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The Ubyssey Sep 21, 1967

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Array ACADIA PARK SNAFU  STILL   UNEXPLAINED
_             .._.,„~„ t,.._    __     or.     „.o-_: -..;..-__•   .. ^.&__   L * gl-S _»,_-S ,,„--_    _,_-.--..    -._.-    _.; ,_.___    -__.
By STEPHEN JACKSON
Ubyssey Housing Reporter
Reasons for delay in completing the Acadia Park
^ family housing project are still obscure.
So  far  200  intended  tenants  have  withdrawn
their names for the planned 275 suites. About 20
other married students have already moved in, 15
^ within the last week.
The remainder, frustrated by a city-wide lack of
housing, are staying in temporary accommodations.
'It is difficult to find out just what the pro-
- blems   are,"   said  housing  administrator   Les   Roh-
'^ ringer, Wednesday.
First scheduled for  completion in the planned
175-suite row housing complex is cluster five. This,
to have 33 suites, was originally planned to open
^ with partial occupancy on August 31.
Rohringer's office notified 23 married students
early in July that they were assigned to suites in
the cluster.
On the basis of these letters, the families gave
Xfe notice to their landlords.
But on August 29, Rohringer receiv£*Oi \fefter
from physical plant (ex^buildings and gfbunds), saying that the first 23 suites in cluster/five, "would
definitely not be available before September 12^'--^
Immediately, Rohringer sent telegrams to the
intended tenants informing them of the-Change.
The students altered their plans to fit'ttie.new
occupancy date. By Sept. 12, however, only fiv#
suites in the block were ready. Since then another
15 have moved in.
Meanwhile, all the other clusters are behind
schedule. The opening of cluster four has been
postponed from September 18 to October 16. Cluster
three, at first due to open Sept. 30, will not be ready
until mid-way through November.
Clusters one and two, together with the 92-suite
high-rise apartment that completes the project, will
not be available until December 15, one month later
than the date first predicted.
Most of the prospective tenants are now living
in temporary quarters, Rohringer said.
"Some are staying with friends," said Don Mun-
' ton? Almas,-Mater Society first vice-president and
chairmaif it ihe AMS housing committee. "At least
one family is luring in a motel."
r , ' Tha families being inconvenienced should be
reimbursed kg some way by the university, said
Munton.
"It ^frc&xld be done either with help in housing
«:now",  or "with  an   allowance   deducted   from   their
rent once they move in," he said.
Attempts to help have been made, Rohringer
said. Eight families are being accommodated in
unused education huts.
"I was very disappointed that the contractor
of the project (Laing Construction and Equipment
Ltd.) could not give a more precise completion
date," Rohringer said.
"I have asked the director of physical plant to
take a personal hand in the matter."
Munton said the university was "more worried
about getting the project done than about the
students."
"It's up to physical plant," said Rohringer, "They
to tell us when they can turn the suites over to us."
■vs
Vol. XLIX, No. 2
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 1967
FIRST WEEK OF CLASSES, no term papers clue tomorrow that physics lab can wait. Life is tranquil when there's nothing to do but sit and talk and eat your lunch on the library lawn.
Only the thought of Christmas exams being 11 weeks away ruins it all.
\
The heat is on —
keep off grass
By NORMAN GIDNEY
Ubyssey Gay Blade Reporter
Grass temperatures at UBC fluctuated wildly
■s  during   1966—from   18   degrees   fahrenheit   in
January all the way to 57 degrees in July.
And that's only part of the total climate picture for last year as tabulated by the UBC
climatological station.
Their annual report, just released, includes
all sorts of pertinent data on hours of daily sunshine, precipitation intensity and maximum temperatures.
As UBC's webfooted students know and the
report confirms, rain emptied down from Sep-
"4 tember to December for a total of 28 inches.
Monthly radiation (solar, not strontinum-90)
soared to 703 Langleys one day in June and consequently scored the second highest temperature
"* of the year—77 degrees. A Langley, as Langley
residents will confirm, is a measure of solar
radiation.
3p For some reason, grass is colder than the air.
On January 19 the air temperature was the
coldest of the year—28 degrees. Yet the grass
temperature plummetted to 18 degrees.
For those making out or reading this on
the library lawn, the grass temperature, according to last year's figure, is probably 40 degrees.
Grass-minded thermometer keeps it cool.
Fresh ideas
form basis
for Arts I
By BONI LEE
Ubyssey Ass't City Editor
A brand-new window to let fresh ideas into UBC was
thrown wide open this week.
It is Arts I, a nine-unit course designed to avoid fragmentation of knowledge, combat alienation and give students greater
individual freedom.
According to co-leaders Father Gerald McGuigan and Dr.
Ian Ross, prospects of its success are more than encouraging.
"We're very pleased with the response of the student body,
university officials and the Alma Mater Society," said McGuigan
in an interview Wednesday.
