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UBC Publications

Pow Nov 17, 1992

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 Volume 75 No 19
UBC-TV
PAGE 3
MEDIA
Woman foreign
correspondent:
courage in China
raised her profile
BYEFFDEPOW
OTTAWA—She once staked out
a man at his house. She waited for
the man to walk his dog early in the
morning.
That's what it takes to get to a
source, a talent that catapulted
reporter Jan Wong from The Globe
and Mail's Report on Business to
the paper's China bureau.
"I love the strategizing and getting
the story," Wong said.
Wong, now 40, became the
most followed journalist in Beijing
during the Tiananmen Square
demonstrations in 1989. After the
tragic massacre of thousands of
students demanding democracy,
Wong was arrested by China's
government Many reporters hid in
hotels, but Wong, after being
released, probedmoreintoBeijing's
urban sector. She even travelled to
the countryside for reactions, that is
until her car was stolen. She later
discovered it repainted with a
government logo.
Though she surprisingly didn't
secure any national newspaper
awards for her daring reporting.she
was appointed Globe China bureau
chief. Then she became the first
Globe foreign correspondent to have
a baby on the job.
Her stories since have added
colour to the usually dry Globe
pages, ranging from Beijing's dog
zoo to a countryside man who could
multiply laige digit numbers in his
head.
"If I can get there anyone can,"
said Wong during the weekend's
national Women in the Media
conference.
Sure. That's what they all say.
Wonggraduated from McGill's
Chinese history program and then
studied in China where she started
assistingTheNew York Times. She
returned and studied at the world's
first journalism school, established
by Pulitzer himself at Columbia
University.
She joined The Globe in 1980
after bank reporting for The Boston
Globe, The Wall Street Journal and
The Montreal Gazette.
Globe reporter lan Wong
■M^       SOMETHING'S GOTTA GO
POW
UBYSSEY SPECIAL
Vancouver, British Columbia, November 17, 1992
BREAKING THROUGH: Unlike other local papers, Pow has managed photo by Rosa tseng
to attract many readers, writers, stories and images of many races.
COVER	
Media Mix:
A "dramatic change"
BY BRENDA WONG
Pow packs a mean punch.
It is the latest contender in the
campus newspaper arena.
And it may dramatically alter
the face ofthe resistant news media
which has often been accused of
being exclusively white in staff
and coverage.
The controversial biweekly
edition of UBC's 74-year-old
student newspaper The Ubyssey,
has already drawn a record number
of writers and photographers from
UBC's Asian and Indo-Canadian
societies.
The growing number of Asian
and Indo-Canadian staffers, now
passing two dozen, has beaten those
found at any major English-language
daily in Canada.
At UBC, Asians and Indo-
Canadians make up almost 40 pa-
cent of its student body of 28,000.
But The Ubyssey had until this
year failed significantly to cover a
proportionate number in print. A
1991 survey of 25 consecutive issues
showed that not one Asian or Indo-
Canadian had been photographed
and only a handful had been
interviewed. Only a handful of
staffers from these communities
appeared sporadically in print
With Pow, new front page byline and photo credit surnames are
surfacing for the first time in UBC's
history—as are new images and
story sources.
A waste management survey
on its second run showed that
almost 14,000 of 15,000 copies
were picked up, nearly a third
greater than regular Ubysseys.
Pow has become the first
Canadian student newspaper to
successfully attract readers from
all racial backgrounds.
White-dominated studentpapers
in Halifax, Montreal and Toronto
(which has 300,000 Blacks) are
struggling to reach their large Black
communities. But often they have
refrained from interviewing Blacks
for general news stories.
See page 6
QUOTE OF THE
DAY
"The cars that are most
usually broken into are
Hondas, Volkswagens and
Nissans."
PAGE 3
ACTING BIZ
Role call:
Not here
"I always consider
myself an actor—an
unemployed actor, but
Fm an actor."
BYTSUIHOYAN
HE walks on Hollywood
Boulevard, the street of his
residence:, the boulevard of his
dreams.
But the roles have not been
rolling for Eric Michael Zee, 26,
an American-bom Asian actor.
In The Young and The
Restless, he played a gangster. In
theTVseriesBronxZoo.heplayed
a Vietnamese studentwhocouldn't
speak English.
"It's always stereotypical
roles, like either a Vietnamese
refugees orasoldier, gangster types
or otherwise the goofy Asian,"
said Zee.
"It's tough," he said. "I
auditioned plenty."
"There's just not enough
writing for Asian actors...Right
now, especially with the economy,
jobs are hard to come by...if it's
going to be the difference between
a white guy getting the job and an
Asian guy, it's definitely going to
go to the white guy."
Conjure up an American
movie with an Asian lead, the task
proves a difficult feat.
The shortage of good roles
for Asians in North America has
stifled many talented actors'
aspirations. Zee said.
Asians choosing an acting
career eventually turn away
disgruntled by the lack of
prominent parts.
"Say there's 20,000 white
guys, blond-haired, blue eyes and
maybe 2,000 Asian guys...for those
20,000 white guys there's
hundreds of roles whereas for the
Asian guys there's only two or
three a month."
