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The Ubyssey Apr 11, 2013

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Array  // Page 2
OUR CAMPUS//
THE MOST POPULAR CHANGEMAKERS FROM UBC
Ray Hsu Am I content, at,
poet, to stay in the arts and
entertainment section, or
do I want to blow things Up
Do I want to be on the
frontpage?
Here's to another Year of being awesome, UBC.
—Features editor Arno Rosenfeld & managing editor, print Jeff Aschkinasi // News
EDITORS WILL MCDONALD + LAURA RODGERS
B.C. GOVERNMENT »
The B.C. Liberals are confident their shared services plan will save $46 million -
CHARLESTO PHOJWHE UBYSSEY
- but the opposition isn't so sure.
Schools mull cost-cutting plan
Andrew Bates
Managing Editor, Web
As B.C.'s colleges and universities puzzle over how to deal with
$46 million of funding cuts, the
provincial government is trying
to convince them to cozy up to
each other.
The Ministry of Advanced Education is currently making proposals for post-secondary institutions
to cut costs by combining services
like information technology, purchasing and libraries.
But with the project still far
away from implementation,
some wonder whether it can save
enough money to deal with $46
million in funding cuts to B.C.'s
post-secondary sector over the
next two years.
Called the Post-Secondary Administrative Service Delivery Project, external consultants Deloitte
and Touche delivered a report in
February identifying opportunities for universities to cut costs by
sharing services.
The report identifies three
categories of opportunities —
those with the clearest benefits
and those easiest to implement
— as saving between $38 and $83
million, not counting the $13.5-26
million they would cost to implement. Many ofthe opportunities
revolve around purchasing; the
idea is that buying things together
and loading more schools onto the
same contract for things like credit
card payments, print services,
food services, vending machines
and shipping could result in more
favourable rates.
"I thought it was a well-crafted
report," Oliver Gruter-Andrew,
UBC's chief information officer
and representative on the project,
wrote in an email. Gruter-Andrew
went on to praise the project's
tight timelines. The project began
in June 2012.
Because UBC is so large,
Gruter-Andrew suggested that it
doesn't have a lot to save through
the program. "UBC already has
critical mass and our costs are
at the lower end ofthe possible
range. This is simply a function of
our size compared to most other
institutions," he wrote.
He suggested that the main
benefit would be making things
easier for smaller schools. "We will
mostly contribute our purchasing
power,... as well as our expertise
and resource capacity," he said.
"UBC gains from the strength of
the whole sector."
A budget-planning document
on the University of Victoria's
website calls the project helpful.
But UVic still believes it will have
to cut education programs to meet
the province's funding cuts, and
it doesn't think the program will
help. They say they have already
found savings that amount to 8.5
per cent of its operating budget
since 2009, and asked departments
on April 1 to cut a further four per
cent from their budgets.
Gruter-Andrew said that while
he agrees with the savings projections, there's still a lot of work to
do to find out whether or not those
savings are actually possible, as
well as what they'd cost to execute.
"The ranges of savings ... are subject to significant interpretation,"
he said. "Achieving the target
benefits will require substantial
investments upfront."
The NDP's post-secondary
critic, Michelle Mungall, wasn't
against the project, but criticized it
as a way of justifying the post-secondary funding cuts. "Interesting
being an ambiguous word, it was
nonetheless interesting that there
were some opportunities, absolutely, to save costs to the system,"
she said. "Overall, an interesting
component in all of this is how the
Liberals have chosen to administrate this."
Mungall said that the project
is the government's main plan on
how to achieve the $46 million
in cuts, even though the savings
could take six years to realize.
"The reason why they're cutting
$46 million between post-secondary education is the difference
between 83 and 38," she said.
"They're going to jam-pack it into
the next two fiscal years."
Mungall also noted that shared
services have had mixed success
in B.C.'s health industry. It's a sore
point among unions that make up
part ofthe NDP's support base,
who worry that it could mean job
losses for public-sector employees.
"If we're goingto proceed on
this as a government, we're going
to have to be very thoughtful," she
said. "We definitely can't steam-
roll ahead ... because we're talking
about people's jobs."
Though the original report
said the decisions ofthe project's
nine-school committee will be
binding on those nine schools, the
government says that institutions
will help the government develop
business plans, and not every institution will be included in every
project. The ministry has also confirmed that implementation won't
break existing contracts with
university workers and is not expected to result in staff reductions.
Many ofthe job opportunities,
including those related to IT operations, will go through independent bodies operated by either the
government or groups of post-secondary institutions. Some of these
include BCNET, which handles
network services, and BCCampus,
which handles research and development of software systems.
"Some of our institutional
partners do see us as outsourcing,
but in actuality we're not," said
Victoria Klassen, BCCampus's director of communications. "What
we've worked very hard to do over
the last 10 years is to make sure
that whatever we built can work
and integrate with... systems that
respect the autonomy ofthe institutions, but at the same time bring
institutions together."
BCCampus, founded in 2002
by the Liberal government as
part of a pilot project for shared
services inthe post-secondary
sector, develops IT products
like ApplyBC, which attempts to
streamline university and college
applications, and Moodle, an open-
source Learning Management
System that operates like WebCT
Vista. BCCampus also develops
business models and practices for
online learning.
"Even if there is a desire of
several institutions to work
together, there has to be one kind
of space, one body, that has the
infrastructure and the processes
in place that will actually bring
those institutions together," said
Klassen. "We really believe that
together, we can do more than one
institution can do on its own." Xi
NEWS BRIEFS
Minister promises to tackle
TransLink funding issues
Transportation minister Mary Polak
has created a working group to
address a variety of issues plaguing
TransLink, including their ongoing
funding crunch.
Theworking groupaimsto
create new legislation to tackle the
public transit body's many problems, including a lackof moneyto
expand rapid transit and concerns
about the accountability of their
unelected board.
Polak said they hope to give the
TransLink Mayors' Council more
power. The council consists of
regional Lower Mainland mayors
and provides some oversight
to TransLink.
UBC gets high grade on making
medicine affordable
Universities Allied for Essential
Medicines recently gave UBC the
top grade among North American
research universities in terms of
how well its medical research
helps people with neglected
diseases.
Universities Allied for Essential
Medicines is a group that advocates for researchers to make
medicine affordable to treat people
in developing countries.
UBC received an A- grade from
the organization. Medical powerhouse Johns Hopkins received a
B, Harvard received a B- and and
most schools scored in the C to D
range. Xi
SUSTAINABILITY »
Prof questions
value of AMS water
filtration machines
Veronika Bondarenko
StaffWriter
Despite a series of recent maintenance misfires, it looks as though
the Waterfillz machines that have
been popping up across campus
in the last three years are here
to stay.