All 243 students who applied were accepted for the experimental program.
Ross said about 300 responses were received but only 243
students showed up at registration.
"We're three over our original quota but we're very happy
that we didn't have to turn students away," he said.
The program, which seeks to make freshmen less vulnerable
to wounds caused by impersonal institutions, places students in
classes of 25 under the guidance of six faculty members.
"The students are very enthusiastic," Ross said. "We've
been discussing their required individual projects already, and
they look very promising."
The students are currently attending formal lectures and
will not begin meetings and seminars until next week, Ross
said.
Ross said the program is housed in the old music building.
"We're self-contained there," he said. "It gives the students
a place to belong to and makes the university less cold."
He said carpets are being placed in rooms to give students
the freedom of sitting on the floor during classes and discussions.
Here are some of the aims and curriculum of Arts I as
expressed by Ross in the preliminary program:
"Lectures, debates, seminars, tutorials and periods of individual study will be used to promote the spirit of critical inquiry.
"A feature of the program will be the sequence of oral
reports and essays assigned with the aim of inducing the student
to becomo articulate.
"Throughout the session, he will be called on to collect and
assess information, develop ideas and arguments and foster the
powers of his imagination."
Students in the program are divided into two sections. One
will work with themes of communications, tyranny, war, imperialism and Utopia. The other will deal with war, love, death,
work and education.
Six weeks is given each theme and the relationships between
themes stressed.
The student also takes two other courses of his choice.
McGuigan said he was disappointed that high schools did
little to inform students of the program.
"Some did, of course, but a lot didn't," he said. "Mind you,
there has never been much communication between high schools
and the universities."
Arts I, a pilot project, will run three years with students
and faculty volunteering for each session of the program.
Achievements of the program will then be evaluated and
distributed to the public.
HOUSING  CRISIS
(See Page 3) Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 21, 1967
—kurt  hilger  photo
JUST COUNT THE HEADS and  multiply by $60. That's the way the administration sees it as
the  perennial  book riot, fills the fieldhouse.   Piles  of  texts,   milling   mobs,  indifferent staff
and exhorbitant prices make it one of the  less enjoyable places to spend four hours.
EVE TO LAMARSH...
Egg on HER face?
By JADE EDEN
Four floundering philosophers questioned the
frailty of woman in Brock lounge, Wednesday.
A predominantly female audience of about
100 persons was challenged and entertained by
Research, nursing
in new hospital
Construction has begun on the second stage
of the psychiatric unit of the university's new
health sciences center.
When completed the unit will form the first
wing of the 410-bed teaching and referral hospital planned as the core of the integrated center.
Stage one of the unit, a three-storey building
containing three 20-bed psychiatric nursing units,
is expected to be completed next February.
Stage two, scheduled for completion in mid-
1968, will be a five-storey extension of stage
one. It will contain research laboratories, teaching facilities and offices.
Rick Watts, law 1, Brian Wallace, law 1, John
MacGowan, eng. 2 and Law Undergraduate Council president, Jim Taylor in their attempt to
resolve whether or not "Frailty, thy name is
woman."
The debate became an account of femininity,
and lack of it, from the time of Eve to Judy
laMarsh.
Illustrations of woman's nature included Eve,
"woman with scientific egg on her face," trying
to analyze the source of milk content in cows.
Another point of contention was whether or
not the eating of the fateful apple was an indication of weakness or strength.
Woman, however, did not come out for the
worse, as the affirmative speakers praised her for
her femininity, ("fraility is morning sickness,"
said Brian Wallace) and the rebuttal lauded her
for the lack of it.
In order to protect the speakers from the
potential wrath of their fragile audience, the
question was left unresolved.
The debators escaped unscathed from the Debating Union's first onslaught.
RECORD SALE
WIDE SELECTION AT LOWEST PRICES IN   B.C.
COLUMBIA
$3.58
Reg. $ 4.98
* THE BYRD
* THE PEANUT BUTTER
* CONSPIRACY
* SIMON & GARFUNKEL
* DAVE BRUBECK
* JOHNNY MA THIS
* BOB DYLAN
a        ups«wDOW"s,n«e«r.
11
-aspc
*mK
KCL 2662/KCS 9462
4 TRACK TAPES AND 8 TRACK CARTRIDGE TAPES AT DISCOUNT PRICES
A«B SOUND
Open Friday Until 9 p.m.
571 GRANVILLE (ot Dunsmuir)
MU 2-1919 MU 2-4846
Students' means surveyed
More than 60 per cent of UBC students participated in this
year's student means survey.
Steve Beckow, chairman of the survey committee, said
Monday more than 10,000 students filled in forms which asked
them how they pay university costs..
The AMS voted a sum of $280 to get the information tabulated.   The figures will be used by student government to point*'
out student needs.
The last survey was taken four years ago.