That propelled Zee, a 1985
USC grad, to relocate in 1989 to
Hong Kong where he began
earning a $1000 a day acting in
commericals.
"I did all kinds—everything
from telephones, to pizzas, to ice
cream, to cakes, and clothing,"
said Zee.
See page 5 Tuesday, November 15,1992
POW
Vol.75, No.19
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RATES: AMS cardholders - 3 lines, $3.00, additional lines, 60 cents, commercial - 3 lines, $5.00, additional lines,
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932 GRANVILLE
Student OPINIONS
"What do you think of an
18% tuition increase?"
Isabel
Brooksbank
Agriculture 3
•No
• works $8 an hour
for two shifts
during school
and all summer
• no student loan
• owns a car
• will have to work
more hours
Sharlene OToole
English 3
•No
• summer job
with BC Tel
• job cut short by
recession
• no student loan
• has a car
• works a shift a
week for
spending money
Compiled By Ian 'Wattau
Jackie Bailey
Anthropology
and Sociology 3
•No
• tuition is high
enough
• will shut out
more students
• more students
will have to
take time off
to work
• no student
loan
18% TUITION
INCREASE!
Can you afford it?
Come to the rally against an 18% tuition increase:
Thursday, November 19
at 1 pm
Meet on top of
Sedgewick Library (next
to the Old Admin Building where the
Board of Governors is meeting)
inmsi
W
Christmas Comes Early!
Travel CUTS offers "Student Class Fares"
to take you home for the Holidays.
Booh now before tbey are sold out!
Edmonton      from $233 +*«
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Montreal
Exam troubles?... Change your flights for just $50!
Other cities are also available. Prices subject to availability.
Vis* The Student Travel Extterts for fuR details:
* We are On the UBC Campus *
Student Union Building, Lower Level
Qfext to Tortellini's)... 822-6890
"1RAVELCUIS
ET^fl Canadian Universities Travel Service Limited Vbl.75,No.19
POW
Tuesday, November 15,1992
>W\i
NEWS
UBC to launch television station
BY KAREN YOUNG
AND GORSHARN TOOR
COUCH potato vidiots who
are bored with .ABC, NBC,
CBS, and Fox may soon find a new
alternative in UBC-TV.
UBC will launch in January its
own television station, one that may
eventually expand into Vancouver
and the Lower Mainland.
Two video monitors are slated
for the Student Union Building while
others may later be placed in Hebb
Theatre, Buchanan Building and
Sedgewick Library.
The initial $15,000 cost of
UBC-TV will eventually inflate to
$104,000 for a full operation.
"It is not a huge expenditure to
be involved at the grassroots of
something which could potentially
turn out to be a gold-mine," said
AMS executive Caireen Hainert
A "charter member" needs to
pay an annual $2500 fee to sit on
UBC-TV's controlling board of
directors.
"The board of directors doesn't
want every single student group to
be able to have representation on
the Board of Directors," Hainert
Parkade car thieves
stopped in speed trap
BY KAREN GO
STOLEN car goods were
unexpectedly discovered by
UBC RCMP as they nabbed two
thieves in a routine speed trap.
Cons. Greg Bishop stopped a
1992 Nissan 240SX on campus at
11:30 pm last Tuesday after he
spotted a passenger switching seats
with a speeding driver.
The original driver's license
had been suspended after too many
speeding tickets.
Bishop then found a replica .38-
calibre gun, stolen radar detector
parts, a rear spoiler, wire cutters,
pliers and a screw driver.
"It was justcircumstance," said
Cons. Bishop.
The goods were stolen from a
car parked at UBC'sNorth Parkade
whose windows were smashed.
Bishop said the two suspects
later confessed to another car break-
in theft on campus.
Two 18 year-old men from the
Lower Mainland were arrested and
will appear in court January 11.
Charges are pending.
UBC has faced an increase in
car thefts during the last month,
Bishop said.
"Thecars thatare most usually
broken into, are Hondas,
Volkswagens andNissans,"hesaid.
"Stereos are targeted and
anything that's left loose like CDs."
"During the winter season
there are more vehicles on campus,"
he added.
Students should report
suspicious parking lot activities to
the RCMP.
Police also arrested a UBC
student Nov 7 who allegedly set
his own car on fire at the campus'
Memorial Road underground
garage.
Fire-fighters extinguished the
fire before it got out of control and
police are viewing it as a potential
insurance fraud.
Death of a UBC heritage tree
STAFF REPORTER
The lights are out for UBC's
longstanding Sequoia tree.
Day by day, pieces were cut
down.
First the limbs on Nov.10. Two
days later the tree was gone.
The tree had stood on its own
before UBC's Main Library for
seven decades.
Then campus planners tried to
"preserve" the giant landmark.
Instead, they killed it.
They built a concrete box around
its base and filled it with woodchips
to prevent people from leaning
against its trunk.
They cut off the giant's surface
roots to make room for cement.
Within a year, the tree died.
Its Christmas lights will not shine
this year.
said.
Only two student groups will sit
on the board: the AMS studentcouncil
and AMS Programs.
"If Club X or Service
Organization X wanted to have access
to the board, it would be fine if they
made a presentation or some
suggestions," Hainert said. "But we
have to limit the membership to some
extent."
