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The Ubyssey Sep 27, 1974

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Array Food services' replies weak
By DENISE CHONG
Whether food services likes it or
not, their prices are out there doing
all the dirty work for public
relations.
Someone's been overworking
them.
Thursday's issue of The Ubyssey
reported that campus food prices
are increasing twice as fast as the
national consumer food price index, which means the purchasing
power of your food dollar on
campus is declining at twice the
rate of a food dollar off campus.
The inflation chant just didn't
seem to fit — but where this
pipeline of extra dollars goes to is,
so far, pure speculation.
Price hikes, rising food costs and
higher labor settlements all ride
the same inflationary merry-go-
round. If we take, campus menu
prices over the past three years
and allow for those "soaring food
and labor costs," we're still left
1 with a gap.
But today we put away our price
yardsticks and take a look at some
of food services' policies and
procedures, so we at least know
what or who we're dealing with.
Watching over operations is food
services director Robert Bailey,
replacing Ruth Blair, who is on
sick leave. And at ground level are
dietician-managers Mary Stovell
and Shirley Louie, responsible for
the day-to-day operations of the
SUB cafeteria and the snackbars
around campus.
Food services operates against a
backdrop of uncertainty, where the
market situation is more one of
discord than harmony.
The morning headlines arrive on
the doorstep in the form of supplier
invoices. Food services anxiously
point out, in chorus, that not even
delivery can be guaranteed, let
alone price.
"Our suppliers would say the
same thing," says Bailey. "It's all
dictated by economics."
Suppliers for food services
operations were once held to one
year contracts, guaranteed
shipments and prices. When
soaring food costs began pacing
the rate of inflation, suppliers
refused to commit themselves to
a^y-corrtracts^with the exception
of meat contracts which are
reviewed every three months.
Similarly, prices were reviewed
only once a year, presumably to
coincide with renewable food and
labor contracts. Students this year,
however, face menu prices that
were red-pencilled twice, the first
increase was May 1 of this year,
the second came Sept. 1.
The policy on price changes is
that increases are put through
when the term breaks, never
during exams and, up until now,
never during term. We can certainly expect a review of prices
this December as the price instability in the background will
reach the«front sooner or later.
The "how" of food services'
pricing is not entirely an arithmetical process.
Each item is priced individually
See page 3: STUDENTS
U BC food prices shock BoG
By MICHAEL SASGES
Members of the board of governors said Thursday they want the
board to investigate massive increases in food prices at UBC.
Beverley Lecky said she plans to discuss the matter at Tuesday's
board meeting, but other members of the 11-person group indicated the
agenda has already been made up.
A Ubyssey story Thursday shows food prices at UBC increasing twice
as fast as prices off campus.
"If the figures are correct, then I think it's shocking," Lecky said in
an interview. "I think the board should look into the matter.
Beverly Field echoed Lecky's statement, saying the figures are
"unbelievable."
'Labor costs blown up'
"If food services is no longer
helping students, then students are
in an unfair situation," she said in
an interview. "Students definitely
shouldn't have to pay more (than
off-campus prices).
"But the last time the board
looked at the situation, it found the
prices comparable to off-campus
prices.
"Certainly prices should be
reviewed again."
Field said she would want to
investigate labor costs, which a
university spokesman said
Thursday have increased by 40 per
cent in about 18 months.
But the head of the union
representing food services workers
disputed the percentage given by
the university.
"I certainly wouldn't say the
increase has been as high as the
university indicates," Ken Andrews, president of Local 116 of the
Canadian Union of Public Employees, said Thursday.   .
He said in an interview that
although there have been increases
and the work week has been
decreased, the university has not
increased its staff.
"One of the differences between
outside food outlets and food
services is that the university's
operation has full-time dieticians
who are non-productive staff,"
Andrews said.
He said he has been attempting
to reopen the union's contract,
which is in effect until next April,
to negotiate a cost-of-living adjustment.
'Prices lead inflation'
-sucha singh photo
AN ALTERNATE TO FOOD service in SUB, intrepid salesman displays nature food sandwiches made with
real bread. Among delights are banana and peanut butter, cheese and tomato and avocado sandwiches.
"But so far, I've been unsuccessful," he said.
"The way I see it, your (The
Ubyssey's) figures show food
services is not only contributing to
inflation, but leading the way.
"The figures indicate that our
(the union's) suggestion for a mid-
contract increase are justified.
'New tenant act won't cover UBC
By JAKE van der KAMP
Provincial rentalsman Barrie Clark said
Thursday the new Landlord and Tenant Act
will not apply to UBC residences.
In an interview with The Ubyssey, Clark
said he will listen to complaints from students
in residence but will not necessarily give
orders in any of their cases.
He said he considers residences to be in the
fcame category as logging camps and nursing
homes which do not come under the act.
Clark said any rented accommodations in
which the type of tenant accepted is restricted
under definite rules are so-called "licensed
areas" which fall outside the act.
However two staff members in the ren-
talsmen's office have told The Ubyssey
(hat the new act does apply to university
residences. They also said the recent 48-hour
eviction of five Gage towers residents is not
enforceable.
Clark pointed out that only students are
allowed in the university's residences and
that their  tenancy  is  restricted to  eight
months.
But he said the restriction applies only to
single student residences. Married quarters
which the university's housing department
operates come under the act.
He said single students in residence can
resort only to common law in redressing their
complaints.
Clark declined any comment on the old
Landlord and Tenant Act and how it applies to
UBC residences.
Housing director Leslie Rohringer said
Wednesday he believes conditions will be
worse for students in residence if they are
covered by the act.
He said he prefers to see decisions on
conduct of residence students made locally by
committees of students and housing officials.
Rohringer and the Gage residence liaison
committee were censured Wednesday by
student council for "their indelicate method
and improper haste" in evicting the five Gage
residents.
Rohringer justified the short eviction
notices as a means of ensuring that those
evicted behave themselves. "A student is a
transient and can raise utter hell if he knows
he's going soon," Rohringer said.
Short eviction notices are given only for
substandard behavior, he said. He defined
substandard behavior as imposing unfairly
upon the rights of others.
But when it was pointed out that the evicted
students were not the ones who threw the
bottles, Rohringer said only: "What stops the
guests from coming back?"
The evicted students also complained that
their case was heard in an improper manner
by the Gage liaison committee.
Dan Hicks, one of the five, said the committee heard their appeal to the eviction but
overturned it after area coordinator Derek
See page 2: ROHRINGER
"There certainly is a pressing
need for" an increase, especially if
our members are going to eat in
food services," he said.
However, a spokesman for the
university's personnel services
said he doesn't think the increases
will affect negotiations. "But I
would imagine that the university
would have to give consideration to
the figures if the union were to."
The spokesman declined to
comment further, saying personnel director John McLean
speaks for the department.
McLean was unavailable for
comment Thursday.
Thursday's Ubyssey story shows
that food services prices have
increased by an average of 30 per
cent since last year with an 80-per
cent increase for a piece of pie and
75 per cent hike for a soft drink.
And, by using an index based on
100 in 1972-73, food prices on
campus went up 57 points in two
years, while restaurant prices
increased 36 points.
The story also shows that food
prices for 35 selected items have
increased twice as fast at UBC as
off campus.
Administration president Walter
Gage said Thursday the board has
a perfect right to investigate the
increases.
And he agreed that when his
standing committee on university
See page 3: GAGE Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday,  September 27,   1974
New Grit press shy
Art Lee, newly elected Liberal
MP for Vancouver East, began a
speech before about 30 party faithful by asking newsmen in the
audience not to quote him.
"Political parties and
parliament are the places to thrash
out controversies not the press,"
he said in an interview later.
Rohringer, Parry
clash over powers
Lee said party discipline "was a
very important factor in the image
of a party."
"You would never catch the
Liberal party tearing into each
other the way the Tories are now."
Part of the reason provincial
NDP are in trouble is their lack of
party discipline, he said. Lee
claimed   evidence   of   the   NDP
From page 1
Parry was allowed to address the
committee in camera.
He said Parry acted as a
prosecutor in the case.
Hicks' story was confirmed by
committee member Gerald
Algaier who said Parry was
"really out to get them."
Rohringer said Parry was to act
only as a channel for student
complaints adding that he was
satisfied Parry did not exceed his
powers.
"I'm convinced he was not involved in deciding on the evictions," Rohringer said.
But Rohringer's statements
were contradicted by Parry
himself who told The Ubyssey
Wednesday that he personally
recommended eviction after
consultation with the house advisors.
Rohringer also said the evictions
will serve to deter other students
from breaking residence
regulations.
"Regardless of right or wrong,
I'm saying that making an
example of a situation is a very
definite message."
He said a harsh judgment of the
five students is understandable as
a means of expressing frustration
with residence students who
constantly break regulations.
But he admitted that he really
did not consider the judgments
harsh.
"Basically they pack up and go
to the housing list in SUB and their
troubles are ended."
Rohringer said he fears the introduction of the Landlord and
Tenant Act to residences because it
will create problems of having to
state and justify precise rules.
Residences in the U.S. have had
tremendous problems with precise
rules of conduct, he said.
But Alma Mater Society council
member Steve Mochnacki said
Wednesday he does not believe
Rohringer's system of operating
through recommendation from
student committees has worked.
"disorganization" was shown
when their own party whip voted
against the party in the legislature.
Lee said he is "very confident"
he will win a legal battle begun by
defeated NDP incumbent Paddy
Neale over alleged irregular
election procedures in the July 8
federal election.
"The action is definitely not a
publicity stunt, the amount of
money involved is too great," he
said.
Lee defended Liberal inflation-
fighting policies by claiming that
Canada can do very little until
other major economic powers in
the world make a move.
He said he is aware of the
limitations of the backbencher role
but that he looks upon the job as
"an educational experience to gain
knowledge about parliament
before stepping into more important positions."
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You don't blow an extraordinary idea
on an ordinary shoe.
**^if:"'tlijjj^
-:'m:>:
'"^i
*.-
 lr»m«j;S!'S-1
By now you're probably
aware that Roots are not
like other kinds of footwear.
The heel is lower to give
you the natural kind of
walk you'd get by going
barefoot in sand. The arch
is supported, so if you.
spend much time on your
feet you'll now spend it in
much greater comfort. The
rocker sole helps spring
you off on each footstep,
so walking becomes a little
less work than it ever was
before.
But a big part of Roots'
success lies in not how
766 Robson St.
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well. Only the finest grade
Canadian hides are
selected. These are handcrafted into Roots, simply
because, for much of our
production, the most
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This is why, of all the
reasons we could give you
for trying Roots, none
would fit quite so well as the
shoe itself.
The Wmdjamming Canadian.
MOLSeH
CANADIAN
Molson Canadian.
Brewed right here in B.C. Friday, September 27,  1974
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
Petition opposes $5 pool levy
ByRYONGUEDES
"From October 13, 1974 no
further moneys shall be spent on
the proposed Aquatic Centre out of
funds raised by levy from students.
"Students shall no longer be
levied $5 each year for the purpose
of constructing a swimming pool.
"Unspent funds, including interest, raised by levy from
students for the purpose of Constructing a swimming pool, shall
be held in trust by the Alma Mater
Society until a future referendum
is held to decide the use of these
funds."
There are the resolutions on a
petition — scheduled for circulation today — requesting the
AMS hold a referendum to
reconsider construction of the
planned $4 million pool.
Members of the ad-hoc committee who drew up the petition
charged Thursday the AMS "has
become preoccupied with erecting
buildings and has lost sight of its
primary responsibilities toward
students" and that UBC has not
fulfilled its responsibility to
provide students with all facilities
necessary for adequate
recreational and physical
education.
