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The Ubyssey Jan 15, 1991

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Array the Ubyssey
N
D
E
T-TT-Two
edits in
one. Pg. 10
Founded in 1918
Vancouver, B.C., Tuesday, January 15,1991
Vol 73, No VT3Z
Marchers condemn Canadian
military action in Middle East
Jmw by Matthew Johnson
No war in the Persian Gulf: protesters at the Vancouver art Gallery on Saturday.
DON MAH PHOTO
Students to protest fee hikes
by Martin Chester
A new committee formed to
combat tuition fee increases is
calling for students to protest
above-inflation hikes proposed by
UBC president David Strangway.
The Fight the Hikes Committee, an ad hoc student group organized by the AMS last Thursday,
has planned a 12:30 pm rally at
SUB Plaza on Wednesday.
Arts Undergraduate Society
president Sigrid Thompson said
"the protest is to create awareness, both amongst the students,
the Vancouver community and the
government of BC about the tuition increases over the past five
years.
"The rally is to get attention,
and to do that we need a good
turnout," Thompson said.
"Awareness, I think, is our main
goal. Awareness of great student
discontent about the rate of increases over the past five years."
The organizers' main goal is
to stop Strangway's three-year
plan for above-inflation fee increases, she said.
"The whole three-year plan
ought to be re-thought, this time
with significant student involvement."
"I believe that it is the first
step among many," she sai d. "Thi s
protest is not a one shot thing. It
won't be as effective as a one shot
thing."
Organizers are aiming for a
turnout of 2,500 students.
Following the noon rally, the
protest will move to the corner of
10th Avenue ind Wesbrook Mall
where the group plans to distrib-
Tuition protests last year
DON MAH PHOTO
ute pamphlets to motorists.
AMS external affairs coordinator Jason Brett said: "I really
hope we can at least stop the three-
year plan from going through,
minimize the fee hikes for next
year and convince the Board (of
Governors) to establish a multilateral committee to determine the
roleoftuitionatUBC."
Thompson, however, is calling for a tuition fee freeze so that
the Fight the Hikes Committee
can bargain with Strangway from
a position of strength.
"I think calling for minimal
increase is being a little bit optimistic," she said. "I say freeze the
fees, because then at least we may
get compromise."
Brett said UBC has the highest tuition in BC and is among the
three most expensive universities
in Canada, depending on the
program.
"It doesn't matter how much
higher we are, it matters what
direction we're headed in," he said.
by Matthew Johnson
An estimated crowd of 2,000
people filled the square in front of
the Vancouver Art Gallery Saturday to march and protest Canadian
involvement in the Persian Gulf.
The protest, organized by End
the Arms Race—a coalition of peace
and anti-war groups in BC—included speeches, songs, and a
march on the US Consulate in
Vancouver.
"(We are) here out of a growing sense of gravity and anxiety,"
said Vancouver COPE city councillor Libby Davies. "We have to
reject the militaristic option and
mindset."
Hadani Ditmars, UBC student
and member of Arab-Canadians
For a JustPeace, said she wanted
to show the general public that
there are Arabs who want peace
and are working for it.
"As a group we wanted to have
news footage of Arab-Canadians
wearing Kefayeh, and carrying
signs in Arabic," Ditmars said. "We
had Salaam, the Arabic word for
peace, on our banner."
Ditmars said she is a supporter
ofthe peace movement, but not in
a "namby-pamby way.
"We want peace with justice
for all peoples in the Middle East,"
she said.
Rev. Robert Smith of the
Shaughnessy Heights United
Church said the government and
mainstream media is working to
get the public to practice "enemy
thinking" concerning the Iraqis.
"It is an attempt to make us
look at the people of Iraq as less
than human," Smith said.
Svend Robinson, MP for
Burnaby-Kingsway (NDP), said
the world is "standing on the edge
of an abyss," facing impending
armed strife in the Persian Gulf.
"We are speaking out to our
leaders, 'Stop this madness. Work
for peace and not for war,'"
Robinson said.
"I can only hope the elected
officials will listen to the people.
For once they have to listen to the
will ofthe people [in the debate in
parliament]."
In a display of unity and
strength, a group of approximately
500 after-rally protesters staged a
spontaneous march through the
streets of Vancouver. The police,
caught off guard by the action,
were unable to direct traffic away
from the marchers.
After marching 10 blocks
through the streets of downtown
Vancouver, walking through cars
shouting slogans such as "Noblood
for oil," and "Hell no! We won't go!
We won't die for Texaco!" the crowd
stopped at the corner of Granville
and Georgia for fifteen minutes,
filling the intersection and halting
traffic.
Explaining why he was at the
rally, UBC student Joel Cummings
said, "I'm concerned about the
outbreak of a war I consider intolerable.
"The use of violence to solve
economic problems and political
disputes is a waste of human life." Classifieds 22S-3977 IJPPjl
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before publication. Room 266, SUB, UBC, Van^ B.C. V6T2A7, 228-3977.
05 - COMING EVENTS
ESSAY PRIZES BEING OFFERED!
Two one hundred dollars are being offered to
UBC students for the best essays/drama/
songs, etc. speaking to thebuildingofhuman
community and the preservation of our environment Deadline April 15th. For more
information call 224-5202. THE MENNO
SIMONS CENTRE.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE dinner night -
East Indian style Jan. 19 6:30pm. Purchase
tickets at I.House office 228-5021.
STUDY SKILLS Workshop. SFU Harbour
centre room 1520. Sat. Jan. 19. 10am-4pm
261-1300. Cost $50.00.
FREE LECTURE: "The Coming Chaos" at
Technocracy. Sun., Jan. 20 at 8. You are
welcome at 3642 Kgswy. For information &
free literature, call 434-1134.
11 - FOR SALE PRIVATE
"78 CELICA GT. 5 spd. Runs well, rare
matte blue. Rebuiltengineand clutch. Snow
tires. $2000 obo. Call 278-9840.
1965 MG MIDGET, $500 Summer or project
car. Days 228-4641. Mike.
1976 AUDI FOX $1000 obo. 4 sp. Silver
edition. Futon like new, DBL. $50. 682-
3537.
20 ■ HOUSING
1 BDR BASEMENT suite in exchange for
housesitting, babysitting etc. 4167 West
13th Ave. 224-8712 after 3:00 Martine.
AVAIL FEB 1ST, room in spacious house
with own laundry facilities. Female pref.,N/
S. $3067month & utilities. Bbcated 18th/
Larch. Ph. 736-8617 after 5pm.
Between
Deadline for submissions: for
Tuesday's paper is Friday at
3:30pm. NO LATE SUBMISSIONS WILL BE ACCEPTED.
Note: "Noon" = 12:30 pm.
WEDNESDAY, JAN. 16
School of Music. Richard Goode.
Piano Masterclass. 7:30 pm Admission: Auditfee $10. Recital Hall,
Music Building.
Jewish Students' Assoc/Hillel.
Torah Study with Rabbi W.
Solanon. Noon, Hillel House.
Campus Pro Life. General meeting. Noon, Buch B314.
Gays & Lesbians of UBC. Gay
Men's Discussion Group. 4:30 - 6:30
pm, SUB 215.
Gays & Lesbians of UBC. Workshop for Peer Counsellors. Noon,
BRCK362.
!
Student Christian Movement.
Dinner, Bible study & discussion.
This group welcomes all students
and includes Lutheran and United
Church groups. 5 pm, Lutheran
Campus Centre.
Varsity Outdoors Club General
meeting and slide show. Noon,
Chemistry 150.
Dance Horizons. Stretch &
Strength class taught by Roy.
Noon, SUB Partyroom.
Dance Horizons. Jazz 1 taught by
Jackie. 3:30 - 5, SUB Partyroom.
Student Environment Centre.
Performance - The Raging Grannies. Noon, SUB Concourse - by
Auditorium.
Student Environment Centre.
Environment Week. 10:30 - 2 pm,
SUB Concourse.
ON CAMPUS SHARED room & board $380
per month, 2270 Wesbrook Mall. 222-2646.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED to share
large 2 bdr. suite near 4th/Alma. Pref. older
grad student N/pets. $325/mo. 731-0605.
SHARED ACCOMMODATION: Modern
downtn hirise 1 bdrm apt. Common area
fum. You get private unfurn. bdrm. 1 blk to
express bus 20 min. UBC. Me: Mature UBC
student rig. smoker very tidy/clean. You:
Platonically friendly, responsible student.
Sexual orientation or gender irrelevant.
Immed/Feb. 1st (March for right person).
$327.50. 683-8893.
85 - TYPING
30 - JOBS
Institute of Asian Research. Brown
Bag Seminar. Topic: Southeast
Asian Migration to Australia by
Dr. Christine Inglis, University of
Washington. Noon, Seminar Room
604, Asian Centre.
School of Music. Wednesday Noon-
Hour Series. Lafayette String
Quartet with Robert Silverman,
piano. Noon. Admission: $2. Recital Hall, Music Building.
THURSDAY, JAN. 17
Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship. Meeting with Myron
Augsburger on "In Pursuit of
Wholeness". Noon. Wood 4.
Sikh Students Association. General Meeting. Noon, SUB 207.
Pre-Dental Society. General
meeting. Guest speaker: Dr.
Rosamund Harrison. Topic:
Pedodontics. Noon. Wood 6..
Jewish Students' Association/
Hillel. Operation Exodus on
Campus Kick-off. Noon. Hillel
House.
.i.
Pacific Rim Club. "What Does
Canada Need tobe Competitive in
the Pacific Rim?" Open discussion.
This means you! Noon. Asian Centre Auditorium.
International Socialists. No War
in the Gulf! 7:30 pm, SUB 211.
Life Drawing Club. Drawing sessions with professional models for
beginner to experienced artists in
a relaxed, positive environment.
$4.50 drop in, $30.00 for 11 sessions. Noon - 2:20pm. Laserre 204.
Dance Horizons. Jazz 1 & 2 taught
by Val.l2:30-2pm, SUB Partyroom.
Dance Horizons. Beginner Jazz
taught by Val. 3:30-5, SUB
Partyroom.
Dance Horizons. Jazz 2 taught by
Blythe. 5:00-6:30, SUB Partyroom.
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST, 30 years exp.,
word processing/typing. Student rates. Dorothy Martinson 228-8346.
ON CAMPUS WORD PROCESSING
Need the professional touch?... have it done
for you - you can even book ahead. $27/hr.,
6-8 double spaced pages of normal text per
hour, laser printer. SUB lower level, across
from Tortellini's Restaurant; 228-5640.
ON THE BOULEVARD
Hair Care Services
> Indoor Suntanning
• Esthetician
Hours:
Mon    Sat 9:30 - 6:00
SUNTAN SPECIAL
12 sessions $39.00
evp. Jan. 30/90
5784 University Blvd.
224-1922 • 224-91 16
P.T. CLERK/RECEPTIONIST req. for
Wes t Broad way Medical Office. Flexible Hrs.
Mon.-Sat. Approx 15-20 hrs/wk. 222-4140.
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL COMPUTER
LAB in Upper Kits wants supervisor for
max. 15 students. 12:10 -12:55 pm. One or
more days/wk. up to $25/hr. Phone 734-0465
or 731-0206.