Other board members are
Intramurals, the Registrar, UBC
Athletic and Sports and student
counselling and Extra-Sessional
Studies.
OnlyUBC-TVchartermembers
can display self-produced shows or
commercials. The station will start
with bulletins of campus events such
as AMS elections and telereg dates.
Commercials and shows similar
to those on a community networks
may run within a year, Hainert said.
SFU launched its airport-like
monitor system 11 years ago. The
monitors strictly display bulletins.
"SFU has pretty much eliminated
the need to use posters," said Bill
Goodman of SFU's Instructional
Media Centre.
But unlike UBC-TV, SFU's
television system allows free use
for any student
The monitors are stationed in
the cafeterias and along SFU main
enclosed building Quad designed
by Arthur Erickson.
And the SFU administration
paid the entire cost.
The Burnaby campus recently
replaced 17 monitors with $850 each
for new ones.
UBC-TV will first operate from
AMS Intramurals which can write,
script, shoot or edit any show.
Hainert: said she will most likely
represent the AMS student council.
THE FINAL CUT: Chainsawers removed the last bits of UBC's famed
Sequoia tree in front of Main Library on Thursday.
PHOTO BY ROSA TSENG
In the wake of a nightmare: UBC remembers the "murdered"
BY GORSHARN TOOR
Kristallnacht,November9,1938.
That day was the start of a
nightmare which culminated in the
Holocaust
Nazis descended upon Jewish
homes, synagogues and shops and
burned or destroyed them. The police
and fire departments were ordered
not to respond to calls.
'To deny the Holocaust happened
is to deny that the bomb was
dropped on Hiroshima," said Alex
Hart, organizer ofUBC'stenth year
Holocaust Awareness Week.
"Free speech is not free hate,"
he said in the wake of David
Irving's arrival in Vancouver.
Irving, a British academic
recently convicted in Germany for
hate mongering, had claimed the
Holocaust was a hoax. His entry
two weeks ago into Canada was
short-lived after police arrested
him
Hart called UBC's Holocaust
Awareness display last week an
"antidote" for lies dispersed by
naysayers of the Holocaust
"More students were provoked
and moved," said Hart of the Irving
incident "It raised their awareness."
In Israel, Holocaust Awareness
Week occurs in April, but UBC
students wanted it to coincide with
Kristallnacht
UBC pharmacology professor
Rudolf Vrba escaped Auschwitz in
1944 and reported the horrific events
at concentration camps to a Jewish
council in Hungary. But the
information, he said, was witheld.
Vrba called the camps huge
institutions of murder and robbery
and he objects to the use of the word
"extermination."
"Extermination is a word you
use for killing coachroaches, not
humans," he said. "These people
were murdered."
Property stolen from victims
was used to pay the soldiers and
others who did the actual killing.
The murderers were primarily
motivated by theft, Vrba said told
a panel at Hillel House last week.
With the recent rise in neo-
Nazism in Germany and "ethnic
cleansing" in the Balkans, Zac
Kaye of Hillel House said,
Holocaust Awareness Week has
been made "more pertinent and
poignant" 4 Tuesday, November 17, 1992
POW
Vbl. 75, No.19
ARTS
The University of British Columbia
DEPARTMENT OF THEATRE
WOYZECK
by   Georg   Buchner
a German classic
Directed   by   Edel   Walsh
Translated  by Paul  Malone
NOVEMBER   18-28
2 for 1 Preview
Wed. Nov. 18th
Curtain: 8pm
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
Res. 822-2678
SUPPORT YOUR CAMPUS THEATRE
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687-6622
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The man the media missed
WHO'S THAT MAN—A man with no name (Tony Leung) is overpowered in the media by
his anonymous counterpart (Jane March)
BY BIANCA ZEE
DOWN the muddy Mekong
River the tattered ferry raft
carries the dissonant hoards into the
heart of Vietnam.
A young white woman leans
lazily along the railing at the ferry's
front, a fedora shadowing her face.
Within a respectful distance, a man
sits silently in a glossy black
limousine amidst a pack of rust-
ridden cars.
He is the mysterious man, the
leadactorwhomostmoviereviewers
chose to ignore.
In a crisp white linen suit, he
walks past the masses, sliding a
cigarette from his pocket
He is also Chinese.
Is this a dream? An Asian man
in an English movie who is not a
gangster or goof?
The lead is Tony Leung, a
Hong Kong film star, who portrays
the title role in Jean-Jacques
Annaud's The Lover. Slick and
suave, he delivers his real-life
Office of the Reaistrar
playboy persona onto the screen.
The popular Leung helped
draw almost a full house, more than
half Asian, for the film's Vancouver
Centre opening on Friday.
The Lover, based on French
writer Marguerite Duras's best-
selling autobiographical novel,
L'Amant, depicts Duras' 1929 affair
in Saigon as a 15-year-old schoolgirl with a rich 27-year-old Chinese
man.
