blvd.
In The Village - V/z blocks
from Memorial Gym
Reprive Recording |9
Nov. 5-17
has recorded
5 LP's
latest single hit
just released
"Things You
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"THE" PLACE
to meet
your friends
is at
The Diner
4556 W. 10th Ave.
Try our delicious T-bone
Steak $1.75
Ifs Really Goodl
Full course meals
within your income
Student Meal Tickets and
Catering Services Available
Socialists change view—MLA
Socialists are moving out of
the area of nationalization and
into the area of economic controls, says NDP MLA Norman
Levi.
Levi, winner of a Vancouver
South by-election this spring,
told 40 people in Bu. 100
Thursday socialists have reevaluated their position.
"We're not selling out. We're
just adapting to a particular
situation," he said. "The basic
socialistic theme is still there."
"But we are trying to spread
the wealth around by bringing
people up from the bottom
rather than depressing people
at the top."
Levi criticized the provincial
government for not correctly
using the federal medicare plan.
"We see Bennett is not doing
anything with the extra money
coming from the federal government, because there is no
apparent increase in the services of the B.C. mdicare program.
"Politically, Bennett is an
idiot," said Levi.
Levi said the NDP caucus is
studying university financing.
"We are visiting the universities to collect information
which we hope to present to
public forums before the next
legislature.
"Universities are going to
have to realize as the amount
of money increases, there has
to be more accountability to
the taxpayer," said Levi.
Levi   said  much   more  dia-
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logue    was    needed    between     lems of socialism is how do we
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calls for the highest type of business leadership . . ."
THE STANFORD UNIVERSITY
GRADUATE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
invitee you to meet its Admissions Representative,
Mr. Terry Mahuron, Assistant to
the Director of Admissions
on November 18,  1968
to discuss the Stanford M.B.A. and Ph.D. Programs in
Business  Administration.   Appointments  to meet  with
Mr. Mahuron may be made through
Mr. A. F. Shirran, Director of Student Services.
The M.B.A. Program is a two-year general management
course particularly designed for students who have
majored in liberal arts, humanities, science, and engineering. The purpose of the Doctoral Program is to
train scholars for the stimulating challenge open to
business educators,  researchers, and innovators.
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THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  November 5,  19o8
CUS head Warrian
not anarchistic'
By KEVIN PETERSON
Canadian University Press
Peter Warrian doesn't talk about the Canadian Union of
Students, he talks about a student movement.
And he sees his main task as putting across certain relationships to students which they may not see now—relationships
like what he sees in the movie Rosemary's Baby.
"How about a film review of Rosemary's Baby in terms of
liberal consciousness?" he asked Peter Allnutt, editor of CUS'
national student magazine, Issue. "The just society is going to
be Rosemary's Baby."
Peter Warrian is president of the Canadian Union of Students.
The professional media pictures and quotes him as a building-
burning revolutionary who intends to knock Canadian universities down to the ground and then move on to level the rest of
society in the same way. The media lies.
Warrian on leadership says: "My concept of political leadership is not the leaders and the led. Leadership is describing ihe
situation, then presenting alternatives."
"The student movement has always been hung up on leadership, the charismatic leader like Dutschke or Cohn-Bendit . . .
encouraged by the media which builds these people."
For the moment, Warrian would much rather stand on a
table in some university cafeteria and talk to students than lead
howling masses through the streets. He doesn't deny that someday
he may be fighting in the streets, but he has no intention of
doing it until Canadian students think that's what's required.
CLEAN-CUT CANADIAN BOY
When people describe Warrian sympathetically, they say he
is the image of the clean-cut, Canadian boy—doesn't smoke or
drink, likes football (he still pays it occasionally) and once was a
seminarian. In short, he becomes the male version of Playboy
magazine's "girl next door".
If you want to like Warrian, he's all that and more. When
he speaks, he has a sincerity which, at times, becomes too much
to believe.
He speaks in quiet tones, but the message is the sort that is
supposed to come across only in revolutionary rallies.
He wants CUS to take ideas to people and help them see
their position: "We talked a lot at the congress about taking it to
the student . . . when we talk about confrontation, we mean not
only political confrontation but a confrontation of ideas."
CUS's September congress in Guelph passed several motions
condemning American imperialism in Canadian society. Warrian
is convinced the student can see his position within this framework.
"When I say imperialism, I have in mind a system of political
domination and exploitation," Warrian says. "Students may be
turned off by the word imperialism, but that's a semantic
problem."
"I think an examination of our situation will show we are
politically dominated and economically controlled."
Warrian sees housing in similar terms.
He says, "You can't deal with the question of student housing
in isolation, You must start with the overall problem of housing
in Canada. Again, you are going to arrive at some basic contradictions which have produced the situation."
FULL  TIME   FIELDWORKERS
Warrian and CUS are taking things to the student with an
expanded fieldwork program: four full time fieldworkers, one
each in British Columbia, the Prairie provinces, Ontario and the
Atlantic provinces.
If the approach proves completely successful, Warrian says,
"The year will end with mass student involvement—the majority
of students would demand their place in university decisionmaking and take that place firmly and clearly. The university
would probably begin to operate on a sort of syndicalist (student
as worker) line."
