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The Ubyssey Mar 13, 1984

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Array u*>o Archives Serial
Group to stop cruel experiments
By MURIEL DRAAISMA
One of Vancouver's foremost
animal rights groups is launching a
campaign to stop scientific cruelty
towards primates in university labs.
Peter Hamilton of Lifeforce said
UBC is a major offender.
UBC neurosciences professor
Juhn Wada conducts cruel and violent experiments on primates,
Hamilton charged. The experiments
are geared toward finding ways of
preventing epileptic seizures, but
Hamilton said they cause unnecessary pain and suffering to primates
involved.
Wada's results are scientifically
invalid because the convulsions induced in the primates are not comparable to those experienced by humans with epilepsy, he said. Subject
to electrical shocks and confinement, the primates' brain and body
function abnormally, he added.
Wada forces the primates into a
behavioral observation box with a
sliding neckpiece to ensure the animals do not wound themselves,
Hamilton said. The primate cannot
turn around in the box and its paws
are restrained to prevent it from removing an electrode attached to its
brain.
"It's morally wrong to cause this
pain to animals," Hamilton said.
"I find it hard to believe that people
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXVI. No. 43
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, March 13,1984
228-2301
— nail lucente photo
WORLD'S MOST POPULAR guy, UBC administration president George Pedersen faces the circling
microphones of a horde of screaming banshee journalists. "I know you're going to misquote me whatever I say
so I might as well say something really outrageous," he sighs and mutters something about Bill Bennett coming
to take fine arts at UBC. Gullible reporters don't realize that the statement is very literal and our favorite Fuehrer
is going toake the fine arts building to Kelowna as a summer house.
Persky loses chancellor race
By CHRIS WONG
UBC's new chancellor is "this
year's representative of the
bourgeoisie'' and will not adequately stand up for education said
former Solidarity Times editor Stan
Persky.
Persky lost his third bid to
become chancellor to Robert
Wyman, chair of Pemberton,
Houston, Willoughby Inc. The vote
was about 10,000 to 5,000 said UBC
information services officer Al
Hunter.
Persky called Wyman a "legalized gambler" because of his dealing
in the stock market, adding Wyman
supports the Social Credit government and is not likely to criticize its
education policies.
"I just think the chancellor has to
become a public advocate for public
education," he said.
But Persky said he is pleased with
the results because his percentage of
the vote increased to 35 per cent
from 30 per cent three years ago
when he ran against current
chancellor J. V. Clyne.
"The good thing is I haven't been
relegated to a sort of fringe candidate status," he said.
Persky said running for
chancellor is "strictly an uphill battle," and is one of the hardest elections in the world to win. "For
three elections in a row, the worst
person has won, which shows the
reactionary grads of UBC still hold
the upper hand."
But he added he will run for a
fourth time in three years as long as
the election is democratic.
The chancellor is a non-voting
member of the university's board of
governors and senate, and acts as
UBC's senior representative.
Persky said the chancellor must
employ unorthodox methods to
promote education because of the
government's   failure   to   make
education a funding priority.
Wyman's candidate statement
published in the UBC Chronicle
contained "utterly orthodox" ideas
about running a university including raising funds among
business circles, said Persky.
Persky said the chancellor should
concentrate on:
• changing the public's attitude
towards education,
• acting as the university's om-
budsperson.
• prompting university reforms.
"You just have to help people
who fall down, lose consciousness
many times a day, in front of everyone, anywhere. You have to help
these people."
Wada denied the primates' abnormal state upsets the experiments' validity. Because emotional
tension and psychological upset
prompt epileptic seizures, the primates' nervous state suits the experiments, he said.
The restraining device which
Hamilton considered cruel serves to
protect the primates from inflicting
pain on themselves, he added. "As
a professional scientist, I don't depend on the opinion of people like
(Hamilton)," he said.
with epilepsy would deny these experiments are cruel."
But Wada, considered to be a
world expert on epilepsy, disagreed
with Hamilton's charges. He said
his experiments follow the stringent
criteria determined by the Canadian
Council on Animal Care and are
judged by peer groups to be scientifically valid.
Wada agreed animal models fail
to produce the same results as human models, but said it is unethical
to use humans in experiments concerning epilepsy.
"As a medical scientist, I believe
my research is very important. I
have witnessed that many patients
have been helped by my research,"
he said.
Program presents
risky venture
By STEPHEN WISENTHAL
At least 15 per cent of students in the Ontario student venture capital
program went bankrupt, according to an Ontario Canadian Federation of
Students researcher.
Richard Balnis said the students were paid on average less than minimum
wage in the program, which is similar to the one starting in B.C. that provides students with a $2,000 interest free loan to create new summer
business.
"The students are in the small business sector. That has the highest
failure rate of any in Canada," he said.
He said only 876 businesses were created in Ontario last summer, adding
the program was mainly a public relations scheme and not a solution to
unemployment.
"1 don't think (the Ontario government) think it's a solution (to
unemployment) either," he said.
He said the government only mentions exceptional cases like a window
cleaning company which now has $200,000 a year in sales and pays students
about $3,500for 16 weeks work.
"And that's the best company," he said, adding that most students in
the program would probably earn much less.
He also criticised the program's stress on competition which teaches
students to pay employees as little as possible and displace union workers.
"Just sticking it to your neighbour is not the sort of ethic that I'd want to
learn," he said.
He said the Ontario program is in its eleventh year and has grown rapidly
with 151 companies in 1981, 424 in 1982 and 876 in 1983 as direct job creation funding has decreased.
Rick McGuire, ministry of labour coordinator for the B.C. student venture capital program said the B.C. government expects 1100 businesses to
be started through its own $2.5 million scheme.
He said the B.C. program is very closely based on the Ontario program.
UBC students Pat Koropatrick and John White are applying for a loan
to start Student General Contracting, a painting and odd jobs company.
Koropatrick said they are confident the company will be successful because
of past experience in a similar project.
It would be difficult to start a company without prior experience, he
said.
McGuire said local chamber of commerce branches responsible for approving loans will not authorize projects that are financially unviable or
undercut older or unionized employees.
Koropatrick said they would use the money to buy equipment.
"With this we can get a head start against the other guys," he said.
Koropatrick said they expect to make over $1,500 each. "Basically you're
going to have a lot of difficulty going back to university with this," he said.
Simon Seshadri, liason between the government and the Alma Mater
Society on this program, said the government is providing $500 to pay
students to staff an information booth on the program. The booth will be
open weekdays in the SUB listening lounge until the end of March and
possibly longer, he said.
There has been a good response in the first week of operation with about
20 inquiries per day, he said. He said the program is not for everyone.
"It's geared for the go-getters," he said.
Students to prompt action on Socred 'fraud'
By MURIEL DRAAISMA
UBC students should "get off their butts"
and protest the provincial government's
failure to pass on federal funds for post
secondary education, says a newly formed
group of concerned students.
The Social Credit cabinet's refusal to pass
on a $27 million increase in federal transfer
payments for 1984-85 post secondary education in B.C. means students should start lobbying federal politicians now to reverse the
decision before September, said Nick Banks,
a member of the informed students association.
When finance minister Hugh Curtis unveiled the budget in mid-February, he revealed
the $27 million would be diverted to general
revenue. Banks, who has contacted federal
finance minister Marc Lalonde's office and
NDP spokespeople about the issue, said this
move is tantamount to fraud.
"The government's treatment of us is an
affront to our intelligence and I'd be disappointed if we didn't react," he said.
The federal government increased funding
by nine per cent for post secondary education
in B.C. from $451 million in 1983-84 to $478
million in 1984-85. At the recent federal-
provincial finance ministers' conference,
Curtis agreed to pass on the increase, but he
has since reneged on the deal, said Banks.