Duras, a film-maker herself,
refused to cooperate with Annaud
See next page
The University of
DEPARTMENT
NOTICE OF ELECTION
Student Representatives to serve on the Board of Governors and the Senate
This notice is a call for nominations for full-time students to run for election for the
folowing positions:
A. Board of Governors Two students
B. Senators At-Large Five students
C. Senators from each Faculty    One student from each faculty
Nomination forms giving full details of the requirements of nomination are available
at the front counter in the Registrar's Office, the A.M.S. Office (SUB, Room 266) and
in the offices of the Student Undergraduate Societies and the Graduate Student
Society.
Nominations must be in the hands of the Registrar no later than 4:00 p.m. on
Friday, December 4,1992.
a black
Directed by De
NOVEMBER'
2 fori Preview-Tues,
DOROTHY SO
Res. 8 \bl. 75, No. 19
POW
Tuesday, November 17,1992
ARTS
U.S. actor Michael Zee, 26, (second from left) poses with Jackie Chan during the Hong
Kong film-maker's birthday.
From front page ■■■■^^^
"I was recognized alot from
my commercials."
Zee's big break came when
America'smost famous Asian actor
John Lone (The LastEmperor, Year
of the Dragon) hired him to play a
gay man in the historical epic
Shanghai 1920.
"It's a lot less formal over in
Asia and they are still big on the star
system over there,"he said. "Astudio
will sign up a person and turn them
into a star..they create peoplc.there
is very little auditioning."
Unlike in America, Zee no
longer had to wait tables while he
pursued an acting career.
"In Hong Kong I was able to survive
as an actor financially," he said.
Zee recently decided to return
to Hollywood to finish his masters
degree at UCLA where he stays
from 9 am. until 11 p.m.,amixture
of studies and rehearsals;.
"I always consider myself an
actor," he said. "An unemployed
actor but I'm an actor."
The Lover's lead actor a rarity
from previous page    ■■■
whom she saw as a competitor.
Annaud, to avoid the
controversy of sex with minors,
altered the ageofDuras(Jane March)
to 18, and her nameless Chinese
playboy has become 32.
Annaud who also directed The
Name of the Rose, Quest for Fire,
and The Bear was the first foreign
feature film-maker ever to shoot on
site in Vietnam.
The Lover beautifully
recaptures Saigon in French Colonial
Vietnam. The city, ravaged by a war
that ended two decades ago, still
retains sparks of its past
sophistication in Annaud's film.
Annaud surrealistically
captures the din of unsuspecting
passersby as the movie's couple
makes love in a shabby room in
Saigon's Chinatown.
The Chinese man satirizes
stereotypes of Asian men, the
British Columbia
OFTHEATRE
physically weak "financial
minority" which owns nice
property.
"It would take four of me to
beat you up," he says. "You really
don't know how weak I am."
Like F. Scott Fitzgerald's
Great Gatsby, only money and real
estate allow the Chinese man power
in his society.
Ironically, he cannot reverse the
disrespect, for he is Chinese.
Even his lover who has
shared intimate moments with him
says, "I don't like Chinese," as he
thumbs through large bills to cover
their expensive meal.
The characters are nameless,
as in Bertolucci's classic Last
Tango in Paris, perhaps paralleling
the insignificance of their
personalities.
The crux of their affair hangs
on an inter-racial carnal desire.
The Lover has a rare film
affair. An Asian man making love
with a white woman.
He, worldly, Paris-educated,
wealthy by inheritance, is compelled
by her sultry innocence, her race.
She, poor, fatherless, from an
uncultured family seeks solace in
his money and attention.
The Lover weaves racial
tensions stemming from the couple's
entanglement
The inter-racial combo may
have caused viewers more
discomfort than the abundance of
sex scenes.
The young woman's family
simply accept the man because of
his wealth.
When he takes them to an
expensive dinner, they gorge on the
food, barely glancing or uttering a
word in his direction.
It is only when the check
arrives that they glare unanimously
at him.
r-*ca
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nnis Garnhum
0-14 & 18-21
ov. 10*  Curtain: 8pm
ERSET STUDIO
2-2678
HIGH CHOLESTEROL?
ARE YOU?
male
aged 18-65 years old
living with a spouse or partner
currently on no cholesterol lowering medication
The Division ot Cardiology at University Hospital,
UBC site requires participants for a research study
evaluating "Quality of Life" while taking approved
cholesterol lowering medication.
For further information please call
822-7187 or 822-7785.
LATE NIGHT BITES.
Subway's got the best tasting subs under the stars. All your favorite
meats piled high on fresh baked bread — topped with free fixin's.
Want a late night bite? Make it Subway tonight.
ANY
FOOTLONG
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5736
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(IN THE VILLAGE)
(500 off six-inch)
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Offer Expires: Dec. 1/92 Valid at this location only
BRITISH COLUMBIA
How:
Mon/Tue»Thu/Sun:
10 am - Midnite
Wed/Fri/Sat:
10 am - 2 am
LEGISLATIVE
INTERNSHIP PROGRAM
PURPOSE
To provide recent university graduates with an interest in public affairs an
opportunity to supplement their academic insights of the legislative process
with practical legislative and administrative experience.
WHO IS B.IGIBLE
Students who have recently completed a B.A. or other first degree from a
British Columbia University.
HOW MANY
Seven interns will be selected for the 1994 program.
LOCATION
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, British Columbia.
WHEN
January to June, 1994.