But even Warrian doesn't believe in complete success. Optimistically, he says, "I think it may be possible that by the end
of the year 20 per cent to one-third of the students in Canada
may be involved on a continuing day-to-day basis, with an equal
number following them in crisis situations."
CUS IN TROUBLE
If something near Warrian's prediction is not reached, the
umon may be in trouble. For the past three or four years there
have been rumblings throughout Canada that "students aren't
getting their money's worth from CUS" and talking to people
is not going to produce easily defined financial benefits.
CUS lost nine members during its congress, although three
others signified their intention to join. Referendums are taking
place on numerous campuses about CUS memberships this year
—no one is quite sure how many—and if more large campuses
withdraw, the union could be in serious trouble.
Warrian is bothered by referendums on member campuses,
not because of possible membership losses but because, "Theoretically a referendum is a way to bring issues to the student; in
practice it doesn't.
"Referendums may be valuable at the end of the year, but
in the fall they become counter-productive, abstract, organizational debates.
"If the conditions are there they give rise to the movement
—if they remain, the movement will flourish. We don't manufacture the issues and it is impossible to justify CUS on those
grounds."
However, whether Warrian likes it or not, there are fall
CUS referendums and they do have to be fought.
Join the
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Some have become marketing
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Start by picking up a copy of
Great-West Life's career booklet
fiom your Placement Officer. At
the same time make an appointment to talk to the Great-West
Life Career Counsellor who will
be on your campus:
NOVEMBER
13, 14, and  15
Great-West Life
ASSURANCE   COMPANY
ENGINEERING
GRADS
Graduates in civil, electrical and mechanical engineering
are invited to consider employment opportunities with
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INTERVIEWS: NOVEMBER 12-15, 1968
Mr. G. Laatunen, will be on campus to discuss engineering careers with you on the above dates. Arrange your
appointment through the Placement Office today. Tuesday, November 5, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 7
■*•*£"*
^
Economist  Boulding
warns  rebel  students
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A leading American economist and author Friday described student revolts as challenges to the legitimacy of the
traditional student - professor
relationship.
Speaking to about 75 people
at noon in SUB ballroom, Kenneth Boulding said if we abandon this relationship the whole
institution of the university
would have to be changed.
Boulding is president of the
American Economic Association, former research director
of the Center lor Research in
Conflict Resolution, and author
of numerous works.
"I'm not against student
power," he said, but he warned
that rebelling students could
destroy the university by underestimating reaction to their
threats.
"I'm suspicious of trying to
create freedom through the
threat system, which is what's
coming into the universities
now," he said.
"Threats always produce
counter-threats."
He said youth must not think
student power is legimitate
just because it is youthful.
LEAVES at UBC dominate, along with mud, rain and cars.
Who needs students anyway ? There's no room for them.
Liberal  club frowns
on prof pad take-over
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The UBC Liberal club has
officially frowned on the recent
student occupation of the campus faculty club.
A general meeting of the
campus young Liberals, by a |
two to one vote, said the occupation two weeks ago was not
the result of any co-ordinated
plan for students to gain any
of their desired ends.
"Some of the effects of the
seizure of the faculty club are
detrimental to the image of the
student in the community at
large, especially in the minds
of the people whose support
students   need   most    in    our
struggle with a reactionary
provincial education department," read the club's statement.
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ONTOLOGY SOCIETY presents guest
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NOV. 5,12:30 -SUB 205 (K)
rr
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■
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How
• •
you
yourself?
What kind of person are you?
Are you a doer, a thinker, a prober, an innovator, a leader, a follower, a doubter, a starter, a go-getter, a work-horse, a hot shot. . .
What are you?
How do you see yourself?
Stelco is not only interested in your scholastic discipline, but also in
your ability to learn, to think, to apply. We'd like to hear from you.
We think we have something to offer.
Why not contact us directly or through your Placement Officer.
THE STEEL COMPANY OF CANADA,   LIMITED
Management Development Department
Wilcox Street. Hamilton, Ontario Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  November 5,   1968
STUDENTS INTERNATIONAL
MEDITATION SOCIETY
presents:
An Introductory Lecture on:
DRUGS
AND
MEDITATION
founder of the world-wide sims
maharishi  mahesh yogi
of the himalayas, india
TUES:  Nov.  5th
BU:   100,   12:30 p.m.
»7
^
■FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
It
MAN IS MAN
Bertolt Brecht's farce-parable about the
transformation of a porter into a human
war machine
with
PETER JAENICKE-ALAN SCARFE-GREGORY REID
and an outstanding student cast
Directed by DONALD SOULE
Designed by RICHARD KENT WILCOX
Music by JOHN CHAPPELL
NOVEMBER 8-16
STUDENT TICKETS $1.00 (Available for all performances)
- SPECIAL STUDENT PERFORMANCES -
Monday, November 11 — 7:30 p.m.