Once a KING
always a KING . . .
but once a Knight is enough
Kinn of Clubs
 1275 Seymour St.	
The dirty S.O.B.'s
on The Ubyssey Ad Staff
didn't contact me for an
ad on Tuesday—so
a belated welcome
back to U.B.C.
THE FRIAR
4423 West 10th
Deliveries 224-0833
Welcome Back
to the
Sports Car Crowd
Drop In and See
Our Latest Accessories
OVERSEAS
AUTO PARTS
12th   &   Alma 736-9804
...ALWAYS ON
SUNDAY!
LUTHERAN CAMPUS CENTRE
5885 University Blvd. 224-1614
Across from the Village
10 a.m. - Worship 11:15 a.m. - Worship
(Pearson officiating) (Fox officiating)
ALSO ON WEDNESDAY - 10 P.M.
and simply beautiful- our wedding set with a
quiet elegance all its own. Ornamented only by
tiny icy slivers of baguettes, their stillness
is in contrast to the fire of the round diamond.
Rings illustrated are exclusive Grassie designs,
and must be handcrafted
BUDGET TERMS—10%   DOWN
Preferential Discount to UBC Students
Diamond Specialists Since 1886
566 Seymour 685-2271
Open 5  days a  week — Fridays unttil 9 p.m. — Closed Wednesdays. Thursday, September 21, 1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
Paper discloses
racial incidents
WINNIPEG  (CUP)—Incidents  of  racial  discrimination  in
university  accommodation  were  revealed  here  by  a  student
^newspaper survey.
International Student Organization advisor Reverend Michael
Hicks told the Manitoban that in many cases overseas students
were discriminated against when seeking off-campus residence.
One potential landlord said,  "We don't like  the smell of
-^Indian cooking."
"The discrimination problem exists in Canada just as it
does in the United States," said Deo Poowassie, ISO program
director.    "The difference is that here nobody is prepared to
-bring the issue to the front."
Fitz Roy Clarke head of the special overseas student reception committee, did not hold the same opinion as Poowassie.
He  said Winnipeg families  have been eager to  provide
temporary accommodation for  arriving  students.     "Renting  a
Oroom to a non-white student for an entire year might be a different matter, however," he added.
AT SIMON FRASER U
Council pres quits
The KING is a thing.
it's a happening
Kina of Clubs
v'        1275 Seyn
Seymour St.
DID SOMEBODY MENTION SWEATERS?
We have them — Lambswools, Shetlands, Alpacas —•
the finest selection of Domestic and Imported Pullovers
and Cardigans available anywhere. Come in, choose
several now, and take advantage of your student discount.
III! II IK UN & FARISH LTD.
786 Granville
and THE COLLEGE SHOP LTD.
802 Granville
FOR ALL YOUR CLOTHING NEEDS
The president of Simon Fraser University
student council has resigned — after a vote of
non-confidence from council members.
Greg Hicks, 20, a second year commerce and
economics student, submitted his resignation
after two weeks in office.
"Due to the expressed and explicit wish of
a majority of council members, I feel I must
submit my resignation effective immediately,"
the statement read.
Council voted 5-1 with 3 abstentions for the
vote of non-confidence.
David Yorke, former council vice-president,
said the vote was based on six points. These as
decided by council were the following:
• Hicks openly opposed the teaching assistants strike plans last spring.
• He has released statements constituting
a repudiation of his election program, especially
regarding students on the SFU Board of Governors.
• He made a "unilateral" decision to attend
the CUS congress in Ontario this fall in violation of council's decision to the contrary.
• Hick's actions and statements at the CUS
congress were contrary to council's feelings.
• Hick has failed to develop a useful program of action.
• Council questioned the leadership and
ability of Hicks.
SFU council has opened nominations for
president and first vice-president. (Post of vice-
president has not yet been filled.)
Elections will be held Oct. 10 and 11.
Hicks told The Ubyssey he was not certain
whether he would run again.
Peak editor Stuart Gold said Hicks changed
his mind twice about running again and "didn't
know what he was doing."
Unpicturable register
meets photog Hilger
Money from books may draw looks from
crooks.
That, according to Ubyssey photo editor
Kurt Hilger, is why no pictures of a cash register can be taken in the fieldhouse.
Hilger, armed with a camera and dauntless
resolve, trooped to the fieldhouse to capture
the melee of swarming book purchasers.
"I had barely leveled my camera when
distinct protestations were audible from a cash
register clerk, identified only as Miss Race.
"She told me with horror that on no condition could a picture of a cash register be taken,
because it would bring attention to the money
being handled at this time," Hilger said.
John Hunter, manager of the UBC bookstore,
explained later RCMP do not allow pictures of
actual cash transactions.
"You can print all the pictures of lineups
you want," Hunter said.
Two members of the B.C. Corps of Com-
missionaries are on duty at the bookstore.