STIPEND
$1700 month
APPLICATION DEADLINE
January 15,1993.
HOW TO APPLY
Program literature and application forms are available from the Political
Science Departments, and the Student Employment Centres on Campus, at
the University of Victoria, Simon Fraser University, and the University of
British Columbia or from the Office of the Speaker, Suite 207, Parliament
Buildings, Victoria, B.C. V8V1X4.
<M*eA 4— i if ij merino nant emtaiLMe
ancampus
dinoccino! Tuesday, November 17, 1992
POW
Vol. 75, No.19
EDITORIAL
ArtsEdHor
EMt rem Karea Young       fan-la Chan
Edter Ncwi Editor       News Editor
iWor|    Oervl Mama*       Rosa Tseng LfllhuiAu
News Editor        Photo Editor        Photo Editor      Hew Editor
i Zm       Wanda Chow      Charles Nho
Cohjmnbt        Sports EdHor
VtMMjhj
Ucho Vta kschot
Nt-M Editor
MaritNMtca  Sfebhan Roaotree
Snorts rtoto
Other contributors: Yukie Kurahashi, Judy Quan,
Peter Bouchard, Bonnie-Lynn Holter, Tsui Ho Yan,
Barb Dawson, and Anjum Khan.
Graphics: Mark Perreault, 873-1938
Typesetting: Peter Bouchard, 263-6932
Newspaper Design: S.J. Ahn, 822-6881
Advertising: Jennifer, 822-3977
POWa^F*
Pub •224279
fi
UBC's Dean Richards breaks past Huskies defence
T-Birds hit the blues
PHOTO AND STORY BY BONNIE-LYNN HOLTER
The UBC Thunderbird hockey team extended their losing streak to
seven games after a loss to the University of Saskatchewan Huskies.
The T-Birds were impressive early in Friday's game, out-shooting
the Huskies 15-8. But excellent goaltending by the Huskies kept the Birds
out in the cold.
The Huskies beat the Birds 8-4 with more physically aggressive and
disciplined team play. The Birds could not capitalize on several power
plays and were victims of defensive errors.
The usual dynamic goaltending by UBC's Marie Thom was at a loss
to the precision shooting of the Huskies. The only shining star of the T-
Birds this weekend was Bill Parkinson. The second-year player was able
to dig deep and score two goals and two assists.
Saturday, after licking some wounds, the T-Birds came out a more
determined team. Playing a more physical game, the T-Birds were within
striking distance of a win, keeping the game tied into the third period 3 -
3 on goals by Brad Edginton, Jeff Watchorn and Charles Cooper.
Late in the third period fatal defensive errors gave the winning power
play opportunity to the Huskies. They held on to a 4-3 lead and then to score
two more late goals, winning 6-3.
This weekend the Thunderbirds host the University of Manitoba
Bisons Saturday at7pmandSundayatlpm. They hope to break this losing
streak and tie the Bisons for fifth place in the Canada West Divsion.
NEWS
Pow packs a punch
COVER STORY from page 1
POW'S staff attributes its success to the paper's
innovations and fresh content
Its PR-motivated masthead, unlike any other in
Canada, show photos of two dozen staffers so readers
might recognize them in public.
Although Pow does not have an affirmative action
program, the paper has noticably interested a large
number of Asian and Indo-Canadian women.
Ubyssey staff previously attributed a shortage of
editorial participation from these communities to its
gruelling traditional all-night productions and, like those
in other papers, its cliques which are primarily white.
Pow shifted The Ubyssey's production to the
daytime which freed its editors to train and support new
staff.
Pow also uncovered issues specific to a large
population.
Gorsharn Toor said she was attracted to a story
about Asian adults who live with their parents printed in
Pow's first edition.
"It covered issues that are not normally covered,"
said Toor. "Pow attracts more people who would
normally not be interested in joining a newspaper."
Toor had casually conversed about the paper with
her classmate Effie Pow, without knowing she was one
of Pow's dozen editors.
Toor, who had been hesitant to join a newspaper
despite her desire, said the frontpage of Pow and its staff
have not intimidated people of any race from joining.
"There is nobody with a checklist saying you have
to be a certain way," said Toor, now a Pow reporter.
UBC grad student Hao Li, a long-time Ubyssey
photo technician, more senior in experience than any
current editor, had not written a single news story for his
student bosses despite having been a professional
journalist For Pow, he has already written six stories in
three issues and developed a large campus following.
"Having other people learn about newspapers at the
same time with me is not as intimidating," said Li.
-f OW, unlike regular Ubyssey editions, can have
an unlimited number of unelected editors, who simply
volunteer, receive training and work in the daytime with
writers.
"At a basic level all these people wanted to hang out
at a newspaper, and hope they just might get the chance
to learn," said editor Effie Pow.
But the launch of Pow has been beleaguered by
backlash. Hostilities directed at the paper have ignited
racial tension, and soured Pow's relations with its
primarily white parent. The Ubyssey.
In summer meetings, tension escalated between
Pow supporters and incoming Ubyssey editors who
initially greeted the project proposal with silence.
"After the idea was proposed, there was nobody
saying anything about it for 10 to 15 minutes," said Pow
photo editor Cheryl Niamath, who has also reported for
The Ubyssey.