Thursday, November 14 — 12:30 NOON
Tickets: The Frederic Wood Theatre Room 207
SUPPORT YOUR CAMPUS THEATRE
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
A
Join the
Commerce Grads
at Great-West Life
Some are investment
specialists. Others have
become marketing experts. Many are with the
computer crowd. Where
would you like to be? The fact is,
no matter what area of business
you wish to enter, you can find
the opportunity you're looking
for at Great-West Life.
You'll be working for one of the
fastest growing companies in the
country, in a job that is stimulating and demanding. The future?
It's just as big and bright as you
want it to be.
Now is the time to get more facts.
Start by picking up a copy of
Great-West Life's career booklet
from your Placement Officer. At
the same time make an appointment to talk to the Great-West
Life Career Counsellor who will
be on your campus:
NOVEMBER
13, 14, and 15
Great-West Life
ASSURANCE    COMPANY
G""EG
INTERNATIONAL
Radical groups
protest election
NEW YORK (CUPI) — Plans were revealed Thursday for
protest action on election day, today, by students for a Democratic Society and the National Mobilization Committee to End
the War in Vietnam.
They include:
• A student strike Monday and today by high school and
college students across the country to protest "university military and racist policies."
• Demonstrations on the streets of a dozen major U.S.
cities, including a New York protest at Nixon headquarters and
a similar protest (complete with draft card burning) at Hubert
Humphrey's home in Waverly, Minn.
• An "anti-election people's festival" at Chicago's Lincoln
Park where cops and students battled during the Democratic
national convention.
The Guardian, radical newsweekly, described the protests
this way:
"In city streets all over the country, at draft boards and
military bases, in financial centres, schools and polling places,
the movement will demonstrate that the elections are a fraud,
and that millions of people will not voluntarily accept their
disenfranchisement."
Both sponsoring groups insist they do not seek to disrupt
the elections but simply plan to provide a "real means of political expression".
'Law and order'
ad condemned
TORONTO (CUP) — Toronto area teachers are upset by an
advertisement placed last week in major Ontario newspapers
by the executive of the Ontario Secondary School Teachers'
Federation.
The advertisement called on citizen support of principals
trying to maintain "proper order and discipline" in their schools.
It said principals were hampered by "irresponsible actions" on
the part of a few "students, trustees, parents and organized pressure groups."
Teachers strongly condemned the ad at a stormy Toronto
district meeting Thursday but spokesmen said there would be no
statement forthcoming until later this week.
Robert Brooks, Toronto district president of the OSSTF,
said the executive "made a mistake in assessing the tone-feeling
of the membership in the province." Brooks was not involved in
the ad placement.
Meanwhile, student-teachers at the 5,000 student Ontario
College of Education are circulating a petition that condemns the
ad and calls for "clarification" by the provincial executive. The
OCE is an associate member of the senior organization.
A leader in the petition movement said the ad "sounds like
fascism to me."
"Anyone who looked at the ad didn't like it," he said. "It
was offensive."
fH-„,--t' ,    *<,•**•■• -   ••*-» - t/p- -'**, —■"■*■••*• ** ** "*•'   .    *»  *4 »..**   **■** ,
i Education minister
I faces student rival
I MONTREAL (CUP) — Quebec students have been out
§ to shake up education minister Jean-Guy Cardinal ever
§ since he refused to take any action in the junior college
§|   disturbances two weeks ago.
And Michel Mill, a 24-year-old student at l'Universite
de Montreal, has found a way.
Wednesday he announced plans to run against Cardinal
in a by-election December 4 in the provincial riding of
Bagot, formerly held by the late premier Daniel Johnson.
He is the only cabinet minister who does not hold a seat
in the legislature.
Mill, who will run under a socialist banner, said he did
not want the minister to run without opposition.
"This would be anti-democratic, especially at a time
when Cardinal has been the object of student opposition 1
because of his guilt in the post-secondary education fiasco," i
he said. §
PANGO PANGO (UNS) — Editorial blorgs leaped for joy
when news spread that Irving Fetish had been paged over the
Fort intercom. Fetish is one of the blorgs defending the Fort
from invasion by subversive forces.
The Fort's doors haye been locked for the past two weeks,
and the opposition has provided no ventilation in the form of
windows.
Fetish is the blorg responsible for the editor's propaganda. Tuesday, November 5, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 9
STUDENT NEWS ROUNDUP
RUN ART SCHOOL
Students won't  give in
MONTREAL (CUP) — Self-determination
has become the major issue at L'Ecole des
Beaux Arts, a city fine arts school occupied
for over four weeks.
The  students  run  their  own  classes,  plan
Profs to strike
for wage hike
TORONTO (CUP) — University of Toronto
professors will strike unless demands for a
wage increase are met.
The faculty members voted 133-72 Wednesday night to endorse "the concern, spirit and
resolve" of a strike proposal presented by
assistant prof Peter Seary.
Seary suggested the professors refuse to
mark final examination papers unless the wage
of a assistant professor is raised to $13,000 a
year from $9,500, with comparable increases
in other ranks.
their curriculum and administer the physical
details of the building. They cook and sell 40-
cent meals in the cafeteria, and have reconverted classrooms into seminar areas and bedrooms.
Wednesday, teachers at the school asked the
students to give up the occupation and join a
tri-partite group to administer the school. The
body would have equal numbers of teachers,
students and business administrators.