Committee member Steve
Mochnacki, a grad studies
representative on council, said the
petition — requiring 500 student
signatures to call a referendum —
will draw a broadly-based support
from students.
"The AMS has been so involved
in buildings — SUB, Thunderbird
winter sports centre and now the
pool — the various times important
issues have come up, such as
housing and increases of tuition,
the executive has not taken the
lead on these problems until
initially forced to by council,"
Mochanacki said.
He said several council members
asking administration president
Walter Gage, the Alumni
Association and the board of
governors to fund important
student services were told by AMS
executive members to desist
because funding the pool was the
AMS's highest priority.
Mochnacki said financing
construction of a pool was the
responsibility of the administration. Current plans for the
pool need not be nullified if the
administration would take it over
completely, he said.
"We're not saying we're against
the pool," he said. "We're against
students having to take the
responsibility for paying for it."
Use of the $200,000 already raised
by the AMS to fund the pool should
be decided in another referendum
after extensive public debate, he
said.
He said suggestions for use of the
money include legal fees for a test
case to establish whether students
are covered under the Landlord-
Tenant Act and building more
student housing.
"The thing we're stressing is
that people should sign the petition
even if they don't agree with the
resolutions," he said. "To give the
students another chance to
reconsider a decision made with
such a small majority."
"I smile and smile," AMS
president Gordon Blankstein, a
member of the pool committee,
said Thursday when he saw the
petition. "There's a bunch of
crackpots on campus who try to
start something like this all the
time."
He said the petition effort is
made "too late" to halt pool plans,
after council had already voted to
hire an architect, approve
preliminary and schematic
drawings and set up a.
management committee.
"I must again remind them a
majority of the students voted to
have the pool built," Blankstein
said.
The $5-per-student fee levy
barely squeaked past a necessary
two-thirds majority with 67.3 per
cent — less than one per cent over
line — after 2,776 out of 4,124
students approved the pool's
construction.
The referendum authorized
spending up to $925,000 of student
funds — one-third of the total cost,
then estimated at $2.8 million —
with the UBC administration
matching the amount and the
remaining third to be raised from
private funds.
General costs of inflation and
plans for additional facilities
raised the cost of building the pool
to $4 million and moved its
scheduled 1975 completion date to
1976 at the earliest.
LECKY   . . .   let's  look  at  food prices
^*w»"
STOVELL
caught    in    the middle
BAILEY . . . it's all economics
Students shouldn't be caught on food seesaw
From page 1
based on the basic food cost and
labor involved, Louie says.
The percentage applied for
labor depends upon which one of
three blocks of production the item
fits into. The labor input is
classified as either counter, low-
level production or complex
production.
The problem with this method
though, is whether or not the item
has been slotted into the correct
block or whether in actual fact the
blocks themselves are correct,
Stovell says.
This pricing method, however,
more accurately relates price to
cost compared to the former
practice of using a constant
markup over raw food costs.
But because the cost is subject to
change whereas menu prices are
fixed, at least in the short run,
safety factors are built into the
menu price as insurance against
erractic price movements on the
supply side.
Soft drinkers pay towards a
different insurance policy.
"We include a safety factor here
because there are a lot of double
drinkers before they reach the
cash register," Stovell says.
As was pointed out in Thursday's
article, if anticipated price increases do not materialize then
these insurance premiums turn
into free dividends for food services — unless some sort of
downward adjustment is made at
the next pricing session.
Percentages aren't as tight as
they could be though since percentage variations  from   cost
to   price  are   hidden   by   nickel
roundoffs on the menu.
"We went into the penny bit with
a few items," Stovell says. "But
the customers complained because
the service at the cash register was
too slow."
But consumers needn't be stuck
in the up position of the seesaw
though. An alternative to raising
prices is cutting costs.
It you've counted fewer chips for
35 cents than you got for 25 cents
last year, you're not really paying
more for less, it's because food
services is bearing down.
The food industry calls it portion
control.
"I'm as willing as the next
person to admit that there will be
variations between last year and
this year," Stovell says. "But each
year the servings get bigger and
bigger. We've been too lax in this
area — this time we are being very
strict about it."
Making substitutions and quality
adjustments is one way of playing
checkers with changing supplier
prices. China to paper plates and
back to china was another move.
The responsibility for manning
these levers on efficiency and cost
control rests with food services
management.
Although we need a yardstick
with finer markings to properly
assess management efficiency, a
price level rising at twice the rate
of the national average has to be
symptomatic of something
unhealthy.
Efficiency brings with it an
automatic cut-off point for the
more expensive items on the menu.
Health foods, for example, can't
make the cut.
So as prices rise the menu
shrinks and the boredom level
drops a notch lower.
And if high protein items happen
to be standing first in line, then
variety and nutrition are sacrificed
for efficiency.
Food services welcomes
suggestions, either verbal or
written, and considers all complaints a prime call on their time.
Out of a flow of 8,000 to 11,000
students per day through SUB
cafeteria,   only   four   or   five
suggestions are collected from the
suggestion box at the end of the
month.
Meanwhile, food services has a
few suggestions of their own.
Bailey, with the philosphy that
"everything should stand on its
own feet" is reviewing past
operating results and at the same
time re-evaluating existing
programs and facilities.
.He has planned an aggressive
start, from hammer and saw activity in SUB cafeteria, to standardized  production  procedures.
Adjustments to the service area
should result in a faster flow of
people through the lunch lineup
and the increased volume will
hepefully generate more revenue,
Bailey says.
But the louder the hammers
hammer and the faster the saws
saw, the harder it becomes to hear
the grating inefficiences of food
service operations.
Who's there to check the joints
and prevent the rusts?
Who's to say the oil isn't being
droppered into all the wrong
connections?
Gage wants prices look
From page 1
community services and food
services reconvenes, it should take
a look at the situation.
"The committee should determine if the figures are facts and
then it should decide what can be
done," Gage said.
The committee did not meet
during the summer and the last
increases it agreed to were for
prices to take effect May 1, said a
university spokesman.
University treasurer Allen
Baxter, to whom acting food
services director Robert Bailey
reports, said Thursday the committee didn't meet because
students weren't around during the
summer.
He said he knew a number of
prices were raised during the
summer by Bailey after the increases    May    1    because    of
"dramatic" increases in the cost of
raw materials, but admitted the
president's committee would not
haye known of the increases.
"We certainly try to keep the
prices as competitive as possible,"
said Baxter.   -
And bursar Bill White, to whom
Baxter reports, said Thursday he
is unfamiliar with the situation.
Board member Paul Plant said
he agrees the board should review
the prices.
"The agenda's set for Tuesday
now, but that's not to say the
matter can't be discussed," Plant
said in an interview. "The board
has often had to react to sudden
situations."
Board member Richard Bibbs
said that if the figures are correct,
the board should consider investigating the increases.
'However, over the years, food
services has provided a real service to students."
Thomas Dohm said Thursday he
agrees there should be some kind
of investigation.
"I think we should get someone
independent to look at the
situation," he said in an interview.
"The person should be someone
with standing in the community
who has a background in the food
processing industry.
"Perhaps students could get a
fellow like Nat Bailey interested."
Bailey, a legendary Vancouver
restauranteur, started off as a
street pedlar of peanuts and
popcorn, turned the business into
the White Spot chain and sold out
for 51 per cent of $6.5 million.
Other board members were
unavailable for comment Thursday. Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, September 27,  1974
Food hard
to swallow
It's not often that The Ubyssey and the board of
governors agree.
But after the report printed here on food services, it
would be difficult to find anyone who didn't agree that there
should be an investigation into food services operations.
It is obvious that food services is run ineffipiently. When
they have trouble breaking even while putting their prices up
at twice the off-campus rate something has got to be wrong.
.Especially when you consider those off-campus
restaurants are making a profit on the food (and in some
cases, it could probably be called real food) they serve.
So something is wrong. But even reporter Denise Chong
found it difficult to acertain just what after an exhaustive
investigation of the food services operation.
The reason for the difficulty is that food services heavies
think of their operation only within the existing terms of
reference.
That is, when a possible area of inefficiency is pointed
out, it can be covered by 100 bureaucratic arguments of why
that particular situation exists.
Everything can be explained in terms of precedents and
compounded arguments. They say this factor relates to that,
which means this is such and so.
And what happens is everyone gets caught in a series of
orders and procedures that doesn't neccessarily make sense.
Which means the operation itself doesn't make sense.
Crazy things happen. Like one price being charged for a
bacon and tomato sandwich with cheese and another price
being charged for a cheese and tomato sandwich with bacon.
And when you try to talk to them about these situations,
the heavies refer you back through the same channels that
have so obviously confused them for ages.
So it's hard to find out just exactly what is wrong, aside
from general inefficiency.
One major point does occur though.
And again, food services head Robert Bailey won't tackle
it — although this time because former head Ruth Blair is on
sick leave and it's not nice to dump on sick people.
The point is this: that food services has been run
inefficiently for years and the current situation is a
conglomeration of past policies.
Sudden increases, like the ones we've witnessed this May
and September, come because the new head is racing to get
the food services back into shape so it can pay off a large
loan.
But again, this is something that is obvious but hard to
prove in its minute details.
An intensive study is just the thing needed at this moment
to find out exactly what is going wrong and how to remedy
it.
It's something home economists from the home ec
department here could deal with efficiently. No reason to call
in outside restauranteers.
Food services obviously doesn't have to take lessons from
them in how to rip students off.
And during this study, they should consider means of
making the food palatable.
It really is awful, as anyone whose ever eaten there knows.
The quality and the selection are both bad. And there's no
reason why students should have to put up with the situation
as it now exists.
mmmw
SEPTEMBER 27,1974
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the writer and not of the
AMS or the university administration. Member, Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly
commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are
located in room 241K of the Student Union Buildinn.
Editorial departments, 228-2301; Sports, 228-2305; advertising,
228-3977.
Editor: Lesley Krueger
These toiled: Denise Chong, Lesley Krueger, Gary Coull, Doug Rushton,
Jake van der Kamp, Reed Clarke, Marcus Gee, Ian Metherell, Pat
McKitrick, Dan Miller, Mike Sasges, Pat Kanopski, Marise Savaria, Peter
Cummings, Sucha Singh, Ralph Maurer, Alan Doree, Cedrlc Tetzel, Ryon
Guedes, Richard Hunt, Ron Binns, Richard Yates, Fred Wheeler, Jacob
Heilbron, Ken Dodd, Bernie Bischoff, Kini McDonald, Tom Barnes, and
some strange person known as the Manitoban. Berton Woodward coached
from the sidelines. Christine Krawczyk and Gord Mullin cheered.
"V?'^s?4'oi
KA^ocmie  poor   vat>oy GOOD.ye^.
£Ameu di«t FADoom BtEErt —    CyjrA&L
Thanks Barrie, you
Provincial rentalsman Barrie Clark has yet
to take office but already he's proved
himself adept at passing the buck.
Well, it seems there's some obscure ruling
that if a landlord has rules governing the
type of tenants he accepts, then the tenants
are not covered by the act.
Now Barrie Clark may say so and because
he's rentalsman that carries a lot of weight.
But his decisions can be challenged in court
and.probably will be, considering there are
lawyers who disagree with him.
If he is proven right and refuses to
protect on-campus tenants, he will have
turned the new act into a farce.
Simply put, students, because they are
students, will be left at housing director
Leslie Rohringer's tender mercies and their
only protection, will be the agreement they
signed with housing.