Round-robin talks eventually started but the
uncertainty of support from Ubyssey's powerful elite
hung in the air like lingering cigarette smoke.
Editors and old hacks have traditionally had the
greatest power of influence at The Ubyssey.
Effie Pow, the project spokesperson, said she was
shocked by editorial support from The Ubyssey. But she
believes Ubyssey editors allowed the Pow initiative
only in response to the paper's historic racism.
"That's guilt," said Pow who added, relations are
still tense.
But Ubyssey editor Frances Foran flatly denies any
powerplay on the part of any editor.
"The Ubyssey is run on a democratic basis—one
vote per person," she said. "There is no way we could
have enticed people to vote against it"
However, a few months later in Pow's third
production, Foran and two Ubyssey editors intervened
People wanted to hang out
at a newspaper, and hope
they just might get the
chance to learn
on a Pow editorial supporting a disabled Black Ubyssey
reporter who survived an assault during a domestic dispute
in public. The editorial was pulled.
"I don't know if this issue is between the Ubyssey and
Pow," said Ubyssey editor Lucho Van Isschot "There was
a heated discussion among some Ubyssey staffers and some
Pow staffers, and an awkward consensus was reached about
the editorial. But there was no vote on it"
In the U.S., racial tension has gripped dozens of
newsrooms which have had an influx of Blacks who want to
change news coverage. But in Canada, few papers have
encountered similar tension. Most Canadian English-
language papers have been racially homogenous.
Pow is the first paper to have a large number of staffers
who are not white in a newsroom with a primarily white
elite.
J\ FTER its second issue, several readers also pegged
Pow as solely an ethnic voice though half the issue's stories
and photos focused on whites.
And Ubyssey editors have criticized Pow staff for
reserving their enthusiasm and energy strictly for Pow.
They say Pow staffers should show up to weekly
Wednesday noon-hour Ubyssey meetings and contribute to
The Ubyssey.
"I would like to see Pow overflowing with more people
wonting on n ana tnose people coming into meetings, saiu
editor Foran. "That would benefit it"
Said Ubyssey editor and Pow contributor Yukie
Kurahashi: 'Tow has saved to fragment Ubyssey staff
members and Pow participants."
"Butit'sgoodforsolicitingnew writers and The Ubyssey
could learn from that"
Though anyone can be a Pow editor, Kurahashi said
Pow is "hierarchical" unlike The Ubyssey which has five
editors who are each paid a $2500 honorarium.
Pow "is so informal that it's hierarchical," she said.
"Chung does a lot, a lot, a lot of the work so he gets targeted
for the responsibility."
Pow editor Chung Wong has no apologies for Pow,
which he says is still evolving with each edition.
"In four editions we have had more front page and
accumulated by-lines and photo credits from Asians and
Indo-Canadians than The Ubyssey has almost had in its
entire 74-year history," Wong said. "It's about time, these
people were originally banned from The Ubyssey when it
first began."
"We've also covered every major campus issue from
crime to sports," he said. "If The Ubyssey's editors would
recognize more of Pow's new staff, call them, talk to them,
then maybe they would come to meetings and contribute."
Gorsharn Toor has already called a support meeting for
several new Pow staff. About a dozen new staffers attended
her orientation meeting.
"It's nice to have a person show you around," said Toor.
Pow is on the verge of creating support clusters, small
cooperative teams which include at least one editor, one
writer and one photographer. These clusters generate story
ideas, share resources, and produce stories together as a
team.
The Ubyssey will review
Pow Wednesday Nov. 18
starting at 12:30 pm.
Those interested should
attend the meeting. Vfol. 75, No. 19
POW
Tuesday, November 17,1992
btUMilMlMMMI
'^fafyt'tekZ
■MMtMHMlMMMMHMU
LETTER
Asian clubs clarify story
We would first like to
express our appreciation for your
paper's attention to minority issues.
However, upon reading the article
"Asian Club Boom: 3000,"wefound
many misleading points in the article
which may give the careful reader a
distorted view towards our clubs.
First, we would like to clarify
that the Asian clubs are on good
terms with each other. Moreover,
there is no more rivalry between the
clubs than there is between the
different departments of
engineering. In fact, over the past
years, our clubs have actually
worked together to organize several
events. We also want to stress that
the term "banana club" was not used
by any club to describe the Chinese
Varsity Club. We despise this racist
term used to describe an individual
who is "yellow on the outside and
white inside."
Second, we feel that it is very
arbitrary to differentiate the clubs
on the basis ofthe languages spoken
by their members. Language is not a
responsible way of categorizing
Asian clubs because the members
vary widely within each club. It is an
over generalization to describe Asian
clubs as Cantonese or Mandarin
based and to characterize their
members as mostly illiterate or only
having a basic understanding of a
language. Furthermore, many
members belong to more than oneof
the clubs mentioned in the article.
This substantial overlap makes the
use of language proficiency to
classify Asian clubs illogical and
inaccurate. We feel that our clubs
can be best distinguished by the
different kinds of events that each
clubs organizes.