.^. ^ ^vH!^ .. ;^
s#- _^ u
W""    t-
Housing situation on the mend
committee flooded  with  calls
The housing shortage which earlier this
week threatened to leave many UBC students
homeless is slowly improving.
"The publicity which the problem received
this week has resulted in phone calls from all
over the city, offering rooms and suites,"
said Don Munton, chairman of the Alma Mater
Society's housing committee.
He said students still searching for accommodation should register in the AMS housing
office on the second floor of south Brock.
Mrs. Assiah Yahya, a clerk hired by the
AMS to assist in the housing office said the
flow of students asking for accommodation has
subsided, but there were still 40 applications
Wednesday.
Munton said he is planning to appear before Vancouver city council asking that a Dec.
31 deadline for the elimination of illegal suites
in the UBC area be extended.
(In October 1966 an appeal by the AMS to
have the city relax single-
family zoning regulations in
the Point Grey area was rejected by the council.)
He said a postponement
v *     is possible, especially if public pressure is put on city
council.
"We want tenants of the
MUNTON        suites to ask their landlords
to write city counicl asking for an extension,"
he said.
U of Manitoba head denies
discrimination in housing
WINNIPEG (CUP) — The president of the
University of Manitoba Students' Union has
charged the university with discrimination
against non-white students.
In an open letter to Dr. Hugh H. Saunderson, president of the university, UMSU president Chris Westdal said, "It has come to the
attention of the University of Manitoba Students'
Union that the university maintains discriminatory off-campus residence lists.
"In other words, the university lists accommodation that is available for all students, regardless of their race or colour, and maintains
a second list of accommodation for white students only."
The letter concluded, "It saddens me to think
that an institution such as the university which,
by definition, cannot subscribe to any practice
of racial discrimination has stooped to accommodate the racial prejudice of others in our
community."
In a written reply, Saunderson said the two
lists maintained by the university actually differentiated between people who preferred to
take in overseas students and people who had
not expressed such a preference.
Saunderson said the university does not practice any discrimination in any housing which
it provides. However, since campus residences
can only accommodate about 1,300 students, it
is necessary to rely on downtown accommodation for several thousand more students who
come here frome outside Greater Winnipeg.
The reply said: "We have a great deal of
difficulty in finding enough homes to accommodate this number of students.
"We rarely get enough places to meet the
entire need. If we would refuse to list those
people who express a preference for women or
for men, for older students or for freshmen, or
for overseas students or Manitobans, we would
have to shorten our already too short lists."
Saunderson said, ''If a homeowner tells us
that he or she is prepared to take any students,
and then refuses any category, we strike that
name from our list.
"But if a preference is expressed, at the time
of listing, we try to make sure a person of
that type is given the name and address of the
home-owner.
"I am naturally unhappy if some homeowners have special preferences in students.
"But it seems to me to be extremely important that non-resident students should be
located in homes where both parties are going
to toe congenial."
Saunderson said there was little likelihood
the present system would be changed. THC WSSSY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press, Underground Pres';: Syndicate. Founding member. Pacific Student Press. Authorized second class mail by Post Office
Department, Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. The Ubyssey
publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and* review. City editor,
224-3916. Other calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo. Page Friday, loe.
24; sporst, loc. 23; advertising, loc. 26. Telex 04-524.
SEPT. 21, 1967
Inhumans...
"We are against the concept of student as citizen."
With these deatibdess words one Al Anderson, president of the University of Alberta's student union explained at this month's Canadian Union of Students
national congress the philosophy behind the Edmonton
campus' extraction of itself from the union last fall.
Anderson's notion of the student's place in society
— shared by Alma Mater Society first vice-president
Don Munton and by former UBC CUS chairman Steve
Beckow — seems to say that when an adult person opts
to spend some time doing unpaid intellectual work
rather than a salaried job he loses his status as citizen.
The result of the student-isn't-a-citizen view was an
inane recommendation put before this month's national
CUS congress by the UBC delegation.
The recommendation was the laughing stock of the
congress and damaged UBC's reputation in every part of
the country, with the exception of the Alberta Neandra-
thal-belt.
Written by Munton, it stated: "That certain programs CUS is currently engaged in should not be supported. Examples of these types of programs are: human
rights, action programs and policy stands on international
affairs, associate membership in the International Student Conference and International Union of Students."
Conference and International Union of Students."
It is difficult to understand how a rational person
can say human rights are none of students' business —
unless students, already defined as non-citizens, are to
be considered non-humans as well. Human rights are
the business of all humans.
Similarly strange is the view that CUS should not
partake in "action programs." What kind of programs
would he have the union undertake? Inaction programs?
With justified anger, a student from a less privileged
country answered the UBC view that Canadian students
should pretend the big bad world isn't there: "It is the
duty of all people to be concerned about the oppressed
people of the world," Carlos Celle, of Chile, told a
plenary session of the congress.
The aspects of CUS activity opposed by Munton
cost Canadian students almost nothing — most of the
union's funds go to research and service within Canada.