And that agreement is like a contract to
buy food when you're starving. The person
who's selling it may charge a fair price but if
he wants to charge 50 times what it's worth
you still have to pay.
Rohringer has a waiting list for residence
and you need a place to stay. So if you want
to get into residence you sign on the dotted
line even if it means that you can be kicked
out in 24 hours for what your guests do.
Rohringer may be a benevolent autocrat,
but he's nontheless an autocrat and his
image of benevolence has been tarnished
recently with the eviction of five Gage tower
residents because guests at their party threw
beer bottles over a balcony.
What the university's residences need is a
written document of tenants' rights and
obligations and nothing does the job better
than the Landlord and Tenant Act.
But now that the rentalsman has been
sucked into believing that everything is fine
and dandy at UBC the chance of limiting
Rohringer's powers is minimal.
Thanks Barrie, you're a real pal.
Letters
Singles
saga
Why is it necessary to sell tickets
for UBC dances such as Undercut
'74 this weekend only in couples?
Mouthing off for singles I find
this really discourages me from
attending. It's demeaning for
another girl and myself to attend
on a couples ticket.
I think it considerably reduces
the singles percentage and also
implicates singles as duds for not
operating effectively enough to
latch onto a permanent of the
opposite sex.
Coupling for mutual security
may be a part of certain humans'
human nature but I think us fun-
loving, contented singles should be
granted some consideration.
unsigned
Bunk
My attention has just recently
been refocussed on the appallingly
slow, incredibly frustrating
banking services on campus, (i.e.
SUB Bank of Montreal).
Surely the number of wickets
and "choice" location of the bank
warrant hiring the personnel to
man (or woman) all the wickets
during line-up hours.
Is it too much to ask? They must
be making a fortune on university
business as is; surely prompt
service is  really  the minimum
requirement for their really un-
forgiveable monopoly (as a function of location.)
If they find they cannot give
better service perhaps we the
students should consider other
alternatives.
unsigned
P.S. It took almost half an hour
to deposit a few hundred dollars
and check my account, as the
person at the information desk
refused quite rudely to do it.
Both these letters arrived in The
Ubyssey office unsigned.
Because it is the beginning of the
year and some people are perhaps
unaware of our policy in this
regard, they are being printed
anyway.
But in the future letters reaching
the office without a signature will
get file 13.
Ubyssey policy is that all letters
must bear a signature. Names are
withheld if the author of the letter
includes a valid reason for
anonymity.
This policy first of all keeps
everyone honest, since it's easy to
make false statements behind a
pseudonym.
It also provides the paper with
protection in the case of a libel suit.
Finally, a signature lends
credibility to the letter, since it
shows the writer has the courage of
his/her convictions.
Neither of these letters presents
any valid reason for the lack of a
signature.
In the future, letters like these
won't be printed.—Staff.
Bookstore
As you probably know, the
bookstore and its accomplice — the
armouries — are the largest and
most widely used bureaucracies on
campus. I ask simply, why?
If the Alma Mater Society, or
anyone, were to establish a
competitive bookstore, students
might not be told to "wait until
December, the shipment has been
delayed in Caracas" or "don't ask
us where your book is, ask your
instructor."
I am amazed at fellow students
who stand in line outside the
bookstore for two hours just to find
their book will be in tomorrow. And
those who after making it inside
and actually finding their book
must wait 1-1/2 hours to pay for it.
Does anyone out there want to do
anything about it?
Ron Tuck
commerce 1
[The AMS now runs a secondhand bookstore in the SUB
basement. Many texts can be found
there, since students sell their used
books for a portion of the original
price. — Ed.]
The Ubyssey welcomes fetters
from all readers
Though an effort k made te
print all letters recebedL, The
Ubyssey reserves the right to«4il
tor clarity, legality, brevity sad
taste.  musicmusicmusicmusicmusicmusicmusicmusicmusicmusicmusic
The lady wails the blues
By RON BINNS
A capacity audience watched Bonnie Raitt
and Jackson Browne live on stage at the
Orpheum last Thursday.
Who is Bonnie Raitt? An exuberant
woman with a powerful voice who wails out
a style of rock blues in a manner at times
remarkably similar to Janis Joplin. She
sang a range of material including songs by
James Taylor, Randy Newman and, would
you believe, Jackson Browne.
She also sang a couple of her own songs,
which was unfortunate since she is a bad
songwriter. As a warm-up set it was on the
whole excellent and deserving of the rapturous audience response.
Less applause, though, for the super-cool
freaks in the audience who drifted in
anything up to 20 minutes late, or for the
fidgeting dope fiends who, determined to get
high and ignore outmoded appeals not to
smoke but to respect the Orpheum's ageing
splendor, spent more time fumbling with
rebellious joints and dodging the eyes of the
stern usherettes than on anything happening
on stage.
The first five minutes of Jackson Browne
were something of a shambles of poor
rehearsal, featuring an intriguring darkness
and guitar plucking sounds to titillate a by-
now restless audience. But eventually the
concert started and, to be fair, the Orpheum
was the first gig, so we were told of a 50-city
tour.
Jackson Browne played a long set which
included songs from both the Jackson
Browne and Everyman albums, as well as
numbers from an imminent new album Late
From The Start.
The set was initially troubled by a faulty
sound system and the squeal which cut
through the close of the beautiful
"Everyman" song was painful. Despite the
hassles Browne remained stoically cool,
remarking "From where I come from we
have an old saying: fuek it."
The emphasis was more on the heavier
numbers from the LPs which was perhaps a
pity since Jackson Browne's voice can get
by much better without a cushion of electric
backing. It was also apparent from new
numbers like "Before the Deluge" and
"Late From the Start" that Browne is in
danger of becoming a repetitive songwriter.
His voice is not particularly remarkable
or distinctive, and his strength lies in his
songs. With "Everyman" or "A Song for
Adam" (which he didn't sing) Jackson
Browne is up there with the best of the
singer/songwriters. But on the slightly
heavier numbers like "Doctor My Eyes" the
rhythms seem at times to be forced. The fine
comic song about the pregnant swinger
tying down her man marks a refreshing
change of direction from his other lyrics.
Jackson Browne seems to have reached
an axis point in his career from which he can
either climb out of the cult circuit and get
better known than he is now, or merely
continue to spin out those familiar chords
from the first two albums and slump back
into obscurity.
His ability to excite an audience was
proven at the Orpheum, and maybe the new
album will provide the test.
Perhaps also his muse will derive bitter
inspiration from the moment when, announcing a song for a friend who died, he
was interrupted by a loud roar of laughter
from some insensitive fan at the back.
In a recent issue of Rolling Stone CSN's
Crosby claimed, with bizarre egotism, that
"Everyman" was written about himself.
Jackson Browne, in an aside, referred to
Crosby as "fatty."
Strange.
Classical master strums
By JACOB HEILBRON
A master of the classical guitar played in
concert Wednesday night at Vancouver's
East Cultural Centre.
The guitarist in question is Christopher
Jordan, who held 150 people in respectful
silence as he played a two-hour show with a
theme of the Spaniard and the Gaucho.
Most Vancouverites are probably
unaware of the existence of Jordan, who
is in fact a resident of the city and director of
the Classical Guitar Centre on West Cordova. ,
The concert, on a windy Wednesday
evening, brought several points of interest
to light. The first is the artistic excellence of
Christopher Jordan, who shows that his
training with such masters of the classical
guitar as Julian Bream has paid off.
Jordan was quite a sight to see, dressed
rather formally in a grey suit, hunched over
his beautiful Spanish guitar, one foot resting
on a special stool, built no doubt for that
purpose.
The show was in two parts, the first
drawing on music from Spanish composers,
the second from Argentinians. It was apparent by the quiet and rapt attention given
by the audience that Chris Jordan is indeed
an excellent guitarist. He presents a
technically near-perfect show and yet a
feeling presentation too.
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|C|B]G]E]S]G]i]BI€lililil§IS€]€]§]€]§]SE]B]^li]€l€lSS@
PLEASANT SURROUNDINGS
SUPERB CUISINE
NIGHTLY ENTERTAINMENT
SPECIAL PARTIES - ANNIVERSARIES
For reservations call 224-3711
Page Friday, 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, September 27,   1974 booksboooksbooksbooksbooksboooksbooksbooksbooksbooks
Joplin-viewing highs, lows
By RICHARD YATES
Janis.
What a beautiful person. What pain. She
expresses the glory and the sorrow of the
'60s. Her life encompased both an
astounding rise to fame and "success" as
Myra    Friedman,    Buried    A]ive:    the
Biography of Janis Joplin, Bantam Books,
$1.95.
Peggy Caserta, Going Down with Janis, Dell
Pub. Co., $1.50.
well as a deeply-rooted unhappiness and
isolation. And she died tragically.
This is the stuff great biographies can feed
upon. Myra Friedman and Peggy Caserta
have stepped forward to do their duty to
Joplin and to history. Unfortunately neither
gives us a truly great biography, but each
does give us an interesting story.
Within each of us there resides an undeniable desire to peer into the private lives
of others. Fortunately, Janis Joplin provides
us with ample fare for our appetites. She is
just elusive enough to escape the confines of
either an "official biography" or an "intimate expose".
Each of the authors presents a version of
Joplin.
Apparently Joplin's personality was
forever hidden behind the disguises and
pretences her life demanded. The two
complementary biographies can only give
the reader a feeling for what the real Janis
might have been like.
Myra Friedman gives us an un-
sensational, factual account of Joplin and
adds a personal flavor to the story when it
arrives at her later years. Friedman gives a
personal account of Joplin's stays in New
York from 1968 until the end.
Peggy Caserta presents the more sensational story, recounting her experiences
with Joplin during the early years in San
Francisco and the last few days in L.A.
While Myra is obsessed with presenting a
factual account of Joplin, Peggy isn't
bothered by the petty demands of objectivity.
Caserta's book has the most flaws.
Probably much of its faults can be laid at the
feet of ghostwriter Dan Knapp. The story is
inflated with the cant of pornography. How
much of the activities, attitudes and
dialogue are bogus and how much of it is
real is difficult to judge.
Caserta's story begins with a tale about
Joplin's miserable heterosexual relationships with Country Joe; and Sam Andrew
who was a member of Big Brother and the
Holding Company. Meanwhile she builds up
the story of Joplin's shy interest in herself.
The story now gets complicated with long
interludes concerning the love spats between Caserta and Kimmie — Peggy's
original lesbian lover. Finally the story gets
into high gear with long passages rhap
sodizing the pleasures of the body and the
spiritual highs of heroin.
All this is good solid drugstore bookrack
reading material, but unfortunately the
story only carries us up to the beginning of
Joplin's superstardom. A throwaway ending
covers Joplin's death and which doesn't
really fit in well with the rest of the book
leaving at best a musty window through
which to peer into Joplin's psyche and soul.
Another problem with the book is that
Caserta can't seem to extract herself from
the story. Long passages are taken up
rehashing the joys and degradations of her
and Kimmie's lesbian life-style. Though
Kimmie plays no role in Janis' life, she
plays a fairly large role in Caserta's book.
Friedman is the official biographer, intending her book to be factual and complete,
telling two stories.
The first is an impersonal recording of
facts and dates enlivened by attempts to
gain psychological insights into Joplin and
her problems. The other story is the one that
revolves around Friedman's personal
relationship with Joplin.
Friedman's search into Joplin's psyche
describes her as a shy child with a creative
and independent temperament clashing
with the intolerance of the small-town
narrow mindedness in which she was raised.