70 - SERVICES
EDITING SERVICE. Thesis - $2.00 per
page. Undergrad paper essay - $3.00 per
page. 3 read throughs. 224-2310.
80 - TUTORING
BUSINESSMAN seeks native Japanese
speaker for weekly evening conversation
class. Should be time flexible $15/hr. or
language exchange. Call 876-6367. Eves.
M.A., Ph.D. thesis editing.
Assistance with essays.
Ph.D., references.
Clayton, 222-4745, after 9 p.m.
WORD-PROCESSING 2.50/dbl sp. page.
Computersmiths3726W. Broadwayat Alma.
New grammar check. 224-5242.
FIRSTCHOICE Word Processing- Quality
French and Eng. Service - Laser Printing -
Studentrates($14/hr.)-open 7 days/week &
eves. 274-7750.
JUDITH FILTNESS, superior typist, APA
spec. 3206 West 38th Ave., 263-0351.
HIGHLY EXP. TYPIST willing to do resumes, manuscripts, essays and term papers. Rate $2.25/pg. Ph. Donna 261-3534.
LECTURES/INTERVIEWS TRANSCRIBED. $1.50 - $2.00/page (depending
on sound quality & quantity). 224-2310.
consider shared
accommodations
call...
ROOM
FINDERS
for professional
assistance.
736-1733
Student Environment Centre.
Environment Week. 10:30 - 2 pm,
SUB Concourse.
Sikh Students Association. Meeting. Noon, SUB 207.
Newman Club (Catholic Students
Undergrad Society). Meeting -
Discussion on Social Justice. Noon.
St. Mark's College, Music Room.
FRIDAY, JAN. 18
Jewish Students' Association/
Hillel. Winter retreat. Jan. 18 -
20, 6 pm, 561 W. 28th Ave.
Students of Objectivism. Beginning
of term meeting. Noon. Scarfe 20 7.
St. Mark's/Newman Club. Annual
retreat, 3:30 pm-Sun., 6 pm, Keats
Island.
Dance Horizons. Stretch &
Strength taught by Roy. Noon. SUB
Partyroom.
Student Environment Centre.
Environment Week. 10:30-2p.m.,
SUB Concourse.
North Delta SUNFISH
SUMMER
SWIM
Seeks a CLUB
HEAD COACH
Level II Coaching (Theory
and Practical), 3 Years of
BCSSA Coaching (1 year
min. as Head Coach). NLS
Certification Preferred.
Send complete resume to:
Mrs. Sharon Perry
Nordel Postal Outlet
P.O. Box 33009
Delta, B.C.
SILKSCREENING
OYE SPORTSWEAR & DESIGN
ft
BARBARIAN.
Rugby Jerseyt
5T
100% Cotton
EllU
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PRICE INCLUDES: 1 colour print, garments, set
up, screen & artwork .... puff printing & flash cure-
ing (.33 extra).... solid coloured fabrics may vary
in price .... additional colour printing by quotation.
Call: (Ask for Kenneth) 270-6348
Monday - Saturday    10 am - 6 pm
Open Saturdays/Sundays/Evenings by appointment
AWARDS
A
WILLIAM G. BLACK
MEMORIAL PRIZE
William G. Black Memorial Prize - a prize in the amount of
approximately $1,600 has been made available by the late Dr.
William G. Black. The topic for the essay will be designed to
attract students from all disciplines. The competition is open
to students who are enrolled in undergraduate or professional programs and who do not already possess a graduate
degree. A single topic of general nature related to Canadian
citizenship will be presented to students at the time of the
competition. Duration of the competition will be two hours.
Candidates should bring their student card for identification.
The competion will be held:
DATE: SATURDAY. JANUARY 19. 1991
TIME: 10:00 A.M. -12 NOON
PLACE: ANGUS 10+
UK  DEPARTMENT OF STUDENT HOUSING
Invites Applications for the Position of.
RESIDENCE ADVISORS FOR 1991-92
These positions are open only to registered U.B.C. students. Successful applicants will be required to live in the Residences. Applications
forms and detailed job descriptions are availalble at the Student
Housing Office, Ponderosa Bldg., and at the Front Desk of each single
student residence area: Totem Park, Place Vanier, Walter Gage and
Fairview Crescent
INFORMATION MEETING FOR PROSPECTIVE APPLICANTS:
6:30 p.m. Thursday, January 10,1991 in the Maclnnes Lounge, in the
Walter Gage Residence commonsblock.
Applications will be accepted from January 2nd to January 18th, 1991 at the
Front Desks ofthe Single Student Residences, or at the Student Housing Office.
Faculty, Staff & Student
From Taiwan, R.O.C.
Welcome to A
Get-To-Know-One-
Another Party
Time:
January 16,1991 (Wed.)
4:00 - 6:00 p.m.
Place:
Graduate Student Centre
Garden Room
Chinese Refreshment Available
"Bush will be responsible for more deaths
than Hitler."
Pat Ruckert, an American, and others will be
speaking out about the
Gulf Crisis.
Thursday Jan. 17
Noon.
Hebb Theatre
Sponsored by the Federation of
Chinese Students and Scholars.
2/THE UBYSSEY
January 15,1991 NEWS
"Society and Engineer" course set
by Nicole Sadinsky
The engineering faculty is
getting a little taste ofthe arts.
Anew non-credit course called
"Society and the Engineer" has
been created partially due to the
infamous discriminatory
nEUSlettre published last year.
The course, which the UBC
Senate approved in December, has
a more social and cultural approach compared to other applied
science courses. It covers such
subjects as professionalism, engineering ethics, gender,
multiculturalism, First Nations
and environmental issues.
Michael Davies, associate
dean of Applied Sciences, said the
faculty wanted to introduce many
issues to the students, not strictly
technical ones.
"It will include material which
will increase students sensitivity
to issues. All students should be
able to take it, not just engineers,"
he said.
However, for all students entering the engineering faculty in
1990, the course is a requirement
for graduation.
Davies also said that the
nEUSlettre incident—which contained material deemed discriminatory, sexist and homophobic by
Student Court—was a factor in
the creation of the course.
The faculty has been concerned with its overall image as a
result of other incidents involving
engineering students in the past.
"Their activities can do a lot
of damage to the faculty," Davies
said. "We're very serious about
this and feel the course will be an
outstanding contribution to their
education and make them better
engineers."
Reaction to the new course
from groups outside the engineering faculty has been positive.
Marsha Trew, director ofthe
Women's Students Office, called
the course "an excellent idea."
"There are complex problems
not necessarily dealt with by just
introducing a course but is a definite valuable step in the right
direction," she said.
Canada out of the Gulf
by Paul Dayson
Canada should get out ofthe
Gulf war rather than surrender to
American foreign policy, according
to a four person panel at
Christchurch Cathederal in downtown Vancouver last Saturday.
The speakers criticized American and Canadian policy on the
situation in the Persian Gulf.
UBC Political Science professor Michael Wallace questioned the
Canadian government's support of
American intervention and the
sending of Canadian troops, planes
and ships to the Persian Gulf.
"We are doing it to keep us in
good stead with the Americans,"
Wallace said, referring to an article
in The Globe and Mail detailing the
benefits on free trade the Canadian
participation in the Gulf was
bringing.
"Mike Pearson stood up to
Lyndon Johnson and said we don't
want to get involved in that war
(Vietnam). We could use some
people like that here now," he said.
As it stands now, Canada is
providing offensive capabilities,
since it decided to send a tanker
plane to the Gulf, he said.
"Without a tanker plane F-18s
cannot strike into Iraq, with a
tanker plane they can do that,"
Wallace said.
"Who the hell gave the government the mandate to do that (send
troops to the Gulf on a war footi ng)?"
he said.
"The approval rating of the
Mulroney government is fourteen
percent. That is the same as the
number of people who believe Elvis
is still alive. I believe the government has a greater mandate to
search for Elvis," Wallace said.
"They (the government) are
responsible to us not to Washington," he said.
One woman in the audience
speaking for the Hospital Employees Union said, "If we hope to get
Canadian troops out ofthe war it is
going to have to be us in the streets
who stop the war... just like Vietnam."
Wallace said a Gulf War will
not solve the massive inequality or
complete lack of political rights that
exist in the region.
"Everyone talks about getting
rid of Hussein's regime but that
leaves Iran and Syria as the most
powerful nations in the region," he
said, noting their poor records with
human rights.
"None ofthe underlying issues
(in the Middle East) will get solved,"
Wallace said.
Mordacai Breimberg, member
ofthe board of directors ofthe Near
East Cultural and Educational
Forum of Canada, agreed the
problems ofthe Middle East would
not be solved by this war and said
there were examples of other aggression in the Middle East which
have gone unchallenged by the US.
United Nations resolutions
have condemned the Israeli invasions, occupations and annexations
of the West Bank, the Gaza strip,
east Jerusalem, and the Golan
Heights as well as the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait, Breimberg said.
"This is common knowledge in
the rest of the world but not in
North America," he said.
"Bush and his administration
keepreferring to a new world order.
The 'new worl d order" was the rallying cry of another expansionist
empire that was centred in Germany at that time," Breimberg sai d,
adding, "You cannot have stability
in a region when the majority of
population disagree with the order
you are trying to impose."
Breimberg added, "A peace
conference on the Middle East, that
applies equally to all conflicts, is
the only solution.
"The American public is sixty-
six percent in favour of an international peace conference on the
Middle East if that will avoid war,"
he said. "That is the proposal of
their president's enemy, Saddam
Hussein."
University of Alberta economics professor Ed Shaeffer, said oil
was the main impetus to war.
"Oil and war are an ugly mix,"
he said.
The war is about oil because
"they (the US's economic rivals,
Europe and Japan) need Middle
East crude more than the US does.
It (the US) needs Middle East oil to
control the world economy," said
Shaeffer, an ex-oil consultant and
World War Two veteran.
"America wants a military victory carried out by Americans to
ensure control," he said.
Members of the panel advocated continued sanctions as a
means to resolving the dispute.
Representing the Canadian
Council of Churches, panelist Jean
McCutchon of Project Ploughshares
said, "In refusing to purchase Iraqi
and Kuwaiti oil we will be denying
the Iraqis the fruits of aggression.
"We know economic sanctions
are having an effect," she said,
quoting a letter from Brian
Mulroney.
The speakers also expressed
concern that dehumanization of
people in the Middle East will create a racist "enemy" stereotype.
Breimberg said we are told that
"they are not afraid of death. They
don't value life, like we do. They are
willing to walk like lemmings towards it.
"We have been presented with
the Middle East as full of terrorism
and religious fanatics... full of
uncomplicated people unlike us."
Verna Kirkness, director of
the First Nations office, agreed
saying: "I'm glad its happened although its not enough, but it is a
great beginning and maybe will
lead to more."
Phillip Ibis, a first year engineering student who completed
the course in the first term, said
he enjoyed the course overall although he had some mixed feelings.
"Parts of the course were interesting although some were repetitive compared to things I already knew."
He added that although some
students disagreed with some
controversial issues which were
presented by guest speakers, the
course can only help.
"Its good for those people in
the long run and could make a
difference," he said.
He disagreed, however, with
the premise that the course would
make him a better engineer by
increasing his knowledge and
sensitivity. "No, that course didn't
teach me anything to become a
better engineer," he said.
