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The Ubyssey Mar 5, 1982

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Array THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXIV, No. 56
228-2301
Vancouver. B.C. Friday, March 5,1982
QUEST
BURNING    WITH
FIRE
By SHAFFIN SHARIFF
LOS ANGELES — Director Jean-Jacques
Annaud is jubilant about his new film Quest
for Fire. After four years, his film adaptation
of J. H. Rosny's novel, La Guerre du Feu, is
finally complete.
"The book has an essential respect for
those early insignificant creatures?' says Annaud. "And, of course, its central theme was
immensely exciting — man's discovery of the
means of making and controlling fire, which
anthropologists now agree was a giant step in
mankind's evolution."
Quest for Fire is about that "giant step"
which propelled humanity into a new era of
technological and social order. Annaud's
ambitious film isn't merely about the quest
for fire. It is about the quest of civilization,
of discovering and searching for values and
unknown peoples. And finally, it is about the
quest for love.
Suffice it to say that Quest for Fire is an extraordinary motion picture experience.
The film's setting is the distant past, 80,000
years ago. In an unidentified but varied
locale, three tribesmen roam the land to discover fire, which is essential to their tribe's
survival.
For the Ulam tribe, primitive Homo Sapiens, fire is a precious and closely guarded
commodity kept in a sacred cage. When a rival tribe attacks their cave — the fire is lost
forever, because the Ulam do not possess
skills to make fire manually. Quest for Fire
sends three warriors from the tribe, Naoh
(Everett McGill), Amoukar (Ron Perlman),
and Gaw (Nameer El-Kadi) on a dangerous
journey that leads them to discover other and
riot always friendly tribes, and finally to the
Ivaka, an advanced tribe that holds the secret
of fire.
There are four different ancestors of humanity in Quest for Fire, four different steps
of man on the evolutionary ladder.
The most organized and culturally sophisticated tribe is the Ivaka, which has staked out
a territorial claim and permanent settings.
Next on the ladder is the Ulam tribe, a group
of extended families. The Wagaboo are preying Neanderthals, and the Kzamm are also
predators who raid and capture members of
other tribes for cannabilistic ceremonies.
During a violent encounter with the
Kzamm, Naoh, Amoukar and Gaw find (Rae
Dawn Chong), whom the cannibals have captured. It is Ika, a member of the Ivaka tribe,
who knows how to make fire with sticks of
dry wood, and as she travels with the group,
she and Naoh fall in love — a first for mankind in this film. Naoh and Ika, members of
two different tribes, are Annaud's archetypical representations of humanity's ancestors.
As cliched as his statement sounds, Annaud says that the velement of love sets Naoh
and Ika apart from others. "The specificity
'of man is love," he adds. "Love is proportional to the level of sophistication."
And Quest foi Fire is tinged with a romantic underpinning that makes the film
both lyrical and fascinating to experience.
Annaud's film is unapologetically tender and
evocative. Life is harsh and brutish, but Annaud's archetype;, are fervent optimists who
refuse to give up their quest for fire.
Quest for Fire is being billed as a "Science
Film crews good, devoted
Jean-Jacques Annaud has
a few words for the Canadian
film industry.
Speaking to a group of Canadian college press writers
recently, Annaud has nothing
but praise for Canadian film
crews.
"There is a great deal of
doubt about the Canadian
movie industry," he acknowledges. Annaud says he
is aware of the business aspect of the film industry and
the detrimental tax loopholes
that allowed investors to
write off films without any
creative accountability.
"I had the privilege of
working with some of the
best technicians around," he
says, adding that he found
Canadian crews to be the
most proficient. "I'm trying
to find out how I can get
them for my next film."
Annaud's producers on
Quest for Fire are John Kem-
eny and Denis Heroux, who
organized the International
Cinema Corporation to promote quality Canadian films.
"If you have any integrity
at all, you never set out to
make a bad movie," says
Kemeny. His first film under
the ICC banner was Atlantic
City, the Louis Malle film
which has been awarded five
ANNAUD
Academy Award nominations, including Best Picture
— a first for Canada.
Kemeny says the best route
for the Canadian film industry to take might be what
he has attempted to do —
work with creative and financial sources out side the country , but not necessarily America. Quest for Fire, like Atlantic City, is a Canadian/-
French effort, with director
Annaud at the helm.
Kemeny and Annaud, who
agrees with his producer's
comments, may be correct.
Al though the list of Canadian
films during 1980 and 1981
looks better than it has in the
previous years — with Les
Plouffes and Les Bon Debar -
ras at the top — the federal
government's tax incentive
program for foreign investors
ha:; done more damage than
good to the industry's image
at home and abroad. A responsible co-production, like
Quest for Fire or Atlantic City, may be one of the few options the film industry has at
the moment.
The talent, as others have
claimed before, is out there.
In Annaud's words, "To be
good is one thing, to be good
and devoted is another."
Canada's film crews are
both.
McGILL, CHONG . . . love and sophistication
fantasy," and the description is accurate. As
filled as the film is with authentic facial and
costume recreations, it. rings true on an emotional and esthetic level. Annaud's film is
crammed with references and allusions that
compress the beginnings of Homo Sapiens,
the true beginnings, into a 90 minute film.
The problem that faced Annaud — and
which faces its distributors today — is, will
audiences sit still and watch caveman grunt
and speak a virtucilly unintelligible language?
If Quest for Fire requires some patience during some boring parts, rest assured the film's
rewards are considerable.
Quest for Fire is more than anthropology
on film. As anthropology, Annaud's film
takes care to be as faithful as possible to present what is presently known about humanity's past. The quest — a road journey, as it
were — becomes the impetus for varied and
various discoveries. In Quest for Fire, Annaud tracks down the beginnings or perhaps
the stabilization of patriarchal social groupings, permanent home settings as opposed to
nomadic existence, the ritualistic beginnings
of animism, the missionary position during
sex, and most importantly, love.
Although Annaud is dealing with the crys-
talization of male-dominated culture, he
doesn't underestimate the importance of the
role of women in humanity's cultural development. It is Ika, as a representative of the
most advanced tribe, who has the secret of
making fire, who forces Naoh to look at her
while they're making love, and who demands
that Naoh respond emotionally to her.
Quest for Fire transcends a strict, academic
definition of anthropology. As screenwriter
Gerald Brach is quoted in the production
notes, "(I wanted the deepest human experiences) to give free run to my imagination and
yet see to it that my boldness always strictly
adhered to the scientific truth."
Annaud, to his credit, has imbued the film
with a spirit and drive that makes one respond to his film. Quest for Fire represents
first of all, a love and commitment for the
cinema that is both genuine and rewarding.
Annaud spent more than four years of his life
seeing the project through as it bounced between studios, and finally secured financial
guarantees, with the help of Canada's ICC
Cinema Corporation. Canadian producers
John Kemeny and Denis Heroux stuck with
the project, which was filmed in Scotland,
Kenya and Canada.
Annaud sought behavioral theorist Desmond Morris (The Naked Ape) to devise the
body language and gestures for the film.
Morris and Annaud worked with the actors
for four weeks in London before production
began. Linguist-writer Anthony Burgess also
worked on the project, and planned an entirely new language for the film. The language
of Quest for Fire has Indo-European roots,
most notably Sanskrit and Greek. The film's
word for fire is "atra."
Because Annaud is dealing with a film that
clashes directly with most audiences' conception of "caveman" pictures, Quest for
Fire may be problematic for some viewers
who will find the language and the gestures
initially undecipherable. But everything in
Quest for Fire has a purpose. The grunts and
gestures may seem like standard perceptions
of ancestral man's behavior, but as the film
charts its fiery path, the initially unintelligible
language becomes familiar and comprehensible, and when the Ivaka enter the picture, we
are dealing with a tribe that has developed a
complete and complex linguistic pattern.
Quest for Fire's strengths are almost entirely non-verbal, though. To override the
potentially troublesome language and behavior of the characters, Annaud and cinema-
tographer Clause Agostini have photographed and captured wild terrains with a beauty
that needs no verbal support.
Even if one were to ignore Quest for Fire's
language (an impossibility), Annaud's film
could tell its story visually, with images that
point to significant development without verbalizing them. For example, when Naoh offers a mammoth some dry grass as a gesture
.of peace, you can feel the awe he feels for the
animal and the beginnings of animistic religion — when man saw himself below animals
in the universal order. Later, when Naoh and
Ika stare at the moon, you can tell that the
moment isn't just designed to capture starry-
eyed lovers romantically gazing at the stars.
What they are doing is looking at their universe, searching the skies with a fascination
and curiosity about their beginnings and their
future.
Quest for Fire has an added bonus: a magnificent musical track, composed by Phillipe
See page 6: QUEST Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, March 5,1982
MON. Wet "10" T-shirt
Contest
TUES. Whip Cream
Wrestling
WED. Ladies Night
THURS. Hoser Night
Wear toque, scarf or
ear muffs and  get in
free.
TOP LIVE BANDS NIGHTLY
FRI. Er SAT.
THIS WEEK:
KICK AXE
NEXT WEEK:
March 8th-13th
The Guy Jones
Band
First 50 Ladies Friday & Saturday get in FREE.
315E. Broadway879-4651 FreeParking^
LUV-A-FAIR
Vancouver's #1
New Wave Club
1275 Seymour St.
HONG KONG
CHINESE FOOD
(Self Serve
Restaurant)
& 5732 >>
■"• UNIVERSITY BLVD/?
/-T Eat In and Take Out i£
•f^ OPEN EVERY DAY *,
4:00 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.      *^
Phone: 224-1313 A
*
Soft Rock
Cafe
1925 W. 4th Ave.    734-2822
Friday 5th, Saturday 6th
JIM BYRNES
;f
i
3g^.r-JrJid.-drdrd.^l?lri^rfi=li-Jrfi5d!--*B-
CATOV
Traditional
Greco-Roman Cuisine
7 Days a Week: 5 p.m.-1 a.m.
Fri. and Sat.: 5 p.m. to 2 a.m.
FREE fast delivery I
228-9513
4510 West 10th Ave.
Sunday 7th
David Raven
and the ESCOftS
Monday 8th
ELEVENTH HOUR
BLUE GRASS BAND
Tues. 9th, Wed. 10th
Blue Northern
UBG Gampas
^3cf    Pizza
Steak & Pizza — Lasagna
Spare Ribs — Ravioli
Chicken — Greek Salads
• Souvlaki
Fast Free Local Delivery
224-4218 - 224-0529
Hinii-. Mum llmis 11 30 d.ui. 2:00 p mi Fi
II .10 ,i in 3 00 p in S.H -1 IK) |i in 3 00 ., ii.
Sun   4 IM) |i in   1 00 ,i in
2136 Western Parkway
FULL
MEAL
DEAL
NOTICE!
Galiipoli has been
cancelled.
In its place:
SUBFILMS presents
Thurs & Sun 7:00
Fri & Sat 7:00 & 9:30
$1.00       SUB AUD
It's the best meal deal going. Our 100% pure
beef double burger with "More Burger Than
Bun™". A small order of crispy, golden fries.