Her problem was heightened when during
high school Joplin became pudgy and
developed a severe skin condition.
All these problems developed an acute
need for acceptance and love in Joplin,
while at the same time her alienation and
■»'<w~    m
independence drove her to excesses that
effectively denied her this acceptance.
Originally Joplin entertained with her
"excesses" in order to buy a kind of
backhanded acceptance.
Later she discovered music which gave
her a vehicle through which to entertain.
Eventually she discovered the blues, which
allowed her to both entertain and express
her pain.
Despite her "success" in the rock record
business, Janis could not attain a normal
happiness. Her past had alienated too much
Pathos mapped
By ROB HARVEY
In an accurate depiction of the sympathies
that draw people together and the conflicts
that keep them apart, Matt Cohen's third
novel fulfills the promise  of his earlier
The Disinherited, by Matt Cohen
McClelland & Stewart, 1974
fiction, especially his brilliant but uneven
collection of short stories, Columbus and the
Fat Lady.
The Disinherited is a richly authentic
story about a rural Ontario family and the
passing of land from one generation to the
next.
Richard Thomas is an aging patriarch,
felled by a stroke after a lifetime of working
the farm homesteaded by his fathers before
him. Now a small family circle stands an
uncomfortable vigil: his wife, Miranda; his
son, Erik, an intellectual claimed by the
city; and his stepson, Brian, resentful of
Erik and contemptuous of his city-acquired
indifference.
The central drama of who is to inherit and
who is to escape is part of a larger theme
which pervades The Disinherited — the
encroachment of the city on the countryside
through the speculative seduction of
developers.
Cohen uses technique skillfully to reinforce the novel's themes.
Jumps in time and lucid streams of
consciousness do more than reveal
overlapping waves of thoughts and feelings.
They also build a metaphor for an ancestral
memory filled with violence and even
madness.
Another example of technique reinforcing
a theme lies in Cohen's frequent alternation
between inner and outer perspectives. An
inner point of view compels us to identify
with a character while an outer point of view
dictates detachment and allows us to assess
a character critically .Alternating between
these two perspectives reinforces the theme
of the paradoxical need in human relationships for intimacy as well as distance.
More than most writers, Cohen is alive to
a myriad of sounds, smells and sensations
and this adds descriptive depth and immediacy to his novel. One could almost say
you should read this book with your eyes
closed.
from both herself and others. Life became
for Joplin a long journey in isolation and
pain.
Friedmen tries to give us the road map of
Joplin's life journey by continually attempting to make psychological
assessments of Joplin.
Buried Alive gives a good rendition of
Joplin's evolution through the music scene
in Austin, to San Francisco, and then to the
big time. It discusses her music and her
showmanship, as the reader discovers
Joplin's grunts, pants and howls were not all
that spontaneous and becomes familiar with
the various aspects of the recording
business and of the role of the promoter.
Details abound.
Another delight for the reader is a peek
into the incestuous relationships among the
family of rock stars. We get a look at Jim
Morrison and his spat with Joplin and a
limited view of the relationship between
Joplin and Kris Kristofferson.
There are major flaws in Friedman's
efforts. In the last two-thirds of her book she
introduces a first-person account of Joplin.
The reader soon realizes there was no great
intimacy between the two women, undermining any confidence in her revelations
about Joplin.
How honest was Joplin toward Myra?
How perceptive was Myra of Joplin's real
feelings and real motives? The reader
suspects not all is recorded simply because
the two did not really share their lives with
one another.
The other flaw in this narrative comes
from her efforts to protect Joplin's image.
We are assured Janis was a very intelligent
woman, a very self-aware person. But then
there is Joplin's self-destructiveness. The
question of how much real control Joplin
had over herself is passed over in favor of
reassurances about Joplin's inner wisdom.
So Joplin, who were you? Why did you sing
that way? What would you have said to us
about your biographers?
HOLLYWOOD THEATRE
Sept. 30th to Oct. Sth Incl.
ST. MATTHEW'S GOOD NEWS CAST IN
A JOYFUL ROCK MUSICAL!
"GODSPELL" at 7:30
With David Garber - & Big Cast
ALSO -LAWRENCE OLIVIER -SARAH MILES   in
"LADY CAROLINE LAMB" at 9:20
BOTH PICTURES RATED "GENERAL"
SAT. MAT. 1:30
SPECIAL SHOWING OF
GODSPELL - ALL SEATS 50c
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Oct. 7th to 12th Inclusive
Susannah York - John Morley
"IMAGES"    at 9.30
B.C. Director Warns - Some Nudity and Violence.
ALSO RICHARD ROUNDTREE in
SHAFT IN AFRICA" at 7.30
Adults & Students - $1.50 Evenings
3123 W. Broadway 738-3211
FREE PASS FOR TWO . . . FREE PASS FOR TWO
The TAP Has Been Turned On At
JACKS HANGING TREE
For the thirsty — it's ice cold —
it's bubbly - it's frothy - it's light amber colored and at regular
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Why not visit Jack's Hanging Tree Cabaret, be our guests, just bring
in this ad, good for two admissions.
NIGHTLY ENTERTAINMENT FEATURING:
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FREE PASS FOR TWO . . . FREE PASS FOR TWO
Friday, September 27,  1974
THE      UBYSSEY
Page Friday. 3 volcanic man not ch
Malcolm Lowry, an internationally
famous novelist, lived in the Vancouver
area between 1939 and 1954 and wrote
almost all his important work during this
period.
In his lifetime Vancouver took no interest
in Lowry and even now, almost 20 years
after his death, the city continues to ignore
his mounting fame.
Except, that is, for UBC, which houses 36
boxes of largely unpublished Lowry,
manuscripts in the special collections
division of the main library, and the
magazine Canadian Literature whose
editor, George Woodcock, encouraged an
interest in Lowry long before concern with
his fiction reached its present proportions.
Today a few of the buildings where Lowry
stayed still stand, decaying amid the new
white highrise apartment blocks of downtown Vancouver.
Lowry's shack at Dollarton, where he
spent his happiest years, is long since gone,
bulldozed down along with the forest that
came to feature so importantly in his later
work. But as the physical landmarks drop
away, so the interest in his fiction grows and
in the portraits of his own legend that he
worked and reworked in his writing under a
breathless variety of personae.
In the Consul, doomed hero of Lowry's
greatest novel Under The Volcano, he
created his finest embodiment of that
recurring Lowryesque character: the ultra-
alienated drunkard and melancholic, tormented by the past and irrevocably toppling
toward the abyss.
It is easy to stress the romantic elements
of Lowry's life and work — the drop-out, the
drunkard who blew his mind, the anguished
suicide, the paranoiac and depressive who
early on in life discovered Kierkegaard,
Y
Letters of Malcolm Lowry, available as a
Capricorn Books paperback.
Douglas Day's recent biography of Lowry
is also essential reading for a full account of
the Vancouver/Dollarton years, while UBC
English professor William New's booklet
Malcolm Lowry, in the McClelland and
Stewart Canadian writers series, provides a
By RON BINNS
short, cheap and useful introduction to
Lowry's work, which includes a discussion
of the manuscript material held in the
library.
George Woodcock's Malcolm Lowry: The
Man And His Work, published by the UBC
Press, is an anthology of academic essays
and reminiscences, while ex-UBC lecturer
Tony Kilgallin's Lowry provides further
biographical material and a detailed account of sources in Ultramarine and Under
The Volcano.
Lowry was. 29 years old when he first
arrived in Vancouver in July 1939. Born in
England, Lowry had left his homeland in
1933, having graduated from Cambridge and
subsequently published his precocious
autobiographical first novel Ultramarine.
This novel resembles other avant garde
stream-of-consciousness novels written in
the shadow of James Joyce's Ulysses.
Although not easy reading, it anticipates
many of the themes and techniques of his
later. works and provides the necessary
grounding in Lowry's densely literary style.
After leaving England Lowry entered a
six-year phase of restless travelling that led
him from Spain to France to New York to
Los Angeles to Mexico, back to Los Angeles
1359 DAVIE STREET ... Lowry and his wife spent the winter of 1952-1953 here,
are in debt, we live on one hard-boiled egg (bad) every three days," he wrote.
Kafka and Hesse and the arcane philospher
obsessed by coincidence and magic, student
of the cabbala and Charles Fort. But Lowry
was also a highly self-conscious — though
complex — literary craftsman and to read
his later work simply as incoherent
emotional outpourings is extremely
misleading.
The later fiction makes heavy demands on
the reader since it involves a complex kind
of literary cannibalism. But to understand
the elements of self-parody and catch the
irony at work, it is first necessary to have
read Lowry's earlier books, which are
persistently alluded to.
If Lowry's self-mythologizing at first
simply involves a romantic drunkard, later
it involves a romantic drunkard who is also
the author of Under The Volcano, who also
may himself merely be a character in a
novel.
In view of the bewildering quality of this
kind of literary narcissism as it moves
toward the metaphysics of the writer as a
god, the best introduction to Lowry's work is
his first novel Ultramarine. This work has
recently been reissued as a Penguin
paperback, in conjunction with The Selected
and winding up ultimately in Vancouver.
During this time he married, briefly and
unhappily, and, shortly before leaving for
Vancouver, met scriptwriter Margerie
Bonner, an ex-child film star, who was to
become his second wife.
Why Lowry came to Vancouver, "the
most hopeless of all cities of the lost" as he
called it, is still not entirely clear. According
to Douglas Day's biography it was either to
enable Lowry to renew his U.S. visa, which
Lowry mistakenly believed could only be
done by leaving the country and then
reapplying for admission or, more probably,
to evade having to appear in court regarding
his divorce.
His first wife, Jan, had sued for a divorce
claiming that he had treated her "with
extreme cruelty and has been habitually
intoxicated" besides providing no financial
support. In Lowry's absence the court
awarded her a nominal $250 settlement.
"I am desperately unhappy, absolutely
alone and without friends in an abominable
climate," Lowry wrote soon after arriving
in Vancouver. He was living in difficult
circumstances at 595 West Nineteenth, from
where he made one abortive attempt to
board a bus back to L.A. and Margerie
Bonner. He was turned back at the border,
drunk. She promptly abandoned her job and
travelled up to live with Lowry.
In Lowry's masterpiece Under The
Volcano, set in Mexico, Canada functions as
a cool northern paradise, a sphere of
possible harmony that the hopelessly
doomed characters long for but can never
attain.
However, the immediate situation for
Lowry and Margerie Bonner, though cool,
was scarcely paradisical: "If something
doesn't happen pretty damn quick the
situation will become like the postulated end
of Kafka's The Castle, in which he was too
worn out to write.
' 'There is an icy rain which hasn't stopped
for days, we both have caught colds, and
Margie has a cough," Lowry protested to his
friend and mentor, the American poet and
novelist, Conrad Aiken.
Though conditions in that first bleak
Vancouver winter of 1939-40 were appalling,
Lowry, with Margerie Bonner's assistance,
began working through a second draft of
Under The Volcano, a novel he had started
in Mexico in 1936.
By late spring they had worked through a
third draft and things improved when the
two of them moved on to live at 1236 West
Eleventh, from where Lowry sent the novel
off to his agent in New York.
But Lowry wanted a break and reading
The Vancouver Sun he discovered an advertisement for a cottage by the shore at
Dollarton. This wooded area, owned by
National Harbors Board, was dotted along
the shoreline with a dozen or so squatter's
shacks and cottages, and it was here that
Lowry and Margerie Bonner came to live.