Sidney Mindess, director of
the Core Engineering Program
and Axel Meisen, dean of Applied
Sciences, were responsible for
putting the course together, with
help from the department heads.
Neither was available for comment.
school students
spark walkout
by Matthew Johnson
UBC students will be joining
an anti-war walkout organized
by Vancouver secondary school
students Tuesday.
At 11 a.m. students at secondary schools and universities
in the Vancouver area will walk
out of classes to protest to Canadian military involvement in the
Persian Gulf.
UBC students will proceed
to the SUB for a brief rally organized by Students Against the
Gulf War (SAGW), then will join
up with students from all the
Vancouver area secondary
schools, colleges, and universities
in a "city-wide protest" at the
offices of MP Kim Campbell.
The protest at Campbells' office will feature speakers from
End The Arms Race, Veterans
Against Nuclear War, unions, and
student groups. After the
speeches and rally, the protest
will move to city hall, arriving
there at approximately 2 p.m.
Organizer Mikaela Smith, a
grade 10 student at Prince of
Wales Secondary School, said the
idea for the walkout came from a
dream she had.
"I had a dream before winter
break that I was drafted, which is
unusual because of my age and
the fact that I'm a woman," she
said.
There is a personal stake in
fighting involvement in the gulf
for Smith.
"My half-brother is an
American in college, and he had
to register for the draft," she
said. "That scared me."
Smith contacted Laurel
Bischoff, a student in the mini-
school at Sir Winston Churchill
Secondary School. The two discussed what actions they could
take to voice their protest against
involvement in the Gulf, and
decided on a walkout from
classes.
"There are authorities at
school. If we get up and walk out
of classes, if we say "we're going
to do this and we don't care what
you say,' it's a strong statement,"
Bischoff said.
"We want students to speak.
I don't feel we get heard enough."
Charles Macurdy, an Ideal
Mini school student and a friend
of Bischoff s, claims that, a lot of
teachers support the walkout although they don't say so publicly.
He said he is strongly opposed to
a war in the Gulf.
"George Bush said that this
[conflict] is about the American
way of life. This is Canada!" he
said.
According to Macurdy, organizing the protest is going well.
"It just goes to show, if we
try, what young people can do,"
he said.
Quebec students
split on referendum
Taking to the streets at the Peace Rally
by Heidi Modro
MONTREAL (CUP)—Quebec's
first student referendum on independence turned into a pro-sovereignty love-in at Montreal's Paul
Sauve Arena last month.
With a rock version of "Gens
du Pays" blaring, more than 1,000
students waved fleur-de-lis flags
as the results ofthe province-wide
referendum were announced on
December seventh.
More than 24,000 students at
31 colleges cast their ballots on the
question: "Today, would you like
Quebec to become a sovereign
state?"
Eighty-two per cent of them
answered "Yes."
Martin Gauthier, from la
Coalition Etudiante sur l'Avenir
du Quebec (the Student Coalition
on the. Future of Quebec who organized the referendum), said
"students from across the province
have expressed a loud and clear
call for independence.
"It was done democratically
and it proves that students can
decide their own future," he said.
Gauthier, a student at Cegep
Ahuntsic, said the coalition was
formed when students realized
they would not be invited to sit on
the Belanger-Campeau commission on Quebec's constitutional
future.
Although federalists and
anglophones were both invited,
they were conspicuously absent
from the event.
"Of course they should be here
tonight," said Jean Gobeil, a second-year administration student
from Cegep Edouard Montpetit in
Longueuil, who was draped in the
fleur-de-lis. "They're Quebecers
too. Why shouldn't they be happy
about the results?"
At John Abbott College, the
only anglophone college officially
taking part in the referendum,
students voted 92 per cent against
sovereignty.
The results at Marianopolis
College, which held its own
unofficial referendum, were similar, with 87 per cent turning down
the call for independence. Less than
10 per cent of Champlain College
students voted in favor of a sovereign Quebec.
MIKE COURY PHOTO
January 15,1991
THE UBYSSEY/3 AMS Position Statement
on Tuition Increases
passed by Students' Council in May 1989 and November 1990
1. The AMS adopts the position that should tuition fee increases be necessary, these increases should not
exceed the Consumer Price Index of the Cost of Living Adjustment for British Columbia.
2. The AMS supports the position that the University should not consider above inflation tuition increases
as an option for catch-up faculty salary increases.
3. While the AMS recognizes the University's efforts to aid students who have financial need, the AMS
opposes the policy of small percentage increases in student bursaries being used to justify tuition
increases.
4. The AMS endorses the position that the University should implement a policy of tuition refund payments
based on academic merit.
5. The AMS endorses the position that the University should implement a policy of tuition refund payments
based on financial need.
President Strangway plans Tuition increases of about 10% each
year for at least 3 years (inflation plus 4.5%).
Tuition increases will be about 10 times larger than
increases in student aid.
To express your concern, write to:
Mr. Ken Bagshaw
Chairperson
UBC Board of Governors
Old Administration Bldg., UBC
Attend the
"Fight the Fees" Rally
12:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Jan. 16
SUB Plaza
Attend the
Open Forum on Tuition Hikes
with President Strangway
12:30 p.m. on Wednesday, January 30
SUB Auditorium
The UBC Board of Governors will vote on Dr. Strangway's plan on the 7th of February, 1991.
4/THE UBYSSEY
January 15,1991 NEWS
Students can't halt
military recruitment
by Maya Bashour
MONTREAL (CUP)—Although
Concordia students voted six years
ago to ban campus military recruitment and research, Armed
Forces personnel still regularly
visit the university.
Concordia was declared a
military-free zone in 1985 after
students supported the idea in a
student council-sponsored referendum.
But the university does not
have any formal policy against the
military's presence on campus and
some campus groups are still
sponsoring army recruiting efforts
during career days.
Concordia dean of students
Brian Counihan said the Armed
Forces have never asked to be allowed to recruit on campus, but
added that, like any other organization, it can be invited on campus
by university groups.
AIESEC, an international
commerce and economics students'
group, regularly invites the Armed
Forces to participate in career days
at Concordia.
Although students' council
controlled areas are considered
military-free zones, the council
executive administrator, Nick
Woollard, said no one can stopother
campus groups from sponsoring
military activities.
"(The council) does not endorse
career day army recruitment,"
Woollard said. "We have nothing
to do with them. Unfortunately all
we can do is protest."
Captain Nadia Sulek, who
works at an Armed Forces recruiting centre a block away from
Concordia's downtown campus,
said no actual recruitment is done
at Concordia despite the Forces'
participation in AIESEC's career
days.
"We don't do recruitment as
such, we only give information,"
Sulek said. "If someone wants to
enlist, then they have to come down
to the recruitment centre."
Sulek said university students
are particularly sought after because of their level of education.
The Armed Forces have recently intensified recruitment on
Canadian campuses, according to
figures provided by the Ministry of
Defence. This academic year they
spent close to $300,000 on advertising directed at students, 25 per
cent more than in 1989-90.
"Like any company we like
our management positions to be
filled with university graduates,"
she said. "If you have a degree you
can apply for anything from a bus
driver to a pilot."
UBC seeks advice for college
Students and nearby residents
will have a chance to express their
views on a proposed 14 million
dollar residence intended to house
100 graduate students at UBC.
An advisory committee struck
to establish policies for the Cecil
Green College will be seeking
public feedback on its draft of recommendations tomorrow (January 17) in the Garden Room ofthe
Graduate Student Centre at 12:30
pm.
The project came into fruition
when, under UBC's 75th anniversary fund, the provincial government matched philanthropist Cecil
Green's donation of seven million
dollars towards establishing an
elite graduate college in the Oxford
tradition.
The expense ofthe college for
the number of people it wouldhouse
has been a source of opposition
accordingto Eileen Mak, Graduate
Student Society (GSS) representative on the advisory committee.
"The idea did not go over well
(with the GSS)," she said. "You can
house a lot more than 100 people
with 14 million dollars."
Additionally, because it is a
college as well as aresidence it will
possibly need an endowment and
it will need more funds to operate
than would a conventional residence according to Mak.
A bursary fund is also in the
works for students who are accepted by the college, but cannot
afford the fees.
Designed to promote interaction between graduate students
and faculty, plans include public
areas and a lecture hall or a combined dining/lecture hall. As well,
up to 30 rooms may be set aside for
couples, and possibly all 100 rooms
may be made larger.
Attention: BoG/Senate/AMS exec candidates, sign up for screenings by
Wednesday-noon. Supply 201ine, typed position paper, and a B/W photo
1841-1991
Master of Industrial Relations, Queen's University
A twelve-month multi-disciplinary program for students wishing to pursue
careers in the broad field of industrial relations and human resource management.
Admission Requirements: A four-year bachelor's degree with upper second-
class standing (or a three-year degree with relevant and substantial work experience and demonstrated evidence of academic potential). Applicants must have
successfully completed a basic university-level course covering both micro- and
macro-economics and at least one university-level course in statistics. Students
from all academic fields are invited to apply.
Information/   School of Industrial Relations, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6
Applications: Telephone  (613) 545-2193
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January 15,1991
THE UBYSSEY/5 SPORTS
'Birds drop two
The road-weary Thunderbird
hockey team struggled home Sunday after dropping a pair of games
to the resurgent University of
Regina Cougars.
The T-Birds, completing a
section of their schedule that saw
them play nine straight road
games, dropped a 6-5 decision in
overtime Friday before getting
walloped 5-1 on Saturday.
Despite outshooting the
hometown Cougars in both games,
the T-Birds were unable to solve
the puzzle of Regina goaltender
Rod Houk.
"Houk got hot in the second
game," said UBC coach Terry
O'Malley. "We outshot them in both
games but that doesn't mean much.
The team was a little stale."
Forward Gary Dickie scored
two goals on Friday and followed
that up with a hat-trick on Saturday to pace the Cougar attack.
Forwards Jay Barberie, Darren
Kwiatowski, Grant Delcourt, Perry
Neufeld and Jeff Crossley replied
for the T-Birds on Friday while
forward Charles Cooper was the
lone UBC marksman on Saturday.
Things will not get any easier
for the T-Birds this weekend when
they take on the first place University of Alberta Golden Bears in a
pair of games at the Thunderbird
Winter Sports Centre.
"Depending on what happens
next weekend we'll either be one
point out of first or in sixth place,"
O'Malley said, referring to the
parity in the Canada West Conference this year. The T-Birds are
currently in third place, five points
behind Alberta and the University
of Calgary.
This weekend's games will be
played on Friday and Saturday
with both games starting at 7:30
pm.
Perhaps the best Canada West hockey of the season will be played this weekend
when the T-Birds play host to the team which has proved to be their nemesis in
recent years—the first place University of Alberta Golden Bears.
FILE PHOTO
OPINION
Two more dropped
The   UBC   Thunderbird    the Thunderbirds'Canada West
win-loss record falls to 2-8, putting their playoff chances in
jeopardy.
Jana Jordan was the top
UBC scorer on Friday night with
28 points, and Devanee Peterson
followed up with 12 while Lisa
Nickle led the Thunderbirds on
Saturday night with 17.
women's basketball team
dropped a pair of games to the
University of Lethbridge
Pronghorns at War Memorial
Gym this past weekend.