It is difficult therefore to understand the motives behind
the UBC recommendations.
Unless Munton was trying to come up with UBC's
answer to Sasquatch — the non-human, inactive, subterranean student.
•   •   •
in houses
Don Munton, the same AMS vice-president who
authored the embarrassing recommendation to the CUS
congress, happens also to be chief author of current AMS
attempts to deal with the perennial housing shortage.
He is battling a set of near-insurmountable conditions:
Residences that have been booked up since midsummer.
A series of egregious blunders by a board of governors that doesn't really care, culminating in the current
Acadia Park mess.
Tight city zoning laws.
Failure of all three levels of government to deal with
a housing problem, of nationwide scope.
In trying to make the best of a difficult situation,
Munton has done a commendable job. But his stand at
the CUS Congress makes his housing efforts here almost
laughable.
If students shouldn't care about the human rights
of non-students and the rest of the world, why should
anyone care about students' human right to have a decent
place to live?
And to refuse to offer even moral let alone material
support to the hungry two-thirds of the world while crying about your own problems is more than just thoughtless — it's vicious.
"I didn't know catching a husband would be so expensive"
Jock
WASHERMAN
By GABOR MATE
Hello, Trivialand, here again
is my column which I like to
pretend is a sophisticated combination of wit, charm, and
relevant social information, but
which — as we all know — is
but a glorified gossip column.
Every day I discuss significant
and essential topics such as who
is 'buying whose restaurant on
Granville Street, or what hotel
is installing velvet-covered toilet seats in its bridal suite.
Also, in exchange for free
admission and liquor at all the
local nightclubs, I write plugs
for the deadbeat acts appearing
there. I quite realize that my
column is insipid and trivial
but on the other hand it is also
dull. For some ridiculous reason, though, it is the most widely read feature of the Vancouver Slum, which of course
doesn't say one hell of a lot for
the Vancouver Slum or its other
features. Incidentally, I am
known as Jock Washerman because I like washing other people's dirty linen in public . . .
NAME DROPPINGS   .    .   .
Every day I make sure to mention several big names in my
column. This thrills the pants
off bored housewives and alienated chartered accountants. So
here are some big names for
today: Frederick Xavier Weis-
henmeierkopf, Taddus Ignato-
vich Pellmellonovsky, Christopher Doblados Carlos Diego de
Parma y Caballero, and Ormon
Rower ...
HORSE   DROPPINGS   .   .   .
Here now is my daily human-
interest bit about the Vancouver cops, whom I continue to
whitewash no matter how many
innocent people they harass and
no matter how many skid-row
derelicts they beat up in back
alleys. One of the Stanley Park
mounted policemen noticed two
50-year-old orphans struggling
desperately to keep their heads
above the water beside an overturned row-boat in Lost Lagoon.
"Put your feet down, the water
is only four feet deep!" he yell-
JOCK
ed to them, thereby saving their
lives . . .
NIT WIT ... I may not be
the greatest wit who has ever
lived, but Stephen Leacock and
Mark Twain are both dead.
Why, just the other night when
somebody asked me as to who
that lady I was with was, I
replied — get this — "Hell,
that's no lady, that's my wife!"
BOOZE BLUES . . . Like
every other ^_
petty gossip
columnist, I
try to appear
in the guise of
a n inspired
social reformer. My Great
Cause is the
liquor licences of Vancouver cabarets. While other people have
wasted their time worrying
about Vietnam, Negro riots,
poverty, the Canadian Indian
problem and other such trivia,
I have written thousands of
words about the burning issue
of B.C. liquor laws . . .
DEALS WHEELS ... An important conference took place
last night at a place I cannot
reveal to discuss a matter I cannot reveal. The participants,
whose names I cannot reveal,
will make known to the public
their decision at a time I cannot reveal. The only thing I
can reveal is that my informant, whose identity I cannot reveal, has recently returned from
a long trip the purpose of which
I cannot reveal. I realize this is
not very much information, but
it makes at least as much sense
as my usual guff . . .
WASHERMANIA . . . Overheard in the men's can at Joe's
Grill: "Why did the chicken
cross the road?" "That's easy—
in order to get to the other
side!"
LETTERS
Intestinal
Tract
By MICHEL LOPATECKI
What's the first thing you see^
when you come to university ?
A golf course.  Then what do
you see? A swimming pool.
Okay, so you only wake up
when a woman wiping a table
in Brock lifts up your cup of
coffee and spills it down your
back.
Then what do you see ? Girls,
girls all around you. You run
outside tearing at your shirt and
you still see girls, only now^
they're smiling and some are
laughing.