At first they had planned simply on a
month's vacation, but Lowry was reluctant
to return to the city.
Staying on for the winter months the two
of them began a new style of life which, it
turned out, was to continue for the next 14
years until the Lowrys left Canada for good
in 1954.
Looking at a map of the Vancouver area
today, the Lowry shack was located approximately by the remaining patch of
woodland at Dollarton, on the point where
the inlet suddenly bends at a 90 degree angle
up toward Indian Arm, roughly opposite
Simon Fraser University and the Shell Oil
refinery. The refinery was there in Lowry's
day, and in the story The Forest Path to the
Spring there is a reminiscence of the time
when the advertising sign first went up: "for
weeks they never got around to the S, so that
it was left HELL. And yet, my own
imagination could not have dreamed
anything fairer than the heaven from which
we perceived this. (In fact I was even fond of
the evil oil refinery itself that at night now,
as the war demanded more and more
lubrication, was often a blaze of lights like a
battleship in harbor on the admiral's birthday.)"
During the period at Dollarton Under The
Volcano was meticulously revised until
finally it was accepted for publication
simultaneously by Jonathan Cape in
England and Reynal and Hitchcock in the
U.S. on April 6,1946. The novel is available
today as both a Penguin Modern Classic
paperback and a Signet paperback. Lowry
also worked on a volume of poems to be
called The Lighthouse Invites The Storm,
and extracts from this are available in The
Selected Poems Of Malcolm Lowry,
published as a City Lights paperback.
Other work at Dollarton included In
Ballast To The White Sea, a long novel
which was destroyed when their shack
burned down in 1944; a novella Lunar
Caustic, which drew on Lowry's experiences
in Bellevue Hospital, New York, and which
has been published posthumously in an
edited version as a Cape paperback; and a
volume of short stories, Hear Us 0 Lord
From Heaven Thy Dwelling Place,
published both as a Penguin and a Capricorn
Books paperback.
Lowry also took Margerie, by then his
wife, on a traumatic journey back to Mexico
to reinvestigate the pSychic, symbolic and
real landscapes of Under The Volcano. This
1945 trip provided material both for Dark As
The Grave Wherein My Friend Is Laid,
LOWRY IN LONDON
Lowry and Dollarton photos from Malcolm
Lowry by Douglas Day. Building photos by
Kini McDonald
available edited as a Penguin Modern
Classic paperback; and La Mordida, still
unpublished.
If Canada provides merely a remote ideal
in Under The Volcano, or a point of
departure in Dark As The Grave and in the
short story Through the Panama in Hear Us
O Lord, it became increasingly important
toward the close of the Dollarton period. The
Lowrys worked on radio scripts about two
classic Canadian novelists, Stephen
Leacock and Louis Hemon and Lowry's
unpublished short novel The Ordeal Of
Sigbjorn Wilderness takes us right out of the
rural idyll to St. Paul's Hospital.
This novel, written in 1949, is reminiscent
of Lunar Caustic for its hallucinatory
narrative set within the experience of
hospitalization, though very much more
autobiographically directed in its characterization and its arcane dealings with
occult metaphysics.
Two of the stories in Hear Us 0 Lord
spring directly from the Dollarton experience. Gin and Goldenrod offers an
ambiguous insight into some of the contrary
aspects of an idyllic life in the woods. The
"bourgeois horrors" of middle class
civilization which nudge the countryside are
counterpointed by "the dark forest, waiting,
one hoped, for revenge."
Some of the ambivalence of the rural
"paradise" is hinted at by the tension in the
story's title, and the protagonist in the story
concludes that "the bootlegger, in rural
places, is as fundamental as the prostitute in
the city." The cloying sentimentality of the
lovers' dialogue seems edged with irony, the
Page Friday,   4
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday,  September  27,   1974 mpened by Dollarton rains
details of the landscape appear slightly
sinister.
The Forest Path to the Spring likewise
celebrates the style of life the Lowrys led in
their Dollarton shack, but again paradise is
not entirely free from ambiguity — from the
demonic. The anonymous narrator envisages writing an opera with the same
name as the actual volume of stories itself,
but whether or not its characters are
situated "on the stage or in the pit" remains
symbolically unresolved. Even the
purifying spring itself runs at the end "down
toward HWoubt."
The Bravest Boat, the first story in Hear
Us 0 Lord, describes two lovers walking by
Lost Lagoon in Stanley Park, hating the
city: "anyone who had ever really been in
hell must have given Enochvilleport
(Vancouver) a nod of recognition."
Finally the lovers come to seem like the
lynx in the cage, "seeking in desperation
also some way out . . . truly damned and
under some compelling enchantment."
Ghostkeeper, another Lowry story
published for the first time last year in
American Review 17 (May 1973) also
features two lovers walking in Stanley Park,
but compared with the earlier story it
demonstrates a similar advance in Lowry's
style as that between Lunar Caustic and The
Ordeal Of Sigbjorn Wilderness. Ghost-
keeper is process, not product. Its self-
consciousness as a literary artifact makes it
a more complex and compelling narrative
for the reader.
At the same time the impetus to objectify
experience behind masks is gone — Vancouver is presented as Vancouver, not
Enochvilleport, and the setting is precisely
dated at the time the Lowrys were actually
living a few hundred yards away at 1075
Gilford Street.
October Ferry To Gabriola, the last novel
Lowry worked on, brings the ragged Lowry
canon to a close and neatly closes up the
continuum of his autobiographical
mythology. After The Ordeal Of Sigbjorn
Wilderness, it is his most local fiction, since
it deals with a trip to Gabriola Island via
Victoria and Nanaimo, while a sizeable
flashback returns us to downtown Vancouver and an extraordinary quarrel between the main characters which severely
qualifies the idea that the city and the
countryside contrast in simplistic black and
white opposition.
As with all the other voyages in Lowry's
fiction the journey to Gabriola becomes
metaphorical of a higher, symbolic quest; in
this case for a new home, new foundations, a
new future. Written at the close of Lowry's
life in Canada, it seems retrospectively and
ironically appropriate that the gesture of
affirmation and optimism at the end of
October Ferry to Gabriola seems too slight,
too temporary to be entirely persuasive;
and that Gabriola itself, the future, is never
actually arrived at but is left looming
ambiguously in the distance.
By the early 50's things were beginning to
go seriously wrong for Lowry. His method
writing meant that he was often involved in
working on half a dozen different projects at
once.
One moment publishers were referring to
Lowry's later work as promising to be "the
most important literary project of the
decade," the next they were turning down
Lunar Caustic and Hear Us O Lord.
Though Day does not mention this in his
biography, letters on file in the special
collections division show that Lowry considered a variety of other means of obtaining financial support.
He entered the Canadian Imperial Bank of
Commerce's short-story competition in 1950
after getting a warm response from the
bank's PR man, who assured Lowry that the
plan called for a writer who should be known
but wasn't. x
Encouraged Lowry went ahead and
submitted Sooner or Later or So They Say
only to receive the chilling reply that the
story seemed completely out of character
with the series as visualized by its PR
organizer. Lowry also thought in terms of
obtaining money from a fellowship from the
federal government, even, one letter shows,
as far back as 1940. Desperate for money
that year he even wrote two short journalistic essays for The Vancouver Sun.
In 1952 Lowry tried again, this time applying to the National Research Council in
Ottawa, who were handing out $4,000
fellowships to enable men and women "of
proven ability" to spend a year abroad.
Though Lowry's editor Albert Erskine wrote
a very favorable reference mentioning
Lowry's "difficult economic circumstances" the application failed.
If as soon as he was dead Hear Us 0 Lord
was to win the Governor General's Award,
in Lowry's lifetime Under The Volcano was
not considered deserving of reward. So it
goes.
Lowry's last three winters in Canada were
each spent in downtown Vancouver. After
the depressing news of the rejection of Hear
Us O Lord and Lunar Caustic during the
1951-2 winter spent at 1075 Gilford Street,
things improved slightly the following year
while the Lowrys were spending the winter
of 1952-53 at the Bayview Apartment Hotel,
1359Davie Street— a flimsy-looking wooden
building which, although no longer a hotel, is
still standing today.
The letters Lowry wrote from this address
are more cheerful in tone and it was here
that he received the news that New World
DOLLARTON CABIN . . . demolished now, but formerly located across from the oil
refinery. Lowry was fascinated as the sign originally went up without the opening 'S' to
glitter "HELL" from across the water.
Writing had accepted the story Strange
Comfort Afforded By the Profession.
It seems ironic that a story with a title —
the profession referred to being that of
writing — should turn out to be almost the
last thing Lowry published in his lifetime.
THE CAROLINE COURT, 1058 NELSON STREET ... The Lowry's last winter in
Vancouver, spent here, was also their grimmest. Lowry learned of his friend Dylan
Thomas's death while staying here, and soon afterwards his publishers terminated his
contract and abandoned him. Four years later Lowry was dead.
By the winter of 1953-54 things reached
rock bottom when, shortly after the news of
his friend Dylan Thomas' death, Lowry was
abandoned by his publishers, who, annoyed
by Lowry's inability to serve up a completed
October Ferry To Gabriola, and insensitive
to Lowry's struggles for a new form of
writing, terminated the contract. At this
time the Lowrys were living in the Caroline
Court apartment block, 1058 Nelson Street,
also still standing today and just around the
corner from St. Paul's Hospital.
From this point on Lowry began the slow
slide to his abrupt and early death in June
1957. At the Caroline Court Lowry began to
drink heavily once again.
As Douglas Day wisely remarks, "one
must resist the urge to end esthetically,
leaving a self-realized Lowry sitting
securely in his waterfront cottage, writing
simply and eloquently about his life of
equilibrium in his Canadian paradise. What
really happened is messier by far, and
sadder."
In addition to his problems with
publishers, Lowry was also in danger of
being evicted from his shack. "Development" was beginning to eat into the
Dolarton countryside, and there was the
additional factor that tax would be due on a
much-needed inheritance that Lowry had
fortuitously come into. In August 1954, with
Lowry already on the road to a crackup, the
couple left Canada forever.
Three years later, back home in England
at last, Lowry was dead — "of misadventure" according to the coroner's report,.
a classic euphemism for a suicidal overdose
of alcohol and barbiturates, though admittedly the circumstances of Lowry's
death are ambiguous and slightly
mysterious.
"Christ how I hate Vancouver," Lowry
wrote toward the end of his time in the city,
but it would be false to regard his responses
as continuously negative.
When Lowry created an image of Canada
in his poetry he thought not of Dollarton but
of downtown Vancouver. "Beneath the
Malebolge lies Hastings Street," he wrote,
but if the city resembled Dante's inferno it
was not entirely without redemptive
possibility.
"This place where chancres blossom like
the rose,
For on each face is such a hard despair
That nothing like a grief could enter there.
And on this scene from all excuse exempt
The mountains gaze in absolute contempt.
Yet this is also Canada, my friend,
Yours to absolve of ruin, or make an end."
A doctoral English student at East Anglia
University in Great Britain, Page Friday
staffer Ron Binns is spending a year at UBC
to study letters and documents of Malcolm
Lowry. Most of these are contained in the
special collections division of the main
library.
Binns has spent a total of seven years
studying the life and writings of Lowry,
already completing a masters' thesis on the
British author who lived in Vancouver for
the most productive literary period of his
life.
Friday, September 27,   1974
THE       UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 5 bicycles bicycles bicycles
Bike, a great
social vehicle
The following is the first in a series of articles dealing with all aspects of
bicycling.