The machines, which were first
brought into the Student Union
Building in September 2010 for
a cost of around $20,000, allow
students to fill their water bottles
with filtered water free of charge.
Recently, the machines have also
been equipped with speakers and
screens that allow the AMS to
run short videos about current
projects, events and initiatives
related to sustainability.
But while the machines have
proven popular with students
over the last three years and have
since been installed in the West
Mall Swing Space and MacMillan
buildings, recent drain blockages
due to the construction ofthe
new SUB have caused water to
start leaking out of several machines on at least two occasions.
An investigation on the costs of
the repairs and whether liability
lies with the AMS or Waterfillz is
still being conducted.
However, some have
questioned the value ofthe machines in the first place.
Associate professor Pierre
it
•
IESS1
»%
AMS ^
SUSTAINABILITY
WATER
<AI JACOBSON PHOJWHE UBYSSEY
Some question whether the AMS's WaterFillz machines are a smart investment.
Berube, who specializes in water
treatment for the UBC Faculty
of Engineering, explained that
tap water in B.C. undergoes a
stringent filtration process and is
already just as clean as filtered or
bottled water.
"It's been treated already, so
the usefulness of refiltering it is
very questionable," said Berube.
"In fact, if you read the fine
print on most over-the-counter
filtration systems, it says that the
system is only valid if it's being
used on high-quality filtered tap
water. So you have to ask yourself
why you are using this product
if it's only valid or rated to be
operated on a water that's always
treated."
Accordingly, Berube said the
Waterfillz machines are not an
effective use of AMS funds.
"I think it'd be better to potentially spend funds on advocating
the benefits of drinking water
with respect to health or getting
people to drink more water,"
said Berube.
But AMS sustainability
coordinator Justin Ritchie said
the machines were brought in
not to discourage students from
drinking tap water, but to discourage them from purchasing
bottled water.
"Though the tap water on
campus is great, a study by UBC
Food Service found that students
weren't filling up with bottle
neck water fillers," said Ritchie.
"In the first month of installing
the Waterfillz machines, vended
bottled water sales fell 50 per
cent."
Shona Robinson is one of three
students who compared the
water from the Waterfillz machines with tap water on campus
for Berube's CIVL 562 class.
The group found that the
water coming out of most
Waterfillz machines, which can
sometimes sit without circulation
for long periods of time, contained hundreds of thousands of
tiny microorganisms that, while
not harmful, are not present in
tap water.
That said, Robinson believes
that many students may still
prefer filtered water because of
the taste.
"The tap water had a little
chlorine left in it," said Robinson. "Chlorine is safe and it helps
keep our water safe, but some
people don't like the taste of that,
so the machine does take that
taste out."
In the meantime, Ritchie
expects the machines to continue running without any
further problems.
"Waterfillz sent plumbers to
install pressure reduction valves
on each ofthe machines last
week and we haven't had any
problems since," said Ritchie.
"We're still monitoring the machines closely because students
have been really disappointed
when the machines aren't running." Xi // Sports + Rec
EDITOR C.J. PENTLAND
PROFILE »
Life after university football
Star quarterback Billy Greene is faced with an uncertain future post-UBC
Jonny Wakefield
Coordinating Editor
Billy Greene played his last
football game in late October. When I sat down with
him in early April, it had been
more than five months since he
last suited up, threw a pass or ran
the ball.
For the majority of UBC athletes, that last game comes with
a sense of clarity: they know that
they will probably never play the
game again, at least at that level.
They've prepared themselves for
their new reality and can move
on.
But for Greene, UBC's former
star quarterback and one ofthe
handful of athletes who have a
shot at playing professionally
after university, clarity is hard to
come by these days. Ask Greene
whether he will be able to play
football again, and you get a sigh.
"I honestly don't know," he
said. "[I'm in] absolute limbo."
Greene, a Surrey native, is
one ofthe most successful UBC
athletes in recent memory.
Before last fall's season, he was
the top player in Canada, winning the Hec Creighton trophy
for CIS MVP. He was recently
named UBC's top graduating
male athlete. His performance
as quarterback in 2011 propelled
UBC to a six and two record,
the team's first winning season
since 2004 (though the team's
record was wiped to 0-8 after the
post-season for use of an ineligible player). Before Greene, the
team hadn't won a home playoff
game since 1999.
Greene's speed and physicality
impressed both commentators
and recruiters over his varsity
career. In his five years at UBC,
he passed for 49 touchdowns and
a total 9,143 yards. He carried in
14 more himself, racking up more
than 1,800 rushing yards in the
KAI JACOBSON PHOJWHE UBYSSEY
3illy Greene was one of UBC's most polarizing athletes over the past five years, but his future with football remains uncertain.
process. In 2012, he was invited
to the Canadian Football League's
spring training camp. Many
wondered whether Greene had
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the ability to play quarterback at
a professional level — something
that has seemed almost impossible for a Canadian.
But while Greene's style of play
grabbed the attention of recruiters, it also made him a target in
the 2012 season.
Greene's injuries are many.
Last spring, he underwent
surgery to remove a bone in his
foot. He has another piece of
bone floating around in his knee.
His hand is "messed up" and his
shoulder is separated.
His coach for the last three
years, former UBC quarterback
Shawn Olson, is familiar with
such pain from his own playing
days, during which he led the
T-Birds to their last Vanier Cup
title in 1997. Whether Greene will
be able to play again is an open
question.
"You get a little bit more pissy
or grumpy because you're in this
pain,... [these] stupid little things
that are out of your control,"
Olson said. "The injuries scramble up the situation in everyone's
minds."
So Greene is in limbo. His
intent is to play again. That will
mean either switching positions
(he's written off the possibility of
playing quarterback) or moving
to play in a European league. But
before any of that can happen, he
has to put his body back together.
For now, Greene is staring down a
year of uncertainty.
University is a structured
time for building expectations and identities.
Graduation, or otherwise moving
on, means finally confronting
those expectations and testing
those identities in the unstructured, demanding world
of adulthood.
For athletes who have had their
identities wrapped up in sports
since before they can remember,
it's an especially complicated
time.
"I know there are a lot of guys
each year who are kind of like,
'Whoa, football's done?' Which
is obviously tough," said Greene.
"There are guys in the past I've
seen who are just lost. They have
no idea what to do without having
to go to practice, without that
schedule."