Federal officials have indicated they are
concerned about the Socreds' diversion of
funds, he said. They are expecting students to
voice their concerns and the informed
students association will give students the opportunity to do so, he added.
Formed last weekend, the association is
launching a petition and membership drive
this Wednesday and Thursday at UBC. The
handful of students who have begun to collect names and addresses of other concerned
students will hit downtown Friday in a blitz
of leafletting, Banks said.
The group was formed in a bid to deepen
student awareness of the problem and to urge
them to take action. Banks said the group
will work in cooperation with the Canadian
Federation of Students and other campus
groups fighting the Socreds' education
policies.
See page 2: UNDERSTANDING Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 13, 1984
Animal tests desensitize researchers
From page 1
John McNeill, UBC's animal
care committee chair, also defended
Wada's experiments, saying epilepsy can cause death and scientists
must continue to find cures for
some of its untreatable forms.
"There is a significant number of
Canadians who are affected by the
disease and can't at the present time
be treated," he said.
"I definitely don't think his re
search is a waste of time and
money." He added that Canada's
medical research council sees
Wada's research as valuable because it continues to provide funds.
But Hamilton said scientists
should be employing non-violent
experiments to solve medical problems. He said experiments like
Wada's desensitize researchers and
others who participate.
"How can you use animals in re
search, torture them, then go home
and walk your dog and play with
your cat?"
Hamilton said campaign organizers are urging those concerned to
write to MPs and MLAs about the
issue and to pressure charities, such
as the Heart Foundation, not to
give money to animal research.
The campaign started Feb. 23
Understanding needed
From page 1
Students must have an adequate
understanding of the issue before
federal politicians will act on their
concerns, he added. "We can't expect them to put their nuts on the
chopping block without public
awareness."
When   the   petitioners   gather
Ooooooooooops
In the story Acadia Camp rent
will cause people to quit (March 9),
the subject was Acadia Park, not
the Camp. New tenants will be paying up to 37 per cent more for a
three bedroom townhouse, and the
range of rent increase for new
tenants will be between 28.8 and 37
per cent in the Park. Neil
Risebrough, vice-provost for student affairs, did not contribute this
information directly.
Vicky Martin will not be quitting
school as was reported. She will
have to take a part-time job which
will make her a part-time student.
The editor responsible promises
to type tweens for life.
enough signatures, they will be
presented to Curtis, said Banks.
Meanwhile, the association is planning other activities to raise the
issue and has contacted other campuses to increase its membership.
Screenings —
be there or
be trapezoid
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when Lifeforce boycotted a speech
by Dr. Joan Lockard, a Seattle-
based animal researcher who spoke
at Simon Fraser University, and is
intended to focus attention on
cruelty to primates in universities in
Canada and the U.S. The B.C.
Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals and Greenpeace have
already expressed their support.
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Shamrock Cookies 35 Tuesday, March 13,1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
CFS referendum fails at Calgary
CALGARY (CUP) — Earlier this
year it appeared Albertan students
would reverse history and breath
much-needed life into the Canadian
Federation of Students, but last
week the University of Calgary
dealt a decisive blow that ended a
five-in-arow winning streak for the
federation.
Students voted 1,632 to 898
against joining CFS in a March 8
referendum. Although federation
proponents never had high hopes
the 16,000-student campus would
join the national student organization, the loss still serves to deflate
the federation's momentum.
"The no side talked about a lot
of things that Were not true, inaccurate, false," charged My les
McDougall, a CFS supporter
recently elected student society
president.
"The university keeps its record
as being a consumate non-joiner,"
he said.
The relatively quiet campaign
saw a spark of controversy when
Don Millar, Alberta's representative on the CFS central committee, was caught ripping down "no
to CFS" posters. Outgoing student
society president Dave Singleton,
an ardent CFS opponent, says he
saw Millar in action.
Doug Tarrence, CFS representative for the University of Calgary
graduates, was also caught removing posters.
Though Singleton was confident
the no campaigners would win, he
was surprised by the margin of victory. "I could say something like
students know what they're doing. I
could say something stupid like
that," he said.
Ironically, it was Alberta's other
major university that started CFS
on this year's winning streak. The
University £>f Alberta became the
federation's largest full member
when students there voted 56 per
cent in favor of joining in an October referendum.
But students have since elected a
new student society president who
plans to run another referendum
next fall. He wants to clear confusion caused when the October
referendum was nearly overturned,
and the new vote may kill CFS on
that campus.
Federation members said the U
of A victory gave momentum to
CFS. The momentum continued in-
Women oppose
attack on rights
By ROBERT BEYNON
Women, men and children waving colorful banners snaked
through Vancouver streets Saturday
to commemorate International
Women's Day.
Pushing baby buggies and
bicycles, the mainly female crowd
of about 400 gathered in a semicircle at the foot of the Vancouver art
gallery's main entrance. The enthusiastic group milled about the
gallery's large stone steps as it
waited patiently for more women to
arrive.
Activists peddling assorted
publications wandered through the
crowd. The television crews pushed
their way up to the front of the rally
to record the historic event, filming
women smiling, greeting and hugging each other.
A huge banner displayed by two
women standing on the steps wished
all the participants a happy International Women's day. It set the tone
for what was to become an uplifting
reminder of women's strengths in a
male oriented world.
The rally's keynote speaker, who
asked that her name not be used,
told the crowd that women must
fight the Social Credit government
to protect their rights to live
without fear and violence.
The government's recent move to
privatize Vancouver's transition
houses — retreats for battered
women and their children — was a
retreat from a commitment to
feminist services and the women's
needs, said the woman who worked
at one of the houses.
She said the government is also
attacking the groups which service
women, such as the women's health
collective, Vancouver Status of
Women and native court workers.
Women must demonstrate their opposition to these attacks now, she
said.
Following her speech, one
woman led the crowd in a song
which she wrote in protest of the
Socreds' legislation.
No, they can 'tjust take our jobs away
not with us watching,
No, they can 'tjust take our jobs away,
not with us fighting,
No, they can 'tjust take them all away.
Other speakers and singers emphasized the need for women to
continue to fight for equality,
peace, political influence and the
liberation of people in El Salvador.
"If we gather together our voices
will be heard," said one woman.
to 1984, and CFS went on to win
four other small campuses.
Alberta's cold shoulder to student organizations is nothing new.
In 1968 the U of A dealt a death
blow when it dropped out of the
Canadian Union of Students
because the group was "too
radical."
Albertan students participated in
the Western Student Services formed one year after CSU's demise, but
it collapsed in 1972 $40,000 in debt.
The National Union of Students,
which lasted until 1981, could never
get much support in Alberta
because of its perceived radicalism.
And the Federation of Alberta
Students was effectively killed in
late 1982 when the University of
Calgary pulled out of the organization.
CFS, Canada's newest version of
the student movement, faces trouble in Alberta because it is perceived
as leftist.
It faces the opposite problem this
week, as University of Guelph
students take their turn at voting on
CFS membership. There the left-
leaning student council is urging
students to vote no because the
federation is too moderate.
— randy qttm photo
SOVIET HELICOPTER GUNSHIP prepares to strafe Afghan rebels in secret hideout in north-east corner of the
cryptically named S.U.B. Rebels are reported to have broken several chairs over the prow of the chopper before
destroying it with a well aimed misquote followed by a very deadly libel.
Cor/boo closes women's centre
KAMLOOPS, B.C. (CUP) —
The Women's Access Centre at
Cariboo College will close at the
end of March, the centre's employees learned on International Women's Day — the day women celebrate gains for the women's movement.