By FRED WHEELER
Your legs are pumping, the wheels are turning and you can actually
feel your heart beating! The open road and blue sky ahead will be
reached by your own power. The pleasant whirr of your machine sets
calmness in your mind. Wind is blowing in your hair. It feels good.
Increasingly over the past five years, all over North America, new enthusiasts of all sizes and shapes are abandoning their four-wheeled
monsters in favor of healthier and more pleasurable two-wheeled transportation.
The bicycle is doubtless the ultimate form of transportation. The
energy consumed to power a bicycle is incredibly little. The bicycle does
not pollute, is inexpensive and faster than walking.
However, I have found the main advantage of bike riding is how flabby
bodies, minds and spirits can be easily regenerated and strengthened.
Bicycling is admittedly not the fastest way of getting around.
However, often much of the fun is travelling to rather than arriving
somewhere.
What better way is there to truly commune with a natural setting? My
own cycling experience has been of trees and rivers, mountains and
streams. Above all, I have been able to recognize people and their
humanity much better because I was not looking at them through a box.
So the bicycle is a great social vehicle, in more ways than one.
Once decided on a bicycle, many people will rush to the nearest bicycle
store and buy the most inexpensive 10-speed available without bothering
to ask any questions.
In purchasing a bike your intended use is an essential consideration.
For the ordinary city rider, a three-speed bicycle or for the hardier
cyclist, a one-speed coaster bike with raised bars is all that is probably
needed.
A three-speed is quite comfortable for short tours and many English
cycling enthusiasts swear by the Sturmey Archer three speed hub.
In fact, tours have been made clear across the Asian continent without
derailleurs because they have been judged as too unsturdy.
Most people turn to the so-called "sophisticated" machine — the 10
speed. It is, of course, a lighter machine and its wide range and easy
method of shifting gears makes cycling much easier. This can be readilty
attested by those hardy few who try to make it up the hill from Alma and
West Tenth to UBC on a 3-speed as they curse at persons flashing by on 10-
speeds.
A good 10-speed is a sturdy, easy to carry, easy to handle and maintain, and for its relatively low cost and cheap maintenance, it is a
bargain. A three or five-speed will easily suffice for any kind of cycling,
but for maximum enjoyment, a bicycle rider will turn to a 10-speed.
Next time around, we'll look at the equipment and other things to
consider when purchasing your two-wheeled beauty.
Eight-year-old Zeppelin mogul
Sligo Coarseface made the world's
longest freefall parachute jump in
May 1963 when he blew six
stevedores while skiing sideways
and spelling "Dostoevskian" at a
weekly meeting of the Mount
Phlegm Curling and Diesel-
powered Nun-swapping Club in
Kitsilano . . . amazing but false.
This week's magic mystery prize
goes to whomever guesses, to
within the nearest 20, how many
maple leats there are on Team
Canada 74's uniform.
Seagram's Five Star Rye is used
by many primitive tribes to tip
their poison arrows.
sub film soc presents
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Page Friday, 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, September 27,  1974 Friday, September 27,   1974
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 11
Ship sets sail for whales
By RYON GUEDES
Protestors aboard the Greenpeace Five will attempt to
blockade Russian and Japanese
whaling operations this summer, a
Greenpeace Foundation
spokesman said Tuesday.
Spokesman Paul Spong said the
vessel will leave Vancouver in
June to patrol the North Pacific as
far as the Aleutian Islands to
establish friendly contact with
large numbers of whales.
"Ninety per cent of the world's
whales have already been wiped
out and some species have been
exterminated altogether," Spong
said. "In the face of lack of serious
action at any level of government
in the world, we are forced to act
ourselves if there is to be any hope
of saving those surviving whales."
He compared extinction of the
whales to the dying-out of the
dinosaurs, citing man and his
machines rather than of famine
and changing climate as the instrument of destruction,     y
Japan and Russia are the leading
whaling nations today, Spong said.
"Significantly, although one is a
capitalist country and the other
communist,   neither   one   has
managed to awaken to a sense of
environmental maturity and
responsibility.
"Through the weakness and
indifference of other more
enlightened governments, these
two nations are being allowed to
carry on a program of slaughter
which amounts to the environmental equivalent of the
dropping of the atomic bomb on
Hiroshima, except that in this case
the victims of man's destructive
technology are not the Japanese
people themselves, but the whales
that live in the seas around them."
Spong said the foundation is
seeking support from Japanese
Prime Minister Kakuei Tanaka's
government in a 10-year international whaling moratorium,
enabling the exhausted whale
population to recover so future
generations can study the
creatures alive.
He said the Greenpeace Five
mission — supported by Friends of
the Earth, Project Jonah, the
Sierra Club, the Fund for Animals,
the B.C. Wildlife Federation,
Pollution Probe and Scientific
Pollution   and   Environmental
'Big change for AUS'
Widespread changes in the arts
undergraduate society are expected when the AUS constitution
comes up for review Monday, a
society spokesman said Thursday.
Bruce Wilson said the AUS has
been quickly losing its effectiveness ever since departmental unions were formed last
year.
"With the establishment of
departmental unions, interest in
the AUS, as a whole began to shift
drastically to concern for the individual departments," he said in
an interview.
As a result, the AUS wants to
institute a more effective link
between the individual unions and
the society in general, he said.
Wilson stressed that the AUS
does not wish to infringe upon the
rights of the student unions.
Wilson said he sees the constitutional proposals as a means
for "setting up a linear relationship between the AMS, the AUS
and the individual departmental
unions."
New election rules for the AUS
and the unions will be one of the
major proposals at Monday's
meeting. Both majors and honors
students will be given equal opportunity to form departmental
unions, Wilson said.
Wilson said one purpose of this
amendment will be to avoid having
faculty members choose reps for
the unions.
In effect, the AUS is striving to
set up a sort of federal-provincial
relationship between itself and the
departmental unions, he said.
If the proponents of the new
constitution are successful, Wilson
said the AUS will be renamed the
arts council.
Argut ShramTweezle, playing
with a broken wicket for Great
Britain in the 1884 Amritsar
Classic scored 714 for not out
before tea in a test match against
the Pakistan over-38 all-star side ..
. amazing but false.
The largest booger ever
recorded fell out of Bombo the
Elephant's trunk at the Snork
Brothers' Circus in Grand Rapids,
Michigan, during an artillery
attack at the Boxer Rebellion 1913
reunion.
The worst recorded case of B.O.
was when Dr. Mormon Beaver-
cheese of Blaine, Washington had a
flatulence attack in 1959 and
messed up Vaughn Palmer's
raincoat. . . amazing but false.
Wilson said the whole process
will likely be completed within a
year.
Control — will include representatives from Canada, Japan, Great
Britain, the United States,
Australia, New Zealand, South
Africa and France.
"Our objective will be to put
human lives between the whalers
and the whales, to demonstrate
that the Captain Ahab mentality
must be abandoned if there is to be
any hope for survival of our own
species, as well as others on this
world," he said.
"If we can learn how to save
other creatures, we will find the
secret to saving ourselves."
Previous Greenpeace vessels
included the Greenpeace and
Greenpeace Too, which sailed into
the Aleutians in 1971, to protest the
U.S. Atomic Energy Commission's
seven-test program at Amchitka
Island. The commission eventually
cancelled the program after three
nuclear blasts.
the old
spaghetti
factory
HOSTESS WANTED
PART TIME
53 WATER ST. GASTOWN
Greenpeace Three sailed in 1972
to Mururoa Atoll, protesting the
French government's atmospheric
nuclear testing in the area. The
vessel was rammed and the crew
was beaten up by French sailors
when they returned to Mururoa in
1974.
The Greenpeace Four sailed
from New Zealand the same year,
but was unable to reach Mururoa
before the end of the tests.
A foundation spokesman said the
boat to be renamed the Greenpeace Five cannot be identified
until negotiations end with several
boat owners.
Try It
You'll Like It
At
LINDY'S
IRVING LAYTON]
Controversial Canadian
Poet reading his own work.
| TUESDAY, OCT. 1,  12:30 |
In   Lecture  Room  2  of  the
Instructional Resources Centre.
3211 W.BROADWAY
738-2010
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CANADA STUDENT LOANS
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the helpful bank
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Dave Stewart, Manager
Cheryle AAaggott, Loans
10th at Sasamat — 228-1141 Page 12
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, September 27,  1974
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KE 32574 —HOLLIES
KC 32760 — SLOW DANCER
-BOZ SCAGGS
KCS 9947 SECOND WINTER
— JOHNNY WINTER
«cord MILES DAVIS
SET      BIG FUN
including:
Great Expectations/tte
Go Ahead John/Lonely Fire
.99
Weather Report
Mysterious Traveller
including
American Tango Jungle Book Blackthorn Rose
Nubian Sundance Scarlet Woman
HERB!E HANCOCK
HEAD HUNTERS
including:
Chameteon/Wstef melon Man
Sly/Vein MeKer
LtuU
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9.98 LIST
KC 32837 - VISIONS - PAUL
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BXN 26466 - INSIDE - PAUL
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KE 32572-PURE MUSIC
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KC   32346-INTROSPECTION
—THUS VAN LEER
KC    32210—SWEETNIGHTER-
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KC 31600-INSIDE II-PAUL
HORN
KC 32194 — HEAD TO THE
SKY-EARTH, WIND & FIRE
KC32712 —OPEN OUR EYES-EARTH,
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kc 32766- between nothingness & eternity
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cs 8271 —sketches of spain
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kc 32957 — apocalypse
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TAPE
PRICES BEGIN
AT A LOW
Epic
556 SEYMOUR ST. 682-6144
?>PEN THURSDAY AND FRIDAY UNTIL 9 P.M Friday, September 27,  1974
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  13
Big food chains gobble small
competitors and their profits
From THE MANITOBAN
The fight for control of food distribution in
Canada being waged by a handful of large
corporations has resulted in a near
monopoly as independent grocers have been
relentlessly driven into bankruptcy.
Corporate chains increased their share of
the grocery dollar from 32.2 per cent in 1951
to 54.1 per cent in 1971. The big loser in this
battle is the independent grocer whose share
of the dollar dropped from 62.8 per cent to 20
per cent in the same 20-year period.
When we look around for an appropriate
example of a large powerful irresponsible
agribusiness corporation, we find many.
The example we have chosen may not be the
most powerful but it unquestionably is one of
the privileged few that can flout the law at
will.
Safeway Ltd. of America controls food
retailing and wholesaling for half of the
North American continent through its many
subsidiaries. The Canadian operation,
copying its American parent, controls the
grocery trade from Thunder Bay to Vancouver.
Combined with its parent, which controls
the grocery business in all states west of the
Mississippi River, Safeway can determine
the price, quantity and quality of food for
more than half of North America.
As money in the corporate system buys
effective power, Safeway is getting more
powerful with each passing day. Canada
Safeway is experiencing substantial gains in
income such as 42 per cent leap in profits
during 1972.
The five-year (1968-1972) increase in
profits totalled approximately 75 per cent or
from $12 million to $21 million per year. Last
November, W. F. Griffiths, chairman of
Safeway's board of directors, announced net
income for the first 36 weeks of 1973 was
eight per cent ahead of the record-breaking
pace set two years ago.
Safeway's ability to reap enormous profits
is clearly related to the control it has over
the grocery trade in Western Canada.
An examination of the Safeway corporate
structure provides a model on which all
successful multinational conglomerates
operate.
Safeway operates in a "vertically integrated" fashion. Simply put, vertical
integration is a method of operation through
which a corporation supplies all its needs
through the subsidiary companies it owns or
controls.