Olson said the loss of structure
affects some players more than
others. "Most ofthe time what
guys miss most is not the actual
football side of things. At some
level it's nice not to be sore all
the time, to put yourself through
these rigorous, sometimes stupid
sorts of activities. But they miss
the team."
For the past few months,
Greene's life has had a different
kind of structure. He spends
45 minutes of every weekday at
physiotherapy in War Memorial
Gym. The most painful parts
of these sessions, accordingto
Greene, take place on "the table,"
where physical therapists try
to poke and prod his body back
into shape.
"I'll yell when I'm on the table
because it hurts a lot, but [I] want
to be able to walk properly," he
said. "I don't want to go out and
make it worse and then be 40 and
unable to move."
Greene refuses to let himself
become directionless. Instead, he
has put a timer on his pro aspirations: 14 to 15 months of physio
and training to get his body back
to where it was during the 2011
season. If he can do it in that time,
he has a shot at trying out for a pro
team. If he can't, he'll move on.
In some ways, Greene is a case
study for university athletics
programs in Canada. Unlike the
NCAA, Canadian programs don't
produce athletes who know nothing but the game. "If we've done
our jobs well, they have parallel
aspirations," said Olson. "It's not
just football and that's it."
"We're here to do school,"
said Greene. "We were fortunate
enough to play football, but we
know there's a life afterwards."
If football doesn't work out,
Greene has options. He's considered working in air traffic
control — perhaps a good fit for
someone who excelled at moving
objects safely through the air. "I
think football is something that
could prepare you for that. You're
on the field and there are moving
parts all over the place," he said.
Still, he doesn't want to spend
the rest of his life wondering
"what if?"
Olson, who went on to play
professionally in Europe, understands where Greene is at in his
life, and said he will do what he
can to get him back on the field.
"You've had all these dreams
and aspirations. You've trained,
you've done all ofthe things you
think are necessary to get there,"
Olson said. "At some level, you
kind of just want to know. You
want someone to tell you, 'Hey,
you're not good enough.'"
"That would give me peace of
mind," said Greene, when he read
that quote. "Either you take that
and say, 'I think I can,' and work
even harder, or you say okay and
move on."
That kind of clarity is one
painful year of rebuilding away.
But for Greene, it's still too early
to talk about "lasts." tJ
GREENE STATS
BY THE
NUMBERS
9,1 A3 passing yards
racked up by Greene over his
five-year career, the most of
any UBC player when only
Canada West play is taken
into account.
49 touchdowns thrown by
Greene during his career.
I,o20 rushing yards
racked up by Greene during
his career.
1 i\ touchdowns that
Greene rushed for during his
career. THURSDAY, APRIL 11, 2013    |    SPORTS + REC    |    5
FEATURING
IBESTTEAMOF
THEYEAR?
MOST
DISAPPOINTING
TEAMO
YEAR?
5
HOWILLBETHEBEST
EAM NEXT YEAR?
I
KRISYOUNG, JANINE
FRAZAO, SHANICE ^^«
MARCELLE, GAGANDEEP
DOSANJH, SAVANNAH KING
AND KELLY ASPIN
WEREMVPS.WHC
ULTIMATE MVP?
'INALLALL
HO IS THE
WHATWASYQl
FAVOURITE
RECREATIONAL
ACTIVITY OF THE PAST
YEAR?
)UR     ^
i
I
CAN ANYTHING
STOP WOMEN'S
VOLLEYBALL'S STREAK
OF CONSECUTIVE
NATIONAL TITLES?
WHAT SHOULD BE
THE SLOGAN OF
UBCTHUNDERBIRD
SPORTS?
CJ.
PENTLAND
FORMERATHLETETURNED
 OLD MAN.	
This is like trying to decide
which Sedin brother is better.
Well, I can't choose just one,
so women's volleyball is IA
and men's soccer is IB. Their
opponents were helpless.
Football was an obvious
letdown, but it sucked seeing
men's volleyball not qualify
for nationals. They were ONE
point away, but they couldn't
doit.
I'm going with a wild card and
choosing women's soccer.
They have a new coach and
several players in their fifth
year who want to leave on top.
Dosanjh is one ofthe most
electric players that I've ever
seen play soccer. Without him,
UBC men's soccer probably
wouldn't have won national
gold.
Wandering throughoutthe
libraries and trying to find an
open table.
The team plays with their feet.
Actually no, they'd still win
doing that.
Be warned: even our women's
hockey team is legit now.
ANDREW
BATES
WATCHESALOTOFSOCCERAND,
WELL, MORE SOCCER.
Men's soccer really impressed
for its total domination of the
CIS field. I was duly shocked
that not only would nobody be
able to beat them, but nobody
would come close.
I wanted more from men's
hockey, to be honest; they
had the promise. I'm also
really disappointed that it was
another year where Janine
Frazao didn't win it all.
I was really impressed with the
young players on the men's
basketball team, and this
year's nationals trip can only
galvanize them further.
Gagan Dosanjh. After a disappointing 2011-12 season, he
rebounded to become a true
leader on the pitch, generate
endless effort and help power
the team's victory at nationals.
Biking to work. Cheaper
than a bus pass! Until mytire
popped, and I thought that
the Bike Kitchen was closed
duetoalloftheconstruction.
Forcefield. (Maybe. If a force-
field loses power every time
it's hit, it can last, what, five hits
from Shanice Marcelle?)
You Can Only Expect Like A
Hundred People ForThese
Things.
ARNO
ROSENFELD
AMERICAN, CAPITALIST,
CHRISTIAN. PROUD TO BE RIGHT!
Men's hockey for standing
strong in the face of adversity.
To be able to stare down
militant feminism and come
out strongerfor it should be
applauded.
Women's hockey.
COLL
CHI A
I'm more of a Clan fan myself.
My money's on the men in
white. Go SFU!!
I'd weigh Michael Vick against
Barry Bonds, but Mike's whole
animal abusething makes him
hard to stand behind, so it's
Barry FTW. No, in all seriousness, it is Marshawn Lynch.
Haven't gotten out to the ice
yet, but I hearseal clubbing is
a blast!
Ithinkthebiggerquestion
is, "Is there anything that can
make people care about
women's sports?"
The future will be better
tomorrow.
DOES SPORTS THINGS ON
 CAMPUS	
UBC's soccer teams are in
a class of their own. Look at
theirstats against the other
CIS teams. They are depress-
inglygood.
Football had a great season
last year and didn't live up to
that this season.
I'm going to rule out the teams
who always win gold medals
and say that the women's
hockey team will show that this
year was no fluke.
Janine Frazao scored 13 goals
in 12 games and set the new
Canada West record for most
career goals. Honourable
mention to two-time Olympian
Savannah King, though.