Finally, there areafew incorrect
facts about several clubs in the
Hillel House
presets
TiJOprn
(USTbcamalUBC
MOVIE FOLLOWED BY RECEPTION
•UHlUclHouK
Students and Seniors $5.00
Adults $10.00
Tickets: From Hilicl, Kaplans,
Shalom Books or at the door.
"" tir=
js. :
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n.ss s
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SS.I3   IJt
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• RECYCLED PAPER
■ AUTO FEED
' REDUCTIONS
1 ENLARGEMENTS
1 + A LOT MORE
UNIVERSITY VILLAGE
' FLOOR
2174 WESTERN PARKWAY
VANCOUVER, B C
2246225
FAX 224-4492
OPEN EVERY DAY M-TH 8-9
FRI 8-6 SAT-SUN 11-6
This week at U LJ O
MUSIC
Wednesday
Wednesday Noon Hour
Martha Brickman,
harpsichord
12:30 pm Recital Hall $2
Thursday
University Singers
12:30 pm Recital Hall
Distinguished Artists
Chamber Music of Today
Douglas Finch, piano
and celebrated guest artists
8:00 pm Recital Hall $14/7
Friday
University Singers
8:00 pm Recital Hall
For information call 822-5574
article. These are not important
individually but in conjunction with
the misleading tone, we feel that
Asian clubs were misrepresented to
the UBC population. We hope that
POW will be more thorough in the
reporting of our story in order to
give a more accurate picture of the
UBC Asian clubs.
Samson Hui
Dragon Seed Connection
Marcus Lai
Chinese Collegiate Society
Amy Lee
Taiwanese Association
Jiun Loy
Singapore Raffles Club
Quinnie Pak
Chinese Students Association
Mellissa Tong
Chinese Varsity Club
AlexYu
Chinese Christian Fellowship
Jewish Family Service Agency
presents
LOVE AND TRADITION
A conference on Intermarriage and Jewish Continuity
Featuring:    Esther Perel, m.a.
Keynote: Interfaith Relations:
Dealing with Differences
With special workshops for: Interfaith couples,
grandparents, Jews by choice
and anyone interested!
Date:   Sunday, November 22, 1992
Time: 9=30 - 3:00 pm
Place: Jewish Community Centre
Fee:     $30.00/person • Students Free
Featuring:
Keynote:
Irving Abella
Jewish Continuity
J
M
Date: Sunday, November 22, 1992
Time: 7:30 pm
Place: Beth Israel Synagogue
Fee: $10.00/person • Students Free
Pre-registration at Hillel House
call 224-4748 for more information
«?
f '*"'''•,
f<      //   ,' ,Zr   ^     Q,
<SM
( S"    '.     ,"
#i
J*
*        fc    /    ,',     '"      •*• f\ ,jX^€jr*
;M   & " x   Vj;7a
%
f   ",'
r
'4fo-
; i '&%"'' %
*    %
2>/4idi & 3><z*tGe,
1925 West Fourth JM^iue, Vancouver
Reservatio
736-8480
jt   universite     MASTERS AND PhD
IS YORK     PROGRAMMES IN
™   fS^V^:    ENVIRONMENTAL
STUDIES
U M I V E R S I T Y
The FACULTY OF ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES offers a
unique opportunity for those interested in graduate work, at both the
Masters and PhD level, to pursue their own interests, build on past
experience, and explore ideas from a broad spectrum of natural,
social, built and organizational environment perspectives.
Interdisciplinary, individualized and flexible programmes are offered
in a wide range of areas including:
1 urban planning
■ social policy
1 organizational change
' international development
1 impact assessment
1 regional planning and
development
> women and environments
> environmental planning
and design
> environmental thought
» housing
> resource management
> communication, advocacy
and social change
> environmental education
human services and health
Native / Canadian
relations
1 quality of working life
1 environmental politics
and economics
1 environmental policy
' tropical environments
■ biological conservation
1 northern studies
1 action learning
» environment and behaviour
1 organizational
environments
1 cooperative management
Applications for September 1993 should be received by March 1,1993.
The Faculty also offers an undergraduate degree programme leading
to a Bachelor in Environmental Studies (BES). Information for all
programmes can be obtained from:
Coordinator of External Liaison
Faculty of Environmental Studies
York University
4700 Keele Street
North York, Ontario, Canada
M3J1P3
Tel. (416) 736-5252
Fax (416) 736-5679
BitNet: ES052003@ORION.YORKU.CA
AT JACK DANIEL'S DISTILLERY, we are
blessed with an unusual cave and special
ironfree water.
Not many distillers have a stream of
cavespring water that's flowing just
outside their door. But that's what we
possess right here in Jack Daniel's
Hollow. And we've used it to make
our Tennessee Whiskey since
1866. Just watching this old
stream meander along is a nice
way to pass idle moments.
Discovering how it flavours
Jack Daniel's, we believe, is the
nicest moment of all.
JACK DANIEL'S TENNESSEE WHISKEY
If you d like a booklet about Jack Daniels Whiskey, write us here in Lynchburg. Tennessee, 3 7352 U S.A. 8 Tuesday, November 17, 1992
POW
U>l. 75, No.19
I'll1111111n11FH.»wiwM).^iyHii»iFwiijiiiiimi11111 iir■ yp■;fty
<* '     '"* A.*?...'..'