The statement issued by the teachers says
in part: "The occupation leaderhip excludes
from its deciding body some parties which are
indispensible to any proper administrative or
pedagogical action."
There is little indication however, that the
students will relinquish their hold on the
school. Leaders, who originally called for the
occupation in support of the recent junior
college disturbances, say they must solve their
own problems in the only way possible — self-
determination.
The school has been hit with three student
strikes in the past four years.
Franco burned
MADRID (CUPI) — About 1,800 Madrid University
law students Thursday burned a portrait of General Francisco Franco, sacked the dean's office in the law school and
stoned passing cars before they were finally dispersed by
police.
The rioting broke out after rebel students held a banned meeting in the law school to discuss their problems.
Ghana U shut
ACCRA, Ghana (CUPI)—The
University of Ghana Administration closed the campus to
students Wednesday in response
to violent student demonstrations outside the vice-chancellor's office Tuesday.
Protests concerned the suspension of four students who
wrote articles alleged to be
"scurrilous and obscene" for
the student magazine Siren.
The demonstrations began 10
days ago and protestors clashed with riot police last week.
The administration has appointed a three-man committee
to examine the student grievances.
We won't take just anybody
Only qualified technical and professional
people willing to work for a low salary
under demanding conditions in any of 45
developing countries around the world
To pick up this professional challenge,
you have to be highly motivated. Eager
to put your own talent to work. Aware
of the need of developing countries for
mature, competent people, ready to
lend a hand. You have to decide to
spend two years of your life working
on the world's number one problem—
development.
If we're getting to you, you aren't
just anybody.
You're somebody we need at CUSO.
Tell us what you can do. We'll tell you where you are needed.
I would like to know more about CUSO and the opportunity to work overseas for
two years. My qualifications are as follows:
I (will) hold
•Qccide
in
(degree, diploma, certificate or other verification of skill)
from
(course)
(university, college, trade or technical institute, etc.)
Name
Address
Prov.
Send to: CUSO (U.B.C. Committee)
CUSO Office, International House,
University of British Columbia,
Vancouver 8, B.C.
Telephone: (604) 224-4535.228-3887
CUSO
Development
is our business
^Ybu**^
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Would you rather wear dark,
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Would you rather try to
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It's pretty clear that Tampax
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Giveyou more confidence,
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Try the better way—Tampax
tampons. This month. Or next.
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THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 5,   1968
Cultured Pearls
GINZA
JAPAN ARTS
1 045 Robson 684-6629    ■ . EAT IN • TAKE OUT • DELIVERY*
FILM SOCIETY PRESENTS
BRIGITTE
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Showtimes 12:30, 8:30
ADMISSION 50c
f^KM rs
■»■
— dick button photo
CAPTAIN MICKEY McDOWELL attempts to make a play as rookie Wayne Schaab waits
expectantly. Schaab was the big gun for the  Birds over the weekend, picking up a goal Friday night and three goals and two assists on Saturday.
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TUES.. NOV. 5 & THURS.# NOV. 7-at. 12:30
I ROOM 102 - BUCHANAN BUILDING
I       EVENING MINI-LESSONS
I   TONIGHT — 7:00 p.m. Grosvenor Hotel, Douglas Room
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TUES., NOV. 5   — 7:00 p.m. Grosvenor Hotel, Douglas Room
9:00 p.m. Royal Towers, Fraser Room
I   WED., NOV. 6    — 7:00 p.m. Grosvenor Hotel, Douglas Room
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Ice hockey Birds
two game winners
By RIK NYLAND
UBC Hockey Writer
The ioe hockey Birds opened the season on a winning note
by blanking University of Victoria "Vikings" 10-0 Friday evening and then coasting to an 8-2 victory on Saturday.
From the opening face-off the Birds were in complete control of Friday's game as the Vikings appeared to shy away from
the heavy checking.
UBC scored two goals in the opening period, added three
in the second and pumped in five goals in the final frame.
Jim Fowler scored two goals and set up two others, Cam
Kerr and Laurie Vanzella each scored once and assisted on two
others.
The rest of the scoring was evenly distributed. This year's
club appears to be more balanced than last year's.
The Birds skated well but at times appeared to let up as
they did not have the necessary competition.
On Saturday the Birds looked sloppy during the opening
period as they had trouble getting into a competitive mood after
Friday's romp.
Victoria opened the scoring at 3:44 of the first period as they
skated and passed well and they kept the lead until the last
minute of the opening period, when Wayne Schaab scored his
first goal of the day.
Coach Bob Hindmarch must have had a few harsh words
for his charges as they settled down and played good hockey
during the final two periods.
Miles Desharnais ended the second period by scoring a pair
of goals one second apart.
Wayne Schaab was the big gun for the Birds as he scored ■
three goals and assisted on two others while his line-mate Mickey
McDowell scored twice and set up another.
In the final period the Birds scored three times while victoria replied with their second goal of the day. Final score, 8-2.
UBC's domination is well shown by the shots on goal as
the Birds outshot Victoria 47-16 and 38-14 in the two games.