The centre which opened in 1979
during International Women's Year
is another victim of government restraint programs.
For the past five years a special
government grant used to start the
facility has decreased and the college has had to pick up the costs in
its operating budget.
The college board voted March 6
to kill the service.
But centre employee Barb Colombo said in an interview Friday
the original reasons for starting the
centre are still here.
"There's still a lot of work to do
but all the support organizations
that are doing the work are dissolving.
Litton 64 charged with trespassing
GUELPH, Ont. (CUP) — The
trial of the Litton 64 is over, and the
peace demonstrators who entered
Litton industries' property last
Remembrance Day have been
found guilty of trespassing.
All 64, including several southern
Ontario students, were fined $75
each. Eleven defendants were also
given one year's probation.
Defendants argued it was their
duty as Canadian citizens to oppose
the manufacturing of cruise missile
guidance systems. But justice of the
peace Paul Chandhoke rejected all
arguments offered by defence
counsels Peter Rosenthal and Mike
Smith during the four-day trial.
Rosenthal, a University of
Toronto mathematician, quoted
Section 197 of the Criminal Code,
which states everyone must provide
the necessities of life for a spouse
and child. And he argued the Canadian Charter of Rights guarantees
the "right of life and security of the
person.
Smith said the defendants were
simply acting as responsible
citizens. He cited the Nuremberg
Principle 6, which says everyone
has a responsibility to oppose
crimes against humanity.
The Litton 64 contended their actions were necessary to prevent
larger crimes. Rosenthal told the
court: "It's like seeing a murder being committed in someone's
backyard, so you jump the fence to
prevent the murder, then the
murderer charges you with trespassing."
On the day of the protest, some
activists tried to speak to Litton
management about converting its
guidance system production to activity which would benefit society.
Other demonstrators attempted a
citizen's arrest of Litton president
Ron Keating for violations of the
Criminal Code. They cited Section
46,  treason  by  sale  of military
equipment that may endanger the
safety of Canadians, and Section
79, making an explosive substance
with intent to endanger life or cause
property damage.
The court's refusal to hear the
testimony of several expert
witnesses hampered the defence.
Those denied expert witness
status included anti-war activist and
author Philip Berregan, Rosalie
Bertell, who testified at the
Nuremberg tribunal, Ernie Regehr,
arms industry researcher and journalist, Frank Sommers, chair of
Physicians for Social Responsibility, and Hiroshima survivor Setsuko
Thurlow.
The testimonies were expected to
prove to the prosecution that Lit-
ton's production threatens society.
Justice of the peace Chandhoke ruled the claims did "not relate to the
charges before the court."
"They've made a very difficult
decision and it's going to take its
toll on women's education," Colombo said. "That's for certain."
The centre counsels women on
career plans. Many women return
to college after raising children or
start college late in life and need assistance and support, Colombo
said.
And the decision to go to college
often comes at a time when women
must deal with problems like marital breakup and limited finances,
she said.
The centre reaches 300 women
per month through courses and personal counselling, she added, and
has grown to be a recognized institution in Kamloops.
But college principle Charles
Brewster said Saturday the college
faces a five per cent decrease in government funding next year and a
funding formula which forces the
college to maintain courses ahead
of services.
If fewer students enrol because of
course cuts the government will decrease operating funds under the
formula, Brewster said.
"The choice was to close down
courses or a support service," he
said.
"There's also a question in some
people's minds that it (WAC) was a
duplication of other services,"
Brewster said. He said women will
still get counselling through the services offered all students.
"I appreciate the Women's Access Centre has had an important
role to play and we regret the loss of
it," Brewster said.
But Colombo criticized the decision and the government for not
making women a priority.
"It's a sentiment in administrations in general that women are becoming a low priority," she said.
Colombo said she wasn't surprised
by the decision because it was in the
college's five year plan.
"I think it's a shared responsibility (by the college and government).
But it's not the only thing to get cut
at the college; there will be more."
In 1979 the government set up
five centres in B.C. at colleges to
improve access to the institute.
Under a five-year plan, the
amount of operating funds decreased annually from the government and the colleges made up the
difference.
This year the centre got $10,000
from the special grant — the last of
the five-year instalments.
Occupation serves as warning
Students who occupied universities minister Pat McGeer's Point
Grey constituency office last week said they succeeded in communicating their concerns about education cutbacks in B.C.
One of the protesters, UBC law-student Bill Coller, said the occupation that ended Friday was aimed at publicizing the issue of
education cutbacks and encouraging students to protest.
"We didn't think this action itself would change the government.
It served as a warning to the government, that students aren't just
subservient, flacid particles."
Coller said public reaction was generally favorable. The occupation drew about 100 protesters during its four days.
He added some high school students who demonstrated "enthusiasm" and "political consciousness" joined in the occupation.
Press coverage of the occupation was generally poor, he added.
"The press seemed to want a direct confrontation to develop. They
don't want to show there's any activity among students," Coller
said.
Coller said some future protest actions are in the planning stages,
k  adding civil disobedience may be involved. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 13,1984
Risky business
H%=|^OMI»|tfey
Ja@titi©rs
Gov H issues challenge
While educational funding is administered solely by the provincial
government, the federal government's contribution in 82-83 was 66
per cent of the total expenditure,
and 81 per cent of the total in 83-84.
For 84-85 the federal proportion is
expected to be even greater. If our
federal government deems it appropriate to increase post-
secondary educational funding,
should the province be allowed to
divert its own contribution?
To act on this matter is a seriousi
proposition. The legal question
raised will have implications in
every province in the country. No
matter how justified Ottawa may be
to assert a degree of control over
these funds, most provinces are certain to oppose and resist such control.
Evidence of widespread concern
is the only condition under which
the federal government will act on
this diversion of money. The
university community must speak
up in a well prepared and definitive
manner. Only then will we be considered to be credible and truly concerned.
By diverting educational funds,
the provincial government has
issued us a challenge — take it up,
learn more about this issue and how
colleges and universities will be affected. Phone the federal finance
minister. Even better, appeal to him
in writing and express your concern
about this diversion of funds. Sign
the informed students association's
petition. Write the prime minister.
Get mad. Do something to show
your concern.
Paul Thomas,
engineering 2
r
THE UBYSSEY
March 13, 1984
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Fridays throughout the
academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British
Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and are not
necessarily those of the university administration or the AMS.
Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is
SUB 241k. Editorial department, 228-2301/2305. Advertising
228-3977/3978.
Muriel Dragssma all the way from Ottawa leaps into the back seat of a yellow Volvo and rushes off to
the printers. Monte Stewart pinked Ross for the host of screaming Bulgarian cockroaches who were
seeking Solidarity with Chris Wong's wight armpit. A squeak passed by for a moment but we all ignored it and carefully picked pubies from Neil's navel. Neil Lucente please keep count, you know we
can't have two hair ads on the same belly. Stephen Whistling blue led the rescue party of scantily clad
yahoos in search of Yaku's toothbrush. By then not a single cockroach was to be seen. Robert Beynon
turned on the overhead lights and we disappeared into the front seat eeting dead pig. Yahoo Yaku pig
bristles at being insulted by the stained urinal. Muriel still draggingma investigates the sample finally
pronouncing it rationally invalid and all hell breaks loose, the doors crashed open under the weight of a
thousand Bulgarian solidarity posters. Social Creditus cranium paralysis reared its ugly head outside
the conference and beyond the protection of a politically astute staff of dead pig eaters. Stephen's
courageous stand tipped the waitress off and no one blamed the armpit for the glorious smeil of ink
and paper.