After falling 80-63 to the
'Horns on Friday night, UBC
conceded a 81-67 setback on
Saturday night. With the losses,
Healthy Body = Healthy Mind?
by Colin Maycock
In the grand scale of things,
the ancient Greeks have an awful
lot to answer for. Not only did
they systemize knowledge
thereby laying the foundations of
such delightful and thought pro-
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voking subjects such as applied
mathematics—(applicable to
what?)—they also instutionalised
the wonderful world of athletic
endeavour. Straightaway I should
state quite catagorically that I believe that people, within commonly
accepted standards of behaviour,
have every right to do what they
happen to enjoy. My only real
quibble is that it appears that there
is a large portion of the world's
population that attai ns a great deal
of pleasure from the most asinine
of all pursuits—sports.
From archery to aikido, bowling to baseball, curling to cricket,
diving to dwarf throwing, the list
goes on and on and would be as
boring to read as to type. The basic
problem with all sports (even those
that I happen to enjoy) is that they
are, at the bottom line, so absolutely futile. Think about it. Why
is it important to anybody if someone can run faster than someone
else or if one group of people can
move an object, usually some form
of ball, over a line or into a circumscribed space in the face of
resistance? Think of all the effort,
energy and sheer willpower that
has gone into the achievement of
such a silly end. What a grotesque
squandering of human resources.
As always these thoughts lead me
to wondering just what might have
been done if so much money and
time hadn't been so fruitlessly
frittered away.
It is really hard to determine
which, of all types of sporting
endeavour, I find the most
unappealing. Actually, no it isn't.
Team Sports, of all descriptions,
are really rather revolting for two
good reasons. First and foremost
it seems that fully grown adults,
with lives full of woes and triumphs, might have something
better to do with their time then
chasing small spherical objects
around. Secondly, the team imposes a system of relationships on
those within the team that are
both dehumanizing and demeaning. Itis dehumanizingin the sense
that as the team has a single
purpose, or if you wish product,
the relationships between members are entirely geared toward its
achievement/production. That is
to say, each individual views each
other individual as merely part of
the production process as opposed
to a living breathing human being. In fact it would be a point of
supreme indifference to the average team player if one of his fellows
were alive, dead, psychotic or a
sociopathic chainsaw wielding
slug with a gammy foot, just so
long as he/she/it fulfilled its assigned task and didn't get caught
doing anything contrary to the
rules of whichever mindnumbing
sport they've engaged.
The demeaning aspect of team
sports is relatively easy to delineate: itis the completely pointless
activity in which they participate.
There is a further aspect of
the sporting world that needs to
be discussed, that is the role ofthe
spectator in the maintenance of
these activities. While I recognise
that there is an amount of pleasure in determining the varieties
of possible or actual strategies
being used by the players or teams
involved. That having been said,
this "pleasure" appears to be
bordering on the onanistic when
its source is something so banal.
The spectator gains a particularly
debilitating vicarious thrill. This
is a difficult problem to unravel
but it essentially revolves around
the expectations generated by
viewing as opposed to participation. By not actually "Just Doing
It" the spectator places uninformed assumptions as to what is
or isn't possible on the field. Furthermore, the spectator cannot,
by the nature of her/his socio-
cultural location, engage with the
subject of her/his gaze. The spinoff
of this is that athletes experience
more and more pressure to perform their futile "entertainment"
function increasingly competitively. What the viewer's want,
they ultimately get and the price
is paid in the blood and body ofthe
atheletes themselves.
As mere cogs in the entertainment
industry there is always another
to fill any gaps created by dismemberment, death or the
atheletes biggest fear, age.
Ultimately, it appears that
organised sports are here to stay
regardless of their blatant stupidity. The biggest question that
needs to be asked is WHY?
6/THE UBYSSEY
January 15,1991 SPORTS
Farrell's return welcomed by volley 'Birds
by Matthew Clarke
Dave Farrell is not your average student athlete. As well as
being a volleyball player accomplished enough to be named a
second team Canada West all-star
last season, he is also one ofthe top
commerce students at UBC.
In fourth year, Farrell was one
of the first two undergraduates
from this university to be invited
to Erasmus University in
Rotterdam, Holland to participate
in the illustrious International
Masters of Science Exchange
Council (IMSEC) program. Along
with 37 other students from 17
countries, he spent the first term
studying international business
and management practices.
Before leaving, however, the
Hamilton native was left with the
task of informing head coach Dale
Ohman that he would be missing
all preseason training and the first
half of his senior season. Despite
losing one of his top players,
Ohman encouraged Farrell to go
and welcomedhim back to the team
when he return to UBC.
"It's really a plum in the cap of
our program," Ohman said. "You
look for good students who are also
excellent volleyball players and
here's a guy who shoots out the
other end."
When he first arrived in
Rotterdam, Farrell found himself
in a program that included six core
courses and two electives as well
as an 'in company project'—the
possibilities for development of
markets in Yugoslavia— in a group
with three other foreign students.
Farrell said he found the
course work more group oriented
and less theoretical than that in
UBC Commerce. Also, it appeared
that the students who came from
The high-flying Dave Farrell (11) is back in the T-Bird lineup after
spending the last semester studying in Europe.
European universities drew from
an educational background which
was slightly different in focus than
his own.
"The Europeans were more
knowledgeable in humanities and
historical theories but less apt to
know about current technical aspects of financial markets,"
Farrell said.
Highlights of his stay included a group trip to Brussells
which included discussions at the
European Community and NATO,
as well as weekends in Paris, Cologne and Munich.
Farrell returns to a team
blessed with both depth and talent
but also plagued with injuries and
inconsistent play. Farrell's athletic and personal attributes make
him a most valuable addition to
the Thunderbirds at this time
Ohman said.
"He brings a lot of different
skills to our team. He is a very
intense player on the court and
that's one of the areas we've
struggled with. He's been a
natural leader for us (in the
past)."
As a full-time starter last
year, Farrell excelled as power
hitter but does not expect to start
right away and may see some
action as middle blocker. Ever
an optimist, he sees this as a
positive situation for both him
and the team.
STEVE CHAN PHOTO
"The talent is there already
which gives me time to refine my
skills after an extended layofffrom
the sport," he said. "I see my role
as that of a catalyst. I hope to
bring fresh vision to the team by
introducing a new perspective."
Having done Europe, Farrell
hopes to stay in Vancouver and
work in the consulting field when
he graduates. Meanwhile, he's
keeping his eye on the CIAU
championships.
T-Birds best in nation, but
need more athletic supporters
by Mark Nielsen
What more could a men's basketball team that has an 18-2 won-
lost record, scores over 100 points
a game more often than not and is
ranked number one in the nation
possibly want?
How about fans?
Based on a simple head count,
fewer than 300 spectators turned
up for each of the UBC
Thunderbirds' victories over the
University of Lethbridge
Pronghorns at War Memorial Gym
over the weekend. Considering how
many students attend UBC and
how many people War Memorial
can hold, there was room for more.
Those who did show up, however, witnesses some top-notch, not
to mention entertaining, basketball as the Thunderbirds downed
Lethbridge 98-83 on Friday night
and 117-96 the next evening.
And the consensus among
those interviewed after the games
was that 'yes, the Thunderbirds
are for real, and worth watching.'
"They have excellent athletes,
they have intensity, they're quick,
they can jump and they can shoot.
Have I left anything out?" said
Randy Clark, a teacher at Britannia High School who was in fact
attending because a friend plays
for Lethbridge.
"I think they (the
Thunderbirds) have a good chance
of winning the whole thing so they
deserve more fans."
UBC coach Bruce Enns was a
bit more stoic about the lack of
people in the seats, saying that
he'd leave it to the media to decide
whether or not there are enough.
Even so, Enns has convinced
a chain of pizza outlets to give
away a $175 scholarship at each
and every home game until the
end of the season to draw more
people out.
Also, he did concede that the
Thunderbirds "would be pretty
scary if we (UBC) had some support behind us." And he said that
UBC's annual trip to the University of Victoria is always his
favourite of the year because of
the huge turnout for the Vikings'
games. They'll be heading there
this weekend.
The final scores were deceptive as small butfeisty Pronghorns
stayed with UBC for most of the
games on both nights. Talent-
wise, however, Lethbridge was no
match for the Thunderbirds, and
eventually UBC pulled out a pair
of decisive wins.
Canadian national team
member J.D. Jackson scored 36
points on Saturday night after
scoring 16 points collecting nine
assists andhaulingin 10 rebounds
on Friday night. Fifth year guard
Al Lalonde, who sat out most of
Friday night with a cold, canned
23 points the next evening while
Derek Christiansen scored 18 in
the opener and Bob Heighton
bagged 16. Heighton, David
Williscroft and Jason Leslie all
reached double figures on Saturday.
After the road-trip to
Vancouver Island this weekend,
UBC will be back home at War
Memorial Gym the following
weekend to host the University of
Calgary Dinosaurs.
BIRD DROPPINGS
First year guard Jason Pamer
will be undergoing knee surgery
this week and will be out for the
rest ofthe season.
Thunderbirds finish
sixth in California
The UBC Thunderbirds
finished arespectable sixth out
of 24 teams at the University
of California—Santa Barbara
volleyball tournament over the
weekend.
Splitting into two platoons
to keep fresh over the eight
games they played in the two-
day tourney, the Thunderbirds
played consistently well to finish with a 5-3 record.
The team placed ahead of
the two other Canadian representatives: the University of
Calgary Dinosaurs, who placed
eighth, and the York University Yeomen, who finished
ninth.
The Thunderbirds lost 3-1
to UCLA, the second ranked
men's volleyball team in the
NCAA, in the match to decide
fifth and sixth.
UBC tennis serves up aces
by Quinn Harris
UBC varsity tennis has enjoyed
early season success, but the teams
hopes to establish a tennis conference in the western Canada to maintain their competitive edge.
The tennis 'Birds compete primarily against US schools, but
women's coach Michelle Fischer and
men's coach Andy Bramer would
like a more formal playing schedule
with western Canadian universities.
Currently, a western CIAU tennis
conference does not exist.
The two coaches feel UBC needs
a competitive league to help develop
promising talent on the teams. Eastern Canada already has an established university tennis conference
in place.
The men's squad includes John
Nickel and Martin Lampa, both
ranked in the top ten nationally when
they played junior.
The women'steam alsoincludes
former top junior players.
Following her success on the
junior circuit, Richmond's Bali
Atchwal has become the T-Bird
women's strongest player.
"Bali has steadily improved
during each of her three years at
UBC," Fischer said.
While the program has attracted excellent local talent,
Fischer and team supporters
would like to see scholarships offered that would attract promising players from outside B.C. and
to keep top B.C. juniors from going to American schools.
"We are looking for local
sponsers to help us establish a
Thunderbird Tennis Society to
finance scholarships," Fischer
said.'
After witnessing the success
of the recently formed
Thunderbird Golf Society, Fischer
would like to see the tennis program financed with a similiar
sponsor structure.
"We are optimistic that a
western conference could be established as early as next season,"
Fischer said.
Fischer envisions the champions from a future western conference playing for a national title
against the winners in the east.
UBC could be serious contenders for a future national title if the
program can continue to attract as
much local talent as it has in the
recent past, Fischer said.