Your favorite small drink. And, to top it all off,
a cool and creamy 5 oz. DAIRY QUEEN®
Sundae. All for only $3.29. Get a good deal
on a full meal  Head for the corner of 2601 W. Broadway
Broadway and Trafalgar. *»■»«• vi»»ay
am o.q Corp.,-1981 at Trafalgar
Iamsc_oncerts'
I Cinema 16
The Panic, March S. SUB Partyroom
Mardi Gras Dance. March 6.
Armouries
The Cliches, March 6, SUB Ballroom
CSA Variety Show. March 6. I.H.
Popular   Front,    Fifty-four   Forty.
Rhythm  Mission.  March 12,  SUB
Ballroom
Fashion Focus, March 13.
Brock House Restaurant
A Night Of Middle Eastern Dance,
March 20, Chateau Granville
Lottery Tickets, The Globe & Mail
PHOTOFINISHING SPECIAL
Now to March 31,1 coupon good for
1 5x7 enlargement at 99c (Reg. Price
$2.40) with each roll of C-41 film for
processing. (Coupon valid until April
30. '82).
AMS
TICKET
OFFICE
AMS PRESENTS
UPCOMING EVENTS
CBO TICKETS
Songfest "82, March 5, Q.E. Theatre
Daniel Amos & Randy Stonehill,
March S, Vincent Massey Audit.
Spotlight Special No. 2 with
Bachman, Ludwig & Mitchell &
Stonebolt. March 6, Commodore
MacLean tt MacLean. March 10.
Commodore
Powder Blues with Montego Shine,
March 12, Commodore
Bonnie Raitt.
March 15, Commodore
Killarney,
March 17. Commodore
Russ Morgan Orchestra,
March 19. Commodore
Sly & The Family Stone,
March 26, Commodore
B.B. King.
March 27, Commodore
"City Nights",  with Pacific  Ballet
Theatre. April 8. 9. 10.
UBC Old Auditorium
Tina Turner,
April 23, Commodore
Mike Warnke with Jamie Owens-
Collins, May 13, Orpheum
Odetta, May 17, Queen E Playhouse
EXPANSIONISM.
MAURICE &
T. CLICHES
TURN OUT
Cube Ops
$4.50 ADVANCE
Til AMS Bo. Office. Zulu. Chas. Bogle
SUB BALLROOM UBC
DOORS    7:30
SAT. MARCH 6TH
She (El!e0t?ttt (EtiecHE inn
A tBrauittonal IngliaJ* iReataurant
4686 Dunbar at 30th 224-2S21
3 COURSE LUNCH SPECIAL
DINNER SPECIALS from
3.96
4.96
Plus complete Menu Selection
of Salad, Sandwich and
Hause Specialties
$Open: 11:30    Midnight j
Monday thru Saturday
'ENJOY ENGLISH PUB-STYLE
FOOD IN AN AUTHENTIC SETTING
Fully Licensed Premises
Make "The Cheese" Your Local
RED LEAF
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Luncheon Smorgasbord
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228-9114
10% DISCOUNT ON
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LICENSED PREMISE
Mon.-Fri. 11:30-9:00 p.ra.
Sunday* and Holidays
4:00 p.m.-MO p.m.
___      2142 Western Parkway
"SBf*     U.E.L. Vancouver. B.C.
(Opposite Chevron Station)
BOOGIE
with BYRNES
at THE PIT
The Jim Byrnes Band
Thursday, Mar. 11th at 8 p.m.
Saturday, Mar. 13th at 5 & 8 p.m.
Door Charge: $1.00 from 4 p.m. Sat.
$2.00 from 7 p.m. Thurs
& Sat. Friday, March 5,1982
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Golden Turkeys:
seeing is believing
ROBOT MONSTER. . .hairy candidate for worst film
By ROB GUZYK
With the recent Genie awards for
Canadian film excellence and the
Academy awards due to reappear at
the end of this month you might get
bored with conventional award
shows. After all, most award shows
are marred by inner politics and
cliches, and nearly everyone has
their own ideas about what constitutes a good film.
The Golden Turkey Awards: The
Worst Achievements in Hollywood
History
By Harry and Michael Medved
Berkley Books
$3.50, 349 pp.
But what about the losers; the
wretched films; the turkeys, if you
will? Don't they deserve some
recognition?
Harry and Michael Medved's The
Golden Turkey Awards: The Worst
Achievements in Hollywood
History remedies the situation by
preparing nominations and awards
for specific achievements such as
the Worst Title of All Time, the
Worst Actor and the Worst Film of
All Time; ad nauseam.
This book, like some bad movies,
is a sequel. It is a follow-up to
authors' 1978 work, The Fifty
Worst Films of All Time. On that
project co-author Michael Medved
(What Really Happened to the
Class of '65) requested that his
name be removed due to career
aspirations as a serious writer.
But public response to the first
book proved that bad film fanatics
comprise a flourishing sub-culture
and since then theatres throughout
North America have offered the
worst of Hollywood. To catalogue
this dubious art form, the Brothers
Medved sat through 2,000 wretched
films and researched the Academy
of Motion Picture Arts and
Sciences archives for background
information.
The result is a funny book,
steeped in high camp. You don't
have to start at the beginning and
read to the end to appreciate the
finer aspects of bad movies. Two-
thirds of the book lists the nominees
and the winners of the Golden
Turkey and recognizes worst actor/actress/director categories by
awarding special Life Achievement
Awards. The authors also have
reader poll for absolute worst of
film efforts.
This edition even offers a compendium of films from A (The
Adventurers) to Z (Zontar: The
Thing From Venus) that can "serve
to instruct the public when its best
not to wait up for the late show."
Brief samplings from the book:
• Nominees for Worst Title of
All Time: The Incredibly Strange
Creatures Who Stopped Living and
&**■* ■>!
j By CORINNA SUNDARARAJAN
If the spring sun has melted away
Sthose multiple layers of woollen
a wrapping, warming your blood to a
[bubbling tickle, then you're in the
Bright state to enjoy the Vancouver
jPlayhouse's breathless production
jof See How They Run.
This British farce, written by
I Phillip King in 1945, is the liveliest
! absurdity to race through the Play-
[house since The Servant of Two
{Masters, and it's just as exhausting
Ito watch. (It could easily be sub-
jtitled The Wife of Five Vicars, but
jthat wouldn't be fair to the dog,
Iwho does his share of the running
1* • •)
In fact, the entire cast of 10 is in
Jtop shape, each romping through
jthe exhilarating tempo of verbal,
Ivisual and generally vaulting farce.
breathlessly good'
w <i-V**:
But the finish-lin; honors belong to
Pamela Rabe, a recent graduate of
the Playhouse Acting School. In her
first major role Rabe portrays Ida,
the maid, with an engaging gum-
chewing serenity that extends like
the spokes of a wheel to secure the
wildly orbiting madness around
her. Equally so, she is the centre of
focus — which is no mean feat
against the irrepressible vivacity of
Tom Wood who, as a hapless corporal, literally leaps about in his natural affinity for comedy.
See How They Run
Directed by Roger Hodgman
Vancouver Playhouse
Until March 13
In all this rushing madness (the
intermission is precisely timed to
avert the complete collapse of both
cast and audience), Martha Burns!
loses her characteristic stiltednessi
and delivers a delightfully sunny
performance as the Vicar's wife.;
Regrettably cast in dramatic roles,!
such as Shakespeare's Juliet,!
throughout the season, Burns is at|
her professional best scampering,!
screaming and fainting in broads
farce. Her performance is energetic-j
ally matched by the antics of Susa
Williamson, Robert McClure and
Henry Woolf. And of course Sam|
the dog.
See How They Run is the last]
production that artistic director]
Roger Hodgman will stage for the!
Vancouver Playhouse. At the close
of his three year tenure, he has setj
such an energetic tempo that the
cast will be propelled into next sea-S
son's productions on its vivacious,
impeti
-•'v*-. y
'*•«.»'
u
Became Mixed-Up Zombies (1964),
Jesse James Meets Frankenstein's
Daughter (1965) and Rat Fink a
Boo Boo (1964).
• Most ridiculous Monster in
screen history nominees include:
Robot Monster (1953), which
recently played at the Ridge
Theatre, From Hell It Came (1959)
which prompted a critic to reply,
"And to hell it can go!" and Attack
of the Fifty-Foot Woman (1958).
• Nominees for worst casting of
all time include: Roger Daltrey as
Franz Liszt in Lisztomania (1975),
Harpo Marx as Sir Isaac Newton in
The Story of Mankind (1957), and
John Wayne as Gengis Khan in The
Conqueror (1955).
In The Worst Performances by a
Politician, the book acknowledges
Hollywood personalities such as
Ronald Reagan, who, by the way,
was 'not nominated for his infamous Bonzo performances. An
obvious oversight. George Murphy
and Shirley Temple have also used
their movie prominence as the basis
for careers in politics. Maybe Bill
Bennett will enter the Canadian
movie industry — for tax purposes.
DALTRY . . . who me?
While most of the book is
devoted to the best of the worst
movies in a lighthearted manner,
there are some tragic tales. In The
P.T. Barnum Award for the Worst
Cinematic Exploitation if a Physical
Deformity the story of one Rondo
Hatten is revealed as a "real life
story that would have made a far
more compelling film then the
tawdry thriller enacted here."
Worst Movie Director Edward D.
Wood Jr.'s strange relationship
with Bela Lugosi is described, in addition to his penchant for a special
type of poetry. In Glen or Glenda,
for instance, writer-director Wood
has The Psychiatrist (Timothy Farrell) comment on the action with a
moving monologue about the terms
of earthly existence: The world is a
strange place to live in. All those
cars! All going someplace! All carrying humans which are carrying
out their lives! . . . But life — even
though its changes are slow —
moves on.
Throughout his life Wood wore
outlandish female clothing, drank
heavily and died while watching a
football game on television.
Serious students of bad films are
invited to find a false movie among
the more than 425 films listed and
reply to the authors. Obviously this
test is meant to separate the wheat
from the chaff in the serious study
of bad film.
Those interested in bad movies
can see Wood's best worst movie
Glen or Glenda (1952) at a special
midnight showing at the Ridge
Theatre.
You'll have to see it to believe it. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, March 5, 1982
HOT NEWS THAT FITS
SFU Students Get
Second Chance At
Athletic Funding
Canadian University Press
Students at Simon Fraser University will have a second chance to
decide whether to pay a semesterly
fee to fund varsity athletics on campus.
At the student society's annual
general meeting Feb. 25, students
approved a $6 athletic fee to fund
competitive athletics. But because
the meeting fell short of the 500
voters required for quorum, the
proposal must now go to a referendum later this month, said student
society resource secretary Jeff Berg.
Berg said two potentially explosive motions on the general
meeting's agenda were overlooked
because of the significant disagreement on the athletic fee. One proposed SFU's withdrawal from the
Canadian Federation of Students
(SFU now holds prospective membership in the organization), and
the other could require approval of
any contract using more than one
quarter of the student society
budget at a quorate general
meeting.