The provincial government is destroying the future
for most young people in B.C. in an effort to continue with its sweeping "restraint" measures.
Its plan starts when a climate of fear begins to take
shape in B.C. The Socreds are beginning to damage
the economy seriously and make everyone afraid of
losing his or her jobs.
This merely increases unemployment because
some people are laid off and others are afraid to
spend money. The Socreds fail to understand that
spending fuels the recovery and creates jobs.
Unemployment in B.C. is now at a post depression
high. Only two years ago, before the so-called
recovery started, unemployment in B.C. was less
than 10 per cent — now the unadjusted rate is about
15 per cent, or more than one in seven workers out
of a job.
This is bad enough but it gets worse. B.C.'s young
people now face a staggering unemployment rate of
about 20 per cent.
Not only do thousands of youth do without jobs,
but wages are forced down because those lucky
enough to have jobs are fearful they will lose theirs to
the job hunters if they step out of line.
This desperation on the part of the jobless is very
dangerous — they may in desperation try anything
available as a possible way of regaining their dignity.
The Socreds have introduced a band-aid program
which will provide adequate employment only for a
few students who manage tomake a decent living
from their summer business.
The student venture capital program provides a
$2000 interest free loan to students for the summer.
It will act as a boon to the fortunate few and a pitfall
to the desperate students who can't find jobs any
other way.
The program has several flaws. In addition to encouraging people to go into debt many of the young
capitalists will be unable to continue their educations
because their efforts didn't succeed.
Unless they can get money from parents, the 15
percent who go bankrupt will be in trouble because
administrators refuse to forgo the money owed.
These students won't have the money to return to
university and will have to find a job to repay the loan.
Some student capitalists will only be a bit more
lucky — they won't default on their loans but neither
will they have made enough money for a year of
university. Instead, they will have to face an uncertain job market.
Hart takes new direction
By ROSS PINK
A classic presidential election is
shaping up in the U.S. which will
likely feature Gary Hart. But who is
Gary Hart and why is former vice-
president Walter Mondale saying
all those terrible things about him?
Gary Hart is a liberal Democratic
senator from Colorado who is seeking the Democratic presidential
nomination. The Democratic
nominee for president will be
chosen this July at a convention in
San Francisco.
Hart skyrocketed to national prominence after his dramatic victory
over frontrunner Mondale in (last
weeks) New Hampshire primary.
Hart is now touted to be a Serious
contender for the Democratic
presidential nomination. Yet three
weeks ago, his ratings in national
pools stood at six per cent and his
candidacy was given little chance of
success.
In the volatile and superficial
world of American primary politics,
Hart's sudden rise to national prominence may appear to be only a
temporary phenomenon. American
political lore is replete with examples of presidential aspirants
who appeared destined for the
White House one moment and the
next moment faded into political
oblivion.
While other candidates may come
and go, Gary Hart seems destined
to play a major role in American
politics.
In the weeks leading up to the
Democratic convention, Gary Hart
will be the man to watch. He will be
the man to watch not simply
because he is the current frontrun-
ner, but because he is a man of
substance and style who is offering
America a new generation of ideas
and a new generation of leadership.
Hart was born in Ottawa, Kansas
in 1936. After graduation from college he attended Yale University
where he earned a degree in law.
Hart's keen political interest
drew him into political activity. In
1960 he volunteered for the Kennedy presidential campaign. Twelve
years later he managed Senator
George McGovern's presidential
campaign.
Though McGovern lost the 1972
campaign to Nixon, the campaign
experience left Hart with valuable
Letters
Socreds abandon agreement
On March 6, a coalition of concerned students entered the Point
Grey constituency office of Dr. Pat
McGeer, minister of universities,
science and communications, and
commenced a sit-in to protest the
Social Credit government's education policy. After serious attempts
to communicate our grievances to
the government were effectively dismissed as trivial, and because the
implications of the cutbacks in funding to post-secondary institutions
will be so devastating for this province, students decided that the occupation and the establishment of a
"free university" were warranted.
This gesture is primarily a symbolic one, a means of conveying the
value and necessity of an education
which is accessible to British Columbians, regardless of their economic status. The media's presentation of our position has been selective at best and this letter is written
to clarify any misconceptions which
may have arisen.
Despite the federal government's
increase of approximately eight per
cent in funding to education, post-
secondary institutions in this province are faced with a five per cent
decrease. The Socreds have abandoned their cost-sharing agreement
with their federal counterparts
unilaterally. Clearly, they are not
prepared to bare the responsibility
for education, a responsibility
which is decreed in the Canadian
constitution. Instead, B.C.'s
government has denied education
any intrinsic value and defined ex-
See page 5: B.C.
insights into the political system.
In his 1973 book on the
McGovern campaign, Hart offered
a critique of how a new generation
of leadership could achieve power.
"First, the forces of change and
progress must organize themselves.
Second, the organization must
relate to people. All kinds of people. Third, to recapture power, the
forces of change and progress must
develop a new generation of leaders
who can instill confidence and
demonstrate competence."
Hart believes the U.S. is at the
crossroads between change and
stagnation. He believes the
American people are ready for progressive change and that he is the
man who is best qualified to lead
them in this new direction. In his
campaign for the nomination, Hart
has continually stressed that he is
the candidate of new ideas and progress. Hart has scored political
points against Mondale by painting
him as a mainstream traditional
candidate.
Hart's tactics seem to be working. While Mondale is viewed as a
decent and responsible candidate,
Hart is gaining the image of a man
on the move, a man with new ideas
and new directions for America. By
allowing Hart to portray himself as
the candidate of the future, Mondale has hurt his chances for the
nominations.
In 1973, Hart wrote that the
"Democratic party, under penalty
irrelevance and extinction, must bring forward a new generation of
thinkers who are in touch with the
real world and a new generation of
leaders who can inspire enthusiasm,
hope and energy in the people."
Hart has based his campaign on
the theme of change and progress.
On the campaign trail he is wooing
younger voters with promises of a
new morality in government, new
ideas and a nuclear freeze.
While in the senate, Hart maintained a progressive voting record.
In some of the key senate votes of
1980, Hart opposed military draft
registration and military aid to
Nicaragua, he supported increased
funding to the International
Monetary Fund and the International Development Bank, and he
supported trimming defense funds
to support social services.
In key 1981 senate votes Hart opposed the sale of the $8.5 billion
Airborne Warning and Control
System to the Saudis, he supported
increased foreign aid and he supported a budget resolution aimed at
reducing unemployment and balancing the federal deficit by 1984.
While serving on the Senate Arm-.
ed Services Committee, Hart has
become somewhat of an expert on
military affairs. He supports the
development of a small mobile
missile   force  with   single  nuclear
See page 7: AMERICANS Tuesday, March 13, 1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
B.C. enters a crucial period
From page 4
penditures for post-secondary institutions as wasteful.
Such cutbacks have been justified
by invoking the current economic
recession and this government's
deficit. However, recently publicized evidence suggests that, in fact,
the deficit has been grossly exaggerated by the Socreds and that not all
possible sources of revenue were
taken into consideration when the
budget was formulated. In light
of such evidence, we find previous
attempts to excuse cutbacks wholly
unacceptable.
The Social Credit government
continues to make vast expenditures
which range from the frivolous, in
the case of repainting Metro Transit
buses, to the absurd, in the case of
the sudden and unnecessary decision to subsidize B.C. Rail at a cost
of $470 million. (The latter figure is
almost twice that of the budget for
education and seven times that of
provincial government contributions.) These are political choices;
the Socreds do not consider the provision of an adequate and accessible
education (nor social services) to be
a priority.