When a Safeway supermarket manager
wants to order more stock, he orders from
Macdonald's Consolidated, a wholly-owned
Safeway subsidiary.
In addition to the "house brands" such as
Lucerne, Bel Air or Empress, Macdonald's
stocks name brand products from such
companies as General Foods, Ralston
Purina and McCains.
Naturally the Safeway brands are
preferred as the company makes more
money through their sale and thus up to one-
third of the products come from Safeway
subsidiaries.
The house brands manufactured by
Safeway-owned companies extend into most
areas of the food industry.
Through Macdonald's Consolidated
Safeway operates bakeries, fluid milk
plants, ice cream plants, a fruit and
vegetable plant, a coffee roasting plant, a
jam and jelly factory and facilities for
processing frozen foods, eggs, beverages,
tea and cheese.
When the warehouse is running low, a
Safeway owned semi-trailer truck is sent to
pick up the needed supplies from the
Safeway owned plant. The same truck may
When a royal commission reports price-
fixing in such a vital sector of the economy
as food, one would expect the forces of
justice would step in and put a stop to all this
nonsense.
Five years later, Canadian Press firmly
reported the Supreme Court of Canada had
The total number may actually decline
further as it is now common policy among
the supermarket chains to close down old
small stores in favor of vastly expanding
present stores. ^ The settlement allows
Safeway to use 'the space of abandoned
stores   for   the   expansion   of   existing
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Companies that Safeway owns or shares common directors with.
also be used to supply the supermarket with
the goods ordered.
Every piece of furniture, machinery and
appliance used in every warehouse,
supermarket and plant is owned or leased
through another subsidiary, Wingate
Equipment Lessors Ltd.
Originally incorporated as Safeway Stores
Ltd. in 1929, Canada Safeway spent the first
16 years of operation acquiring nine retail
businesses, four wholesale outlets and two
food processing companies.
Included in the tally are Empress
Manufacturing Co. Ltd., Fraser Valley
Growers Ltd., Blue Bird Self-Service Stores,
Provincial Produce Co., and Piggly Wiggly
(Canadian) Ltd.
Today it operates 263 retail outlets and 10
warehouses, mainly in the West.
With the opening of a warehouse and office complex in Toronto, Canada Safeway
has just begun a determined bid to grab a
share of the rich Central Canada market.
The most intensive public examination of
Canada Safeway by a government agency to
date was carried out by the Batten royal
commission in 1968.
The commission "discovered" a pattern
of "price-leadership" occurs when one
dominant company in a region sets the
prices which all other companies follow. On
the prairies, Safeway is the price-leader.
stood up to the corporate giant and soundly
slapped its wrist.
Upon examination of the agreement, the
slaps turn out to be more in the line of a
manicure.
While Safeway is forbidden from undercutting opposition in any particular area,
it is not prevented from varying its store
prices. Studies conducted find supermarket
prices are generally higher in poor districts
than in richer areas.
The practice of banning competitors from
a shopping complex through a restrictive
lease is halted for six years. Safeway can
still sign such leases but they do not become
effective until 1979.
A third point of the settlement forbids
Safeway from buying any Calgary retail
food operations for five years. Unfortunately this completely misses the base
of Safeway's power-vertical integration.
None of its subsidiaries are affected, so it
can continue to buy up locally-owned food
processors and warehouses.
The construction of new supermarkets is
restricted to only one in the next 3-1/2 years.
As Safeway has actually a net loss of one
store since 1971, the board of directors
shouldn't lose much sleep.
facilities.
Considering Safeway had up until 1972
more stores than all its competitors combined, it should be able to find at least one
that can be profitably renovated.
Safeway is well-acquainted with the
courts in Canada and the United States.
During the last 35 years the U.S. parent has
been taken to court and/or before the U.S.
Federal Trade Commission for:
• conspiracy to restrain trade
• conspiracy to suppress competition
• false advertising
• price fixing
Despite its hard time with the law,
Safeway has expanded rapidly to such an
extent that it has the largest profits ($90
million) of any supermarket operation in the
U.S.
Control of Safeway is associated with the
Merrill family of Merrill Lynch investment
house. Charles Merrill was co-founder and
largest stockholder until his death in 1955.
Merrill's only daughter married Robert A.
Magowan who left the Merril Lynch
operation to take over Safeway in 1955.
Magowan's son, Merrill Lynch Magowan,
sits on the Safeway board of directors while
retaining the position of sales manager at
Merrill Lynch.
Visit
RHODES
Western Canada's finest selection of sound
equipment. 3 sound areas for undisturbed listening,
knowledgeable staff, highest quality — lowest prices.
2665 W. Broadway 733-5914
'The Finest For Less"
gracious
older home
with accommodations for 15 to 20
students. 7 bathrooms — spacious
common areas. Ideal for student
residence, for fraternity or sorority
house. Prime location 15th &
Arbutus area. An exceptional
opportunity for a student co-op
enterprise. Asking $99,500. Fully
furnished. Vendor will assist with
financing. Call Don Clark 926-2107
or Norm Shewring 261-7849.
macaulay, nicolls,
maitland & co. ltd.
4707 Kingsway, Burnaby
433-8231
fombutcin
Indonesian and Malaysian
batik Afghani dresses and
shoes.
10% off for students during
October.
3712 W 10th Ave.   Vancouver    224-4220 Page 14
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday,  September 27,   1974
Hot flashes
Free lessons
for tenants
If you're a renter and your
landlord is ripping you off (and
sure as Doug Kenny looks like a
chicken he is) the provincial
government has just the band aid
solution you're looking for.
Enough money to get you
really drunk, buy a good meal, or
supply the funds to buy
explosives to blow up your
landlord's car — 30 delicious
bucks.
It's a one time only deal and
won't do much to help pay rip off
rent prices but it's better than
nothing.
To get this fabulous sum, all
you have to do is fill out a renters
resource grant application form
and   send  it off to one of the
faceless gnomies in Victoria that
delight in processing this sort of
thing.
You can pick up one of these
forms at the Alma Mater Society
housing service in SUB.
Do it before the depression
hits.
Missionary
A former personal advisor to
Chiang Kai-shek who, in 1949,
switched sides and called for
Canada's recognition of the
People's Republic of China will
speak on campus next week.
Jim Endicott was born in
China's Szechwan province the
son of Methodist missionaries. He
has played an active role in
publicizing and explaining the
political and cultural progress of
China before, during and after the
revolution.
Endicott was editor of the
Shanghai Newsletter in 1946 and
returned  to Canada  in  1947.
When Endicott visited UBC in
1949 he was heckled and pelted,
with garbage. In 1952 the
University of Alberta board of
governors banned him from
speaking on the campus.
He has been editor of the
Canadian Far Eastern Newsletter
since 1948 and during his last visit
to China in 1973 he was received
by prime minister Chou En-lai.
Wednesday at noon Endicott
will show the film the Red Flag
Canal in SUB auditorium; at 8
p.m. he will hold an informal
seminar in the Lutheran campus
centre. On Thursday noon he will
give a lecture in education 100
and at 8 p.m. will hold another
informal seminar in the graduate
student centre.
Tween classes
TODAY
NOP CLUB
Organizational meeting, noon, SUB
213.
YOUNG SOCIALISTS
Panel of Vocational Instructors'
Association strike participants, 8
p.m., 1208 Granville (next to
Trotsky's Restaurant).
CLASSICS CLUB
S.M.L. Darcus on three critics of
traditional thought, 8 n.m.,
Malcolm's house, 4495 West 7, ..
EUS
Gears and other subhuman deviants
to dance to Mantra, 9 p.m., SUB
ballroom.
MEN'S INTRAMURALS
Flag football referees' clinic, noon,
War Memorial gym 211. /
UBC GAY PEOPLE
General meeting, noon, SUB 105B,
wine and cheese party, 7 p.m.,
43-1148 Thurlow.
GRAD THEATRE SOCIETY
Auditions for one-act plays, noon,
Freddy Wood Theatre 206.
UBC FENCING CLUB
General meeting and election of
club officers, 7 p.m., Winter Sports
Centre, gym E. Regular meetings
Mondays and Fridays 7 p.m. and
Sundays  2:30  p.m. same  location.
SATURDAY
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Frosh dance, 8 p.m., SUB party
room.
MONDAY
UBC KARATE CLUB
Practice, new members accepted, 7
p.m., SUB 207.
TUESDAY
GERMAN CLUB
Oral   German  practice,   7 p.m.,   IH
406.
cooperative christian
Campus ministry
Kay   Hockin   on   women   and   the
church, noon, SUB clubs lounge.
STUDENT CHRISTIAN MOVEMENT
Annual meeting, 8 p.m., Vancouver
school of theology.
CHARISTMATIC CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Weekly fellowship, noon, Lutheran
campus centre conference room.
VOC
Cross   country   ski   meeting,   noon,
Chem. 150.
ECKANKAR
Introductory    lecture,    noon,   SUB
213.
WEDNESDAY
SPEAKERS
Film      on      China,      noon,      SUB
auditorium;   lecture   on    China,   8
p.m., Lutheran campus centre.
VARSITY DEMOLAY CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 213.
VOC
General   meeting   and   slide   show,
noon, Angus 104.
CCCM
Eucharist,  noon,   Lutheran  campus
centre.
With yOUr initials and Now that you have your degree,
OUT Capital, We Can help shingle up. But, as you know, it's
m£*l(& \/r\i ir name   not as simple as that. First you need money
lliai\cyuui  I lall IC. to start a practice .Which is where the
Royal Bank can help you. Because we'll loan up to $25,000 (or more) to help
you bridge the gap until you become established.
You see, we believe in your earning power in the years to come. So we'll tailor
your repayment to fit that - we'll even defer your first payment if it helps.
To find out more, drop into your local branch of the Royal Bank and pick up our
brochure - "Money — anymore - to help you start your Professional Practice".
Or talk to a Royal Bank manager, who's a professional too. And before you know
it, you can have your name out front
like you always knew you would. w^tj   n^wA1   ■-> * .. .. ^
-^ ROYAL BANK
the helpful bank
GIRLS!
UBC Engineers Invite You to
DANCE to "MANTRA"
Fri., Sept. 27, 1974
9:00- 12:30
SUB Ballroom
SPEAKER SPECIALISTS
The most important part of any stereo system is the
loudspeakers. Listed below are speakers we feel have
outstanding performance in their price range. Before
you look into any sound system, be sure to audition
them first.
OhmE $109
Infinity POS-1    $150
Fulton Musical 100    $179
Hegeman Labs 1 $200
KMAL Elf Major    $285
ESS AMT-4    $299
Infinity Columns   $359
ESS AMT-1 Tower $499
DAHLQUIST DQ-10   $599
For your best value in quality sound systems, come to the new
SOUND ROOM
2803 W.Broadway
Corner of Broadway & Macdonald
736-7771
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES:   Campus - 3 lines, 1 dsy $1.00; additional fines 25c.
Commercial — 3 tines, 1 day $1.80; additional fines
40c. Additional days $1.50 & 35c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance, Deadline is 11:3Qa.m., the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241, S.U.B., UBC, Van. 8, B.C.
5 — Coming Events
CHINESE    MOON    FESTIVAL    DANCE.
Dance  Friday  27th,   8:30 - 1:00   International House. $1.50. AU welcome!
CHINESE    MOON    FESTIVAL    DANCE.
Dance  Friday 27th,   8:30 - 1:00.   International House. $1.50. All welcome!
TONIOHT and Sat., 8:30 p.m. Joani
Taylor and Ron Small, Arts Club
Theatre.