The fee levy for athletic teams
was proposed to bail out the football track and field programs at
SFU after their funding was eliminated from the university operating
budget.
Fewer Student Debtors
Than Report Claims
the annual report of the Canada
Student Loans Program issued
Tuesday.
The report said $105 million in
loans are unpaid since 1964, when
the program began, forcing the
government to pay for more than
96,000 loans in that period of time.
But UBC financial aid director
Byron Hender said the number of
loans never payed back is much less
than the default figures indicate.
Many students who are technically   in   default   "have   every  intention of repaying their loans,"
Hender said recently.
Many students who are in default
have low incomes, are single parents or unemployed, and the system
needs to be made more flexible for
these people, he said.
The report said 991,000 loans
worth $1.5 billion are being repaid.
But those in default are only seven
per cent, and eventually only four
per cent of student loans are not
repaid, Hender said.
sor of the bill, said the tax could
generate $2 million monthly. The
bill would only solve one tenth of
the state's total financial problems,
but combined with other cuts and
deferrals, might be just the thing
that would "save the bacon," he
added.
"Without some additional
revenues, there must be some additional cuts in education or higher
education as an alternative," Tilley
said.
The state sales tax on food was
eliminated in 1977 by a state-wide
referendum, a decision which may
cause politicians to shy away from
passing the bill. Retailers have
already voiced their opposition,
claiming the list is unreasonable and
that the additional tax will cause a
"nightmare" at the cash register.
Students repay more than 90 per
cent of the loans issued according to
Junk Food Junkies
May Be Taxed In U.S.
First there was income tax — and
now there's twinkie tax.
In an effort to generate a steady
source of revenue for financially
beleagured Washington state, their
legislature is proposing to tax all
"non-nutritious" food.
According to the University of
Washington Daily, cookies,
pastries, sweet breads, candy, chewing gum, ice cream, ice milk, frozen
confections, cocoa, coffee and tea
would all be taxed in grocery stores
starting April 1 under the proposed
bill.
Representative Earl Tilley, spon-
Switch
blades.
That's right. After the
strenuous job of switching the blades on your ice
skates, you'll probably need
a monstrous, tasty burger.
15 super varieties. Plus other
great stuff. 11:30 on-7 days
a week. 2966 W. 4th Ave.
and Bayswater.
>,m r<
fmr>
PURIM MUSIC
FESTIVAL
\
Featuring
Chassidic Songs
and
Cantorial Pieces
AvremI Friedman
and
Zalman Baumgarten
vocalists
accompanied by a live band
followed by
REFRESHMENTS
Sunday, March 7, 1982
7:30 p.m. in the
Lubavitch Centre Auditorium
5750 Oak Street, corner 41st Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
COST: $7.50 — adults,
$6.00 — Seniors & Students
NOMINATIONS
ARE NOW OPEN
For Student Appointments
To The Following
Presidential Advisory Committees:
Child Care Services
Concerns of the Handicapped
Food Services Advisory
International House Board of Directors
Land Use
Men's Athletic
Safety, Security and Fire Prevention
Student Services
Traffic and Parking
United Way Campaign
Walter Gage Memorial
War Memorial Gymnasium Fund
Women's Athletic
Youth Employment Program
AMS Representation On These Committees
Is Of Vital Concern In Ensuring That
Students Are Well Represented In All Facets
Of The University's Operations.
NOMINA T/ON FORMS AREA VAILABLE FROM THE ALMA
MATER   SOCIETY   EXECUTIVE   SECRETARY'S    OFFICE
ROOM  238,    STUDENT   UNION   BUILDING
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NOMINATIONS CLOSE ON WEDNESDAY
MARCH 10, 1962
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$119.50
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$ 59.50
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$ 59.50
PRO QUALITY BASKETBALLS ....
$49.50
GEORGE BRETT BALL GLOVES . . .
$ 37.95
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$ 29.95
$ 27.95
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$ 27.95
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$ 27.95
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$ 24.95
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$ 19.95
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$ 19.95
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$ 19.95
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733-1612 Friday, March 5, 1982
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Second Stage destroys mystique
By SHEILA MUNRO
In 1963, Betty Friedan wrote The
Feminine Mystique, the book that
shattered the myth of the happy
housewife of the '50s.
She found that many of the
women who chauffered their four
or five children around in station
wagons, waxed and rewaxed their
shiny suburban homes floors, and
waited for their husbands to return
from the "real world" of work,
were profoundly unhappy.
The Second Stage
By Betty Friedan
Summit Books
300 pages, $17.95
The popular culture of the day,
armed with the Freudian dictum
that "anatomy is destiny," bombarded them with the message that
they could fulfill themselves only
•through childbirth and domestically. With a driving wedge of rage,
Friedan cut through the saccharine
picture of women typified by this
excerpt from a 1956 issue of Look
magazine.
(the new woman) works . . ., less
towards a big career than as a way
of filling a hope chest or buying a
new home freezer. She gracefully
concedes the top jobs to men. This
wondrous creature also marries
younger than ever, bears more
babies and looks and acts far more
feminine than the "emancipated"
girl of the 1920s or even 30s . . .
Today, if she makes an old-
fashioned choice and lovingly tends
a garden and a bumper crop of
children, she rates louder hosannas
than ever before.
Now, after almost 20 years of
Bold drama
amid confusion
By GENE LONG
Equus is a play ostensibly about
normality. A 17 year old boy has
blinded six horses with a metal
spike. His psychiatrist is determined
to find out why. And we're all sup-,
posed to learn some sort of lesson
about passion.
Peter Shaffer's 1973 play is being
staged by Langara's Studio 58. It is
a bold project that struggles to
represent explosive and disturbing
scenes to give power and meaning
to the play's complicated content.
The boy, Alan, has created a sexual horse-god, Equus, whom he
worships by secretly riding at night
from the stables where he works.
He has taken on a psychotic obsession that derives from his mother's
oppressive Catholicism and his
father's repressed sexuality. He is
confused, alienated adolescent and
sick. He meets with 17 year old Jill
who gets him the job at the stables.
Her family is also messed up but
she is normal, and horny. Alan's
violence is triggered by an attempt
to make love to her in the loft.
Equus intervenes, and Alan
retaliates.
Equus
by Peter Shaffer
Directed by Barbara Russell
at Studio 58 until March 20
Alan's story is unwound through
sessions with Dysart, the shrink
(Kevin McNulty, and Dysart's interviews with the parents, who provide much exposition. Under hypnosis Alan re-enacts the events of
the fateful night at the stables.
The play is challenged to stage. A
simple unchanging set is surrounded by all the characters who are
observers to the slow and
sometimes monotonous interview
scenes and the more fantastic spectacles involving Alan and the
horses.
The Langara production is a
wholly imaginative representation
of the play's intense theatricality.
The horses here cast an ominous
backdrop of eeriness as a humming
chorus,   dressed   in  extraordinary
liberation, Friedan feels that il is
time for reassessment. In The Second Stage, she talks about the
malaise that has infected women
who are uneasy with the gains they
have made. She worries about an
article in Savvy magazine that
"reveals an austere machine-like
productivity" in executive women,
the preoccupation of the women at
Smith College (former bastion of
feminism) with power and getting
into the executive suite, and the
trend among young college women
to reject careers altogether.
The reason that women in the
'80s are so troubled, according to
Friedan, is that feminism has focused myopically on the battleground
of sexual politics, instead of the
larger vision that included men and
children. The corrosive "man as
enemy" rhetoric of the '60s and
'70s and the obsession with issues
like rape and pornography, created
masks of metal headgear and
elevated metal hooves.Alan's
character (Michael Vairo) is played
with an excellent combination of
youthful zeal and adult insanity. He
is a victim trapped by a vicious
psychosis for which his parents may
or may not be directly responsible.
Alan has quite a scene with Jill
(Nadine Liberto) prior to his attack
on the horse-god. Their nakedness
is at first a bit uncomfortable for all
concerned — the audience is fully
engaged, with Dysart, as voyeur to
Alan's secrets — yet the stage is effectively set for the violent
physicality that follows.
We are indeed successfully
brought into the plays visceral
ugliness. Dramatically it is innovative and high pitched. But
amidst all the spectacle, the play's
intricate thematic underpinnings do
not really amount to much.
Shaffer has scripted a plot of
Freudian intrigue, filled with a
detective style mystery of motivation and causal ambiguity. Yet
before long, it becomes clear that
the play is no longer concerned
with answering "shy" and is less
about Alan than it is Dysart's
fascination with him.
Dysart of course has got his own
problems. He too is a sexual
disaster ("the lowest sperm count
you could find") and so, believably
or not, for him, Alan represents an
enviable model of vitality.
The play closes with Dysart's
dilemma: By curing Alan, he will
only return him to a boring,
unimaginative state of normality.
Isn't it just as well, he asks, to be
crazy, but to at least have some
outlet for free and passionate expression.
Through Dysart, Shaffer does
provide a decent commentary on
socially induced sterility and alienation. But in the end, Dysart doesn't
make a lot of sense when he talks
about his patient, and ultimately we
are left with a confused and
idiosyncratic resolution of the many
interesting psychological issues
which have been raised.
a split between feminism and the
family. The second stage's task is to
heal the split; to recognize the
crucial significance of motherhood
in most women's lives.
How are we to do this? Friedan
says we must get rid of the suburban dream home concept and opt
instead for "service housing," in
which living facilities are both
private and communal. We must
encourage what she calls Beta style
leadership, v/ith its practical, innovative solutions to individual
problems ra:her than the rigid,
linear, "either/or" approach of
Alpha thinking.
But are Friedan's prescriptions
for better daycare, more flextime
and more convenient housing
enough? According to Colette
Dowling, author of The Cinderella
Complex, women are responsible
for holding themselves down
because  they   scarcely   believe  so
meone will come along and rescue
them. Women will have to come to
terms with their own conditioning
before a significant change occurs.
The Second Stage is an annoying
book to read, bloated with jargon
of popular psychology.
One runs out of breath trying to
follow the empty abstractions of
sentences like "Thus, sex-rok
polarization and inequality lead to
and are reinforced by sexual obsession revulsion which leads to and is
reinforced by sexual dehumaniza-
tion and alienation from the core of
generative authentic human love
and life — and this feeds violence."
Friedan admits she did not want
to write this book, but felt duty-
bound to debunk the "feminist
mystique" she helped create. No
doubt she hopes that younger, more
energetic feminists will propel us
forward into the second stage.
EQUUS . . . Alan worships horse-god, foils shrink Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, March 5, 1982
Quest a journey
From page 1
Sarde, which draws on the music of
Prokofieff and Pindereki. Sarde, a
foremost composer for films today,
has also worked on A Simple Story,
and most recently composed an excellent soundtrack for John Irvin's
Ghost Story. Sarde's track for Tess
was also one of the more
memorable aspects of the Roman
Polanski film (Gerald Brach, who
wrote Quest for Fire, has also worked for Polanski on Repulsion, The
Tenant and Tess.) There is a particularly impressive solo flute piece
that evokes a stirring crescendo.