Fischer considers both UBC
squads, among the strongest in
Western Canada.
Despite losing to the University of Calgary in a recent tournament, men's captain Rory MacKay
agrees with Fischer.
"We had beaten U of C earlier
in the season," MacKay said. "Unfortunately, at the Western Canadians we were playing without our
number two and number four
players and that really hurt us."
The women's team's next competition will be in Edmonton
January 25-26 against the University of Alberta, while the men will
be hosting Western Washington
University on February 16.
January 15,1991
THE UBYSSEY/7 11111111111111111 i i i 1111111 i I i 11111111111111111111111111111111 TTTT-n
The University of British Columbia
Frederic Wood Theatre
Our Country's Good
by Timberlake Wertenbaker
Directed by Stephen Malloy
January 16-26   8 PM
SPECIAL 2 FOR 1 PREVIEW - WEDNESDAY, JAN. 16
Res. 228-2678
The best articles
you couldn't find
last term are still
in the Library*
And so are the ones
you need this term.
'or are available through Interlibraiy Loan
ofjm
Hong Kong
Chinese Foods
5732 UNIVERSITY BLVD.
(Just one block from campus in the village)
LUNCH SPECIAL (COMBO)
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Let us help you
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LIBRARY TOUR
EVERY THURSDAY
12:30-1:20
MEET IN MAIN LIBRARY
ENTRANCE
HILLEL HIGHLIGHTS
FAMOUS HOT LUNCH
TODAY (TUESDAY) 12:30!
Thursday. Jan. 17
12:30 PM
OPERATION*?
EXODUS
KICK-OFF
• Get the current facts on
Soviet Jewry.
• Video and presentation
Wednesday. Jan. 16
12:30 PM
Torah Study Group
With Rabbi W. Solomon
--. Friday Jan. 18 through Sun. Jan. 20      ""^
. J^~       Share a weekend of informative discussion, program
3_ planning, leadership development, and FUN!
$10 fee, includes some meals —*"
Hillel House is located on the North side ol SUB next to the parkade. Tel: 224-4748
Marking your papers?
Doing some late night studying?
Bored with it?
Catch a FREE
Monday Night Movie
Meet a new friend ... munch on some
delicious popcorn
6:30 pm Fireside, Grad Centre, All Welcome
January 21   "LOCAL HERO"
and "HANDMAID'S TALE"
January 28   "FAWLTY TOWERS" VOL. 3
and "THE FIRST FLYING CIRCUS
- MINISTRY OF SILLY WALKS
& ARCHITECT'S SKETCH.
That was then and this is now:
the anti-war movement in the '60s and the '90s
by Carolyn Eagan
CUP (Toronto)
In the United States I was a
member of Students for a Democratic Society (SDS) which was one
of the largest student organizations during that time. I worked as
an anti-war organizer in New York,
Boston, Madison, and Wisconsin:
primarily on campuses but also in
the workplace. I came to Canada
as the partner of a draft resister.
When one talks about the
Vietnam era, itis really important
to recognize that it was a real
crossroads historically and politically. It was a rebirth of radicalism
after the passivity which typified
the McCarthy era ofthe fifties.
The shift towards radicalism
began in the early sixties as the
civil rights movement began to
question basic tenets of North
American society. Afro-Americans began to fight back against
segregation and the racism they
faced every day.
Young, white, middle-class
college students also became active in this movement. They went
to the South to work on literacy
campaigns and voter registration
drives.
And they and African-Americans went face-to-face against cops
and clubs and dogs.
Veterans of this campaign
were very instrumental in the new
and growing student movement.
The free speech movement in Berkeley was one of the earliest examples. Itburston the scene rather
dramatically. There was a demonstration/occupation which led to
800 arrests in 1964. Seventy-five
percent of the student body of
35,000 went out on strike.
The SDS had chapters on almost every campus across the
country. It also had urban development projects in centres like
Newark, New Jersey. But its major focus became campus work and
opposition to the war.
Opposition to the war grew
slowly atfirst—in '61, '62, '63 demonstrations would get out a few
hundred people. But in 1965, SDS
decided to call a demo in Washington.
I was in New York at the time
and went to the demo. Twenty
thousand, mostly students, took
part. It was absolutely extraordinary. No one expected anywhere
near that number. We had a sense
that something really dramatic
was beginning to happen. Political
work and discussion and organiz-
ingon campuses and on the streets
was beginning to have an effect.
Coupled with the growth of
the anti-war movement was a rise
in militant black struggle. In 1968
there were black insurrections all
across the United States with a
revolutionary politic emerging
from the ghettoes.
And people were dying in these
insurrections—twenty-three in
Newark, forty in Detroit, 2500 injured and 4000 arrested.
PERSPECTIVE
Politic was defined as revolutionary and groups like the Black
Panthers, the Young Lords (a
Latino group), the Third World
Women's Alliance were forming
and they were getting a real hearing.
There was a lot of state repression, and a lot of it was aimed
at the African-American community. During the period, twenty
Black Panthers were killed by the
police. Malcolm X and Martin
Luther King were also killed. Kent
State students were gunned down.
Of course the African-American and Hispanic communities
were providing a great percentage
of those who were going to Vietnam. Their harder, fight-back
politic gave an impetus—sometimes in an indirect way—to the
anti-war movement.
The strength of the anti-war
movement—hundreds of thousands of people saying 'no' to the
war—allowed for the development
of a real draft resistance movement. When the draft was implemented there was a huge increase
in students fighting back—for obvious reasons. This brought the
war home to students in a very
concrete way and it led to the immediate mobilization of many.
As opposition to the war
spread, the ideas discussed over
the years that had passed began to
show changes. In the slogans and
the mobilizations, demands were
changing from 'stop the war now'
to 'bring the war home!'
The links were beginning to made
between issues—between imperialism abroad and racism at home.
As Mohammed Ali said at the
time, "no Vietnamese ever called
me a nigger"—and as you remember, he refused the draft.
The upsurge of struggle challenged many of the assumptions
people had about their own lives
and the society in which they lived.
Women were actively involved
in the anti-war movement and
began questioning 'the feminine
mystique', and the sexism they
were confronted with, in the
movements themselves and in
society at large. This was the
start of the women's liberation
movement. Tens of thousands of
women, because of their experience in the civil rights and antiwar movements, would no longer
accept gender oppression limiting
their potential.
Today we're facing the possibility of war in the gulf. The U.S.
troop build-up is certainly as large
as it was in Vietnam. One difference today is that anti-war demonstrations and mobilizations have
been taking place even before the
war has begun and support for
Bush's initiatives has dropped remarkably between the time troops
were originally sent to the Gulf
and now.
Itis already clear to many people
that this war is about oil and that the
state fights in the interest of capital
gain and not in the interests of the
working class, blacks, hispanics or
other oppressed people.
The potentialisheretoonce again
to build an anti-imperialism movement where the exchange of ideas,
and exposure to radical politics can
take place.
When we chanted in 1968, "hell
no we won't go", it was a very radical
statement. But what we're chanting
today, "hell no we won't go, we won't
die for Texaco" is even more powerful.
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228-6121
228-6125
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any Budget
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DAILY
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Watch All Your Favorite Sports
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Bar And Kitchen Open Daily At 11:00 A.M.
Squash - Racquetball Contracts
We will be offering four month contracts for January 21 '91 through April 30 '91.
These will be a one court week contract with no reduced fee's.
Courts will be issued strictly on a first come first serve basis with payment required in full.
Special rates available only on presentation of valid student AMS card or faculty/staff card.
Contracts Can Be Booked On Friday, January 18, Starting At
7:30 A.M., At the Sports Shop.
TMUNDERBIRDS FIGHT FOR FIRST PLACE.
Don't miss great university hockey action when the Alberta
Golden Bears come to town. Fri./Sat. January 18th • 7:30 PM
Help cheer the Thunderbirds on to 1st place!
8/THE UBYSSEY
January 15,1991 OJP NEWS
Student councils withhold CFS fees
by Krishna Rau
TORONTO (CUP) — Some members of the Canadian Federation
of Students say they pay the piper
and they should call the tune.
Eleven student councils in BC
and Ontario are withholding fees
from the services branch of CFS
as a pressure tactic. They say
members have lost control of CFS-
Services (CFS-S) and they'll hold
their fees in trust until something
gives.
But they may be running the
risk of being sued by CFS if they
don't pay up soon.
Student councils belonging to
CFS pay $4 per student per year.
One dollar from that goes to CFS-
Services (CFS-S), which is controlled by CFS, but operates as an
autonomous wing. CFS-S runs a
travel agency (Travel Cuts), and
operates such programs as the
Student Saver Cards and the Student Work Abroad Program.
Some student councils in
Ontario and British Columbia
charge CFS-S is run
undemocratically and that CFS
members, who own the services
wing, have no say in its decisionmaking process. Some of those
councils are now putting CFS's
dollar into trust funds instead of
paying it immediately.
Lisa Berland, the executive
assistant at the Ryerson's student
council in Toronto, said they've
had their CFS-S fees in trust since
October to protest the lack of input member councils have.
There's a sort of lack of accessibility for members in
decision-making. There's not a lot
of accountability built into the bylaws of CFS-Services."
Berland pointed to CFS-S's
decision, made without member
approval, to take over a federal
government program that brought
young women into Canada as au
pairs as an example of autonomy
gone awry.
None of the student councils
have expressed any desire to leave
CFS, but tempers seem to be fraying somewhat over the issue. At a
CFS national executive meeting
in early January, two motions
were brought forward to take legal action against the councils
withholding their fees. Both were
later withdrawn.
Jaime McEvoy, the president
of the Douglas College student
council in BC said legal action
would be foolish.
"If they want to take legal
action against us to recover their
fees, they'll be hard-pressed to do
it.
McEvoy also saw CFS-S as
requiring more member input.
"We view the services as an
organization that largely runs itself."
At the last CFS general meeting in October, the members voted
to bring the constitution of CFS-S
into line with that of CFS. This
was enough to persuade the student council at the University of
Ottawa to schedule a vote on resuming payment of fees.
"Once they (the constitutions)
were made compatible, we felt that
the main objectives we wanted
were achieved," said U of O council
executive Marc Molgat. "It raised
the whole issue of what CFS-Ser-
vices is and what CFS-Services
should be."
Molgat said, however, that
other members still have complaints, and that CFS should not
even be considering addressing
the questions in a courtroom.
"I think it's ridiculous. If
you're not able to respond to the
legitimate questions people have
about your organization, then
there's definitely a problem at the
national executive level."
CFS deputy chair Christoph
Sicking said the national executive did not want to sue any
council, and the proposals came
from a minority of the executive.
He agreed, however, that the
constitutional changes did not
seem to be enough for many councils. He said such changes would
not alter the day-to-day decisionmaking process of CFS-S, but he
held out hope for the future.
That in itself is not enough.
But now the groundwork has been
laid," he said.
But Molgat said some schools
are looking for fundamental
changes in the way CFS-S operates.
"I think some schools want
some very important changes to
the way CFS-Services are run.
They want seats on the board of
directors of Travel Cuts, and a
greater say in the allocation of
monies," he said.
The positions of members in
BC will be examined at a meeting
later this week. The Ontario Federation of Students will also hold
a meeting this week.