Ultimately, prospective students
are faced with massive tuition fee
increases (at UBC a projected 126
per cent increase over three years),
cutbacks in faculty and staff, the reduction of classes and programs, a
centralization of institutions in the
Lower Mainland (the David
Thompson Centre University will
close in April) and the abolition of
the student grant program. (Many
will carry a debt burden approaching $30,000.) For students from
outside the Lower Mainland and
Victoria and those who have and
will continue to receive low incomes, that debt will be particularly
oppressive, precluding the possibility of post-secondary education for
many.
y
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Much of the philosophy which
underlies Social Credit policy is derived from 19th century economic
theory. This laissez-faire individualism assumes that all people possess
equal resources and abilities with
which to compete, and only the individual benefits directly from his
or her education. But this is not the
case; there is a vast disparity of
wealth in this province. Moreover
B.C.'s whole social being reaps the
fruits of an educated population.
We will all suffer the effects of these
cutbacks.
This is a critical period for British
Columbians. Changes effected now
will not be felt in their entirety for
years to come and will cripple our
social and economic being. These
are cuts that will not heal. On that
basis, the coalition of concerned
students chose to occupy McGeer's
office. Because the Social Credit
government intends to deny its people access to post-secondary institutions, we opened a "free
university."
We do not anticipate a serious response from the provincial government but if, through our actions,
we can promote a critical awareness
of the crisis in education, we will
have succeeded.
Rosalind Morris
Bill Coller
coalition of concerned students
The Hairline's team of experts wants
to give students a break!
10% OFF
our regular prices
Monday - Thursday
(Student A.M.S. card required)
I
2529 Alma
224-2332
Mon.-Fri. 9:00-7:00
Sat. - 9:00 - 5:30
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SPEAKEASY
IS A PEER
COUNSELLING
CENTER
STAFFED BY EMPATHETIC
PEOPLE WHO ARE WILLING
TO LISTEN AND
OFFER SUPPORT
Mon - Fri: 9:30 AM to 7:30 PM
DROP IN: SUB COUNCOURSE
(no appointment necessary)
OR PHONE: 228-3700
PLANNING YOUR SUMMER?
Come with us to
AMAZON 84
For a cross cultural experience you'll never forget, join
with hundreds of Canadians on an international summer
project in Brazil. Sponsored by Campus Crusade for
Christ of Canada, AMAZON 84 will be an opportunity to
present the good news of Jesus Christ to thousands of
Brazilians.
Working in communities along the Amazon river, and
providing food & water relief to communities in drought
ridden northeast Brazil, project teams will work closely
with Brazilian pastors, laymen & missionaries.
Key to the outreach will be the use of the film "Jesus."
Now being shown around the world in 81 different
languages, this visual presentation of Luke's gospel will be
for many the first that they have ever heard & seen the
complete life-story of Christ.
You are the key. For a summer with a purpose,
join us at AMAZON 84 from May 26 to July 27.
□ Please rush me an information packet on AMAZON 84.
Reply  before  March  26   for  a   special  discount   on
registration costs. (Offer valid only when accompanied by this
ad.)
□ Please send me information on Campus Crusade for Christ
Name	
Address
City	
Prov
Code
Phone (
)_
Send to: Campus Crusade for Christ
Box 368 - Abbotsford, BC V2S 4N9
A-Collegiate Auto
Sales, Service & Leasing
We have the best selection, price,
quality of Japanese and sports
cars for you. We specialize in student transportation and student
leasing. All our cars are
guaranteed for one year. PLUS
complimentary gift (worth approx.
$200) upon presentation of your
student/staff ID with purchase/leasing.
1090 Kingsway - 879-5838
C^IIDDA   f*T    10% Off Discount
O UrrlM   U # Jo Staff and Students
f^CMTDC       witn Library Card —
IriC/V I nc       (Excluding Specials)
Dino 13" Italian Craftsmanship steering wheel $49.95 ea
Pennzoil 20W50 GT Performance motor oil $1.99 ea
Accal Silicone 7mm super wire $17.98 set
Monza for Rabbit/Jetta/Scirocco    $120 ea
Fiberglass Fenders Steel Fenders
Datsun510 $149 pr. BMW 2002 $196 pr.
510 Flared $159 pr. BMW 3201 $189 pr.
240/260/2B0Z $249 pr. Datsun 210 $178 pr.
B210 Fender $149 pr. B210 $166 pr.
510 Flares $ 45 pr. 240/260/280Z $394 pr.
510 Air Dam $ 55 ea. 620 P.U. $200 pr.
240/260/28QZ Air Dam $ 85 ea. Honda-Accord. $189 pr.
Honda CVCC Fender $192 pr. Civic 120073-79 $152 pr.
Civic Fender $129 pr. Civic 75-'79 $185 pr.
Honda Spoiler $ 55 ea. Civic '80-'82 $178 pr.
Toyota Celica 70-75 $169 pr. Toyota Corolla $220 pr.
Celicia '78-'79 $ZdJ pr.
Flares $ 55 pr. Corona 74-78 $266 pr.
Corolla $149 pr. VW Rabbit $197 pi.
356 E. Hastings, Van.     669:3804
MARINE DRIVE COLLISION LTD.
15% off Labour Tel. 266-3366
10% Off PartS (mechanical,electrical, bodyi
— All private & I.C.B.C. claims —
For UBC Staff and Students with I.D. ONL Y     t/,
• ICBC claims handled promptly !L
• Free local towing with Repairs 251-1255
• Free'83 Courtesy Cars        24HOURS       certified
• All workmanship guaranteed
Shop
970 S.W. Marine Dr., Vancouver   Mon.-Fri. 8-7, Sat. 9-4 Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 13, 1984
W&
<(i00?t
TODAY
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Aerobic clan, 4:30-5:30 p.m., SUB 207/209.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Film series: East Indians, A Time to Rtse/Ra-
vinder, 7:Xp.m., Gate 4 — International House.
SLAVONIC STUDIES/SOCIAL SCIENCES
AND HUMANITIES RESEARCH COUNCIL
Lecture by Prof. Georges Mink: The Polish
Challenge — recent developments and prospects
for the future, noon, Buch. A202.
UBC SCALE MODELLING CLUB
Radio-control thermal and slope soaring, high-
start provided, every day when there is good
weather. Sports Pavilion Field/Locarno Beech,
call 224-5238 - Terry Lkjw.
HILLEL
Falafel lunch, noon, Hillel House.
WEDNESDAY
THUNDERBIRD RUGBV
Hosts the Univers. of Cal. - Berkeley NCAA
champions in the World Cup, 7:30 p.m., Thunderbird stadium.
GERMANIC STUDIES/SLAVONIC STUDIES
Lecture: Reflections on literature and politics:
The Ca«e of Hungary by George Faludy, Hungarian-Canadian poet, noon, Buch. A202-
HISPANIC AND ITALIAN STUDIES
Play entitled La difunta by Unamuno, noon-1:30
p.m.. International House.
NATIVE INDIAN STUDENTS' UNION
Native Indian cultural awareness days, speakers,
food samplings, films, time and place TBA.
UBC FEE-HIKE STRIKE COMMITTEE
Organizational meeting, noon, Buch. 0238.
GRADUATE STUDENT SOCIETY
International seminar, Human Rights in Peru,
speaker Alicia Barsallo, noon, Graduate Student
Centre garden room.
CAMPUS PRO-LIFE
Film: should man play God?, and report on pro-
life youth conference in Toronto, noon, SUB
212.
AMS INTEGRITY IN ACTION
Guest lecturer Manning Cticksohn, Levels of Fitness, noon, Buch. D327.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Singing, testimonies, bible study, discussion,
noon, SUB 213.