<-U
MUSIC
"Money is
replaceable...
if you lose
your culture
though,
it is gone
forever."
story and photos
by CHERYL NIAMATH
New music fromAncient Cultures
One of them is a UBC forestry prof. Several are engineers.
A couple are professional musicians. And one is an attendant
in a campus parking garage.
They are American in the
broadest sense, hailing from Chile,
Peru, Guatemala, Mexico and
Vancouver Island.
"I came to Canada to bring my
Chilean culture here," said flutist
Leonardo Baeza of Ancient
Cultures.
The Vancouver musical group
performs music based on pre-
Columbian folk culture of the
Andes. Their music, however, is
not common, even in South
America. They utilize unusual
combinations of wind, string, and
percussion instruments to produce
lyrical, textured music with African
and European influences.
The group last performed at
UBC's Museum of Anthropology
earlier this month as part of the
museum'sMiinc^ettrta/ice series
which celebrates 500 years of
resistance to European colonialism
in America.
That was their fourth concert at
MOA as their fans have increased
steadily. The band has also played at
Vancouver's FirstNightNew Year's
Eve celebration among other city
venues. CBC's Stereo Morning and
Disc Drive have given airplay to
their first album, Acoustic Mirage.
Flutist Baeza, the group's newest
member, has only a vistor's visa in
Canada.
Baeza feels immigration
officials will not allow him to stay in
Canada because he has little money.
"People who come to this country
with lots of money are allowed to
stay," he says. "If you have money,
it doesn't matter what you do."
Baeza said musicians and other
creative artists wishing to live in
Canada should be given special
status.
"Musicians should be treated like
business people," he said. "We have
something to give culturally to
Canada. Money is replaceable...if
you lose your culture though, it is
gone forever."
PHOTO EXHIBIT
Cheryl Niamath will have an
exhibition called "Written in
Stone" at Cafe S'il Vous Plait, 500
Robson Street, from Nov 17 to
Dec 16.
Vibraphone player Angel
Araos at MOA
The Music of Resistance series concludes on Tuesday, December 1 at 7:30 pm with a World AIDS Day concert by Elektra Women's
Choir. AH proceeds from the concert will go to Vancouver People With AIDS Society. For more information, call 822-5087.
Rabbi Shlomo Riskin
Founder of New York's renowned
Lincoln Square Synagogue
will address:
Tuesday, November 17th |
7:30 PM
Beth Israel Synagogue
4350 Oak Street
Young
Turned Off!
FACULTY OF SCIENCE
University of British Columbia
Call for nominations
AWARDS FOR EXCELLENCE IN TEACHING
The University of British Columbia established Awards for
Excellence in Teaching in 1989.  Awards are made by the
Faculty of Science to UBC faculty, lecturers and laboratory
instructors who are selected as outstanding teachers.
We are seeking input from UBC Alumni, and current and
former students.
Deadline for nominations:  February 1, 1993
Nominations should be accompanied by supporting
statements and the nominator s name, address and
telephone number.  Please send nominations to:
Chair. Faculty of Science
Excellence in Teaching Award,
c/o Office of the Dean of Science,
R 1505. 6270 University Boulevard,
University of British Columbia,
Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4
FAX (604)822-5558
UBC STUDENTS WANTED FOR
IMPORTANT ANGUS REID STUDY
TASK FORCE ON THE PROVISION OF COUNSELLING
AND RELATED SERVICES FOR WOMEN STUDENTS
The Angus Reid Group, Canada's foremost public opinion firm, has been commissioned by the taskforce to provide
insight into student's attitudes of, and perceptions on, counselling services at UBC.
Students, both men and women, who have ever consulted one of the following list of campus counselling services,
whether by phone or in person, are eligible to participate in this study.
COUNSELLING SERVICE PROVIDERS
Awards and financial Aid
Student Housing (or Residence Advisors)
Chaplains /Tfieolgical colleges
Student Health Services
Disability Resource Centre
Student Counselling & Resource Centre
first Nations House of Learning
{of Student Counsel!^ Centre)
individual Faculty Members
Student SocietSee (Afcna Mater Society/
international House
Graduate Student Society Ombudspefson)
Pacific Spirit Chitd and Family Services
Your Department of Faculty
Reading, Writing and Study Skills Centre
Women Student's Office (or WSO)
Sexual Harassment Office
Women's Resource Centre
Volunteers would undertake an ENTIRELY CONFIDENTIAL AND ANONYMOUS 10 minute telephone interview.
Responses will be held stricty confidential, and will be presented only in the form of statistics.
INTERVIEWERS WILL BE STANDING BY TO RECEIVE YOUR PHONE CALL:
893-1651
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday, November 16 to Friday, November 20
In the event that interviewers are unable to attend to your call at thai moment, or if these hours are inconvenient for
you, you may call at any time and be offered the option of leaving your first name and phone number on a voice mail
system. This information will be used only for the purposes of contacting you, and will not be recorded with your
survey responses. Nor will any information as to the nature of the call be disclosed to anyone who may answer at the
number you leave.
Please call early to ensure your participation, as there are a limited number
of students who may be interviewed.
Thank you for your help in this important study.

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