The Birds dominated the Vikings physically as they hit
hard in the corners to dig out the puck; they were given rough
play penalties for a total of 22 minutes while Victoria was penalized for only eight minutes.
K
A
L
E
I
D
O
S
C
O
P
E
Come To International House
11th  ANNUAL  FALL  FAIR
NOV.  8 - 7:00 to  12:00 P.M.
NOV. 9 - 2:00 to 9:00 P.M.
Students — 75c
SECOND FLOOR OF SUB.
68
Trinidad Moonlighters Steel Band
DANCE
Nov. 9 - 9:00 to 1:00
SUB BALLROOM
Admission One Dollar Tuesday, November 5, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 11
lv
Thunderbird Basketball
Varsity defeats Grads
By TONY GALLAGHER
The 1968 edition of the Thunderbird basketball
season opened last Friday night with an 82-75 Bird
victory.
Everyone was pleased; the Birds, the 1,250 fans,
and especially head coach Peter Mullins. "This year's
team could be the best ever," said Mullins after
watching a sterling performance by his whole club,
especially sophomore guard Ron Thorsen and forwards Bob Barazzuol and Neil Williscroft.
"We need work on defense and on our fast break,"
added Mullins, "but there are no major defects at
all."
Thorsen was particularly brilliant with his quick
driving, accurate passing, and a 22 point output —
14 of them in the second half.
The official season opener is on Nov. 23 against
University of Victoria, and with 3 weeks to work
out their minor problems, the Birds will provide
campus basketball fans with some first rate entertainment.
J.V. basketball needs a manager — see Norm
Watts at gym for information.
'Bailers victorious
in  own  tourney
The Thunderbird Field Hockey team defeated
Jokers I by a 1-0 score on Saturday.
Playing at their home ground, which is the New
Spencer Field, the Birds put up a very tough defense
to slow the iokers to only two or three attempts on
the UBC goal.
Halfbacks Doug Harrison and Paul McMillen were
standouts in the Birds defensive unit.
The game was played at a very fast pace and
even although the score was low, the game certainly
did not lack exciting action.
In other field hockey action the Braves won over
Vancouver "A", 3-1. The Tomahawks had more
trouble as they could only manage a tie, 1-1 with
Jokers II.
Big Block Club Meeting
The Big Block club is having its monthly
general meeting and luncheon this Wednesday
The luncheon will be at the Village Cafe
dining lounge and is for members of the club
only.
The cost of lunch is one dollar but as there
will be a general meeting also, the club's executive would like to see a full turnout if possible.
-x-?
— dick button photo
THE START of a long basketball season. The start
of the Birds vs. grads game sees Neil Williscroft,
jumping for the Birds (in blue) against the Grads
centre, Steve Spencer.
Thunderbirds win
field hockey game
The Thunderbird volleyball players began the
new season exactly were they expect to finish —
on top.
Led by the power of Mike Rockwell and Ken
Witzke, the Birds won the UBC-BCIT Invitational
Touranment held at UBC on Saturday.
The Birds won nine games and lost one on their
way to the finals.
The finals themselves were close as the Birds
lost their first game by a 15-5 score, to the University of Washington squad.
They then staged at dramatic comeback to beat
U of W by scores of 15-9 and 15-12 to take the victors
laurels.
Dale Ohman, took the place of injured Mark Bell
and helped the Birds immensely with his accurate
set-up shots.
The second UBC team entered showed considerable promise as they compiled a 6-4 record.
They were led by rookie Hugh Jones and veteran
Vic Lee.
The team's best game was against Oregon State
University when they won 11-0. Oregon went on to
take fourth place in the tournament.
•      •      •
ICE HOCKEY BRAVES defeated Richmond
Rockets by an 8-2 score last night. The game was
still a toss-up after two periods as the Braves were
held to a two all tie.
VESTED CO-ORDINATES
ro DISCOUNT
OR YOUR CHOICE OF
SHIRT AND CO-ORDINATING
TIE OR TIE AND PUFF
I
FREE
Special...
Fantastic selection of heavy-weight
mohair and super-fine Worsted
suitings. Tailored-to-measure.
Hurry! for the holiday parties! Only
$110
4445 WEST 10th AVE.
OF   VANCOUVER
DISTINCTIVE   MEN'S    CLOTHING Page 12
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 5,  1968
'TWEEN CLASSES ...
Rabbi returns,
Shlomo to sing
Singing rabbi Shlomo Carle-
bach today, noon, SUB ballroom. 25 cents. He turned an
hour folk concert into a two
hour happening last year.
PRE-MED SOC
"Pills, potions, and physicians." Dr. K. MacCannell,
Dept. of Pharmacology, Wed.
noon. Wes. 201.
ARCHAEOLOGY CLUB
Meeting at Archaeology Mu*
■*■*«*' seum   (beneath  math, bldg.)
Tues. noon. Dr. Borden
speaking.
CANOE CLUB
X' Meeting noon today, Ang.
110. Final plans for Skagit
and Thompson trips.
ROD AND GUN
General meeting Thursday
noon, SUB K.
LEGAL ADVICE
Free legal advice in AMS
vice-pres. office, every Mon.,
Wed. and Friday noon.