Quest for Fire also boasts exceptional performances from actors
who worked under difficult conditions. Everett McGill, who plays the
leader Naoh (note the similarity of
his name with the Biblical
character), recalls: "You have to
remember my position, I was looking at the technical crew, the
camera, while sinking in a swamp in
cold weather."
Quest for Fire is a humanistic
film, fired by the intelligence of its
director whose next project will also
deal with prehistoric man. Annaud
defends the romantic angle of the
movie as necessary.
Annaud is a director who has
chosen to define and reinterpret
man's past esthetically, symbolically, emotionally, technologically,
socially — culturally complete that
is. Quest for Fire emerges as an imaginative journey, tracing our
roots at a crucial moment in human
evolution, and becomes a film that
is different from most mainstream
films today. It also speaks for its
director's imagination. It is the collective unconscious of humanity on
film.
Quest for Fire opens today at the
Stanley theatre, with an R rating
that is both unfortunate and unnecessary, despite the violence in
the film, most of which takes place
off screen.
Sound and Substance
Featuring
Salmond & Mulder
SUNDAY: MARCH 7/14/21, 8:30 p.m.
SUB PARTY ROOM
Sponsored by
INTER-VARSITY
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
The ARTS UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY
Announces March 8-14 as Arts Week and
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Monday: Apathy Day —
12:30:   Get your buttons and mellow out on the
strains of an apathetic orchestral ensemble.
Tuesday:        Radical Day — wear something radical.
12:30:   Come and listen to rock music in Buchanan
Lounge.
The 2nd Annual Arts Yacht Races in the
Buchanan courtyard.
4:00:   Bear Garden in Buchanan-Lounge.
12:30:   BBQ with distinguished members of our
faculty as chefs, in Buchanan courtyard.
Open House.
Wednesday:   12:30
Thursday:
Friday:
For additional information talk to the AUS I Buch. 107)
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"UBC INTRAMURAL
CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES
rr
Buchanan
Badminton
Championship
(Armoury)
14
Totem Tennis
Championship
(Armoury)
Cycle Tour
(Pender Island)
8
Men's
Curling
Championship
(TWSC 7:15 p.m.)
15
Men's Curling
Championship
(TWSC 7:16)
Womens Basketball
(WMG 12:30)
Men's Volleyball
Championship
Div. I, Div. II, Div. Ill
(Osborne Ct. 7:30)
Women's
Volleyball
Championship
(WMG 7.30 p.m.)
16
Womens Basketball
Championship
(WMG 12:30)
10
Nitobe Basketball
Playoffs Team
Captain Meeting
(WMG Rm. 211
12:30)
17
Tower Beach *| **|
Suicide Run    '  '
(12:30)
Men's Hockey
Championships
(TWSC 7:46 p.m.)
Women's Hockey
Championship
(TWSC 8:30 p.m.)
Women's Floor
Hockey League
Championship
(Gym F7:30 p.m.)
18
Womens Floor
Hockey League
Championship
(Gym F 7:30 p.m.)
UBC Open "IO
House      ■ •—
Nitobe Basketball
(WMG 3:30-6:30.
8:30-11:30)
McNutty Team Relay
Championship
(Harry Logan Track
12:30)
Tug o' War
(Bookstore 12:30)
Men's Volleyball
(WMG 6:30-8:30)
19
Storm The Wall
Finals
(12:30)
Intramural
Banquet
(Faculty Club 6:30)
Saturday
Buchanan
Badminton
Tournament
13
UBC Open
House
Canoe Trip
(Allouette River)
20
Intramural
Sports Day
(War Memorial Gym
11:00 a.m.) Friday, March 5, 1982
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
Box office success eludes Ross
By LAWRENCE PANYCH
In Vancouver we have several
dance companies which exist as
vehicles to present the work of a
specific choreographer. The danger
inherent in these non-repertory
companies is that so much depends
on the talents of one person. The
choreographer must really have
something special for us to sit
through two hours of their work.
Paula Ross Dancers, now at the
Vancouver East Cultural Centre, is
one such company. It has been
around for some time and recently
has begun to enjoy critical success.
This has not yet, unfortunately,
translated into box office success.
Paula   Ross,   the   company's
choreographer and raison d'etre is a
woman of impressive imagination.
Her work is always interesting. It is
humorous, energetic, colorful and
futuristic.
In the program at the Vancouver
East the company is presenting four
works in total. Three are recent
ones, though they have been seen
before, and the fourth is the remounting of an older piece entitled,
Coming Together. Three of the
four pieces on the program are performed each evening.
Paulatics, the first in ths: program, is divided into four quite different movements which explore the
various moods of the Bela Bartok
score. It is an abstract work and
contains the best choreography of
the three works I saw. The other
two works are almost in the performance art category.
Ross uses clever technique in
Paulatics to create a sense of
weightlessness. At one point two
dancers, one hanging onto the
other's feet, roll diagonally across
the stage as though pulled by gravity. With this simple movement and
others like it she destroys the orientation of up and down, leaving us
unhinged.
In Strathcona Park four women
in large capes like enormous wings
and four men wearing white masks
create some very striking visual images. The use of the capes was par-
ticularily   fascinating.   In  the  last
ROSS COMPANY . . . Strathcona Park, 1980
Taped music needs input
By GREG FJETLAND
Taped electronic sounds accompanied by live music were the main
attractions at An Evening of Electronics, presented by the Vancouver
New Musical society, at the Vancouver East Cultural Centre Sunday
night. Hosted by the always inimitable Barry Truax, the program
featured works by Michael
McNabb, Truax, John Chowning,
Denis Smalley and Sergio Barroso.
Truax's opening remarks indicated that selections represented a
trend in electronoacoustic music
because they all used natural sound
sources, which were then synthesized. This trend was more or less evident throughout although there
were extended lapses sometimes into unstructured electrono-
cacaphony that can seem endless
and pointless.
Dreamsong by McNabb, the first
composition of the evening was a
good case in point. The piece began
with a melange of street noise which
blended away into lovely synthesized tones, which are perhaps based
on human voices. The sounds were
not thin sine tones but richly
overlaid with much tonality. The
structure was imaginative, playful,
but controlled. It's as .though we
were hearing and seeing resonating
sonic images in some "mind's ear."
Still, for all this, the audience's
attention wandered. At times the
composition was without apparent
direction.
Truax's Eastwind featured a live
performer on alto and tenor
recorder, accompanied by tape. The
tape began as a slow and lugu brious
drone while the recorder ran over it
in a mystical and almost oriental
melody.
Chowning's Phone was the
favourite of the first half af the
evening. The purity of sound was
refreshing. Neither did the piece
lack in eliciting emotional response
from the audience, Chowning gave
vent to full musical expression. The
sounds were difficult to recognize
though the program stated the computer programs the synthesizer
employed "are designed to permit
exploration into ambiguities which
arise in perception." Once again,
however, the piece suffered from its
length.
The second set began with Pulses
of Time by Smalley, a New
Zealand-born composer. The piece
began slowly with the effec: of a
dropped bouncing ball. This slowly
increased in tempo but possessed a
John Cage-like random effect. The
sound became more synthesized,
assuming a sharp glassy timbre.
Yantra VI, by Sergio Barroso,
featured the composer in live ac-
companiament on  the  piano.   In
itially the composer played frantically, apparently in struggle
against the tape and when the tape
subsided, Barroso too played
softer. The tape returned with a
geiger counter rasp, and in this new
struggle the pianist died away.
Later the tape was muted and these
tones seemed to envelope the piano
notes. Really, the contrast between
tape and grand piano was incredible
and part of the success was due to
the instruments the reel-to-reel
reproduced were all keyboard instruments: organ, harpsichord, and
electric piano. An interesting footnote: Yantra VI was awarded the
Electronic National Prize by the
Ministry of Culture in Cuba.
This concert was a qualified success. While there was a good number of people out for the performance and it was clear that the evenings selections were well-received,
the selections shared certain salient
aspects: the length of the piece, the
natural sound source, the tendency
to fall into what I call electrono-
cacaphony. This may be because all
selections were suggested to the
society by Truax. A more broad-
based input, with slightly less
esoteric and academic selections,
more pleasing to a larger audience,
no less sophisticated or excelling in
the qualities that can make electronic music so enjoyable.
frame of this work the capes are
spread in large circles on the floor
with a dancers head in the middle.
It appears as though the bodies
have melted into huge puddles leaving only the head behind.
The final piece, The Bridge, uses
the company of eight dancers all
dressed in black jumpsuits that look
like tight fitting overalls. It begins
with some rather rigid movement
that eventually thaws and finally
boils into a psychic frenzy. It ends
as it began in a calmer, controlled
state. In bridge, Ross departs the
furthest from dance as we usually
think it to be.
There is a dreamlike quality to
Ross's work It is often bizzare but
never nightmarish, although at
times it comes close. While her
work is very intricate there is also a
naivete that is alluring. We might
wonder what sort of mind can produce such stuff but there is an instant empathy with whoever it is.
Paula Ross Dancers remain at the
Vancouver East Cultural Cenfer
through to March 6. Shows are at
8:30 p.m.
One bad, one not
By LAWRENCE PANYCH
David Y. H. Lui Productions
presented Romania's Ballet Fan-
tasio at the Queen Elizabeth
Theatre last Friday marking one of
the lowest points of I his year's
dance season.
Over the years, Vancouver audiences have come to expect a high
calibre of dance from any event
David Lui has put his name to. But
this is not what the Ballet Fantasio
provided.
What we saw was thoroughly second rate dancing, tacky costumes,
hack choreography and overall rotten production values.
The men of the company were
notable for their technical incompetence. Indeed, few seemed
capable of gracefully completing a
double tour en aire. The sole male
in the opening ballet, Chopiniana,
set the tone for the evening with an
embarassing display of clumsy partnering. The young man who interpreted Conrad in the Corsair pas de
deux at least managed to stay on his
feet. But his dancing was so wild
and uncontrolled it became a
parody on the sometimes circus appearance of virtuoso dance.
The women were somewhat accomplished. But that is giving them
precious little. Basic technique such
as spotting a turn and landing in
plie (on bended knee) seemed to be
beyond even some of the soloists.
Such technical shortcomings
might have been forgiven if at least
the company had shown some personality or character or if there had
been some interesting
choreography. What they presented
was a mixture of some old classical
works and a couple of original
works devoid of any imagination
whatsoever. On Carmen, the last
ballet of the evening, they even
managed to make sex boring.
One could go on and on but why
bother?
Criticism is a relative matter. It is
not fair to apply the same standards
to all companies, especially the
young ones. As an international
class company Ballet Fantasio
stinks but on a lower level we might
be kinder and only say they are a
boring little group of no
significance.
The reason this review is so harsh
is because we were led to believe
that Ballet Fantasio was a top rate
company. That they weren't was
evident from the first snap, crackle
and pop on their sound tape as the
curtain opened.