Versus, the zombie battle
thing. It just looked really
cool.
When the CIS abolishes the
competition because there's
just no point anymore.
"Kill! Maim! Destroy!" Not
thatitshould be actually their
ethos. I just think it would really
intimidate the opposition.
JEFF
ASCHKINASI
WHEN HE GOESTO A GAME, HE'LL
TWEET ABOUT IT. #GOBIRDSGO
Women's hockey. My roommate claims to have cried
when she found out they went
to nationals, so I take it that
thiswasa#BFD.
FOOTBALL. I'm not going
to lie, this is like one of three
sports at UBC that I have
any semi-vested interest in. I
mean, they were so close to
the playoffs and lost it.
UBC Wresting. They're like
that ugly stepchild of varsity
athletics that might get the
chance to go to the big
leagues next year.
I think that Savannah was in
the Olympics, so she seems
pretty badass (a.k.a. MVP-
worthy).
Day ofthe Longboat. While
many of The Ubyssey's teammates were too hungover to
attend the event, the survivors
got brunch. That's right, Sunday motherfucking brunch.
Having ugly shoes. Seriously,
I bet that men's volleyball
wouldn't fly with ugly shoes.
(If so, I'm disappointed with
yourshoe blog, Jarrid.)
I think that UBC Athletics
should support a viral video
campaign emphasizing their
amazing —yet depressingly
under-utilized — hashtag,
#gobirdsgo. YEAR IN REVIEW    I   THURSDAY, APRIL 11, 2013
Standout
stories
For some editorial boards, UBC can be a
boring place to cover. Change at universities
comes at a glacial pace, scandals are few and
far between, and students come and go so
guickly that it's hard to get any major projects
moving forward. 2012-13, though, was one
forthe books. Our reporters covered strikes,
social media snafus, election scandals and a
departing university president.
So how to choose the top stories in a year
like this one? Lots of arguing, that's how. We
looked for stories that will have a far-reaching
impact, that were a real sign ofthe times, that
captivated students. After much debate, we
finally came to a consensus on the top 10 UBC
stories ofthe academic year.
AN UPSWING IN
ENGAGEMENT?
"*.     /     Schneider
BIEKSA AND UBC
JOY TO HUNGRY I
FANS THURSDAY APRIL 11, 2013    I   YEAR IN REVIEW
FOR
S
1,165 FOLLOWING
500 FOLLOWERS
li 21 Sep  |
so Sjocplant C'SamanthaHarM you can
need more lube here ASAP!"
ole Ditties I dimewatch
.AGUE
ETICS
r
BRING
HOCKEY
10. BIEKSA AND UBC
BRING JOY TO HUNGRY
HOCKEY FANS
The NHL lockout was a bad time
for a lot of people. Fans were
disappointed, businesses lost
revenue and charities saw their
donations dry up. But thanks to
the efforts of Vancouver Canucks
defenceman Kevin Bieksa and
several of his "Buddies," all that
was forgotten forone night in October. In front of a sold-out crowd
atthe Doug Mitchell Thunderbird
Sports Centre, several Vancouver
Canuckstookon the UBC men's
hockey team, who they had been
practicing with and mentoring
during the lockout.
The game proved to offer
almost everything that the lockout
had taken away. Bieksa and
co. came from behind to defeat
the T-Birds 8-7, capping off an
exciting game where both sides
showed talent. Ticket proceeds
raised $100,000 for three Vancouver charities, and that total
was then matched by singer Michael Buble, making the total for
the entire night $200,000. Thanks
to Bieksa, something good came
out ofthe NHL lockout.
9. PR PROBLEMS PLAGUE
HEADLESS ATHLETICS
DEPARTMENT
Despite the success of the varsity
teams, the athletics department
itself weathered a number of public scandals this year.
Two minor drug-test suspensions tested the department's
already-frayed reputation for being able to comply with Canadian
Interuniversity Sport rules. Then,
in December, the department
fast-tracked a former Langara
coach to head the women's soc-
certeam. People raised a stink
because they passed over Angela
Reid, a former Canadian national
team captain, and the department
ended up retracting the hire one
day later because they didn't
follow the rules. They eventually
hired Reid.
Then there was the Dime Watch
scandal, where UBC athletes were
alleged to be behind an anonymous Twitter account that tweeted
voyeuristic photos of women
without their consent.
All this came during a time
when universities were trying to
figure out where athletics fit in
their public missions. UBC has
begun the process of revamping
its own programs after the departure of long-time director Bob
Phillip. Nextyear will mean a lot
of change for the department, but
hopefully it will be quieter on the
PR front.
8. A BANNER YEAR FOR
T-BIRD ATHLETICS
UBC teams have won 87 CIS
championships in school history
— by far the most of any Canadian
school. At this point, UBC teams
are expected to do well. But this
yearsawThunderbird squads
perform in a way that few had
before. A total of six teams won
national championships overthe
past year (men's soccer, women's
volleyball, women's swimming,
women's cross-country, women's
field hockey and women's golf),
and they did it in impressive style.
Men's soccer and women's field
hockey both had undefeated
seasons, women's swimming won
by 143.5 points at nationals and
women's volleyball finished the
season ona25-gamewinning
streak to capture their sixth
straight national title.
In addition, six teams won Canada West championships. One of
those conference-winning teams
was women's hockey, a team who
had won only one game the previous season, but orchestrated the
greatest turnaround in CIS history
to finish fifth in the country. With
six players awarded MVP honours
and five coaches winning top
coach accolades, UBC showed
that its athletic program is arguably the best in Canada.
7. THE AGONY AND THE
ECSTASY OF KAPPA
SIGMA
Stories involving fraternities always get a lot of attention on campus. Whether people love or hate
the Greek system, hearing that a
fraternity has been shut down for
"code of conduct violations" garners a lot of interest. The chapter
had a few months to appeal the
decision to its national office.
During thattime, both chapter
members and the national office
kept silent about the infractions
that caused the chapterto be shut
down, leading some students to
assume they did far worse things
than host a kegger.
The chaptersuccessfully
appealed the decision and was allowed to start back up on campus
— with some serious fun-killing
provisions. Almost three quarters
of the chapter's members were
either kicked out or decided to
leave of theirown accord. No
drinking is allowed in the chapter
house, and all members have to
do additional community service.
6. UNIVERSITIES JOCKEY
FOR POSITION AHEAD OE
PROVINCIAL ELECTION
Universities have asked for some
big-ticket items in the lead-up to
this May's provincial election.
The promise — orspectre —
of power changing hands in the
provincial legislature hung heavy
over this year at UBC.