INTERNATIONAL SOCIALISTS
Socialist booktable with buttons, pamphlets and
literature, 12 noon, SUB concourse.
THURSDAY
FILM SOCIETY
Elections, noon, SUB 212.
ANARCHIST CLUB
Video   on   Mondregon   worker   collectives   in
Spain, noon, Buch. B232.
HISPANIC AND ITALIAN STUDIES
Two plays. La difunta by Unamuno, and La Za-
patera  prodigiosa by Garcia Locra,  3:30-4:30
p.m.. International House.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
Weekly testimony meeting, all welcome, 1:30
p.m., SUB 215.
EDUCATORS FOR NUCLEAR DISARMAMENT/
SCIENCE FOR PEACE
The NFB's war series, The Profession of Arms,
noon, Hebb Theatre.
ISMAILI STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
General meeting, noon, Buch. B214.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Small group meetings, 7:30 p.m., call 228-8554
or 224-4652.
HISTORY STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Or.   Hanna   Kassis,   department   of   religious
studies, lecturing on Lebanon: background to
crisis, 4 p.m., Buch. penthouse.
APOLOGETICS OF CHRISTIAN
THOUGHT IN SCRIPTURE
Discussion: A Christian view of science — part
two, noon, Scarfe 204.
to
ZL
UBC STUDENTS FOR PEACE
AND MUTUAL DISARMAMENT
Seminar: Gary Marchant, UBC grad student on
chemical and biological warfare, everyone welcome, 8 p.m., Grad Student Centre basement.
MEN'S BIG BLOCK AWARD BANQUET
Seventy-first annual awards dinner. Herb Ca-
pozzi guest speaker, tickets at athletic office,
7:30 p.m., UBC faculty club.
FRIDAY
UBC SOCIAL CREDIT CLUB
Annual general meeting — election of officers
for 1964-86, noon, SUB 215.
NUTRITIONAL SCIENCES
STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Milk fun run, three km and five km, milk for all
people completing run, and pizza, noon, in front
of SUB.
PRISM INTERNATIONAL
George Faludy poetry reading, 8 p.m., Robson
Square media centre.
GRADUATE STUDENT SOCIETY
Irish barn dance — all welcome, 8 p.m.-1 a.m.,
Grad Centre ballroom.
Workshop and annual general meeting, 1 and 4
p.m. respectively, Grad Centre ballroom.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Film: assignment life, presenting and discussing
the abortion issue, 7:30 p.m., SUB 212.
UBC STUDENTS FOR PEACE
AND MUTUAL DISARMAMENT
Film: Dr. Strangelove, $1, noon, SUB auditorium.
VOLUNTEER HELPLINE
The following opportunities are just a sampling
of what is available at Volunteer Connections
this week.
VOLUNTEER INTERVIEWERS
Opportunities available for students interested in
interviewing other students for volunteer jobs.
Ideal for those interested in personnel, counselling, public relations or public administration.
Wanted for next school year (84-85).
INCOME TAX WORKERS
AND ACCOUNTANTS
Must be bilingual in Chinese and English to help
low income clients with income tax returns in
Strathcona area. Volunteers to be able to commit six consecutive weeks, either evenings or
weekends.
JOURNALISTS
To participate in the production of any of a wide
variety of arts and public affairs radio programs
such as story researcher, reporter, commentator
or reviewer. Time flexible. Orientation and training provided.
COUNSELLORS
For Grandview- Wood lands area to provide supportive counselling to unemployed, to offer practical job search assistance, to job search assistance, to provide referrals to other community resources and help with resumes and tele-counselling.
INCOME TAX AIDES
To help seniors and low income clients prepare
forms in the Mt. Pleasant area. Time flexible and
training provided.
PHYSIO-ASSISTANT
Someone with life-saving qualifications needed
to help at a Burnaby veteran's hospital.
CHILDCARE WORKERS
For kindergarten programs in Marpole for children three to five years with handicapped integration program.
For more information about volunteering make
an appointment with Volunteer Connections at
228-3811 or drop by the Student Counselling and
Resource Centre at Brock 200.
IN SUB BASEMENT
For the very best sandwiches, snacks, pastries,
juices. Have now introduced
GRILLED SANDWICHES
AND SCHNITZELS
ATTENTION STUDENTS:
228-4846
The    OMBUDSOFFICE    now    has   an
answering machine!
If you have a problem with any aspect of the University please
call 228-4846 24-hours a day and your call will be answered
promptly.
Remember you can also come to our office in SUB Rm. 100A
during scheduled office hours as posted on our door.
r>
c^linis
T**2
from
3 to4
CAKl \-COI i! !.
/per per
\u:m\ ,v < on i r
Ipvi pers
$2.50
$1.25
A
— i.
^ MOMMV   J-KHMY
irS^      "" ''"•'"" 'k "'''"■ <*«<'•
rWEmNEiT
Serving U.B.C. and West Point Grey
for the last 24 years.
We put our Sole in your
FISH & CHIPS
English Style Horn* Cooked MmIs
at Reasonable Pricaa - including
Roast Beaf and Yorkshire Pudding
Open Monday to Saturday
8:00 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.
Closed Sundays 6 Public Holidays
For the early ones,  we start serving
breakfast from 8:00 a. m.
4556 W. 10th Ave. - 224 1912
We accepi Chargex
i
r j
Intramural
Color
Banquet
AWARDS NIGHT
Thursday, March 22, '84
5:30 p.m.. Student Grad Centre
CELEBRATE
WINE, DINE, DANCE
Students $17.50
Non-Students $25.00
rTHE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders — 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional*
lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $4.20; additional lines, 65c. Additional days, $3.80 and 60c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the
day before publication.
Publications Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders over $5.00. Call228-3977.
COMING EVENTS
70 - SERVICES
CAREER
OPPORTUNITY
WORKSHOP
Led by Pat Brown,  Employee
Relations Assistant, UBC
THIS THURSDAY,
MARCH 15 at 12:36 p.m.
Henry Angus Room 221
Sponsored by B. S. U.-U.B.C.
BOOKKEEPER will do tax returns. $10. Call
298-6871.
80 - TUTORING
ENGLISH TUTORING - Assistance in all
areas. Oral, written; grammar composition,
spelling, punctuation. 682-1043.
85 - TYPING
DUKE'S IS OPENING
The SUB's very own Gourmet
Cookie   and   Specialty   Coffee
Shop is opening
THURSDAY. MARCH 15
r
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
THE CECIL H. AND IDA GREEN
VISITING PROFESSORSHIPS
1984 SPRING LECTURES
KONRAD BLOCH
Professor Konrad Bloch is widely acknowledged as one of the world's outstanding biochemical scientists. His research in the area of the biochemistry of
fats and cholesterol has earned him a number of significant distinctions, including the 1964 Nobel Prize in Medicine and Physiology. Professor Bloch
currently holds the position of Higgens Professor of Biochemistry at Harvard
University. His lectures should be of interest to a wide range of groups in the
basic and health sciences.
STEROL CONTROL OF PHOSPHOLIPID BIOSYNTHESIS
Tuesday, March 13 — In Lecture Hall 1. Woodward Instructional Resources Centre, at 4:00
p.m.
STEROL STRUCTURE AND MEMBRANE FUNCTION
Thursday, March 15 — In Room 250. Chemistry Building, at 12:30 p.m.
THE CHEMISTRY OF EVOLUTION
Saturday, March 17 — In Lecture Hall 2. Woodward Instructional Resources Centre, at 8:15
p.m. (Vancouver Institute Lecture)
ALL LECTURES ARE FREE—PLEASE POST AND ANNOUNCE
Occasionally unadvertised seminars are presented.