Surely the producers could have
learned a bit more about this bunch
before they booked them. Had they
done so the Queen Elizabeth
Theatre would have been free for a
happier experience and a school
gymnasium could have been found
somewhere for Ballet Fantasio.
The Ukranian Shumka Dancers a
the Queen Elizabeth Theatre: Feb
27
It somehow seems poetic justice
that David Lui should present one
of the worst and one of the best
dance events in the same weekend.
The night following the appearance
of the third rate Romanian Ballet
Fantasio at the Queen Elizabeth
Theatre we were treated to a spectacular show by the Ukranian
Shumka Dancers.
For those who don't already
know, the Shumka Dancers are a
group of 46 from Edmonton who
perform Ukranian folk dance. If
you were unfamiliar with Shumka
or Ukranian folk dance you may
not have expected much. Most folk
traditions are tame in comparison.
The high energy and acrobatics
of Ukranian folk dance always
make it popular. But Edmonton's
Shumka Dancers are no ordinary
group. Their product has a professional finish that few companies
can rival.
And amazingly they are actually
an amateur troupe. Here the word
amateur is used only to emphasize
ihe fact that the dancers are unpaid.
In all other respects they are a professional company.
In a two hour program (which
must be murder on the dancers) the
company manages to survive a
steadily increasing tempo that absolutely explodes at the end.
Throughout it all they maintained a remarkable brightness and
precision. It is difficult to believe
that an amateur group (or professional for that matter) could be so
well rehearsed. With such an enormous company in such a small
space it is a small marvel that no
one tumbled into the orchestra pit.
Even more impressive was a stage
presence which was evident in every
last dancer. It is a rare quality.
There is a very sharp differentiation in male and female roles in
their style of dance. The men are
much more showy and energetic.
Their roles tend also to be more individualistic. The women, on the
other hand, concentrate on precision corps work.
In the last section in the evening,
for example, as the men dazzle the
audience with their virtuosity the
women form a line along the back
of the stage. They move together
with exact timing to form patterns
which frame the action.
The first of three pieces, entitled
Ukranian Spirit, was exactly as the
name suggests. If there is a more
sombre side of the Ukranian
character it certainly wasn't in
evidence in this colorful and
energetic number.
Unlike the first piece, the other
two works, Napad and Malanka
Prelude, tell a story similar to the
old classical ballet. The plots are
simple and only roughly
represented in the dance. Both
mime and dramatic gesture are used. These pieces were akin of old
story ballets such as La Fille Mai
Guardee.
The only unfortunate aspect of
the Shumka Dancer's visit was that
it lasted only one night. The company is truly one of this country's
cultural jewels. Edmonton should
be proud. Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, March 5,1982
WW. ml
-zz/-BRRRi^
Shoot the edit —
Featured on page three of this
fine rag is an examination of great
flops in movie history. The Golden
Turkey award is handed out to hundreds of godawful films for various
insipid categories.
Thinking about these fantastic
celluloid flops is all very fine, but
too often we fail to give appropriate
attention to inspiring moments in
real life. Thus we present our own
version of the Golden Turkey
awards
For the turkiest driver on the
streets, candidates include Judge
E. Davey Fulton and newscaster
Harvey Kirck. But the most appropriate candidate is also the winner of the false piety contest. Sun
columnist Denny Boyd.
In the competition for turkiest effort at dispensing punishment the
choice is tough. UBC president
Doug Kenny and engineering dean
Martin Wedepohl collaborated
beautifully in an embarrassing "rap
the naughty boys' knuckles" effort
when they padlocked the engineering hangout, the cheese factory, in
response to sexist and racist hate
literature published in the Red Rag.
But the runaway winner is the
three member "Kane razing committee", which handed down a horrendous 18 month suspension
without pay to professor Julius
Kane. The man had been convicted
in county court of misusing a $.5
million research grant.
And in the stupidest name for a
sports team (women) category, the
judges had a tough time choosing
between the top flight contenders
like the Vikettes (a herd of vacuum
cleaners),   the   Dinnies   (loud
mouths?), and the Lady Wesmen.
But the eventual winner, the
University of Lethbridge Lady Pronghorns, was a standout entry that
couldn't be passed up.
Unfortunately, the UBC athletics
department made a smart decision
and changed the Thunderettes to
the Thunderbirds, and was forced
to drop out of the contest.
The nominations for the worst internal democracy are The Ubyssey,
the engineering undergraduate
society and the NDP. And the winner is Fat Dave for his incredible efforts in trying to influence the party
nomination meeting in Vancouver
East.
Well, time is running out and
there are thousands of categories
we haven't mentioned. But there is
one last category that deserves
mention: embarrassing moments in
attempts at humor. There was only
one nomination for this category,
and you guessed it, the prize goes
to The Ubyssey for this incredibly
dull and shitty editorial.
Turkeys
. . .and speaking of turkeys.
Nominations for editorial positions
on The Ubyssey are now open.
These positions are open to anyone
who will be a student at UBC next
year.
Contrary to popular opinion you
do not need certain political beliefs
to work on the paper. The only people who are unacceptable are those
who still think it is 1968, like the
turkeys in office this year.
Letters
Gears' dean denounces dastardly deeds
An open letter lo engineering students:
You may know that I am a
registered professional engineer and
as such I am bound by my professional code of ethics. Most of you
may not realize that under this
code, if 1 am witness to a misdeed
but do not express an opinion about
it, 1 tacitly signify my approval of
that action.
Because of this, 1 am forced to
express publicly my strongest objection and disapproval of the recent
issue of the Red Rag, because:
(1) it is sexist;
(2) it is racist; and
(3) it approves of and advocates
cruel violence.
A recent article in the Vancouver
Sun, entitled "Some adolescent
goofs in the guise of adults," accurately sums up the quality of the
publication. It equates the mental
age of the people who prepared it
with four-year-olds, and I share this
assessment.
While 1 realize that the vast majority of students in this faculty are
disgusted and disapprove of this
publication, this is not good
enough. By your silence you have
not only endorsed the contents but
you also share the disgrace to the
faculty. I personally am deeply
ashamed to be associated with a
faculty whose students produce
such a publication.
The harm done to this faculty
may be irreparable and, in any case,
will be long lasting. You will have to
swallow the bitter pill of having
been the a registered student in this
year of 1982. How you intend to
cope with the future is up to you.
Silence will not safeguard you.
L.M. Wedepohl
Applied Sciences dean
Enlightened gear writes reply
An open letter to applied science
dean Martin Wedepohl:
After reading your letter 1 felt
compelled to write you this reply
relating to you my experiences with
the engineering undergraduate
society. My viewpoint is unique and
I feel it will interest you to read on.
1 first became an active member
of the EUS in September of 1980,
when I was elected first year sports
representative. My involvement increased greatly over the following
months as I became more interested
in the activities of my club and the
EUS. I felt then (as I do now) that
the EUS is a vigorous organization
which can motivate its members to
accomplish some very creative
things, such as last year's engineer's
ball.
In February of 1981, 1 was
elected publicity rep of the EUS, an
Letters should be typed triple-
spaced on a 70 character line or they
will sit around for several months.
executive position. As publicity rep,
1 was in charge of publicising
events, printing tickets and
publishing the first year handbook.
1 believe you will remember my
coming to show you the contents of
this handbook before its publications last August.
In November, I resigned from my
position on the EUS council. I quit
as publicity rep because I became
disenchanted with some of the attitudes prevalent within the EUS,
especially those of the executive (of
which 1 was a member).
I came to the conclusion that the
underlying mood of the EUS was
one of cynicism and disrespect for
views differing from its own, as
sanctioned by this executive.
Despite its charity functions and the
amazing stunts it pulls off, the EUS
was essentially a conservative
organization which possessed little
foresight and sensitivity.
At times, I felt it would rather
risk antagonizing the faculty, the
university and the rest of the community than give up the outdated
traditions it held so dear. I am poin
ting to the Red Rag as an example,
in the recent issue of which the cartoon about Clifford Robert Olson
was simply devoid of social conscience.
I was not innocent in this matter,
as you stated in the second last
paragraph of your letter-. As a
member of the EUS, I gave each of
these traditions my outward approval, keeping any reservations I
had to myself. I am thus expressing
my regret for being party to actions
which only befit immature,
uneducated "goofs" rather than
future professional engineers.
Having learned that you have
recently authorized that the Cheeze
Factory be closed to EUS activities,
I hope that something good will
come out of this mess. I hope that
the EUS will revive itself as a
mature, responsible organization
(keeping its sense of humor intact)
and that it will again become a vital
member of the university community in its improved form.
David Janis
mechanical engineering 2
r
THE UBYSSEY
March 5, 1982
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout
the university year by the Alma Mater Society of the
University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the
staff and not of the AMS or the university administration. Member, Canadian University Press. The
Ubyssey's editorial office is in room 241k of the Student
Union Building. Editorial departments, 228-2301; Advertising, 228-3977.
It was official. The Ubyssey was going Hollywood, well son of. Staffers, old and new, were
up for awards. Gene Long thought awards should be given to those who tried to blind
turkeys. Greg Fjetland, cruising to the sound of electronic music objected. Nancy Campbell
was happy because she had the support of the Killer tomatoes. From Surrey, the land that
time forgot, came the combined forces of Sharrin Shariff, Bob Guzyk and Scott McDonald.
They had hoped the prize would be a golden "pooper scooper," something tht properly
suited the talents of "investigative journalists." After re-watching Rat Fink a Boo Boo for the
first time Craig Brooks and Arnold Hedstrom hoped for some recognition for endurance. Corinna Sundararajan was still pondering the significance of the golden butterball. Meanwhile
Brian Jones and Glen Sanford introduced the entrants to the "Ladies and Gentlemen." But
there was no audience. Thos in charge of transport, Kevin Mullen and Lawrence Panych just
stood back and let it ali be. Sheila was the winner. No contest, the judges said. Friday, March 5,1982
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
Anti-gay 'misunderstands'
Here we go again . . . Another
mindless univers'ty student who
likely has been on campus too long
and has lost touch with the real
world.
Can WifJiam S. Clark explain to
me, and to himself, why sex for
reproduction is natural but sexuality isn't? My understanding of the
English language has lead me to
believe that the two words are closely linked in meaning. Surely my
Collins dictionary hasn't misled me.
But again a man who doesn't
believe many people are trapped by
our sexist society (or 'world') is
likely to be out of touch with reality. I suggest, William S. Clark, that
you talk to any number of working
women who are poorly paid, have
menial unrewarding jobs and no
career future. And while you are at
it have you ever wondered why
there as so few women in the
engineering faculty?
As for your comment, William S.
Clark that Harry Britt is suggesting
people are wanting to escape from
our society; well you are more confused than I originally thought.
Britt, like many people in the world
today, would like to see society
change to being truly pluralistic and
accepting of the vast but presently
too often suppressed variety native
in people.
You suggest that gays and lesbians of UBC could do better in
their selection of speakers. I suspect
that since you consider Britt's trite
that anyone they'd bring in with a
healthy and viable alternate to your
apparently rather narrow world
would meet with your disapproval
and mindless criticism.