FULL GOSPEL STUDENTS
Film, Windows of the Soul,
Wed. noon, Bu. 104.
ACADEMIC ACTIVITIES
Discussion of the economic
issues of the Czechoslovakian
crisis. Today noon, Bu. 106.
ONTOLOGY
Michael Cecil expounds on
"Man and his Purpose."
Noon, SUB 205.
TEACH-IN FOLLOW UP
Meeting on teach-in Thurs.,
8 p.m., SUB art gallery. All
faculties welcome.
MARKETING CLUB
Mind-blowing discussion on
The Media is the Message.
Thrilling speakers from no
less than five different media, including billboards. Billboards? Also' newspapers,
radio, television, radio, mail.
Thurs. noon in Henry Angus
215. And it's free, especially
to new members.
FILM  SOC
B. Bardot and J. Moreau in
Viva Maria, Old aud., today,
1'2:30, 8:30 p.m. 50 cents.
AFRO AMERICAN MUSSOC
Meeting for all interested in
jazz, blues, r and to, Bu. 202,
today noon.
PRE LIBRARIAN SOC
Tour of Government public-
„ ations div. of main library.
Meet by main card catalogue
Wed. noon.
AQUA SOC
Sign up for two day boat
dive, info in club lounge.
FILM SOC
Michael Caine in Funeral in
Berlin,    Old    aud.    Regular
times Thursday, Friday 6 and
8:30 p.m. 50 cents.
SKYDIVING CLUB
Meeting Wed. noon for members interested in learning to
pack, Bu. 219.
CVC
Ron Yuen speaks on the
future of Chinatown, noon,
Nov. 6, Bu. 205.
CHORSOC
Practice Wed. 18:00 hrs., Bu.
104.
DEBATING UNION
Hot air, today noon and Friday, Nov. 8, SUB 111.
YOUTH RESOURCES
Meeting noon today, SUB
105  A.
WUS
Balthazar Vorster, noon, Nov.
6, SUB K.
COMMERCE US
Commerce council meets 6:30
today, SUB council chamber.
STUDENT SPOUSES
Wives general meeting Nov.
6 at Cecil Green park, 8 p.m.
Guest speaker, Dr. Gamble.
SUS
General meeting for all bluejackets Thursday noon in
Henn. 200. Turn out and
bitch, baby. Also, find out
what's happening to SUS.
AQUA SOC
Two day boat dive (glub)
Sat., Sun. All details on club
notice board. Lots of fun, get
that sinking feeling.
CIRCLE  K
Scintillating David Zirnhelt
raps today noon, in SUB
council chambers. Members
only.
TRACK 'N FIELD
Practices every Tues. and
Wed. at 4:30 p.m. in the armory, also Thurs. noons at John
Owen Pavilion.
COMPUTER CLUB
Elections, dig. Friday, this,
noon. Angus 314. Come.
ARTS LECTURE SERIES
Dr. Milne of Polisci speaks
Wed. noon in SUB auditorium
on "Issues and scope in
political science."
HISTORY UNION
Meeting, Wed. noon, SUB
118. (off cafe.)
FRENCH DEPT.
Meeting for French Honors
and Majors students. But
first and second-year students welcome. Wed. noon,
Bu. 3233.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Baha'i Faith Presentation,
Tuesday noon. International
House, Room 400.
SLAVONIC CIRCLE
Meeting, noon in International House music room.
VOC
Nov. 10 is final day to finish
qualifications for membership.
SAILING CLUB
General meet to discuss Saturday classes and arrangements with KYC, Bu. 100,
Wed. noon.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students, Faculty & Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 75*, 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.0-0, 3 days $2.50.
Rale* for larger ads on request.
Classified mda are not accepted by telephone and
are payable in advance.
Cloaing Deadline it 11:30 a.m. tha day before publication.
Publication Office: 241 STUDENT UNION BLDG., UNIVERSITY OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
PAISLEY POWERED MUSIC AND
Strobalized lights. The very next
thing for your dance, party or orgy.
For bookings  call Paul,   731-7301.
VANCOUVER'S TOP BANDS ABE
managed exclusively by MCM <fc
Associates.  731-4741.
Greetings
12
THE UNKNOWN
SUBTLETIES
68 - INVITATION - 69
1. SKIING—Mt.   Baker  ski pass  is
valid  on  any  holiday.
2. MOVIES—12   movie   passes   are
valid during 3 week
Christmas holiday except  3  legal  holidays.
3. RESTAURANTS—Valid as many
times   as   you
want.
BUY NOW
Lost 8c Found
13
WOULD PERSON WHO TOOK
briefcase from Bookstore Friday
noon at least return the notes to
same place  or phone  626-4082.
REWARD FOR RETURN OF YA-
shica 8 mm movie camera lost
Thurs., 2:00 p.m. in Foreshore Park,
433-8353.
LOST WOMAN'S NAVY UMBRELLA
flowered border and stud handle,
left  in   red   MG.   Phone  733-3959.
HALIFAX GIRL WHO LEFT UM-
brella in red sportscar phone Gerry,
325-0055  after  5  p.m. 	