Tim Jackson, the chair ofthe
Ontario Federation of Students,
said OFS had stayed out of the
disagreements so far.
One of the motions to sue
members at the CFS national executive meeting was put forward
by the Ontario representative, although she later withdrew it.
Jackson, however, said he had no
opinion on legal action.
"It's irrelevant what I think. I
don't have a seat on the CFS executive."
Jackson then compared the
situation to the difficulties OFS
had in collecting fees from the
York University's studentcouncil.
The OFS membership had voted
to sue the council if an agreement
could not be reached.
But, said Jackson, he really
had no part to play in the
disagreement.
"I don't really think it's appropriate that I get involved in it
that much."
Lakehead University in
Ontario has also put its fees in
trust, as have the University of
Victoria, Simon Fraser University, and Langara, Capilano,
Selkirk, Malspina and Cariboo
Colleges and the Emily Carr College of Arts—all in BC
Imitation Ivy Leagues inadequate, inquiry says
by Mike Adler
OTTAWA (CUP)—Undergraduate teaching will suffer in Canada
until our universities stop imitating Harvard and Yale, according to the commissioner of the
inquiry of Canadian University
Education Stuart Smith.
Smith said his report this fall
will argue that universities should
be encouraged to specialize.
"We're all in favor of diversity
of role," he said in Ottawa last
month after listening to over 200
witnesses in nine cities.
"What we're not in favor of is
having the government tell people
what they should do."
But Smith said university
presidents are wrong if they think
the report will only echo their pleas
for increased funding.
"Sure they need more money.
But the methods they have chosen
for surviving this period of financial crisis are themselves open to
serious question."
Witnesses told the commission that universities with
graduate and research studies
have chosen to protect these programs, letting the quality of undergraduate education fall drastically.
By reaching for status—and
modelling themselves on famous
American institutions—these
Canadian universities have failed
to stress teaching, Smith said.
"I think I see far too many
universities adopting the policies
of tenure and promotion as though
they were Yale. Well, with great
respect, they're not."
The Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada is
spending $900,000 to pay for the
commission and its office in Ottawa. The federal secretary of
state, responsible for cutting
transfer payments to universities
by $900 million over five years,
contributed $250,000.
Smith praised undergraduate
institutions for "resisti ng the urge
to become mini-Harvards," telling
a group of students from Bishop's
University they were "lucky" to be
at a university that did not shortchange them on teaching.
He appeared intrigued on December 5 when Queen's University principal David Smith told
the commission that government
funding should be affected by "indicators" of what each university
has to offer.
The principal said this could
include special programs,
admission  standards, and job
placement for graduates.
"If I call for differential funding, there's going to be a howl,"
saidStuartSmith, wholater added
he would still consider the idea.
"I have a lot of difficulty with
quality comparisons (between institutions)," he said.
Hearings ended December 6
in Ottawa, after allowing two extra days for presentations. Portions of the commission's draft
report might be circulated in April
or May, said Philip Enros, an assistant to Stuart Smith.
_ T_,^ London
UBC and   #Ufe
A proven combination
Angelo Venetsanos, B. Comm '90 ■ Gord Kavanagh, B A '90 • lzumi
Mikf, 8 A '90 * Sandy Pfiefer, B, Comm '90 ♦ Doris Wong, B. Comm
*90 * David Tompkins, B A >90 • John Mills, 8. Comm '89 * Alan Papic,
8A '69 • Stewart Wong, BA '69 ♦ Gord Michasiw, BA *89 ♦ Carl
Davidson, B.Comm *89 * John Gerbrecht, B.Comm '69 • IqbalMann,
BXomrn *69 * Penny Stainton, B. Ed, '69 * Dave Kraemer, B A *68 ♦
GtermaChe$trn«t,&A,87 • Steve Cox, B A *87 • Greg D'Avignon, B A
*86 * Kevin FJyon, B. Comm, '86 • Dave Dickinson, S. Comm, *86 •
m$k Mafinka,* B, Comm/ '85 • Carlo Niching B, Comm, '85 • Eric
Barclay, BA %$ * Sf$t£ Simpson, 8, Comm* '83 » Chuck Crosshote, B*
Comm.'82 * BingChew,B.P.E.79 * Gord tee, B, Comm, 76 * Randy
Soon, 8, Comm. 76 * Brian Milne, 8, Comm. 72' * Bob McGinn, B,
€omm»*69 • Dave Campbell, B. Comm. f69 • Ron Bumard, B* Comm.
'69 * Brad Gamble, B. Comm, '69 ♦ Bill Cuihbeit, 8, Sc. '66 * Jake
l$$h$k$, BXomm. %% * Mike Tompkins, 8. Comm, '60 • Mike
-Partridge, B. Comm, '59' *. Dick Cavity©/8* Comm. '59...
Look for us on campus again this year or
see Canada Employment Centre
IIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 11 ■ 111 ■ 111111 ■ 11111ITTT-T
The University of British Columbia
The Ghost Sonata
by August Strindberg
depicts the poison underneath
the facade of goodness
January 22-26   8 PM
DOROTHY SOMERSET STUDIO
Res. 228-2678
1 Faculty of Agriculture'
Presents
ROUND - UP '91
LIVE!
Featuring ^^
Metropolis music
No Minors
ROCK 'N ROLL
SUB BALLROOM
SAT JAN 19,1991
DOORS OPEN 7:30
January 15,1991
THE UBYSSEY/9 theUbyssey
January 15,1991
The Ubyssey is published Tuesdays and Fridays by the Alma
Mater Society of the University of
British Columbia. Editorial
opinions are those of the staff
and not necessarily those ofthe
university administration, or of
the sponsor. The Ubyssey is
published with the proud support of the Alumni Association.
The editorial office is Rm. 241k
of the Student Union Building.
Editorial Department, phone
228-2301; advertising, 228-
3977;   FAX* 228-6093
It was a hot and ravingnight at Club Ubyssey
when Corn speck von Specht yelled, "Let's
do the ma sty!" And immediately. Captain
RedsweatShirt Nielsen,Biricenstocky Ernie
and Tangerine Tigger jumped to the floor,
thrusting their hips like a coffee grinder on
acid. $4.25 was the cover charge. Yggy King
wore his John Travolta suit and discoed to
the tune of Senator Mikey Booth. TCeeping
his lawn," thumped Martinmaughamfart-
on-Chesterfield. Turned on by the orgy of
decadence, Matthew Clarke, Quinn Harris
and Lucho van Isschott-ichiban noodles
pulled out their forks and began to masticate vigorously. Titilated and blushing,
Primadonna Rebecca Bishop videotaped and
faxed it to Nightline's guest host
Nzzoobzxpee Rehnby. In the audience were
Nicole Sadi risky,
JennyTheNewSnazzyStaffer and Sam
Green who chanted ."Blasphemous!" took out
their chain saws and sliceddtcedchopped
the tape. So disappointed was voyeur
Hickey Victor Chewygooey Wong who kissed
with three lips that he ran back to Club
Ubyssey and demanded an encore performance. Horny Hao the Idealist and luscious
Lydia Cheng obliged. Jamesian Effie Pow
noted down the details in long, convoluted
sentences, sticking in commas wherever she
pleased, and, excited as she was, managed
to stand, alone, upright, beautiful, and as
poetic justice would serve, she would give a
reading of all the night's masturbation on
paper.
Editors
Rebecca Bishop   •   Michael Booth
Martin Chester •  Paul Dayson
Mark Nielsen
GloODUESS/l   FEEL LIKE RCDCXY/
S Y0&WBAKA/...60 ahead SaddVi,
MAKE MY DAY.^
Vo^'l  YoU THREATEN M£,BUSh\
AfcCTRESSlc^ IS Art   U<qLY TK!?"
UtoHoULi V Uf^vi^A ftWtfci \J\tfOr
/
No oil to grease the military machine?
There are no American oil interests in Lithuania.
Does this bit of information explain the West's passive reaction to the crushing of
nationalist forces in the Baltic State?
Over the weekend Soviet forces used live ammunition to quell the popular
movement that demanded sovereignty for Lithuania which has been under Soviet
control since the Second World War.
Since the Soviet military moved in the Lithuanian people have been attempting
to blockade, often unsuccessfully, the troops from key buildings in the capital of
Vilnius—sacrificing their lives to resist Soviet imperialism.
And while the tanks slowly and methodically crush the Lithuanian people, the
Western leaders have only chastised the Kremlin for the brutal crack down.
Minister for External Affairs Joe Clark "condemned" the Soviet action, while U.S.
president George Bush said he was "disturbed" by what had happened.
These are the very leaders who are itching to send their youth to die in the sands
ofthe Arabian Peninsula.
Why is the Western world being so hypocritical?
Why is it that the West is towing the Soviet line?
Perhaps it is because the US needs Soviet support in the UN or risks loosing
Security Council approval for its actions in the Gulf.
A similar example of Western inaction came during the crackdown in Hungary
in 1956. The West was tied up with the Suez crisis, and distracted and disunified, the
West responded meekly to the Soviet's savage repression of Hungarian independence
fighters.
The timing in both cases has been impeccable. The Soviet union has been able to
wait, letting the discontent brew until the West has been preoccupied, disunified, or
dependant upon the Kremlin's support before they have acted. And then they have
reacted with swift brutality.
The similarities between the two events are striking.
But perhaps there is more.
This time the West has a tremendous amount of money invested in the Soviet
Union. The mighty buck takes over again, as the West turns a blind eye to brutality
because it is in its best economic interests.
Time and time again, the so-called western democracies have proven themselves
more than prepared to overlook a couple of massacres or a few human rights violations
when it is in their best interests. In many cases they have supported regimes
committing these abuses or are responsible for oppressive governments gaining
power.
Today we cry out against the brutality ofthe Soviet government. Whether or not
Gorbachev is willing to accept responsibility, he must be held accountable for the
actions of his underlings. And he must bear the guilt of what happened over the
weekend.
But in the same breath we must let our own leaders know the shame of their
pathetic response.
Where is the February 15 deadline for Soviet withdrawl from Lithuania? There
are no troops massing on the Soviet border in a sign of strength, ready to invade and
defend the Lithuanian people.
Perhaps if we had oil interests in Eastern Europe the brutalities brought against
the Lithuanian people would receive the same recognition as those in Tianamen
The Gulf War: blood for economic stability
"The prospect of war and the loss of Canadian lives is real. There will be thousands of
casualties and we should not rule out the possibility that young Canadian soldiers will not
return but will stay there for burial."
-Joe Clark, Minister for External Affairs, October 25,1990.
Why is the Canadian government willing to risk the lives of Canadians alongside
American troops in a war with Iraq?
That Saddam Hussein is not the most pleasant individual is not worth debate. As a
dictator he has led his nation to massacre Kurds, a minority population living in the north
western part of Iraq, with chemical weapons. His regime has repressed the rest of its
population as well.
But Iraq has been on a war footing for the last decade fighting Iran. Not that this is an
excuse for atrocities.
Yet we, the western powers, have used Iraq's war with Iran as an excuse. Up to six
months ago Iraq was an ally we were willing to supply with arms. Hussein was a leader we
supported. In 1963, Saddam Hussein was installed by the United States.