I could carry on with my comments about your lack of
understanding but instead I suggest,
William S. Clark that you leave
campus and your safe small orbit
here and see the real world. Britt
lives and works in that world. He
has a very clear understanding of its
problems. His suggestions are very
appropriate for the changes
necessary for this desperate world.
Perhaps when you return you will
better understand what Glen Sanford wrote so well about in his article on Harry Britt.
Edward K. McLaren
agricultural sciences
Out to lunch nutrition
During the month of March, letters about nutrition will be sent to
The Ubyseey for your information.
Today's letter focuses on dining out
and how to manage calories.
Does dining out spell diet disaster
for you? Although most restaurant
meals are high in fat, sugar and
calories, you can still enjoy gourmet
dining and stay within your diet.
First off: Plan Ahead
Choose a restaurant that offers a
lower fat items (for example, one
with a salad bar). If dining late,
avoid becoming overly hungry by
having a low calorie nutritious
snack at your regular meal time.
Secondly: Order Wisely
Identify the high fat, high calorie
items and substitute wiser choices
whenever possible.
Avoid foods that are deep-fried
or breaded.
Ask for lemon juice to flavor
salads instead of salad dressing or
oil.
Only order dessert after you complete your meal. Ask yourself if you
are still hungry.
Thirdly: Control Appetite
Sip on water or clear broth to
suppress appetite, and eat slowly.
Fourthly: Control Portions
Most restaurants serve large portions. Select an appetizer as the
main meal, share the main entree
with a friend or ask for a doggy
bag. Order sauces, gravies and salad
dressings on the side. Why
"weight?" Try our dining strategies
and take a friend to lunch.
Chris Lepik
home ec 4
Students next step against rag
Good news. The tide is turning.
The continued public outcry against
the racist, sexist, and violent Red
Rag is finally going to put a stop to
its existence.
It is unfortunate that it tcok outside forces, like Kenny and the
Status of Women, to stop the
engineers. One would have thought
they   would  have  recognised  the
Burdon wrong, again
During three years of Vancouver
residence I have frequently encountered spoken, printed, hinted
and blunt expressions of a certain
attitude. No longer surprised
although still displeased thereby, I
have just read yet another, namely
the enchanting welcome offered to
visa students by James Burdon in
The Ubyssey. As a Canadian who
has been a foreign student, I feel
very obliged to briefly comment.
James, apparently you declare
that:
a provincial pampering of these
people is not only "fact" but "a
probable," cause of "ruined post-
secondary education," and consequence of "wasteful spending" by a
government with "lack of purpose;"
a you could better tolerate
their physical proximity were they
financially penalized in support of
"(y) our principles," as "massive
handouts" to them point towards
"suffering of monetary losses" by
us.
Several quoted and unmentioned
vague terms, questionable ideas and
the accuracy of your strategic
arithmetic aside, could you please
consider that:
a in every country of the
world, only one, "foreigner" may
be used not simply to degrade a non
— or new Canadian referent, but
rather to describe you;
a the mere quantity of subsidy or
penalty is a totally inconsequential
variable within "this issue."
The issue at  hand  is  only an
outlandish kind of blame-pnning.
Shale Lachter
education qualifying year 5
racism and sexism themselves and
would have voluntarily stopped the
Red Rag.
However, while the president is
to be congratulated he is limited in
what he can do. He can lock the
EUS out of their office because it is
university property. The next step
belongs to the students. That has
already started with rehab's refusal
to have reps of the EUS on their
council.
The next step is for the AMS to
make sure that the Red Rag does
not go underground. As the EUS is
a member of the AMS, the AMS
has final disciplinary control. It too
needs to make clear that such publications like the Red Rag do not
belong in an educated community,
and that there is NO justification
possible for its existence. Thus the
AMS must support Kenny's action.
George Hermanson
Anglican-United Campus Minister
Student silence supports
sexist and racist Red Rag
Open letter to Law Students' Association president David Hill:
On behalf of the 1500 clerical
workers (90 percent of whom are
women) at the University of British
Columbia who are represented by
our union, we write to commend
you on your stand against the sexist
'Editorial writer should use facts'
Maybe the Ubyssey should get its facts straight before printing
such blatantly ridiculous statements. It is not true that women in the
faculty of applied sciences are "few and far between." Nursing, the
"other half" of the applied science faculty boasts 99 per cent
women. In the health sciences, at least 50 per cent of the student; are
women in most areas. And thanks for telling me. After attending
engineering dances, engineering meetings, spending my free time in
CEME and being received with politeness and welcome, I would
never have realized that I was never more than a "sexual plaything"
to the EUS. The writer of "A problem of sexism . . ." Should ta k to
an engineer and find out what they really think of women behind all
that "old boys" stuff; and if she/he doesn't like the Godiva ide,
then she/he shouldn't come. Astrid Otto
nursing 2
A
activities    of   the    engineering
students at UBC.
In our view, silence in the face of
sexist and racist attacks on fellow
members of the university community is tantamount to tacit support for those attacks. It is surely
appropriate that student
governments join with those
employed on campus, and with the
campus administration in opposing
discrimination within our own institution .
Our union has always taken a
strong position against the activities
of engineering week. Our workers
must be on campus in the course of
our employment. We are not given
the choice of being exposed to the
Godiva ride or to the Red Rag. It is
important that we know that the
students we serve are prepared to
stand up and be counted.
Again, we support you and we
thank you.
Nancy Wiggs
president, AUCE
BLACK & LEE
TUX SHOP
1110 Seymour St
6882481
Dance To
THE PANIC
at the VOC/EIG
FUND RAISER
8:00 p.m.-1:00 a.m.
TONIGHT
SUB PARTY ROOM
Tickets $2.50
in the VOC Clubroom
BZZR $1.00
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
Presents SHAKESPEARE'S
KING LEAR
'one of the most powerful plays ever conceived for the stage'
Directed by Donald Soule
MARCH 5-13
(Previews March 3 & 4) 8:00 p.m.
Thurs. Matinee-March 11 at 12:30 p.m.
Student Tickets: $4.00
BOX OFFICE - FREDERIC WOOD
THEATRE - Room 207
SUPPORT YOUR CAMPUS THEATRE
FOR THEATRE INFORMATION CALL 687-1515
/ JSUiijff^
VOGUE
918  GRANVILLE
685-5434
Warning: Frequent
brutal violence;
some suggestive scenes. B.C. Dir.
Showtimes: 2:10. 4:00.
5:50. 7:46. 9:40
(MATURE)
CORONET
85I   GRANVILLE
685   6828
Warning: Some gory violence.
B.C. Director.
Showtimes: 2:15, 4:40.
7.25, 9:40
An&eur
JOHN SAVAGE
CHRISTOPHER PLUMMER
1/   BlUmiU^     Warning: Frequent nudity;    %//%■   llVlaf^
IV.LV    *"*»». some sex. B.C. Dir. II    Ml   ll^l^  J
NURSES
CORONET
851   GRANVILLE
685-6828
Showtimes: 2:00. 4:00,
6:00. 8:00. 10:00
f'lSmmmmlES^*
Warning: some
violence; occasional
nudity and suggestive scenes. 8.C Dir.
OQEON
881   GRANVILLE
682-7468
JACK NICHOLSON h
™EBORDER
Showtimes: 2:15, 4:00, 6:00. 8:00. 10:00
(a^TZTT^SV    Warning: Some coarse language and swear-
MAlUllKj ing. B.C. Director.
10 Nominations incl. "Best Picture"
Showtimes: 7:00, 9:15 plus
2:00 p.m. Sat.-Sun.
HENRY FONDA
CAMBIE at  18th
876-2747
HSolden
3-^Bona
(GENERAL)
Warning: Occasional swearing.
B.C. Director.
VARSITY
224-3730
4375   W.  10th
Showtimes: 7:30. 9:45
PETER USTINOV
MAGGIE SMITH
AGATHA CHRISTIE'S
Evil Under
the Sun
1
Warning: some nudity
and suggestive scenes;
occasion violence. B.C. Director.
DROAdwAV
Showtimes: 7:25. 9:25
70 7   W   BROADWAY        WILLIAM HURT
874-1927	
BODY
HEAT
(mature)
Warning: Many scenes may frighten
young children. B.C. Director.
DROAaWA'
70 7 W. BROADWAY
874-1927
Showtimes: 7:00. 8:55
Richard Benjamin
Paula Prentiss
SATUKPAY
(Zk/(f\iftf\    Warning: Frequent coarse language;
V__—^ some nudity. B.C. Director.
duisbAR
DUNBAR  at 3Qth
224-7252
Showtimes: 7:30, 9:40
by ALAN PARKER
SWAN LAKE
VARSITy   ro*-1:!?"*
224 3730
4375   W.  10th
SUNDAY AT 2 P.M. ONLY Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, March 5,1982
[
Tween Classes
TODAY
INTRAMURALS
Final registration for man's and woman's McNulty relays and tug-o-war, by 3:30 p.m.. War
Mamorial gym 203.
STUDENTS FOR PEACE
AND MUTUAL DISARMAMENT
Information table, noon, SUB foyer.
NDP CLUB
Information table, Socred and Socialist calendars at almost giveaway prices, all day, SUB
foyer.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Conversation hour and maating, noon, main
lounge. International House.
VOC EIG
VOC-EIG Fun Raiser,' dance to The Panic.
Tickets are $2.50. Bzzr bar, 8 p.m. to 1 a.m.,
SUB party room.
CIAU SWIMMING CHAMPIONSHIPS
Preliminaries at 11 a.m., finals at 7 p.m.. Aquatic
centre.
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL UBC
Folk night, refreshments and baked goods, human rights discussion, 7 p.m.. International
House.
CITR UBC
Program: noon, Mini Concert, Bonzo dogdoo-
dah band; 3 p.m.. Dateline International, international affairs; after 6 p.m. news. Campus Capsule; 8 p.m.. Mini Concart, Lewe Lovich; 11
p.m., Final Vtnyl, the neglected album: Siouxie
and the Banshees; cable 100 fm.
UBC CHAMBER SINGERS
Spring Concert conducted by Cortland Hurt berg,
featuring The Liebeslieder Wattzer Opus 52 by
Brahms. Also works by Dowfand, Oliver and
Stravinsky, with arrangements by Hurtberg,
Smail and Puerling, noon and 8 p.m., recital hall,
Music building.
INSTITUTE OF ASIAN RESEARCH
Lecture: Do or the Way of Activity in Japanese
Thought by Dr. Hanayama and demonstration of
Kado or the Way of Flower Arrangement by Mrs.
(to, 3:30 to 5:30 p.m., Asian centre 604.
SCIENCE UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY
Bzzr garden, everyone welcome, 4:30 to 6:30
p.m., SUB 207/209.
UBC LIBERALS
Elections for 1962-83 executive, bring member
ship card, noon, SUB 226.
CO-OP SOUP KITCHEN
Cheap nutritious lunches, 12 noon to 1 p.m.,
Lutheran Campus Centre.