Please call Mrs. R. Rumley at Local 5675 for information.
ONE MONTH ADVENTURE to a secluded
town in the Himalayas of India. Student
organized. Lv May '84. Total cost (incl airfare) $1989. Info: Pilar Brothers c/o Trent
Univ., Peterborough, Ont. (705) 743-4391.
POTTERY CLUB ELECTIONS will take
place at Raku Party, March 18 at 10:30 a.m.
Please attend. We need you to continue.
11 - FOR SALE - Private
FOR SALE — One-way airline ticket to
Toronto for March 23 $190 (Negotiable)
874-2598.
20 - HOUSING
PHYSICIAN AND FAMILY returning to
Vancouver July 1/84 looking for 3-4 bdr.
house to rent. Area around Maple Grove
School pref., but any westside area con.
furn. or unfurn. $10OO-$1100 278-7260.
STUDENTS - Pass on a deall Wtd. 2 bdrm
hse/apt. UBC/Granville area to rent from
May. $500 max. 872-0757 evegs till 11:00.
ROOM AVAILABLE April 1st, Female on
campus. $250/mo. 224-3596.
25 - INSTRUCTION
LSAT, GMAT. MCAT preparation. Call
National Testing 738-4618. Please leave
message on tape if manager is counselling.
30 - JOBS	
DUKE'S GOURMET COOKIES is hiring
counter sales people. Apply at the Brock
Hall, Canada Employment Centre.
66 - SCANDALS
PUT IT IN WRITING .... The UBC
Thunderbird Shop in S.U.B. prints personalized bumper stickers for enthusiasts.
EXPERT TYPING. Essays, term papers,
factums, letters, manuscripts, resumes,
theses, IBM Selectric II. Reasonable rates.
Rose, 731-9867.
DOTS WORD PROCESSING service
offers reasonable rates for students for term
papers, essays, & masters thesis. 273-6008
evenings.
WORD  PROCESSING  SPECIALISTS:   U
write we type theses, resumes, letters,
essays, days, evenings, weekends.
736-1208.
EXCELLENT TYPIST. IBM. AVAILABLE
ANYTIME. Reasonable rates. 263-0351.
NEW  SONY  SERIES  36 w/p   SYSTEM
installed. Have your essay, resumes &
manuscripts done on the best. We have
special rates for students. Four years in
business at 266-6814.
EXPERT TYPING. Fast, accurate, reliable.
Near Arbutus/King Edward. 8.50/hr. Agni.
736-1544.
PROFESSIONAL   W/P    SERIVCES    -
24 hour turnaround, courier or drop off.
The WORDCENTRE, 106-7031
Westminster Hwy., Rmd. 276-2283.
WHAT A DEALII Fast, accurate typing for
$1.00 per pagel Call Kathy 266-8498.
WORD PROCESSING, all jobs, tapes
transcribed, student rates. On King Edward
bus route, 879-5108.
W/P & typing: term papers, theses, mscpt.,
essays, incl. reports, letters, resumes. Bilingual. Clemy, 266-6641.
WORD PROCESSING. Essays, Theses,
Resumes, Etc. by professional typist. Ask
for our student rate. Ellen, 271-6924.
QUALITY TYPING on short notice. Reports,
essays, resumes, etc. Reasonable rates.
688-5884.
FAST. ACCURATE TYPING, reasonable
rates. 734-8451.
TYPEWRITING - Essays, resumes, MINIMUM NOTICE REQUIRED. Tapes
transcribed. UBC Village location. 224-6518
day or night.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING: all phases, fast
reasonable. 25 yrs. exp. Electronic type
271-6755.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING. Student rates
$1.25/pg Moneypenn/s Office Services.
876-7313. Tuesday, March 13,1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
U of M dethrones volleybirds
By MONTE STEWART
History failed to repeat itself in
more ways than one last weekend at
the CIAU volleyball championships.
The University of Manitoba
Bisons defeated the UBC men's
team 3-0 in the best of five championship series, thereby dethroning
the 'Birds as national champions.
The 'Birds won the national title
Americans need
a progression
From page 4
warheads as more efficient and
more stabilizing than the MX
missile. He also supports a joint
superpower communication centre
staffed by Soviet and American officers and situated in a neutral
country.
Gary Hart has a long way to go
before the democratic nomination
in July. But he has already
established himself as an intelligent,
creative and vigorous candidate. If
nominated by the Democratic party
in 1984, Hart will provide a clear
and progressive alternative to the
Reagan administration.
The Reagan years have not been
without their failures. Reagan has
not had a single success in foreign
affairs. Relations with the Soviet
Union are marked by increasing
polemics. The administration's
policies vis-a-vis the Middle East
have failed.
Domestically, the Reagan
government has wracked up budget
deficits greater than the accumulated deficits of all his
predecessors.
After four years of Reagan
leadership, the American electorate
may demand new ideas and new
directions. If they do, Gary Hart
will be the man to lead them.
Ross Pink is one of a growing
number of staffers with an avid interest in American politics.
PANGO PANGO (UNS) —
Hairy puce blorgs revolted early today against the American advisors
stationed on their tiny island. Advisors Inane Nitwit and Gross Fink
said the blorgs are upset over their
decision to exile Ronald Reagan to
the island in light of his probable
defeat  by  Gary   Hart.
before a packed house — somewhat
of an oddity — at War Memorial
Gym. Their opponents that day
were none other than their arch
rivals, the Bisons.
UBC qualified for the nationals
by winning the Canada West championship after recording an
undefeated season in Canada West
match play. Therefore, the loss was
somewhat disappointing in that it
was the first loss of the season for
the 'Birds.
The 'Birds qualified for the final
match with victories over host
Laval University Rouge et Ore, the
University of Waterloo, and
Dalhousie University Tigers (from
Halifax, Nova Scotia).
The match against Laval proved
to be the toughest preliminary conr
test. The 'Birds took the best of five
game matches 3-2 (8-15), 15-11,
15-7, 10-15, 15-1). Brad Willock
delivered six aces and four stuff
blocks. Chris Frehlick, who has
now completed his university
eligibility, pounded 29 kills.
The two remaining matches were
of little challenge to the powerful
'Birds. Willock recorded seven aces
as the 'Birds glided to a 3-0 sweep
of Waterloo, winning 15-4, 15-5,
and 15-7. UBC also swept the best
of five contest with Dalhousie.
Willock recorded four aces as the
'Birds prevailed 15-8, 15-11, and
15-3 to qualify for the championship match with Manitoba.
Surprisingly, UBC did not record
a single victory against the team
which they had foiled in the national championship match the
previous year. The Bisons won all
three games by an identical score of
15-8.
The Bisons gained revenge in
more ways than one. Besides
defeating the team which had taken
the title from them in 1982-83, the
Bisons won the national championship after finishing second three
years in a row.
Paul Thiessen and Brad Willock
were named to the tournament ail-
star team.
SOFT
CONTACT LENSES
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3302 Cambie at 17th, Vancouver, B.C.
879-9494
ST. PATRICK'S
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UBC  SUB BALLROOM
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doors SAT. ONLV NO
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Introduces: COPY CARD
• No coins needed
• Fast, Efficient & Convenient
• Easy to use
-Introductory offerv-
20 FREE copies with COPY CARD
$4.00 will bny $5.00 COPY CARD
• Valid on self-service copier #3 only
• Cards ara available at AMS COPT CENTRE counter
• Hurry - quantities are limited
• Save money & boy a COPT CARD
• Unused copies can be used til Mardi 31/84
For more information call:
228-4388 SUB
Limit of 2 cards per customer
Active Components
3070 Kingsway
Vancouver (15 Mln. from
downtown. Straight up
Kingsway.)