To put it bluntly, when Hussein and the Iraqi military were out killing the Kurds we
turned a blind eye. Now that it is convenient however, we have uncovered these atrocities
as evidence of Hussein's evil.
The Iraqi regime is no worse than other governments the United States and Canada
support in the name of democracy. Saudi Arabia, for example, our ally in this war, is a nation
that has frequent beheadings, condones slavery and treats women as second class citizens.
We are not going to be fighting this war for democracy, human rights or any thing ofthe
sort
There must be other reasons.
There is the oil.
Oil fuels the global economy: industry, transportation, utilities and military might.
Nothing in our industrial world runs without it.
The US is not as dependent on Middle East crude, but its economic competitors are.
Europe and Japan are heavily dependant. It is not so much a matter of ensuring supplies
for its own industry as controlling the supplies of its economic rivals.
Since the "end of the cold war" and the competing Soviet superpower's decline into
dependence the global economy has been thrown into chaos. With no rival military
superpower the US needs a way to assert itself on the world stage.
The "new world order" has been shaping itself up as the capitalist dream of free
competition.
But Canada has declared arecession. Right now theUSis also plunginginto a recession,
as yet undeclared. The warriors of capitalism and unbridled competition are finding they
cannot compete.
The result is that the United States needs to use its military might to reassert its
dominance over its rival economic powers, Japan and Europe.
A military victory in the Persian Gulf would provide that dominance, insuring control
ofthe power switch ofthe States' rival's economies, and making America responsible for
protecting industrial nations from the agressive ambitions ofthe developing world.
A war economy would ensure the health ofthe American and the Canadian economies,
which are so closely tied, and would restore "stability" to the global economy.
A stability perched precariously on the nose of a missile, and at the cost of how much
blood, George?
10/THE UBYSSEY
January 15,1991 LETTS8S/OP-ED
Tuition debate hits
CiTR's airwaves
To all students concerned about
the tuition fee increases:
UBC president Strangway defends
his "tuition policy recommendation" in afeature interviewon CiTR
to be heard this Thursday and
Saturday (January 17 & 19) beginning at 5:30 pm. You will also
hear from a panel of student politicians who oppose the fee hikes.
CiTR is at 101.9 on the PM dial.
Stefan Ellis
CiTR news reporter
Wilson's speech
leaves forester
unconvinced
It sure looked like a good turnout for Bill Wilson's address to the
student body at UBC on November
29,1990.1 was quite impressed by
Mr. Wilson's speech but remain
totally unconvinced that First Nations People have the right or ability to manage the land and resources which they seek through
the comprehensive land claims
process.    Although I am very
sympathetic with Mr. Wilson regarding the past injustices perpetrated against aboriginal people in
BC and agree that there is room for
vast improvement in the way that
Natives are treated in society, I do
not feel that this is grounds for
their claim to 85% ofthe province.
For Natives to claim ownership over the land and resources of
the province is ludicrous.   These
people were not indigenous to
North America and have not been
here for 25,000 years as Mr. Wilson stated or since the beginning
of time as other Native peoples
have claimed. They originally came
to this part ofthe world as immigrants (much like us white scum—
Wilson's words) from Asia seeking
a better and easier existence. They
practiced a lifestyle of exploitation
of natural resources, such as fishing, and hunting game and if the
area in which they lived could not
support them because they exhausted its capability they moved
on.   These people even practised
slavery (Haida Nation and other
coastal peoples) until europeans
made them stop the practice.
When early european explorers started trading with Coastal
Indians of BC the aboriginal people
did not welcome the europeans
"with open arms" as Mr. Wilson
states but saw an economic oppor
tunity to gain wealth and luxuries
and seized upon it. They wanted
the beads, blankets and guns because of the wealth, status and
comfort which it brought into their
lives. In exchange they willingly
raped their rich fur-bearing animal
resources until they were totally
destroyed. They didn't care about
conservation because they were
caught up in the greed syndrome
of which they accuse non-native
people today. Do you really think
that with today's economic system
that Native people would manage
the resources of BC any differently?
What will change is simply who
holds the reins of power.
Environmental groups think
that they have found an ally with
the First Nations people of this
province and think that resource
management will be greatly improved once Natives gain control.
How sadly mistaken.
Where are Native trained
people who will manage the land
andresources of this province once
they gain control? Ill tell you
where, they are training to become
doctors and lawyers to lead the
economicgoodlife. I chose Forestry
as a profession because of my love
of the land and from a desire to
improve society's use of it not because I wanted to make lots of
money. I found Mr. Wilson's lack
of concern for the matter shocking
but was not at all surprised when
he stated that if Native professionals did exist he would hire them
over similarly qualified whites.
You and your people Mr. Wilson
are no different than us non-Natives. Whites and other non-Natives do not hold a monopoly on the
ability to discriminate.
At least our present system is
one which is adaptable and attempts to be non-discriminatory.
There are a lot of flaws with it and
these need to be changed but I do
not see the solution being to hand
over control to one segment of society. If the First Nations People
of BC want to change and reform
the society in which they live they
should start by getting out of their
own beds of puke and sorrow.
Break the dependent umbilical
cord which is tied around their
necks and start to work for themselves, send back the government
assistance cheques. Too scary a
thought huh? And Native people
wonder why non-Natives hold the
stereotypical views ofthe drunken
welfare bum.
The federal department for
Indian & Northern Affairs (INAC)
budget for 1990 was $4.0 billion
which works out to $9,639/Indian/
Here we go again
by Michael Booth
So it's election time again
and all through the second floor
of SUB our self-styled would-be
political leaders are scurrying
about in a concerted effort to get
as much information about
themselves (and in some cases
their opponents) out to you, the
would-be voter.
Their schemes and promises are grand, they all promise
to move heaven and earth if
elected, they vow to give students a stronger voice when
dealing with the university administration, they offer us unity
and progressive attitudes.
Things will be a lot better/different than before if they are elected
their assorted posters
scream. You bettcha!
Well folks, 111 let
you in on a little secret:
nothing will change no matter
who is elected. The AMS has
grown to be a massive bureaucracy that feeds on the token
students who act as its figureheads in any given year. The
AMS has its own massive rules
and guidelines that cover every
conceivable event that might
occur during a given school year.
There are deadlines for certain things to happen by and,
with the executive busy helping
AMS Inc. function smoothly, by
the time they have taken care of
their AMS duties, behold: their
terms are over.
I suppose you could call me
cynical about this, and indeed it
is possible to bring about change
during one's term of office. Unfortunately, any changes will act as a
burr under the saddle for an aspiring bureaucrat on one ofthe AMS's
many committees. This paper-
shuffler in training will then run
in the next year's election and
change things back to the way they
were before. The inherent problem
is that there is no continuity in
many of the programs run by the
AMS.
Instead, we will end up with a
scenario that will probably unfold
like this:
The newly elected will spend
the summer working for the AMS
and then spend the fall doing what
FREESTYLE
every other student government
has done for students: not a hell of
a lot. Oh, there will be a lot of talk
about expanding the Pit Pub or
making SUB even bigger because
afterall, it is the inherent duty of
each AMS executive to turn a bigger profit for AMS Inc. than the
executive that proceeded it.
Then, in late November, one
or more of these new executive
members will make the startling
revelation that Strangway will be
raising tuition fees for the following year. The executive member
will nobly offer to put her/his best
efforts into leading the student
body against this latest injustice
by the appointed dictator who answers to the title of UBC presi
dent.
After the winter break, this
individual will continue to act
indignantly about the increases
before anouncing their candidacy for president. And behold,
the cycle begins again.
If only there were real students running for these positions. Instead of SAC-rats and
assorted AMS hangers-on who
have worked their way up the
AMS system until they have
been on enough obscure committees to make them feel compelled to run for an executive
post, why can't we have real
honest to god students who just
want to do some
good for the university and/or their fellow students?
I just wish
that these wonderful candidates
would spend half the effort doing their jobs after they are
elected as they do hyping themselves duringthe campaign. The
effort you see now is the most
you will see out of these people
until the next election.
If only we had seen as much '
effort from the AMS in posting
information about the failed
referendums in October as is
being put into postering every
conceivably free space on campus about how wonderful these
candidates are. Come to think
of it, there are a bunch of referendums being run with these
elections and I have yet to see a
single piece of information
posted about them. Sigh.
year. Of this, 72% is administered
by Indians to Indians. Couple this
money with all of the tax breaks,
free medicare, educational assistance, the right to load their
freezers with fish and game at any
time of the year and other perks
and it's hard for me to understand
how they can ask for any more
advantages. All Natives must do
is ask and they shall receive.
Native people of BC want to
have their cake and eat it too. lam
sick and tired ofthe bleeding heart
bullshit I hear from people like Mr.
Wilson and other Native media
celebrities.   There are problems
within Native and non-Native society which must be addressed and
on this point I wholly agree with
Mr. Wilson but these are not
grounds for giving them 95 million
hectares of our country. At present
there are 62,000 Status Indians in
BC which amounts to 2.2% of our
province's population, why should
they control the land andresources
of the remaining 97.8% of this
province's tax paying citizens and
get a whopping pile of money to
help them in their new business
venture.
I .will not give you back one
square foot of BC nor its resources
Mr. Wilson because the land is all
of ours, not yours or mine. Your
people were immigrants to this
land as were we white, yellow and
black people that wanted to make
this place our home.
Wake up students of UBC and
start to really think about the implications of land claims in this
province in terms ofthe social as
well as financial costs or you will
wake up one day with a new master that is perhaps out of your
control.
Shawn Hedges
Forestry 4
BICYCLE STORES
FENDERS
OZ.OFF
ON THE SPOT
INSTALLATION
12 LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU.
6255 West Boulevard
263-3240
Store Manager
- Met Farrell
4387 West 10th
228-8200
We Also Have A Fully Stocked Service Department
CHEAPEST
ON CAMPUS!
FREE TUESDAY MOVIES
PING PONG TUESDAY NIGHTS
HUGE VARIETY OF IMPORT BZZR BRANDS
BOARD GAMES & DARTS AVAILABLE
OPEN:
TUESDAYS & THURSDAYS
a 4:30 to 10:00 pm
FRIDAYS 4:30 to 11:00 pm
INTERNATIONAL
1738 West Mall, U.B.C.     228-5021     Next to Asian Centre
January 15,1991
THE UBYSSEY/11 Pursue the total
experience
CAMPUS
RECREATION
UBC
For serious fun
this year
BE PREPARED FOR YOUR SUMMER EMPLOYMENT APPLICATION
Quality Instructional Courses in Leisure Pursuits, Campus Fitness, Number One Health Club Weightroom, Rec Clubs, One-to-One
Program, Certification Courses, Outdoor Equipment Rentals.
The RECREATION UBC OFFICE is temporarily located in OSBORNE CENTRE UNIT II
CALL 228-3996 for FURTHER INFORMATION
Programs are available to all students, faculty, staff, and the off campus community. Detailed course information and descriptions
can be found outside the RECREATION UBC Office in the War Memorial Gym.
REGISTRATION for all RECREATION courses and programs
Monday - Friday 9:00 am - 4:00 pm. STARTS Wednesday
January 2 - Friday, January 18,1991.
PLEASE NOTE:
' Late registration accepted throughout the term.