UBC SPORTS CAR CLUB
Car rally. Everyone welcome. Prizes, trophies
awarded, dash plaque for all entries, 6 p.m.,
SUB loop.
SATURDAY
CCCM
Walter Brueggeman speaks on Wisdom and Real
Estate, 9 to 11 a.m., Vancouver School of The
ology auditorium.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Variety show and dance, $1.50 per person at
AMS ticket office, NOT at the door, 7:X p m ,
International House.
CIAU SWIMMING CHAMPIONSHIPS
Preliminaries at 11 a.m., finals at 7 p.m.. Aquatic
centre
CITR UBC
Program: noon, Mini Concert, Robert Fripp; 4:X
p.m.. Stage and Screen, film and theatre reviews, 6 to 9:30 p.m., the Import Show with the
infamous Terry McBride; 11 p.m., Final Vinyl,
the classic album feature; cable 100 fm
COALITION FOR WORLD DISARMAMENT
Speakers, president of B.C. Federation of Labor,
music, guerrilla theatre; march and rally for nuclear disarmament. Assemble at Christ Church
cathedral (Burrard and Georgia), march to Rob
son Square courthouse, 1:30 p.m.
ZEN BUDDHISTS
Introductory and Advanced Retreats Sat., 9:30
a.m. to 4:X p.m., at Britannia Community Centre library, 1661 Napier; and Sun., 7 a.m. to 4
p.m. Re Sunday Retreat, phone Elaine at
294-4372 or Howard at 922-7477. Retreats are led
by a Zen monk from Shasta Abbey, California.
SUNDAY
CITR UBC
Program: 8 a.m. to 12 noon, Music of Our Time,
unusual, mostly modern, classical music; 12
noon to 2:30 p.m., the Folk Show, mostly Canadian, mostly traditional folk music; 2:30 p.m.
to 6 p.m., Rabble Without a Pause, a lunatic
musical view of the world; 3 p.m., Laughing
Matters, a look at the history and content of re
corded comedy; 11 p.m.. Final Vinyl, CITR's #1
playlist album, Material: Memory series; cable
100 fm.
IVCF
Sound and Substance featuring Salmond and
Mulder, admission is free, 8:30 p.m., SUB party
room.
UNDERWATER HOCKEY
Practice, everybody welcome, 10 p.m., Aquatic
centre.
AFRICAN STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Discussion, Drugs: Are Africans tha guinea pigs?
lad by S. Chirwa and F. Ofulua, everybody welcome, 2 p.m., SUB 206.
UBC CYCLING CLUB
Touring ride, 9 a.m., meet at south side of SUB.
MONDAY
WUSC
Ganaral meeting, briefing by staff mambars from
tha Ottawa national office, noon. International
Houae lounge.
WORLD UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF CANADA
Information session on WUSC overseas two year
work programs, 7 p.m., Asian centre, seminar
604.
JEWISH STUDENTS NETWORK
Multimedia display featuring a slide and tape
show, posters, literature, music and more, depicting Jerusalem, the City of Peace, 12 noon to
7:30 p.m., middle of the hallway, SUB.
CITR UBC
Program: noon. Mini Concert, Kraftwerk; 3
p.m.. The Melting Pot, a look at UBC research;
4:X p.m., Everything Stops For Tea, cultural
stuff for the cultured; 7 p.m.. Off Beet, the
world's worst radio program; 8 p.m., Mini Concert, Japan; 9:30 p.m. to 1 a.m., the Jazz Show
with Shelley Freedman; 11 p.m.. Final Vinyl, a
jazz album feature; cable 100 fm.
STUDENT CEC
Rick Hansen, world class athlete, is the guest
speaker, noon to 1:X p.m., SUB party room.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
General meeting, open to all members, executive
elections for CVC 1982-83, 7 p.m., SUB 212.
COMMITTEE ON LECTURES
Professor Gerald Cadogan, classical archeology,
University of Cincinnati, Ohio speaks on War in
Minoan Crete, noon, Lasserre 102.
UBC SPORTS CAR CLUB
General meeting and awards presentation for
holy grail rally, nominations for elections, also,
guest Andy Mahood and his Formula Atlantic
car, 7 p.m., SUB 213.
ARTS UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY:
ARTS WEEK  82
Apathy day, get your buttons and mellow out on
the strains of an apathetic orchestral ensemble,
noon, Buchanan lounge.
TUESDAY
CITR UBC
Program: noon, Mini Concert, Southside
Journey; 5 p.m., Thunderbird Report, UBC
sports; after 6 p.m. news. In Sight, campus issues in perspective, 8 p.m.. Mini Concert, Renaissance; 11 p.m., Final Vinyl, a new album for
you "new" people; cable 100 fm.
UBC JAPAN CLUB
Executive elections, everyone interested is wel
come, noon, SUB 212.
STUDENTS FOR PEACE
AND MUTUAL DISARMAMENT
Film presentation, Who's in charge here, anyway?, followed by a general meeting, noon, Angus 421.
WEST POINT GREY BAPTIST CHURCH
A free concert by Vancouver Bach Choir. Refreshments served, 7:X p.m., Baptist church,
11th and Sasamat.
CO-OP SOUP KITCHEN
Cheap nutritious lunches, noon to 1 p.m., Lutheran Campus Centre.
DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY SPORTS
SERVICES: SCHOOL OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION
Faculty and staff, golf instruction for beginner*
for four weeks, starting today, Tuesdays and
Thursdays, noon to 1:15 p.m., Osborne gym B
east. Fee is $10. Maximum 15 people in the
course. For mora information, phone 228-3688.
JEWISH STUDENTS' NETWORK
Rev. John Grauel, one of North America's most
dynamic non-Jewish Zionists will speak on
When a Dream Comas True: the State of Israel,
noon, Buch. 203.
STUDENTS FOR AN ACCESSIBLE EDUCATION
Organizational meeting for the march on March
12, 1:30 p.m., SUB council chamber.
COMMITTEE AGAINST RACIST
AND FASCIST VIOLENCE
No table this week at noon in SUB foyer.
UBC CYCLING CLUB
Meeting and Barbara Bernhardt speaking on National Bike Rally taking place in Vancouver in
August, noon. Bio. 2449.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Planning meeting, everyone welcome, noon,
SUB 237b.
ARTS UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY:
ARTS WEEK '82
Radical day, wear something 'radical,' come and
listen to rock music, noon, Buchanan lounge.
WEDNESDAY
PRE-MED SOCIETY
This month's newsletter with election details are
now available, deadline is March 16, office hours
are Wednesday and Thursday, noon, until March
16, IRC G30.
CITR UBC
Program: noon, Mini Concert, James White and
the Blacks; after 6 p.m. news, CITR's weekly
editorial, with the wonderful Joe March; 8 p.m..
Mini Concert, Bauhaus; 11 p.m., Final Vinyl —
yet another new album; cable 100 fm.
JEWISH STUDENTS' NETWORK
Lunch in Israel, featuring falafel and lamantasJ-
hen. An Israeli dance performance will take
place. White and blue clothes should be worn to
keep in the Israeli spirit, noon, SUB party room.
CHINESE CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Election for the future of CCF, noon, SUB 211.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
General meeting and executive elections, noon,
SUB 216e.
CO-OP SOUP KITCHEN
Cheap nutritious lunches, noon to 1 p.m., Lutheran Campus Centre.
ARTS UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY:
ARTS WEEK  82
The second annual arts yacht races, noon, Buchanan lounge.
THURSDAY
CITR UBC
Program: noon. Mini Concert, Led Zeppelin (will
you listen now?); 3 p.m.. Cross Currents, consumer and environmental issues; 5 p.m.,
Thunderbird Report, UBC sports; after 6 p.m.
news, In Sight, campus issues; 8 p.m., Mini
Concert, the Rolling Stones (more new wave
punk junk); 11 p.m., Final Vinyl, an import album
feature; cable 100 fm.
INTRAMURALS
Tower beach suicide run (10km), it is a killer,
noon, between SUB and Main library,
r
Hot  Flashes
i
Oh no, ifs's
Arts week!
It's that time of year again. No,
dummy, not St. Patrick's Day or
the Ides of March or the time your
student loan money runs outl I'm
referring of course, to . . . wait for
it  . . .   ARTS  WEEKII
There should be a lot of support
for Monday because it is Apathy
Day.
The remaining 10 per cent of the
students will be happy on Tuesday
because it's . . . radical day!
And on Wednesday is the much
ballyhooed "Yacht Races." This is
your one and only chance to beat
The    Ubyssey   at   something.
Hungry students can attend
Thursday's BBQ, with food
prepared by certain faculty
members. And finally on Friday,
there's an open house in Buchanan
all day.
OLi
LIVE R^^-J'ROLL
MARCH 8-13
Under Cover
Open Mob. - Sal. 7 p.a. -
932 Granville Mall      687-6418
EXECUTIVE
POSITIONS
1982-83
INTRAMURAL — RECREATIONAL
SPORTS PROGRAMS
INTERESTED?
Attend an introductory meeting TUESDAY, MARCH 9th OR
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 10th — 12:30 NOON, ROOM 211
WAR MEMORIAL GYM
For further information, call 228-2401 (Office of the Director)
IF YOU HAVE THE INTEREST AND THE TIME,
WE HAVE THE POSITION AND THE CHALLENGE FOR YOU!!
UNIVERSITY PUBLIC SPEAKING COMPETITION
A 5 to 7 minute speech, theme ia Biography.
Prizes are 1200, »75 and $25 for 1st, 2nd and 3rd.
Open to all full time students. Phone R. Yorsch
for further details. Competition, 7:X p.m., IRC
1. Judges are from Toastmasters International.
ARTS UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY:
ARTS WEEK  *C
BBQ with distinguished faculty members as the
chefs, noon, Buchanan courtyard.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Speaker from Rape Relief, noon, SUB 125.
INTRAMURALS
Referee club meeting, refs please attend, 1:30
p.m.. War Memorial gym 211.
JEWISH STUDENTS' NETWORK
Professor Kal Holsti, UBC political science department head and visiting professor M. Mayzei,
Tel Aviv University history department, speak
about Egyptian-Israeli peace treaty, noon, International House, upper lounge.
EUS CAMPUS WIDE
MARDI GRAS
DANCE
Saturday, March 6th
in the
ARMOURIES
Featuring CRISIS
and a
DIXIELAND BAND
PRIZES FOR BEST COSTUME, BEST MASK
Tickets $5.00 at AMS Box Office
Doors open at 8:00 No Minors
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: Csmpus - 3 Nnaa, 1 dey tt.00: addMenat Nnaa. tie.
Commercial - 3 Nnee. 1 day SMS; additional NnM
He. Additional days *3.J0 and tOe.
Oaarihad ads ara not accaptad by tahphona and'.ara payabla kt
advanea. DaadKna k 10:30 a.m. tha day bafora publkatfon.
Publications Off**, Room241. S.U.B.. UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2AB
Coming Events
30 — Jobs
THE VANCOUVER
INSTITUTE
Free Public Lecture
PROF. DAVID SINGER
Political Science
University of Michigan
INTERNATIONAL
SECURITY IN THE 1980s
Prof. Singer is an authority on arms
control, the causes of war, disarmament, and the application of social
science to foreign policy.