Universities across the
province yelled out their hopes
for increased provincial spending on funded student spaces,
grants for low-income students
and research dollars. And the
NDP — which is poised to take
power this spring — kept doggedly criticizing the B.C. Liberals
post-secondary record. What's
more, the NDP announced a fat
promise of $100 million in grants
for low-income students.
The Liberals, fortheir part,
turned the advanced education
portfolio from an afterthought to
a crater. After a revolving door of
ministers in charge of universities
and colleges, John Yap — who
was also in charge of multiculturalism— found himself implicated
in a scandal that saw taxpayer
money being spent on partisan
campaigning.
The ministry was promptly
shuffled off to ajuniorminister
who's also in charge of seniors'
issues, and chances areslim
the party will give any thought
to post-secondary issues in
its platform.
5. AN UPSWING IN
ENGAGEMENT?
It's hard to measure something as
ephemeral as "student engagement," but by some accounts, it's
on the upswing.
People have long recognized
that UBC students don't have an
attachment to campus outside of
class. This year, we've seen both
top-down and grassroots efforts
to address the problem.
Perhaps the most notable
initiative has been UBC's switch to
broad-based admissions. Instead
of focusing solely on grades and
academic performance, admissions officials now take personal
essays into account. UBC is trying
to send a message to prospective
students: we want people who are
interesting, notjust academically
focused.
The class of 2016 was the first
cohort to be admitted through
broad-based admissions, so the
sample size is obviously too small
to draw any conclusions. But
we've seen a few promising signs
that students are getting more
involved on campus. Thisyear, we
saw a record turnout in the AMS
elections. A dude with a website
and a few T-shirts got hundreds
of students out to parties. A concert on a rainy day in April sold
out. Maybe we're grasping for
examples, but something about
campus this yearfelt more alive.
It's still too early to say, but if
things go well, UBC might end
up being a place that students
actually want to engage with.
4. PRESIDENT STEPHEN
TOOPE ANNOUNCES HIS
PLAN TO STEP DOWN
Earlierthis month, UBC President
Stephen Toope announced that
he will be stepping down from his
post early in summer2014.
Toope's legacy at UBC is an
interesting one. He didn't exactly
carve out a unique vision, but he
was hugely successful in seeing
others' dreams for UBC through.
He helmed a school that was
already on a clear trajectory
from a very good provincial
institution to a globally relevant
research powerhouse. And he
somehow managed to continue
that trajectory through troubling
economic times.
Toope wasn't a towering, beloved figure like famed previous
president Walter Gage, but he
avoided the deeply polarizing
indifference of his immediate
predecessor, Martha Piper.
At a time when budget pressures pushed UBC to act more like
a business, Toope's deep roots in
his academic field (international
human rights law) kept some
focus on the university's first mission: academic progress.
And the way he flaunted and
treasured those roots made his
departure, two years before the
end of his second five-year term,
easierto understand. It really is
plausible that he wants to spend
more time with legal texts and less
with budget spreadsheets.
His record isn't without its
controversies — the quickening
pace of for-proft campus development under his reign rankled
sedate and radical student groups
alike. And some questioned his
tendency to pander to university
rankings ratherthan average
students.
But in the end, Toope kept the
lights on — and kept this university moving forward.
3. UBC GETS CREATIVE
TO FILL THE FUNDING
GAP
This year, UBC discovered it could
be up to $2.5 million short on next
year's budget. To make up forthe
shortfall, UBC had to get creative
to find new sources of revenue.
A lot of that extra money will be
coming from two new academic programs: the bachelor of
international economics and the
Bridge to UBC.
Both of these programs were
controversial from the start. While
UBC presented the new econ
degree as a boutique program for
international recognition, it came
with a hefty price tag. It was originally set at $10,000 per year for
domestic students and $29,000
per year for international students,
but after opposition from several
student groups, the tuition was
cut to $7,670 per year for domes
tic students and $26,939 peryear
for international students.
The Bridge to UBC also comes
with its challenges. While it is
being presented as a way to
increase the diversity on campus
by bringing in bright students
who may not meet UBC's English
language requirements, some
wonder if it is just a money grab to
pad UBC's budget.
Controversy aside, UBC has
set a new precedent for boutique
programs on campus in its efforts
to create a balanced budget.
2. A TUMULTUOUS YEAR
FOR UBC LABOUR
UBC students got a real life lesson
in labour politics this past fall. The
university faced tight budgets due
to empty provincial coffers, and
unionized workers felt choked by
the high cost of living in Vancouver. At least five unions were
negotiating for new contracts this
academicyear, and many of those
negotiations boiled over into
strikes.
The union representing a bevy
of workers on campus, including
maintenance, IT, security and
other service workers, went on
strike first. By the time they had
their deal, TAs walked off the
job, and the newly unionized
AMS Security workers also took
job action while trying to reach
theirfirst collective agreement.
Afterthe dust settled, child care
workers filed strike notice before
reaching a deal.
In the end, UBC found ways to
reach deals underthe province's
cooperative gains mandate,
which allows for wage increases
through savings found elsewhere.
But workers only made these
gains by exercising their right to
strike.
1. A CLASS OF
CONSTRUCTION
When UBC talks about "campus
community," it's accompanied
by soft piano music and aerial
photos of old-growth forest. But
what ultimately brings a com-
munitytogetheris not so much
high-minded appeals from the
powers that be, but the crap
people have to deal with on a day-
to-day basis.
Thisyear, that crap has been
construction. In the summer,
we wrote a feature about the
forthcoming changes to UBC's
landscape. The new SUB is the
most obvious project, followed
by upgrades to Main Mall and
University Boulevard. And that's
just the beginning; stay tuned for
ground breaking on the Alumni
Centre and the new Aquatic Centre on Mclnnes Field, as well as
upgrades to the UBC Bookstore.
We described the next five years
as the "Class of Construction,"
and the name stuck.
The construction struck a
populist nerve. For one, it's inconvenient. Student griped loudly
on social media about encountering blue fences on their way
to class. Some went as far as to
post signs on the fences, one of
which read, "Gimme my goddamn
campus back."
But more fundamentally, all this
capital spending is taking place
in a time when universities are
being asked to cut back and "find
efficiencies," and when the affordability of education is of increasing concern. While UBC's operating grant and capital spending
are two very different things, most
folks have had trouble reconciling
the two.
All these new buildings will be
lovely when they're completed.
But now, peoplejustseethe
campus they love disappearing
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The Ubyssey doesn't select a "person of the year." But in every school year, on any campus, there are people who deserve to be recognized. We've selected eight people who
stood out in 2012-13.