Teeth as clean and beaming
as bed sheets hung on a clothes
line, and with no protective '
shield. You will notice that
those who stick out their
tongues at you have such delicate succulent tongues. *-
So you go over to the library
to observe their apparatus more
closely. You lie on your back
on the sidewalk, your eyes turn- v
ed up, and you hope the girls «
will walk right over you. One
of them does, so you go over to
the lawn, sit down, and eat
grass. '*
Not great mouthfuls though,
we have respec t for our
grounds, just enough to keep
you ruminating through the hottest part of the day. And if you v
don't get bloat you'll stay there
and you'll see many things.
Like birds. Many birds. Many,
many birds. Where did all
those goddam birds come from
anyway? Perhaps you will-
amuse yourself by stoning the
birds or by pulling up earthworms so they can't have them.
You may see a professor.
He'll be running much like a
worm would look if it got up ^
on two legs and ran with a huge
bird chasing it. Except worms
do not get hair in their eyes
nor do they smoke pipes.
Perhaps you'll see the university mascot, a great red carnivore that sometimes walks
round inspecting fire hydrants
and people sitting on the grass.
You'll probably get up to meet
him.
And then you'll fall asleep
for the afternoon. And if they
haven't cut the grass in the
meantime you'll get up, climb
into the family car and drive
home for dinner, past the swimming pool and the golf course.
Face it, student body, you got*
things going for you.
Page 5
EDITOR: Danny Stoffman
City   Stuart Gray
News       Susan Gransby
Managing       Murray  McMillan
Photo       Kurt  Hilger
Associate    Al   Birnie,   Kirsten   Emmott
Senior Pat  Hrushowy,   Bill  Miller
Sports        Mike Jessen
Wire     _        Charlotte   Hair*
Page Friday Judy Bing
Ass't.  City    Boni   _••
The murmurs swelled like a Gregorian   chant   as   fingernails   scraped
on    musty    keys.    Keyed    up,    but
fortified   by   uncurdled   yogurt,   the
massed     avengers     toiled..     Among"-
them    were    Jane    Kennon,    Susan
Gordon,     Wendy     Carter,     Graham
Farstad,    Mike    Finlay,    Miss    Jade
Kden,     Steve    Sinclair,    Val    Zuker,
Norman  "Tuft"  Gidney,  Mary Hull,
Brian   McCutcheon,    Jennette   Mac-^
Lean,   and   Nick   Rundall.   Fighting
off blorgs were  Luanne  Armstrong,
Pat    Walsh,    Richard    Easton,    Pamela    Mutch,    Don    Ratcliffe,    anii^
Gigee   Toth.   Steve   Jackson   looke-Br"
homeless.
Trembling in the darkroom were
Chris Blake, who did all the work,
Lawrence Woodd, George Hollo,
Ron Haxby and Bob McGuinness.
AH were commended by A. Landers.
If you've been missed, come back
and  try   again. Thursday, September 21, 1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
GUERRILLA
GOVERNMENT
Love and euphoria
MORE    LETTERS
By STAN PERSKY
My business seems to be
people. I'm an anthropologist,
i.e., a person native to friends
and strangers. One of the most
important persons in my last
story got left out.
So I guess I'll just start all
over.
Friday afternoon it was hot
and sunny, a piece of Indian
summer. Between the crumbling Stucco-Depression Period
ruins of the armory and the
auditorium, on the newly
erected MacKenzie forum, the
arts council plugged in the
first of a series of free being-
togethers.
The concert was donated by
two local rock groups, the
United Empire Loyalists, and
Papa Bear's Medicine Show, a
band who had recently moved
north from Seattle, to recuperate from the exhausting un-
American Way of Life.
Hundreds of people drifting
around settled into the web
of electronic sound. Workers
on scaffolding stopped in midair.
The Bears were playing.
Their lead singer is Victor, a
beautiful youth visiting our
time zone. He wore a white
deerskin jacket with tassels,
and beads and crosses and
secret amulets hung around
his neck and onto his black
t-shirt; one hand, brushing
back his blond hair, cupped
to his ear.
His uncomplicated love
songs, sounding curiously like
the 1920's, were set in the rock
richness and tight harmony of
the Bears. Victor as image of
hunter, but not slayer.
A very nice human condition, I'd say. Followed by a
succession of representatives
from the State: the local campus fuzz, slightly hysterical but
armed with walkie-talkie; the
RCMP, trained to handle the
student lunatic fringe; and
acing university president,
Papa Panda, Oh yes, and the
. . . free exchange
complainant, a pale psychologist who hadn't seen sunshine
for years, but was awakened
by the music while coercing
hapless freshmen through an
aptitude test.
Not villains or gargoyles,
just people who didn't yet
understand that • arts council
feels that when there's a disagreement it should be amicably negotiated.
(This morning I met my first
outraged student. He was,
angry at the way I had treated Dean Walter Gage in the
last column and characterized
him as the man "who has done
more to help students on this
campus than anyone else." Of
course, I don't agree with that,
but my point is on this occasion Gage wasn't polite or helpful,   merely   authoritarian.)