DR. BUNDOLO — Today, SUB'Theatre
at  12:30.   It's  free!   Be   there!
11-For Sale - Private
ELTON JOHN tickets (two). For Oct
ober 14th Thanksgiving concert.
Phone 224-9750, ask for Murray. Rm.
406.
ATLAS WINTER TIRES,. 13 inch rim,
brand new, $10 each. 263-8794.
'73 HONDA 175. Must sell. Helmets, etc.
Beautiful running. Best offer. 733-
8322 between 6 & 7 p m.
1965 VIVA plus extra tires. Engine in
A-l cond. New clutch and brakes.
263-8794.
SINGLE BRASS BED inc. box spring &
mattress. $385. 266-5750.
20 — Housing
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted to share
one bedroom modern suite. Great
location. $107.50. 224-4556 Barbara —
228-9557.
25 — Instruction
PIANO LESSONS by grad of Juffliard
School of Music. All grade levels wel-
some.   731-0601.
30 - Jobs
35 — Lost
LOST one beige wallet including I.D.
packet. B parking lot or Ed. Building.
Reward.   Sylvia  Mackie, '937-5701.
LOST:   BROWN  LEATHER  WALLET.  II
found, return to Gage Towers, N6/B2.
Ask for Mike. Reward.
40-
Message*
50-
Rentals
FURNISHED basement room, near campus, mature  male, private  bathroom,
full kitchen, very clean. 224 0200.
60-
Rides
65-
Scandab
DISCOUNT STEREO: Example: A.G.S
AM-FM stereo receiver, 2 speakers,
base, cover, cartridge, list $200, your
cost $125. AM-FM! digital clock-radio,
$35. 8-digit calculator AC-DC functions (+, —, X, -J-) list $79, your cost
$49. Also Corry, Akai. Sony. Call
325-0366 after 6 p.m.
70 — Services
TYPING in my home. North Shore. Call
985-2814.
80 — Tutoring
PART TIME tutor for handicapped
Your hours, urgent, Ph. 266-4229 after
6 p.m.
85 — Typing
90-Wanted
FEMALE ROOMATE, share furnished
apartment, Grad. 3rd, 4th yr. Beside
Kita beach.  CaU 731-5689.
99 — Miscellaneous
INVENTOR or perpetual, self-updating,
self-correcting, electrically - powered
calender clock for office, home use
seeks assistance of imaginative engineering student in designing complex but fairly obvious mechanical
details. Could be rewarding! both
creatively and financially. Inducement offerred is formal contract
assigning one half interest in invention and, if obtained, in patent-
Reply 688-4105. Friday,  September 27,   T974
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 15
For rugby match
Touring Scots here
By TOM BARNES
International rugby hits the UBC
campus Saturday as the touring
University of Edinburgh side takes
on the Thunderbirds.
The Edinburgh team features a
relatively young side and favors a
wide open style of play capitalizing
on their speed and fitness. Despite
their youth they are an accomplished team.
They have 10 players on the
Scottish university champions.
The University of Edinburgh
were joint founders of the Scottish
Rugby Union 117 years ago. Today
they still are considered one of the
top university teams in Britian.
The Scots are lead by captain
Ken MacKenzie, a medical student
and two-year veteran of the varsity
team.
Mackenzie plays either fly-half
or centre. He has been named to
both the Scottish Universities team
and the Edinburgh under-23 side.
Another Scot to watch is
economics student Grahamslaw
Henderson, who plays both lock or
no. eight. Although just a freshman
last season, he too played for
Scottish Universities and was a
reserve for British Universities.
The Edinburgh team opened its
tour losing 25-0 to the University of
Victoria Vikings.
The score may be partly justified
by the fact that the Scots spent
more than 40 hours enroute to
Victoria and had to play the day
after arriving.
The travellers rested for two
days, then moved to Nanaimo
where they handily defeated the
Nanaimo All-Stars 21-6.
They then moved to Cowichan
for their last game on Vancouver
Island. A bigger, rougher,
Cowichan side took an early first
Soccer team heads
for southern trip
Would you pay $4 to see the UBC
Thunderbirds soccer team play?
You may not, but there are
people who obviously think it is
well worth the money. In past trips
to Colorado $4 admission has been
charged and attendence has been
near 6,000 fans.
This year's 'Birds team, hoping
for a similar reception, leaves for
Colorado today to play five games.
They will start their series with a
game in Denver against the
Metropolitan State University on
Saturday. This will be followed by
matches against the Colorado
Springs All-Stars on Sunday, Cafe
Promenade on Tuesday, Colorado
College on Wednesday, and they
will finish off with a game against
the U.S. Air Force Academy next
Thursday.
The UBC team will feature
Vancouver Whitecaps Greg Weber
Jock shorts
Physical education won the first
coed intramural event of the year
Sept. 19 by defeating a team from
the Engineering faculty to take the
tug-of-war.
Six teams were entered in the
event.
Members of the winning team,
who share two cases of beer for
their victory, are Karen Johnson,
Betty Baxter, Claire Lloyd, Sandy
Buhr, Brett Lawrence, Walt
Sutherland, Bob Jantzen and
Henry Bouy.
The losing engineers were
consoled by the second prize of one
case of beer. Recreation came
third with forestry bringing up the
rear.
Unofficial men's intramurals
point standings after the first event
of the year are: phys ed, 293;
engineers, 268; forestry, 263;
recreation, 243; and St. Andrew's
Hall, 163. a
The University of Edinburgh
defeated UBC junior varsity 2-0 in
women's exhibition field hockey
play Thursday.
The touring Scots return Monday
for another match against the UBC
varsity woman's team whom they
played to a scoreless tie Sept. 19.
Monday's game is at 5:30 p.m. on
Chris Spencer Field on Wesbrook
Place.
in goal and Daryl Samson in
midfield. Weber will be protected
by a strong back four with Bob
Baker and Roy Zvyderduyn in the
middle and Terry Thompson and
Phil Sanford taking care of the
flanks.
Playing midfield with Samson
will be Ken Legge and John
Nelson. The scoring will be taken
care of by Claudio Morelli, Chris
Speakman and Rick Houghton.
Just in case the Americans play
rough Coach Joe Johnson will
bring three reserves along. These
will be Pete Makelke, Craig
Campbell and Marc Rizzardo.
Last year the 'Birds came back
from the trip with a 5-0 1 record.
Johnson does not think the
Americans will be too much of a
problem this time around either.
He hopes this trip will help the
team settle and give the players a
chance to understand each other.
Maybe after this trip the 'Birds
will make a serious bid for the B.C.
league championship.
half lead and the Scots gamely
attempted to come back in the final
half — only to fall short and drop a
hard-fought 18-12 contest.
Coach Donn Spence's Thunderbirds look as strong as ever.
Although some good players
graduated last season, the
resulting holes have been well
filled.
The scrum, shored up by Warwick Harvel and Ro Hindsom, is
easily as strong as seasons past.
Hindsom is a member of the B.C.
rep team. He was one of two
Canadian players to be picked by
the president of the Irish rugby
union to play on the centennial
celebrations in Ireland last
summer. Fifteen of the top rugby
players in the world were picked
for the occasion and it was the first
time a Canadian was named to
such a team.
The backfield, boasting B.C. Rep
John Billingsly and Preston Wiley,
is not weak either.
The only dark spot for the locals
was the injury last Sunday to back
Rick Bourne's knee. Bourne will be
out with torn ligaments until after
Christmas. Fortunately the 'Birds
are also strong on depth, and there
is no shortage for competent
replacements for him.
Thus far this year the Thunderbirds have taken to the pitch
twice. The first time an exibition
encounter against the UBC Old-
Boys. The Old-Boys know the game
as well as anyone around and
handed the 'Birds a 22-17 setback.'
The other contest, the first
league game of the year, saw the
'Birds defeat the Georgians 36-6.
Last year the 'Birds were 19-3-1
and Spence hopes to see that
record bettered this time round.
Probably the most important of
last season's three losses was to
the University of Victoria Vikings.
It cost UBC the Canada West title.
Spence wants to concentrate on the upcoming game
with the Scots. They've heard UBC
has the best rugby team around
and want to go back home with a
win over the 'Birds.
The game will be Saturday 3
p.m. at Thunderbird Stadium.
Admission is free to UBC students,
and a good crowd is expected.
RECREATION U.B.C.
INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAMS
Commences Monday, Sept. 30
INFORMATION AND MEMBERSHIP CARDS
MAY BE OBTAINED AT ROOM 203
MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM - 228-3996
BICYCLE & HOCKEY
CENTRES
New and Used Skates and Bicycles. Complete selection of
brand name Hockey Equipment, Bicycles and Accessories.
Expert Repairs, Trades Welcome.
Student and Team Discounts.
'FREE SKATE SHARPENING"
4385 W. TENTH
228-8732
620 E. BROADWAY
874-8611
RUGBY 'BIRDS . . . practice for big game
Public Service     Fonction publique
Canada Canada
Careers in the
Federal Public Service
This year, the Federal Government will hire university graduates in all disciplines for a wide variety
of professional and administrative positions.
Find out career possibilities in:
Administration
Pure Sciences
Applied Sciences
Health Sciences
Social-Economic Disciplines
We will be on campus on October 1, 1974.
Come and talk to us.
Information is also available at your campus
placement office.
All positions are open to both men and women.
••••••4
International Men's
VOLLEYBALL
Olympic Champions
JAPAN
vs
CANADA'S NATIONAL TEAM
Friday, October 4th, 8 p.m.
UBC War Memorial Gym
All Seats Reserved $4.50, $3.50, $2.00
($1.00 off all tickets for students)
from Vancouver Ticket Centre
683-3255, all Eaton's stores
(charge them) and all VTC outlets. Page 16
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday,  September 27,  1974
CRAIG
HERE!
The forerunner in
$169
95
The Craig 3510
Cassette Stereo
Tape Player with
AM-FM Stereo Radio
WITH     EXISTING
IN-DASH   MOUNT-
COMPATIBLE
CUSTOMIZED
ING KITS
AUTOMATIC SHUT-OFF  AT END
OF TAPE
ILLUMINATED TAPE/STEREO INDICATORS AND RADIO DIAL
AUTOMATIC FM STEREO SWITCHING
*With proof of U.B.C. registration. Stereo Warehouse is
including with the above units,
1 pair of Craig car speakers for
only 5c. This special runs until
October 15th only.
CAR STEREOS
is at
Stereo WAREHOUSE
3507
CfSAICE 3512
$299
95
The Craig 3507
A Floor-Mount
Auto-Reverse Stereo
Cassette Player with
Pre-Set FM Stereo Radio
* DOLBY* NOISE-REDUCTION
SYSTEM FOR BOTH TAPE AND
RADIO
* AUTOMATICALLY PLAYS BOTH
SIDES OF CASSETTE
* AUTOMATIC FM STEREO SWITCHING, WITH DEFEAT SWITCH
* "QUICK-RELEASE" INSTALLATION SYSTEM WITH UNIQUE
MAGNETIC LOCK
$139
95
The Craig 3512 Quick Mount
Stereo-Matrix Entertainment Centre
with Cassette Tape Player and
FM Stereo Radio
* STEREO-MATRIX CIRCUITRY
* SENSITIVE FM STEREO RADIO
* SLOT CASSETTE LOADING
* LOCKING FAST FORWARD AND REWIND
.*   END-OF-TAPE INDICATOR LIGHT
WAREHOUSE
2814 W. BROADWAY ■ 736-2541

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