KIRAN MAHAL
DAVID FARRAR
NASSIF GHOUSSOUB
In the past, many student government executives fell on
either side of a simple dichotomy: either they were strident
rabble-rousers, angrily railing against the establishment, or
they were meek shills out for personal gain, student interests
be damned. The scarily competent Kiran Mahal, an AMS
vice-president academic who recently started hersecond
term, blasted apart this easy categorization.
She made change. And she didn't make it by impotently
yelling at powerful people from outside the door. Her advocacy
was polished, professional and meticulously researched — and
when she met with powerful people at UBC, they listened.
Along with various student groups, she spearheaded the effort to lower the tuition fees for the new bachelor of international
economics. If UBC hadn't backed down, students taking the
new degree would've been gouged. She led the charge on
re-implementing an exam database and got buy-in from the
UBC Senate. She collected a wide-ranging survey on students'
concerns, helped create midterm teaching evaluations and did
actual, meaningful work on mental health issues.
Mahal reminded us how effective measured, focused advocacy can be when it's wielded by someone who knows what
she's doing.
Various UBC administrators embarked on a number of scary
plans recently. But one of the scariest was UBC's decision to
leave the licensing firm Access Copyright and set out independently— a move championed by David Farrar, UBC's provost and
vice-president academic.
After a period of waffling, Farrar didn't mince words when he announced UBC's decision to leave Access Copyright once and for
all. He said only a few institutions in Canada were going to follow
UBC's lead — he could "count them on one hand"—and he said
he believed UBC "would be the largest finger on that hand" — a
subtle, academic way of saying screwyou to Access Copyright.
But it was Farrar's actions, not his arch comments, that made
him importantthis year.
Though there were initial hiccups, UBC's local copyright-vetting office is now up and running. Doing things internally rather
than relying on Acess Copyright to pay authors for their work has
resulted in million-dollar savings. Twenty-five other schools also
left Access Copyright, including most major research universities.
And a recent Supreme Court decision widening what can be
copiedforfreeunder'Tairuse" law soundly vindicated UBC's
decision.
Copyright law has never been a particularly attention-grabbing
topic. But if there was ever a time to pay attention to it, it was this
year, when Farrar and UBC set a precedent that will be important
foryearstocome.
The phrases "bespectacled math prof" and "hell-raiser"
aren't often seen in the same sentence, but there's no better
way to describe Nassif Ghoussoub. He has been the elected
faculty representative on the UBC Board of Governors,
UBC's most powerful decision-making body, foroverfive
years now. In that time, he has walked a fine line of critiquing
the actions of UBC's administration while looking out forthe
university's best interests.
It has been a productiveyearforGhoussoub. He pushed
through UBC's housing action plan, an attemptto address
the problem of attracting world-class faculty to one of the
world's most expensive real estate markets. He has picked
fights with NSERC, the federal agency in charge of research
grants, for cutting money to graduate research programs.
And he's been an outspoken voice for democratizing university governance, since UBC's Board of Governors is largely
appointed by the province, not elected.
We can only hope that Ghoussoub's eventual successor
brings the same energy to the position.
ROB MORTON
IAN CAMPBELL
TEAM CANADA
Earlier in this issue, we mentioned that "a dude with a website
and a few T-shirts" started organizing parties for UBC students.
That dude is Rob Morton.
It seems that every year, a debauchery-inclined group of
students realizes that good parties at UBC are few and far
between, and sets out to do something about it. Usually, these
efforts peter out around midterms and are never heard of again.
There's a veritable graveyard of inactive "UBC Party" Facebook
groups, left to stand as a monument to the difficulties of getting
kegs of beer and UBC students in the same room.
But Morton's UBC Party Calendar aggregator has had
staying power. Morton and his crew have been visible at every
major campus event, pushing the site and their parties through
savvy social media promotion. They partnered with a number
of campus groups (including, forthe sake of disclosure, The
Ubyssey) for cross-promotion, with generally positive results.
People used to talk about a War on Fun at UBC — a combination of restrictive liquor licensing and policing that makes
it hard to throw parties — but it seems the term has fallen out of
use. It's good to see that a well-organized group like Morton's is
carrying the fight forward.
Outgoing Engineering Undergraduate Society (EUS) president Ian Campbell has achieved a lotforstudents during his
career in both the EUS and on AMS Council.
This year, he did something that will affect students in
multiple faculties foryears to come. Campbell led the negotiations with UBC on the contract forthe new Engineering
Student Centre. The contract gives students more control
of the space than the agreement that Faculty of Science
students approved forthe Abdul Ladha building. Although
the Faculty of Engineering dean will have the final say on
events in the building, students will still maintain a great deal
of control over the space.
The deal will not only affect the engineers. It sets the basis
for the governance of any future student spaces. In January,
the Arts Undergraduate Society approved a fee for a new
student space, and Sauder students are considering a new
building as well. They will look to the EUS's example for
contracts in their new buildings.
UBC student-athletes Savannah King, Tera Van Beilen and
Heather MacLean were on top of the world last summer while
competing at the 2012 Summer Olympics in London, but
after coming back to school they did not slow down. The trio
dominated the CIS once again, helping the Thunderbirds win
their second straight CIS championship. King was named CIS
Female Swimmer of the Year for the second year in row after
winning three gold medals and one bronze at the national
finals; Van Beilen won a gold, a silver and two bronzes; and
MacLean racked up two silvers. This summer will also see King
and Van Beilen head to Barcelona to represent Canada at the
World Swimming Championships.
In addition to their prowess in competitive swimming, all
three found time to give back to the sport in 2013. The three
helped out with a program founded by former UBC swimmer
Hayley Pipher to offer swimming lessons to African students.
And, of course, they accomplished all of this while staying on
topoftheirclasses. II Culture
EDITOR ANNAZORIA
RSDAY.A
LITERATURE »
In the margins of history
Discovering the stories within stories at Irving K. Barber's exhibit of rare books
Rhys Edwards
senior Culture Writer
You find an old textbook
opened to the front page.
Scrawled in the margins,
instead ofthe usual formulae,
notes and doodles, you find dozens of beautifully penned, seemingly arcane words. In slender
cursive, they suggest an alchemical recipe of some kind, and come
complete with a diagram: a nude
man and woman engaged in some
kind of esoteric ritual.
No, you haven't chanced upon
a book once owned by a devious
magician. The markings are
actually the scrawlings of several
bored 18th-century schoolboys
— and that illustration is more
salacious than it is inspired.