Between music and threats
and a public account to the
people on the nature of democracy and the tradition of civil
disobedience, we talked.
(By now, Victor was sitting
on the pebbled floor of the
quad, listening, with euphoric
expression, to the Loyalists.
Representing, I guess, eros.)
The Loyalists, by reasoned
persuasion, tuned down to a
level as inoffensive as the
sound of waves slapping up
against Wreck Beach. Everything ended peacefully. People
seemed to understand the purpose of free exchange a little.
That night I listened to Victor do a set at the Retinal
Circus, conjuring up ghost
voices in the fragmented light.
No voyage, love, into your
hands
tonight in the middle of
September
reflected hi-rises on False
Creek
a long black flatness
Then you must be on Burrard
bridge . . .
Yes, I am walking over
Burrard bridge,
the imitation torches
flicking fire-
colored light, the stone
prows set
below, parking-lot lights
shine
on those hundred small
boats
The summer ends
in a warm sky
that moon
around your skin
the air is heated
as are all those
who drift through the city
How many times I have risen
from the
bed, walked down the
street, imagining
I held the ocean
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
'Sloppy
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Congratulations on your
first issue of the year, which
maintains the standards of
the outstanding (read: "only")
newspaper on campus — fair
coverage, frequent distortions.
Specifically, my comments
are directed to the article by
one Al Birnie, who should
know enough by now to state
all relevant facts before stating his own (I'm tempted to
say irrelevant) opinions.
Re the Arts-AMS-Student
Court hassle: the story pointed out that Arts had distinguished   legal   counsel,   "yet
' Council voted it down." A
major factor is omitted —
that the AMS also had legal
"^ counsel, who presented a conflicting opinion. A second
'bending' of the facts—Council did not vote it down. Due
to the conflicting legal opinions, Council referred the
matter for a decision by Stu
dent Court.
Mr.. Birnie further states
that Student Court "of course,
affirmed that the fee question
was unconstitutional," and
strongly implied that the decision was based solely on
"loss of control for the AMS."
The first quote is unwarranted character assassination;
Student Court in the past has
ruled against the AMS. Check
your files.
The second quote and its
implication is false. The decision was not based on "loss
of control", but on By-law 10
of the AMS Constitution. In
effect, the Court agreed with
one lawyer and disagreed
with the other. Incidentally,
the opinion of the Arts solicitor, should Mr. Birnie care to
persue it, was duly hedged
cautionary "ifs", "ands", and
"buts".
The point of this admittedly long-winded missive is to
suggest your senior editorial
staff   should    make   greater
attempts to display full and
fair reporting in future. If,
however, you intended to present a one-sided viewpoint
(heaven forbid!), you could at
least show more subtlety than
was the case with this ham-
handed exercise in sloppy
journalism.
MIKE COLEMAN
law 3
Ed. Note — If Coleman
would peruse the student
council minutes of May 4,
1967, he Would find that they
did, in fact, vote it down by
6 to 5 with 4 abstentions.
Coleman, we trust will be
duly chastised for the above
ham-handed exercise in sloppy lawyerese.
'Complaint'
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I want to  put in  a  little
complaint here.
Two days back on campus
. . . continued
and it's obvious that the same
do nothing die hards are still
working terribly hard at
keeping the asinine authority
structure going. No co-op at
the bookstore, no student control over the food dispensaries and housing services,
much less the administration.
Please tell me why we still
have to pay list for text
books? Please tell me why
the slopshops still serve
starch for food? Please tell
me why we go to school? (It
has nothing to do with poli-
tesse) — or does it?
Because it's university, see,
TUMM EST, how do you
think to learn without going
to school . . . Agggh.
Come on you guys, would
the joker who has my purse
with all my socialistic self-
righteous indignation cards
plus the whatever which
make my fervor female
please return it to the L and F.
Student opinion has it that
we're too polished to do anything about anything. Mom,
Pop, UBC, God and the liver
wouldn't like it.
Foiled again.
R. C. WEINTRAUB
arts 4
Scw£ on (BookA
We BUY and SELL new & used
university or high school text books
hard covers or paper backs
BUSY 'B' BOOKS
146 W. Hastings St.
Across from Woodward's
MU 1-4931
ihe 9&vei?lisenm&
WW&'VVs'u _i"O'0"i<'U'B
raw lap/ay alter
11 summer jo&.
hd-So-Aa)
ruifier dul
(juile happy loppy &k%
on tfie. campus race.
ife ancient alcfi&nists
would /iave done fetter
if tfiey played around
witfi pickling flax.
"Me clue at jay campus
VS to start ifose
Summer 6ucAs wfore
wy are safe and warm
and convenient* life,
at our 6ankfriHslance.
in one cfour warm
and friendly True
Chequing Accounts;
lapinefte was hoppyas I
could be. after all, it
is kind of -&m to be
bwik. an Canwms after
a summer off labour.
tesides, "there are more
Soys than in the -£tax
■piCkling plant.