LOST:   PAIR   LINED   KID   GLOVES
Bu.   3223  Oct.   28.   Phone   876-6652.
WOULD PERSON WHO ACCIDENT -
ly took briefcase from Bookstore
Friday morning please put it back
or  phone 596-6974.   I'm lost!       	
LOST? T - BIRD CHANGE - ROOM
Thurs., noon brown wallet need I.D.
Reward! Phone 325-3122 or Ubyssey
Doug  Bernon. 	
DON'T FORGET SUB LOST AND
Found is at the Information Desk.
We have many keys, text books,
notebooks, umbrellas, etc. waiting
to be claimed.    	
LOST GREEN VINYL RING BINDER
In the Bokstore Oct. 28. Contains
all my course notes. Phone Frank
266-6574.   Reward   offered.
Rides tc Car Pools
14
CAN YOU HELP, NINE YEAR OLD
blind girl living in loco needs daily
ride to and from Jericho Hill School
(4100 West 4th), will pay $60 per
month for sure. Transportation. Call
936-5849   for   details. 	
HAVE CAR NEED PASSENGERS
from New Westminster or Lougheed
highway.   Call   521-8267.
Special Notices
IS
THE GRIN BIN HAS POSTERS,
Jokes, Cards, Gifts and a Post
Office. You'll And It across from
the Liquor Store at 3208 West
Broadway,
REDUCE THE COST OP YOUR IN
■urance   by   as   much   as  20%.   All
risks  Insured  and  no cancellations.
Motor bikes also. Phone Ted Elliott,
299-9421.	
•68 — INVITATION — '»
A student-oriented booklet of 33
different entertainment passes
valued at over $50.00. Available
at the Bookstore, He & She Clothing (The Village) Canteens In tho
Residences and the Information
desk at S.U.B. 12.50. 	
ARE YOU CONCERNED ABOUT
the future of Vancouver's Chinatown? Attend meet. Nov. 6, Bu 205
noon
CANADA'S RESERVE ARMY
OFFICER TRAINING PROGRAM
Students are being enrolled now for
Officer Training In the Militia. Join
the British Columbia Regiment and
receive part-time paid training
throughout the school year and excellent paid summer employment. 1 May
to 31 Aug. For more information phone
681-3834 (recruiting officer) or apply
$20  Beatty  St.  Tues.  evening
HEAR ABOUT THE BAHA'I FAITH
at 12:30 Tuesday in Room 400 at
International  House.
Travel Opportunities
18
Wanted Information
17
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
Auto. For Sale (Cont.)
21
YEAR END DISCOUNT SALE ON
new Peugeot — all models. Call at
1162  Seymour St.
GRAND  PRIX MOTORS
SALE: RAMBLER 1962, GOOD COND.
Low mileage.  Phone 228-9256
1962 VOLVO P-1800, ONE OWNER.
Low mileage, overdrive, new pirel-
lies.  Private  sale.  Phone  299-2762.
61 RED MGA, 1600. 1 OWNER. 65,000
miles. $650.00. Phone 738-8037 after
6 p.m.     	
1961    VOLVO,    1963    13-18    ENGINE.
Excellent  condition.   Phone  732-7926.
1960 VOLKSWAGEN. RADIO, HEAT-
er. New tires, seatcovers, new battery.  $500.   Call  224-1201.
SKIING? CAMPING? LARGE '60
Plymouth Wagon. Very clean. Perfect condition. Family car. Pushbutton drive. Good mileage. 6 cylinder.   228-8341.
Automobile—Parts
23
'ALMOST NEW" — 2 ONLY FIRE-
stone First Line 4-ply 7.35-14 snow
tires   $35.00.   261-4563   evenings.
Automobile—Repairs
24
Motorcycles
26
BUSINESS SERVICES
Dance Bands
31
Duplicating 8c Copying
32
Miscellaneous
33
NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY
at the UBC Barber Shop & Beauty
Salon. "It pays to look your best."
5736 University Blvd. 228-8942.
Home  Entertainment
35
Guaranteed Expert & Efficient Repairs
Color TV — Black and White TV
Record Players — Radios
Stereo Equipment — Tape Recorders
ALEXANDER  AND AXELSON  LTD.
4512 W. 10th — 228-9088
Complete   Record  Department
Rentals—Miscelleous
36
Scandals
37
RECALL KELVIN BECKETT
gastown soul
AQUA SOC—TWO-DAY BOAT DIVE
Nov. 9-10. Sign list on Club notice
board.
EARN MONEY WHILE YOU STUDY!
"Outrageous!" You say. "Not So," I
say. See File P-393. Placement Office. 	
NEEDED COACH FOR GIRLS FOOT-
ball team —■ Interviews Wed., noon.
Ombudsman's   Office   SUB.   Urgent.
JOHNNY'S BARBECUE WAS A
hanlc mais in Iou of corn wishky
donner us this  weak  for  couth.
Sewing 8c Alterations
38
Typing
40
GOOD EXPERIENCED TYPIST
available for home typing. Please
call  277-5640.      	