LECTURE HALL 2, WOODWARD
BUILDING, SATURDAY.
MARCH 6 at 8:15 p.m.
TYPING ON CAMPUS.  Fast and precise.
$8.50 hour. Phone 224-6604.
35 - Lost
REWARD. Green exercise book with columns of figures inside. Lost on campus approx. three weeks ago. Call 421-6297.
60 — Rides
66 — Scandals
WHY WORRY about 1984? The nightmare
of nuclear madness is upon us. • • •
Speak up!
70 — Services
FOURTEENTH ANNUAL UBC BED RACE
11:00 Saturday, March 27. Enter by calling
224-9620. Trophy, barbecue and following
nega party by Sigma Chi.
10 — For Sale — Commercial
COMMUNITY SPORTS: A store full of ski
wear, hockey equipment, sleeping bags,
jogging shoes, soccer boots, racquets of all
kinds, and dozens of other items at very attractive prices. 3615 W. Broadway.
REBOUND EXERCISERS. Excellent quality
(2 year warranty) at student prices,
873-0819 days or 734-0448 eves.
11 — For Sale — Private
1979 MONZA SPYDER. Black with light blue
interior, sunroof, 4-speed, 305—V8, radials,
power steering, 8-track stereo, buckets,
mags, immaculate, well maintained, $6,500
or best offer. 736-0806.
25 — Instruction
MODERN RESUME - $10.00 & UP.
681-3942
85 — Typing
EXPERT TYPING: essays, term papers
factums, letters manuscripts, resumes,
theses. IBM Selectric II. Reasonable rates.
Rose 731-9857.
TYPING: $1 per page. Legible copy. Fast,
accurate, experienced typist with IBM
Selectric. Gordon, 873-8032 (after 10 a.m.)
TYPING SERVICE for theses, correspondence, etc. Any field. French also available.
IBM Selectric. Call 736-4042.
FUSSY FINGERS TYPING SERVICE. $1.25
per page. Call Mary, after 6 p.m., 274-6448.
WORD PROCESSING. We prepare research
and term papers, resumes and reports in
several languages. Ask for our special student rates. Phone Ellen at 734-7313 or
271-6924.
FAST,
EFFICIENT TYPING.
266-5053
Near campus.
HOMESTAY
PROGRAMMING
FRANCE
3 week  stay with   French  family,
language study course, exursions.
Depart Vancouver from $3,000.00.
11 June-3 July
8 July-1 August
4 August-26 August
CONTACT: Kathy Ronnquist
Kay-Dor Travel
Travel Service Ltd.
210 N. Front St.,
Sarnia, Ontario
N7T7H9
(519) 336-0820
ESSAYS.  THESES,   MANUSCRIPTS,  in
eluding technical equational, reports, letters, resumes. Bilingual. Clemy, 266-6641.
FAST, ACCURATE TYPING of essays, term
papers and thesis projects. $1.40 per page
plus paper. Call Valorie, 521-7474 evenings
only.
MICOM WORD  PROCESSING $10.00 hr
Equation   typing   available.    Pickup   and
delivery. Phone Jeeva, 826-5169 (Mission).
TYPING — Special Student Rates. Fitness
& Cameron Public Stenographers, 5670
Yew Street, Phone 226-6814.
90 - Wanted
WANTED: Goalie for ice hockey Fridays, 3-5
p.m., UBC rink #1. Phone John Warkentin,
228-3113 or just show up. Friday, March 5, 1982
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
The Ubyssey needs volunteers,
everyone needs volunteers.
The Vancouver Volunteer Centre
needs volunteers, as tour guides,
aides, teachers, tutors, and friends.
Be a pal; lend a helping hand. More
details from the centre, at 731-6168.
Enough of the good, community
stuff. Now for the flack pieces:
La Troupe de la Seizieme will
mark their residency in the new
Firehall theatre by presenting Coup
de Sang, by Jean Daigle. "Four
women on a farm," states the press
release. "Domination, revolt,
resignation, and love interact until a
man comes on the farm to shake the
balance." Sounds like powerful
stuff, poetic and archetypal.
Stimulate your glands by attending
this non-event at the Firehall
theatre, 280 East Cordova, March 4
to 14. CaU 682-2628 for more info
and reservations.
Speaking of Theatre, here's one
about the boy who loved and worshipped horses, became deranged,
blinded them, and unwittingly towed his psychiatrist into a personal
dilemma . . . No, it isn't the Ronald
Reagan Story, but Peter Shaffer's
Equus, at Langara's Studio 58. Student rates available. Reservations
324-5227. Playing until March 20.
Repression turns to oppression in
South African playwrights' Athol
Fugard's The Island, presented by
Westcoast actors at the Waterfront
theatre on Granville Island. Tix:
685-6217.
The best thing playing in town is
probably Last Call, a self-
proclaimed "Post-Nuclear Musical
Cabaret." Thoughtful, provocative, and full of other theatrical
cliches. Monday is pay-what-you-
can day. Call 688-1436 for reservations, but tickets may be purchased
from Vancouver ticket centre
outlets.
Chicken
out.
More than just classic
. burgers (15 varieties)
we've got super barbecued
chicken (cheap, too!).
P. J. Burger & Sons. Lots of
great food. Lots of great fun.
11:30 on-7 days a week. 2966
W. 4th Ave. and Bayswater.
The travel source
for students and youth
In rvj   IheCanadian'* h IStudent
... .'±G* GatHtltf Around EurofM
-R£" ' '<«i Men***"*** F»»W»
l jr.. H- u
? '^\y-
*»vaillps
Mexico and
on campus next week
Available at your student office
or from
r^TRAVELCUTS
** Going Your Way!
UBC, Student Union Building
Vancouver. 604 224-2344
And now, we come to our own
back yard and discover a mixture of
Triumph and the Museum of Anthropology. The result? Donald
Soule's controversial interpretation
of Shakespeare's The Tragedy of
King Lear. See Lear in flashback.
See Cordelia and the Fool roles
being played by the same actress. Be
riveted to your seats as Cornwall
(UBC professor Jerry Wasserman
acting as himself) plucks out
Gloucester's eyes. Student tickets
only $4. Box office at Freddy
Wood, 228-2678.
VCC music department continues
its Spring Recital Series with Peter
Hannan playing the recorder ("Was
that do-re-mi or me-do-re?"). The
big event's tonight at Vancouver
Community College (VCC, that is);
Admission only $2 for students,
with valid student card. Otherwise,
you have to prove you're a senior to
get in for $2. Additional information may be extracted from a
knowledgeable voice at the other
end of telephone number 873-2461.
LSAT
GMAT
MCAT
INTENSIVE
REVIEW
SEMINARS
Vu- ott.-r t.<rc.kh.*ttlwl.SAT. (.At AT
.inJMCAT:
• -00 p.iyi.' i ,'p\niiliu\l v'urru ulum
• 70 p.it^t- Math Primer (miii iiu'.uh
LSAT&rAIATu-^tr.mt)
• M.-min.ir-M:vvl </l.i»</*.
• >jxvi.ili:rJ itwrikt.>r>
• ( ui.tr.inii-v: rc|v.it ilu- i.inir*.i' lor no
vvtr.i charge it vour sloiv i-*
unvirist.it. tor\
W'livin.tnivciiN.i^.dl.inJtiiuKMii ho.v
vou i an re.iIk Jo thi- ptvp.ir.u ion uni
Uvp thinking vou'll ys\ .iroun.l to ,^\\
vour utt'ii'
National Testing Centre Inc.
MO-II52 Mainland St
V.iiKouvcr. B.C. Vt»R2T-J
or*: all:
-,604) bM^OQQ
HAIRSTYLING FOR MEN AND WOMEN
We're ready to listen to
your ideas.
Drop by for a complimentary
consultation with one of our
professional hairstylists.
.j fkr\/   OFF our regular prices for students
I UP JrCl on Monday through Wednesday only.
^" (Student I.D. required)
\
Cuts — Men* 15.00 Women $22.00
Perms — Men $35.00 Women $40.00 and up
Streaks, color, hennas and conditioners also competitively priced.
Mon.-Fri. — 9:00-7:30
Sat. — 9:00-5:
2529 Alma St. at Broadway
Telephone: 224-2332
w
NOW SHOWING!
FOR THEATRE INFORMATION
CALL 681-4266
WARNING — Frequent violence, some nudity
and sex —B.C. Director
MON. to FRI. - 1:30 7:15 9:46
SAT., SUN. - 1:30 4:00 7:15 9:45 Page 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, March 5, 1962
harman/kardon
**.
■JrfeS?*'*
$329
«
HK100 metal cassette deck offers quick, accurate
bias adjustment, output level control, quiet signal-to-
noise ratio and low wow and flutter. Takes any kind
of tape.
.^-Jra^j* ■
COMPLETE SYSTEM
A great music system — Sherwood and EPI. The Sherwood
S8300 cp receiver delivers a guaranteed 40 watts RMS per channel. The ST801 semi-automatic belt drive turntable is equipped
with a top-rated Shure M95ED cartridge. EPI 100 speakers give
you "the famous Linear Sound".
©YAMAHA
R300
P350
NS80
si. * ,i o n c\ * i; c\ n
Now anyone can afford the quality of a Yamaha system. Get a
complete natural sound system for only $599.95. The R300
receiver delivers 30 watts RMS per channel at 0.015% THD. The
P350 semi-automatic turntable is equipped with an ADC 0302
\cartridge. Pulling it all together are 2-way NS-80 speakers.
*5W
COMPLETE SYSTEM
Ii
SS110-IC
A
D
C
\ r
A BSR COMPANY
*199
95
A 10 band stereo frequency that allows you to control the
overall response and sound of your system. 10 bands of
equalization for each channel provide an almost infinite
number of possible frequency response variations.
Q YAMAHA
When using the K350 for recording, a live band and the
tape speak the same language. The bass is tight and the
voice is alive. The K350 will accept any tape make including metal. The direct-access transportation system
assures easy loading and unloading.
*319
95
PrasoDic
Sport
About
PC4001
I 9"
A mini stereo cassette player, with FM radio
gives fabulous sound from lightweight headphones. Carrying case included.
M6995
100 FST
New and improved EPI 100 Speakers. Practical
power range 15-90 watts. Features EPI's famous
linear sound. 2-way system.
$124
95
EACH
Mini-size executive cassette recorder has one
touch recording for convenient dictating. Cue
and review allow instant selection location.
Pause control.
*89*
@
M9901
(Not exactly as illustrated)
Sanyo 9901 AM/FM portable cassette recorder.
Two speakers, two built-in mikes, plus LED
recording level indicator.
V.
$139*
s=
^^^^     j^       ^^L       YOUR TOTAL ENTERTAINMENT CENTRE m
O&Osouno
556 SEYMOUR STREET, 687-5837-2696 E. HASTINGS STREET, 254-1601

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