This juvenile graffiti reflects
how books are transformed by
their users, which is the subject
of Problems of Provenance, an
exhibition currently on display at
the Rare Books and Special Collections Library. Each book in the
collection features unusual markings, modifications and additions
that allude to past owners.
"These books have more than
one story to tell," said Sarah
Hillier, curator ofthe exhibit and
graduate student in the School of
Library, Archival and Information
Studies. "One [story] expressed
by the content contained within
their pages, and a second, more
hidden story about their custodial
history that may shed light on
the context of their production
and how owners interacted with
them."
And these aren't just any old
tomes. The exhibit — much like
the rest of the library itself - in
cludes books one might otherwise
find in a bibliophile's dream, such
as a 1688 printing of Milton's
Paradise Lost, a book of Greek
poetry signed by Lord Byron and
a copy of Alice's Adventures in
Wonderland signed by none other
than Alice Hargreave, who was
the inspiration for Lewis Carroll's
titular character.
Many students maybe surprised to learn that the Rare
Books and Special Collections
Library hosts these exhibitions
— or even that the library exists.
Located in the basement of
the Irving K. Barber Learning
Centre, the library is UBC's main
repository for unique archival
materials. In addition to books, it
is home to thousands of historical
artifacts, including posters, maps
and photo collections.
You won't see any of these
items upon entering the library,
however.
"I've actually heard students
refer to us as 'the library with no
books,' because our collections
are completely sequestered,"
said Sarah Romkey, an archivist
working for the library. "They're
all behind the scenes in a temperature- and humidity-controlled
vault."
Given the fragile nature of
the collection, all visitors are
required to put away any personal
belongings before entering. Also,
unlike other libraries, you can't
take these books home with you.
"There's a bit of an intimidation
factor just in getting through the
doors because of these restrictions," said Romkey. "But once
you're here, we want people to
know that we're here to sup
port your research, we're here
to support your studies and we
want you to feel comfortable and
confident in your use of rare and
archival sources."
Although the library's collection emphasizes materials from
British Columbia, it is continually
increasing in scope. From ancient
theological texts from the Vatican
Library to Douglas Coupland's
private letters, there is an eclectic
range of material that caters
to both professional scholars
and students.
"When you're exposed to this
kind of material all of the time,...
sometimes you can become a bit
jaded to it," said Romkey. "And
then once in a while you have to
step back and step out of your
shoes and say, 'Wow, this is really
amazing. This is a book that was
published in the 1600s,' or, 'This
is a photograph of a community
in British Columbia that doesn't
exist anymore.'"
The temporary exhibits,
meanwhile, aren't just a way for
student curators to gain experience; they're also meant to
expose others to novel ways of
thinking about books, libraries
and archives.
"Understanding this history
and seeing the physical evidence
of ownership brings the books to
life," said Hillier, on the subject of
Problems of Provenance. "For me,
this is magical, and I wanted to
share this with others." 31
Problems of Provenance is on display at the Rare Books and Special
Collections Library until the end
of April.
BLOCK F DEVELOPMENT
Musqueam is contemplating an OCP Amendment and Amendment
to the Land Use, Building and Community Administration Bylaw
from the existing MF-l Zone which currently allows for the site to
be developed with residential uses up to a density of 1.45 fsr.
You are invited to drop in to the third Open House to learn about Musqueam's future development
plans for Block F in the University Endowment Lands. At this event, a preferred development concept
will be presented. Representatives ofthe Project Team will be available to provide details.
About: Block F Open House Meeting #3
When: Thursday, April 18, 2013
Where: University Golf Club (5185 University Blvd. ^3
Time: 4:00 PM - 8:00 PM (Drop in)
Please direct questions to Gordon Easton, Project Manager at Colliers International:
Gordon.Easton@colliers.com / (604) 662 - 2642; or visit www.placespeak.com/UELBIockF for more information.
GEOFF LICTER PHOJWHE UBYSSEY
You might be surprised what treasures can be found in the rare books collection.
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604u228.3428 | www.dunbarlawnbowling.com 10    I    FEATURE    I    THURSDAY, APRIL 11,2013
INVESTIGATION »
Getting that green
UBC's partnership with a green construction company
from China was hailed as a new era of sustainability for the
university. But behind the scenes, UBC took millions from
Modern Green and accomodated the company's private
development goals, Alexandra Smith reports.
When Modern Green, one of
China's largest property
developers and a leading
specialist in green development,
formed a "strategic partnership"
with UBC in 2011, the news was
greeted with the boosterism typical of university deals.
But according to documents
provided to The Ubyssey by Neal
Yonson ofthe now-defunct UBC
Insiders website, Modern Green
and UBC engaged in some unusual
practices behind the scenes that
brought millions of dollars to UBC
and a lucrative development deal
for the Chinese company.
The partnership entailed a $3.5
million donation from Modern
Green to the Centre for Institutional Research on Sustainability
(CIRS), UBC's sustainable building initiative. The developer also
formed a research partnership
with the university, giving Modern
Green a partner to test and deploy
green building technologies, as
well as opportunities for personnel
and student exchanges for experiential learning and research. These
opportunities include a graduate
student internship in Beijing funded by Modern Green, which is set
to begin this summer.
"This partnership helps place
UBC and Modern Green at the
forefront of sustainable initiatives,"
UBC President Stephen Toope said
at the time.
Featuring a rainwater collection
system, a solar-powered hot water
system and a living roof and wall,
the CIRS was billed as the greenest
building in North America when it
opened in the fall of 2011.
Vancouver Mayor Gregor
Robertson even complimented
the initiative. "Modern Green's
investments will help stimulate the
local economy and job growth, as
they continue to engage a number
of local firms and build expertise
by implementing new, greener
building technologies," he said at
the time.
Shortly after making the donation to the CIRS, Modern Green
undertook plans to build an environmentally friendly residential
structure in UBC's new Wesbrook
Village. The project was a private,
for-profit undertaking and the
company received a development
permit on June 1,2012.
But unlike standard dona
tions, which go through UBC's
development office in charge of
fundraising, Modern Green's $3.5
million contribution was processed through UBC Properties
Trust. The Properties Trust is
a private corporation owned by
the university. Its main role is to
acquire, manage and develop the
university's real estate assets,
earning revenue for UBC and the
UBC Foundation.
Why did Modern Green send its
multi-million dollar donation to
the institution managing Wesbrook
Village, where it planned to build
its residential structure?
"They call it a donation but
really it's a contribution," Don
Matheson, CFO of UBC Properties
Trust, said in an interview. "There
was no donation receipt given. It
was a contribution."