ESSAYS AND SEMINAR PAPERS
all expertly typed, 25c per page, 5c
copy. Fast efficient service. Phone
325-0545.
EXP. TYPING ESSAYS AND THES-
es, reas. rates; legible work, phone
738-6829 after 10 a.m. Mond.-Friday,
and   Sundays.	
APEX TYPING SERVICE
(Mrs. Gow)
Mimeographing,   typing
4370  W.  10th 224-6033
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female
51
Help Wanted—Male
52
APPLICATIONS ARE NOW BEING
taken for the Pizza Patio Pizza
tossing program. Training course
will be held at the Mllano Pizza
Training Institute — Italy. For further information contact:
Personnel Director — Pizza Patio
The Home of Perfect Pizza, 688-2381
Male or Female
53
MATHS TUTORS REQ'UIR'ED'.
Fourth year minimum. Phone Tuesdays only from 9:00 to 10:00 p.m.
736-6928.	
Work Wanted
54
INSTRUCTION
Tutoring
84
G   T  «
and
SPITFIRES
at
GRAND PRIX MOTORS
Special Consideration To Students
Ph.  Lee 682-7185 or "WE 6-2067
FIRST YEAR MATHS, CHEMISTRY,
physics lessons given by excellent
tutors. 736-6923.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BUNK BEDS, SET, $29.50. 2'xV TOP,
unpainted double pedestal desks,
each $29.50. New 262 coll single
Hollywood beds, complete, from
$49.50. Unpainted book cases, from
$8.95.
KLASSEN'S
3207  West  Broadway RB (-0T1I
(Beer bottle drlve-ln at rear of store)
YES, WE STILL HAVE COCONUT
oil best for your hair and skin. Plus
appointment service. Upper Tenth
Barber, 4574 West 10th Avenue, 224-
6622.
205 CM. METAL SKIS, SAFETY
bindings, size 10% ski boots. Call
266-2054.
IMMEDIATE SALE. JAPANESE NA-
tional 3-speed tape-recorder, mode*
706S. Just Imported. 874-9530 after
5 p.m.	
TYROL SKI BOOTS MEN'S 9(M) —
$25; Women's 7(M) $25. Good condition. Phone 261-5878 after 6:00.
COMPONENT    STEREO    SET.    Excellent quality. Forced to sell. Phone
Nigel   at   224-9986.
PHILIPS PORTABLE STEREO RE-
cord player has many extra fea-
tures.  Good shape.  $65.  224-9110.
ROBERTS 1630 STEREO TAPE RE-
corder. 3 speed, 4 track. Excellent
machine. Like new $225. 224-9110.
The Handiest Book on Campus
BIRD UBC's STUDENT
CALLS    TELEPHONE DIRECTORY
Only 75c al
Bookstore & Publication Office, SUB
RENTALS  & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
ON CAMPUS, $40.00. KIT. PRIV.
Close to meal services, TV. 2250
Wesbrook, 224-9662 — 224-0439 —
4 - 6 p.m.
TWO SEPARATE ROOMS FOR TWO
male students $40 per month. 3275
W,.   13th.   Phone   733-5436.	
PLEASANT ROOM AVAILABLE
Dec. or Jan. Bkfst. optional. Male
non-smoker pref. Near gates 228-
8614.
ROOM FOR RENT - SINGLE - MALE
student. Desk breakfast, laundry.
$50 mo. Phone 733-7486.
FURNISHED — SEPARATE EN-
trance, private shower; use of
fridge, den. No cooking. Available
15th.   $45.   228-8948.
NEAR GATES — BED & SITTING
room. Private entrance, fridge, 224-
7623   attractively   furnished.
STAFF WOMEN NEED PLACE TO
throw sleeping bag. M & T nltes
only.   Cal]   days   228-2197.
Room 8c Board
PRIVATE ROOM AND BOARD. Excellent for two boys, $80. Call Mrs.
Lim, 876-9169 evenings.
ROOM & FULL BOARD FOR 2 MALE
students. Close to UBC. Call 224-
9201.
ROOM AND BOARD AVAILABLE.
Male student over 21 years. Apply
4493  West   8th.  Phone  228-9258.
Furn. Houses 8c Apts.
88
MALE SENIOR OR GRAD STUDENT
to share house vie. 16th and Dunbar.   Phone   738-8400.
ENGLISH, FRENCH, HISTORY LES-
sons given by B.A., M.A., B.L.S.
Other languages offered. Phono 7M-
(923.
TUTORING IN ENGLISH HISTORY
and French First and Second Year.
Reasonable rates. 733-4394 Evenings.
STUDENT TO SHARE FURNISHED
house near gates. Own bedroom. $50.
224-6643.	
GIRL OVER 23 TO SHARE 4 BED-
room house with 3 other girls. Available now. 688-3155.
QUIET MALE STUDENT TO SHARE
upstairs floor with another male
student. Will have own room, formerly master bedroom. Dinners prepared. Appliances. 11th at Bianca.
228-8341.
BUY — SELL — RENT
VSB
UBYSSEY CLASSIFIED
UBYSSEY ADVERTISING
OFFICE
Now Located In
ROOM 241 — S.V&.

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