9 438-3321
Store Hours:
Mon - Thurs 8-6:00
Friday 8-9:00
Sat. 9-5:00
Visa and Mastercard Accepted
The BritRail Youth Pass
beats thumbing it
hands down
A nd if you purchase it before April,
it costs only $117 - and you have 12
months in which to use it!
If you're under 26, you can go
wherever you like, whenever you
like, for 7 days. All through
England, Scotland and Wales. All
for only $117.
You can go on clean comfortable
BritRail trains to over 2,000
stations on 14,000 trains a day.
Trains that go up to 125 m.p.h.
Your Economy Class Youth
Pass is your best way to travel
^long distances; and it's your
Jjest way to take day trips
from London to
jplaces like Bath,
Cambridge
and York.
Passes for 14-day, 21-day or 1
month Youth passes are available
for only $181, $229 or $269. Prices
are valid through March 31, 1984,
for travel anytime in the next 12
months. (Prices higher after March
31).
You must purchase your
BritRail Pass before you leave
Canada. It is not sold in Britain.
Call your TRAVEL CUTS office today
for more information.
Going   r*TRAVEL
1bur¥£y!fr4   CUTS
The travel company of CFS
TRAVEL CUTS VANCOUVER
UBC, Student Union Building
604 224-2344 Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Letters
Tuesday, March 13, 1984
Basketbirds' fate own fault
Regarding Monte Stewart's article System hinders basketballers
(March 6): Get serious Monte. How
can you actually blame the system
for the 'Birds' dismal performance
this year? To refresh the reader's
memory, Stewart blames external
factors for the poor performance of
this year's basketball team. Among
the factors cited were:
• The length of season. The
'Birds have what is essentially an exhibition season from September to
January before beginning their regular season. Why this is detrimental
to the team is never explained. One
would suspect that such an extensive "pre-season" would help in improving individual and team play.
Do basketball players have such
poor stamina? How do NBA players survive their long season and the
many games they play? Of course,
since all Canada West teams play,
the same number of games over the
same period of time, it is inherently
unfair to UBC. After all, aren't we
"west coasters" spoiled by the good
life here in lotusland?
(The University of Victoria
doesn't count because all their
players can walk on water and slam
dunk with their hands tied behind
their back.)
• The schedule. Stewart implies
that the scheduling of games work-
Equal decreases V
not inequitable   ®
In your Feb. 24 issue, an article
by Patti Flather (SFU knew exact
funding cut in advance), attributes
to me a statement that "the three
B.C. universities may not receive
equitable decreases." 1 believe that,,
in fact, I said, "equal" decreases,
for council, needless to say, attempts to avoid acting "inequitably."
Lee Southern,
secretary to universities council
of B.C.
ed against the 'Birds. Playing their
final three games on the road was a
definite disadvantage to the 'Birds.
The fact that their last game of the
season was against UVic, though, is
irrelevant. Wouldn't you rather
face the best team in the country in
your last game of the season rather
than earlier on? In this way, you've
had a chance to improve on individual and team play. By the end of the
season your team should be playing
its best. The fact that UVic blew
away UBC only tells us how much
better the Vikings are over the
'Birds. Maybe we need a fairer
schedule, like ending the season
against Little Flower Academy.
• Regulations. Recruiting regulations hinder UBC to the same extent as any other Canadian university except Simon Fraser University.
The fact that SFU can offer scholarships doesn't seem to have hurt
UVic. Why should it hurt UBC?
UBC works under the same rules as
any other Canada West team. It is
their own program that puts them
at a disadvantage, not any recruiting regulations. (Incidentally,
despite SFU's advantage in recruiting, the team still finished with a
dismal 4-26 season. Some competition, eh?)
• Coaching. At last, a valid reason. Inconsistency in coaching has
hurt UBC both on the court and in
the area of recruiting.
Given the new coach and the
many new faces on the basketball
team, I think the 'Birds did a fairly
good job this season. Their poor
performance was their own responsibility. We expect better from them
next year and wish them luck. And
should they surprise (and shock)
everyone by winning it all, we
should be ready to credit the players
and coaching staff, not some silly
external factors.
William Low
arts 4
SCREAMINGS
Ubyssey staffers - come one, come all to the
i
i
relentless grilling of the naive candidates for
next year's collective. Leave knives at home.
Czech office for exact time Wednesday.
"WE
RUN THINGS
IN THIS TOWN.''
(Quality Copies that is!)
kinko's copies
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Vancouver, B.C.
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(604) 222-1688
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ALL REFUND PURCHASES SUBJECT TO APPROVAL
GRADUATE STUDENT SOCIETY
ANNUAL GENERAL
MEETING
FRIDAY, MARCH 16, 1984 - 4:00 p.m.
Main Dining Room, Graduate Student Centre
AGENDA
1. Presentation of financial statement of the Society and the report
of the auditor.
2. Appointment of the auditor.
3. Annual report on Society activities.
4. Proposed Constitutional amendment to establish an additional Executive Officer of the Society: the Programs Director.
5. A motion to become full members of the Canadian Federation of
Students, and to increase the ordinary members' fees by $7.50 accordingly. The fee increase requires a special resolution of the
Society according to Bylaw 2.9(a) of the Constitution.
• Items 4 and 5 must be passed by special resolution,
which requires a minimum 75%^/ote in favour of the
proposal, and a quorum of at least 75 votes in favour.
j({4M§MJ         NATIVE       AWARE MESS
DAYS
The Native Indian Student Union annua
ly hosts the
Native Awareness Days. The goal of the
events held
during the week is to share various Indian cultures with
the larger students population on campus
ALL FACULTY, STAFF AND STUDENTS
ARE MOST
WELCOME TO ATTEND.
EVENTS SCHEDULE
MARCH 14/84 (Wednesday)
12:30 - 1:30 p.m.  Hugh Breaker, Law School
Scarfe 209
Graduate on Native Profes
sionalism
2:30 - 3:30 p.m.    Margo Kane, Native Drama
Scarfe 100
Performance                              *
1:30 - 3:30 p.m.    Native Display, Indian
Scarfe Lounge
newspapers, books, magazines
and crafts
1:30 - 3:30 p.m.    Native Films Series
Hut 26
MARCH 15/84 (Thursday)
12:30 - 1:30 p.m.  Leonard George, well known
Scarfe 209
speaker and dancer on West
Coast Indian Culture
2:00 - 3:00 p.m.    West Coast Indian Dancing,
Scarfe Lounge
Len George Dancers
1:30 - 3:30 p.m.    Indian Film Series
Hut 26
1:30 - 4:30 p.m.    Native Display, Indian
Scarfe Lounge
newspapers, books, magazines
and crafts
MARCH 16/84 (Friday)
12:30 - 1:30 p.m. Speaker T.B.A.). Topic: Indian
Law Building
Self-Government
1:30 - 2:30 p.m.    Lehal Bone Game Demonstration Scarfe Lounge
4:30 -                      Native Indian Student Union
Scarfe Lounge
Potluck
5:30                       Native Law Students - T.G.I.F.
Scarfe Lounge
Constable Constable
Two CBC Television pilots filmed on location at UBC. It's a whole new
kind of crime when Jackson Davies as Constable John Constable is transferred
from Gibsons' Landing to the UBC RCMP detachment.
JJSit   March 12 & 19, 7:30 pm
1§8»'   CBC2/Cable3

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