Matheson said the trust volunteered to tie the donation to
Modern Green's lease at Wesbrook
Village, where the company wanted to build a residential structure. Modern Green's payments
on the lease were set to be made
over the course of three years,
so by accepting Modern Green's
donation, UBC Properties Trust
would have something fall back on
if Modern Green reneged on their
lease payments.
"It's a way of securitizing the
payments because they're not taking it all at once, they are paying it
over three years. You want to have
some security knowing that they
are goingto make the payments,
so we said, 'Let's tie it to the lease.'
That's why we're involved," said
Matheson.
Matheson clarified that when
UBC Properties Trust receives
the donation, it immediately
turns the money over to UBC's
development office.
But the timing of Modern
Green's contribution to the
Properties Trust coincides with
changes in UBC's campus development plan made to accommodate
the developer. Soon after Modern
Green made the donation, the
height restrictions inthe South
Campus Neighbourhood Plan
were amended to allow construction of Modern Green's six-storey
residential tower.
The South Campus Neighbourhood Plan is a document setting
out regulations and policies for
development in Wesbrook Village.
The initial plan was adopted in December 2005 and incorporated elements from UBC's Land Use Plan, a
document that establishes land use
and provides policies and development criteria for UBC campus. The
old South Campus Neighbourhood
Plan generally restricted building
heights to four storeys.
The contribution agreement
between Modern Green and the
university was signed in early
December 2010. On Jan. 13,2011,
the Land Use Plan was amended
to increase building heights to six
storeys. On March 28,2011, Modern Green applied for a permit to
build a six-storey residential tower
in South Campus. Following their
application, the South Campus
Neighbourhood Plan was amended,
and building height restrictions
were increased to six storeys; Modern Green's structure could now
be approved.
While it may seem that the
South Campus Plan was simply
amended to agree with the Land
Use Plan, not all ofthe University
Neighbourhood Plans were amended. Two years later, the University
Boulevard Neighbourhood Plan,
for instance, has still not been
amended. But neither did a developer seeking to build a commercial development inthe University
Boulevard area make a $3.5 million
"contribution" to UBC.
Richard Fisher, chief communications officer for UBC development and alumni relations, said
in an email, "At no time during
the development permit or the
plan amendment process was the
donation a factor in reviewing the
development proposal received by
Campus and Community Planning."
It is clear, though, that the changes to the South Campus Plan were
explicitly made to accommodate
Modern Green.
Joe Stott, director of UBC
Campus and Community Planning,
said that in regard to the South
Campus Neighbourhood Plan,
"We had an active application for a
development permit from Modern
Green, so there was some priority
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'JJthe ubyssey
APRIL.11,2013 I VOLUMEXCIVI ISSUELI
Coordinating Editor
Jonny Wakefield
coordinating@u byssey.ca
Managing Editor, Print
Jeff Aschkinasi
arinteditor@ubyssey.es
Managing Editor, Web
Andrew Bates
webed itor@u byssey.ca
News Editors
Will McDonald*
Laura Rodgers
news@ubyssey.es
Senior News Writer
Ming Wong
nnwong@ ubyssey.ca
Culture Editor
Anna Zona
culture@ubyssey.ca
Senior Culture Writer
Rhys Edwards
•edwards@u byssey.ca
Sports + Rec Editor
CJ Pentland
sports@ubyssey.es
Senior Lifestyle Writer
Justin Fleming
]fleming@u byssey.ca
Features Editor
Amo Rosenfeld
featu res@u byssey.ca
Video Editor
David Marino
video@ubyssey.es
Copy Editor
Karina Palmitesta
copy@ubyssey.es
STAFF
3ryce Warnes, Josh Curran,
Peter Wojnar, Anthony Poon,
Veronika Bondarenko, Yara
Van Kessel, Catherine Guan,
Ginny Monaco, Matt Meuse,
Hogan Wong, Rory Gattens,
Brandon Chow, Joseph
Ssettuba. Tyler McRobbie,
Sarah Bigam,StephanieXu.
Natalya Kautz, ColinChia,
-<irnPringle,GeoffLister
Business Manager
Fernie Pereira
fpereira@ubysseyca
Ad Sales
Ben Chen
ochen@ubyssey.es
Accounts
Tom Tang
ttang@u byssey.ca
Editorial Office: SUB 24
604.822.2301
Business Office: SUB 23
advertising 604.822.l654
nquiries604.822.668i
Student Union Building
6138 SUB Boulevard
Vancouver, BC V6T1Z1
Online: ubyssey.ca
Twitter: ©ubyssey
Art Director
Kai Jacobson
a rt@ ubyssey.ca
Graphics Assistant
Indiana Joel
joe l@ ubyssey.ca
Layout Artist
Colly n Chan
cchan@ ubyssey.ca
Videographer
Lu Zhang
zhang@ubyssey.es
Webmaster
Riley Tomasek
webmaster@u byssey.ca
Ll
The Ubyssey is the official student newspaper of the University of British Columbia. It is
published every Monday anc
Thursday by The Ubyssey Publications Sociely. We are an autonomous, democratically rur
student organization, and al
students are encouraged to
oarticipate.
Editorials are chosen anc
«ri tten by th e Ubyssey staff. They
aretheexpressedopinionofthe
staff, anddo not necessarily reflect the views of The Ubyssey
Publications Sociely orthe University of British Columbia. Al
editorial content appearing in
The Ubyssey is the properly of
The Ubyssey Publications Society. Stones, opinions, photographs and artwork containec
nerein cannotbe reproducec
«i thout the expressed, writter
Demission ofThe Ubyssey
Publications Society.
The Ubyssey is a founding
member of Canadian University Press (CUP) and adheres
to CUP's guiding principles.
Letters tothe editor must
oe under 300 words. Please
nclude your phone number,
student number and signature (not for publication) as
well as your year and faculty
with all submissions. ID wil
ae checked when submissions
are dropped offattheeditoria
office ofThe Ubyssey; otherwise verification will be done
ay phone. The Ubyssey reserves the right to edit submissions for length and clari
ty. All letters must be receivec
ay 12 noon the day before intended publication. Letters received after this point will be
aublishedin the following issue unless there is an urgent
time restriction or other matter deemed relevant by the
Jbyssey staff.
It is agreed by all persons
olacing display orclassifieciacl-
vertising that ifthe Ubyssey Publications Society fails to pub-
ish an advertisementorifar
error in the ad occurs the I iabi I-
tyoftheUPS will notbe greater than the price paid for the
ad. The UPS shall notbe responsible for slight changes
or typographical errors that
do not lessen the value orthe
mpactofthead.
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