* Late registration does NOT ensure a place in the course.
* Classes will be CANCELLED during MID-TERM BREAK and
EASTER BREAK.
* All courses are subject to last minute changes.
* All courses are subject to a minimum enrollment
PLEASE CHECK WITH THE RECREATION OFFICE IF THERE
IS SOME DOUBT.
REFUND POLICY:
* We cancel - you get a full refund.
* You cancel - before 3:00 pm, Friday, January 25th there will
be a $10.00 processing charge.
* THERE WILL BE NO REFUNO ISSUED AFTER FRIDAY,
JANUARY 25th .without medical documentation.
* GST applies to all programs.
PAYMENT POLICY:
* Payment is required in full at time of registering.
* Cash and personal cheques only are accepted.
* Cheques should be made out to RECREATION UBC.
* A $15.00 deterrent charge will be made against NSF cheques.
" GST applies to all programs.
CAMPUS FITNESS 100-$50.00
SCHEDULE
TIME
MONDAY
TUESDAY
WEDNESDAY
THURSDAY
12:30
Work Out'
War Memorial
Kardio Funk*
War Memorial
Work Out
War Memorial
Body'
Osborne Gym B
3:30
Kardio Funk
Dance Studio
Body
Osborne Gym B
No Jump"
Dance Studio
4:40
Work Out
Osborne Gym A
No Jump**
Osborne Gym B
6:30-
9:30
Fitness Instructor***
Certification
Osborne Student
Lounge & Gym G
"WORKOUT - class emphasizes cardiovascular conditioning with a strength and stretch component.
'KARDIO FUNK - fun, funkie dance-like aerobic fitness, much more than just a workout.
**101NO JUMP -is a moderate, no jump, aerobic workout minimizing stress on leg & foot joints.
(see FITNESS 101 for NO JUMP ONLY ).
••'FITNESS INSTRUCTOR- $105.00see 700CERTIFICATION COURSES.
FITNESS AND STRENGTH TRAINING
101    NO JUMP ONLY-$30.00
(Can be taken as a separate entity)
103    STRENGTH TRAINING-$35.00
A term long developmental course
Tuesday
Thursday
Monday
4:40
3:30   '
5:00-6:00
104 AEROBIC CIRCUIT-$35.00 Wednesday 5:00-6:00
A combination of AEROBICS AND WEIGHT TRAINING, combining muscle tone with a
cardiovascular workout.
105 ONE-TO-ONE - FOR YOUR INDIVIDUAL STRENGTH TRAINING NEEDS
$20.00 per session. A one hour PRIVATE session for your start-up program, sport specific program and
more effective training program. By apppointment only. Sign up in a time that suits you best at the
CAMPUS RECREATION UBC office.
Osborne
Osborne
Weightroom
Weightroom
106
FITSTRONG- $85.00
Includes membership to Weightroom-
PLUS ALL CAMPUS FITNESS 100	
->SEE#1 HEALTH CLUB MEMBERSHIP
 >SEE FITNESS SCHEDULE
500
501
502
503
504
505
BALLROOM I $50.00
•LATIN CLUB DANCE $50.00
BALLET I $35.00
JAZZ I $50.00
CONTEMPORARY $50.00
EASTERN DANCE $35.00
TUESDAY
THURSDAY
MONDAY
MON/WED
MON/WED
SATURDAY
7:30-10:30
7:30-10:30
4:30-6:00
12:30-2:00
6:00-7:30 '
11:30-1:00
DANCE
DANCE
DANCE
DANCE
DANCE
DANCE
STUDIO
STUDIO
STUDIO
STUDIO
STUDIO
STUDIO
•Includes LAMBADA, WESTCOAST SWING, MAMBO, MERENQUE, TANGO
ACTIVITIES START Week beginning Jan 21/91 • END Weekending Mar29/91
400   BEGINNING SKATING $50.00
600 YOGA $50.00
601 SAT. YOGA $35.00
602* SQUASH $60.00
603* KAYAKING $50.00
604* ROLLS & RESCUES $40.00
605    FACULTY/STAFF
BADMINTON
'Denotes short course.
FRIDAY
MON/WED
SATURDAY
MON/WED
FRIDAY
FRIDAY
THURSDAY
FRIDAY
12:30-1:30
TWSC
4:30-6:00
ARM. 203
3:00-4:30
DANCE STUDIO
4:15-5:45
TWSC
10:00-11:45
POOL
10:00-11:45
POOL
8:30-10:30
GYM A
6:30-8:30
GYM A
CERTIFICATION COURSES
[A] FITNESS AND HEALTH
TUESDAY (all term)        6:30-9:30
GYM G/OSB
700   FITNESS INSTRUCTOR
STARTS JAN. 20TH.
A BCRPA recognised Fitness Instructor Training Course
This36 hour course for individuals who are interested in expanding theirfitnessknowledgeand understanding and forindividuals
wanting to teach fitness classes. This term long course will emphasize practical application of exercise theories. With this cou rse,
an instructor is eligible after 8 hours of teaching to register as a British Columbia Fitness Instructor.
Fee: $105.00 Cheapest rates in town.
704    RED CROSS STANDARD 1st AID
(Includes CPR) - $60.00
TUESDAY (all term)
6:30-9:30
203/Osb.
706 FITNESS 1 ST AID(BCRPA) TUES. 29TH JAN. 6:00-10:O0PM 211/WMG
A4 hour course designed to provide dance exercise, fitness, and weight training professionals with the necessary knowledge and
skills to prevent, recognize and manage soft tissue, musculoskeletal, environmental injuries and special considerations. BCRPA
recognized workshop = 4 credit hours. Fee: $35.00 Includes: Life Consultants Certificate of Completion & comprehensive
100-page manual.
707 BCLS'A'HEART SAVER THURS. 7TH FEB. 6:CO-10:00PM 211/WMG
A 4 hour course for laypersons with no previous CPR training. Content includes: Lifestyle Risk Factors & Prudent Heart Living,
Heart Attack Signals & Actions, accessing the Emergency Medical Services Network, Adult Choking, Rescue Breathing and the
Recovery Position. Certificate and manual issued.Fee:S25.O0
708 BCLS 'C
BASIC RESCUER SAT. 23RD FEB. 10:00AM-5:0OPM 203/OSB
(Healtti Care Professional)
A 6 hour course for health professionals, aquatics personnel or persons wishing to become CPR or First Aid instructors/those
who have already completed the BC LS 'B' level course. Content includes: Lifestyle risk factors, prudent heart living, heart attack
signals & actions, accessing the emergency medical services network, adult/child/infant airway obstructions, rescue breathing,
the recovery position, adult/child/infant (1-person) CPR, Two-person adult/child CPR and special considerations. Certificate &
manual issued. Fee: $40.00
709 BCLS C RECERTIFICATION SUN. 24TH FEB. 1:0O-5:O0PM DANCE STUDIO
A 4 hour 'practical skills" only refresher. Certificate & Summary Skills Sheet issued. Fee: $20.00
[B] SAILING AND BOATING
710 CYA BASIC CRUISING STANDARD-THEORY-6 Weeks/18 Hours
STARTS MON. JAN. 21 ST. and MON. MAR. 4TH
MONDAYS 6:30-9:30PM 203/OSB
Terminology; aerodynamics; rules of the water; essential procedures; dealing with emergencies; manoeuvering under power and
sail; the legal position; knots and ropework; everything needed to step onto a cruising sailboat and feel right at home. Leads to
CYA BASIC CRUSING STANDARD. Note: Manual, logbook and seal not included. (Manual available from instructor at
nominal cost.)FEE: $70.00
711 CYA COASTAL NAVIGATION STANDARD-THEORY-6 Weeks/18 Hours
STARTS WED. JAN. 23RD and MAR. 6TH
WEDNESDAYS 6:30-9:30PM 203/OSB
Always know exactly where you are; never be lost; read charts like an expert; be in demand as a crew member; become a more
competent skipper; everything you need to navigate with safety and confidence in coastal waters anywhere. Leads to CYA
COASTAL NAVIGATION STANDARD. Note: Manual; plotting tools and seal not included. (These available from instructor at
nominal cost.) FEE: S70.00
MARTIAL ARTS -$50.00 Start week beginning Jan 21/91 • End week Ending Mar 29/91
200 JUDO I
201 JUDO II & III
202 KARATE I
203 KARATE II & III
204 AIKIDO
205 WUSHUSANSHOUDAO
206 WUSHU (children)
207 TAI CHI I
213 TAI CHI II
208 LUNCH TIME TAI CHI l&ll
209 TAEKWONDO
210 SHORINJI KEMPO
211 SHADOW BOXING
212 JUJITSU
214 AIKIDO WEAPONS
EFFECTIVE WOMEN'S SELF DEFENCE CLINIC - $25.00
A 3 hour clinic (limited enrollment) stressing avoidance of difficult circumstances and manoeuversto overcome unwelcome physical
difficulties. Dance Studio, Saturday 23rd February 10a.m.-1p.m.. Register REC UBC.
RECREATION UBC
THE NUMBER 1 HEALTH CLUB WEIGHT ROOM
MON/WED
8:30-10:00
GYMG
MON/WED
9:00-10:30
GYMG
MON/WED
6:30-8:00
GYMG
MON/WED
7:00-8:30
GYMG
TUE/THUR
6:30-8:00
GYMG
THURSDAY
8:00-10:00
GYMG
SUNDAY
9:00-10:30
GYMG
WEDNESDAY
7:30-8:30
GYMG
WEDNESDAY
8:30-9:30
GYMG
THURSDAY
12:30-1:30
DANCE STUDIO
TUE/THURS
4:30-6:00
DANCE STUDIO
TUE/THURS
6:00-7:30
DANCE STUDIO
SATURDAY
10:00-11:30
DANCE STUDIO
THURSDAY
12:30-2:00
GYMG
TUE/THURS
6;0O-7:30
MAY & JUNE ONLY
TEMPORARILY LOCATED IN OSBORNE CENTRE GYM E
Membership cards required. Purchase membership at the CAMPUS RECREATION
OFFICE, WAR MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM.
$2.00 Drop-in fee in lieu of membership. Weightroom phone number 228-6924.
Please note:
" No refunds on purchased memberships. No exchange except on upgrades
* Lost, stolen and card replacement charge- $10.00
* Facility CLOSED public holidays, Mid-term break
* Picture I.D. AND membership cards required EVERY time you use the facility
* All memberships still available except "Total Health".
* Club is closed MON.-THURS. 5:00-6:00 p.m. Closed 6:30 p.m. on Fridays.
* SUPERVISORS monitor & control overcrowding and safety
" NO Thunderbird Athletes weekdays 3:00-6:00 p.m.
* Prorated fees apply in Term II
105 ONE-TO-ONE-PROGRAM FOR YOUR INDIVIDUAL STRENGTH TRAINING NEEDS
A one hour private session foryour start-up program, sport specific program, new and more effective training program. By appointment
ONLY. Sign up in the time that suits you best at the REC UBC OFFICE. Cost $20.00
106 FITSTRONG- $85.00
Includes all CAMPUS FITNESS 100 classes for both terms PLUS #1 HEALTH CLUB WEIGHTROOM MEMBERSHIP.
12/THE UBYSSEY
January 15,1991

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