2&d , Somehow, it is -the
environmental d&tails
like Soys which makes
life on campus ftm for
girls, and. vice versa.
hit the advantage. o£-
te&ma.JxL\ in.a^Lnuner
at th^flase pickling
f>laivt is like mainly
he scratch they pass
you for y&ttr Work.
not *o mention tne
inestimable advarifcasfe
of knowing how to u
pickle flaS. in case
you want to £jRg4ttsile
itotxi home economics
and you're stack for
a thesis topic.
or something.
loit there should be
little disagreement
about the ^aivarttage.s
whidi pertain to tXe
•pecuniary awards
fbr pickiialian
yersever ence.
So lapi-vette cvai Je
expected to do the
best thind witti Set-
cash —th^same thinrf
She does every fell.
Stash it at the firiendlvl
G&mpushanlc.. J ■
our new Tr ue Chequing
Accounts teat hoVLovt
log's, all hollow.
i>ank o£mot&real
StasHvitte,«*mjmswise
cattijnisbank branch
h,ikt adwtwufrfraticm. intiXdiiuf
^•f-5ei«€onrm»ns^er   G Page 6
THE      U&YSSEY
Contract awarded.
Lower Mall grows
A $1,202,000 contract has been awarded to Burns and
Dutton Construction Ltd. for the building of two new residence
towers in UBC's Lower Mall complex.
Funds currently being spent by UBC as part of the plan
to provide campus housing total $3,615,000.
A $2,413,000 Totem Park contract was awarded in July.
Completion of both projects will add 600 beds to the two
1,600-student complexes.
The new Lower Mall towers will be constructed to the west
of the existing development, and will house 192 male students.
The new residences will be operated by UBC on a nonprofit basis.
The residence contracts are a further step in a plan to
increase total residence space for single students by 2028 beds
or 75 per cent by 1971.
Thursday, September 2T, 1967
MORALMAN
COMING
FRIDAY
Try the KING'S-way .
on Seymour Street
King of Clubs
1275 Seymour St.
^^%?x
" ^   "¥/<NV»w
Multi-million   dollar  institute
will  study  retardation  problems
UBC will be the centre of the $1,400,000 B.C. Mental
Retardation Institute development.
Project co-ordinator Dr. Charlotte David, president of
the B.C. Psychological Association, said the five-year project
is aimed at overcoming a shortage of personnel in the field
of retardation.
The development will culminate in a $300,000 institute
building on the UBC campus.
Funds for the development will be provided by the
Canadian Association for Retarded Children and the provincial government.
Dr. David said the project will concentrate at present
on supporting appointments in designated departments at
B.C.'s three universities.
She said specialists in medicine, psychology, nursing,
education, social work, genetics, neurology, physical education and recreation would be appointed.
"The task of these people will be to launch research and
teaching programs to equip students to deal with the problems of mentally retarded," she said.
The institute building will house administrative offices
and conference rooms.
IS
INTERNATIONAL
HOUSE
ON WEST MALL
PAST ARMOURY
'   'autumk. elegance    il
Vfluflb tvfccn. you nrrep __K> EtU        "
Willi 1 ft_b-n«-lc new b-iratf le.       *
A wlr that lobld only he futai*- ' '"
eta__M_ Air too alow  HtMld-cit-hus1
_• xi wi pinna imm um
hum. umm
I life-    tan-kb Un    Iir_n lik.    km Ua
A bank
is a bank
is a bankbank.
ExceptTheRoyal
Were
a
people bank.
Come on in. You'll see what we mean.
ROYAL BANK
We're approachable.
THE VOLUNTARY RECREATION PROGRAM HAS STARTED
Vacancies in  the    Swi 171171'mg    Pmgram
for non-swimmers and those who want to get swimming
awards and life saving certificates.
INSTRUCTION FREE
Classes in badminton, etc. Information at the Memorial Gym.
Call for your time schedule at the Memorial Gym.
School of P.E. & Recreation
Phone 228-2401
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
Election for the Office of AMS Secretary
This office is open to a student who has completed his
or her second year or equivalent and is a fully registered student for the 1967-68 academic year. Candidates must have attained in the previous sessional examinations an average of no less than 60% for 15
units or more, and 65% for less than 15 units.
Nominations will open at 9:00 a.m. Wednesday, Oct.
4, 1967 and will close at 4:00 p.m. Thursday, October
12, 1967. Voting will take place on Wednesday, October 18, 1967.
Elections for the Positions
of Student Senator
The following are eligible to be elected to the office
of Student Senator:
1. One student registered in the Faculty of Graduate
Studies to be elected by the students registered in the
Faculty of Graduate Studies only. To be eligible for
election to this position, a student in the academic year
most recently taken prior to the election shall have
taken a full winter session programme of studies at
this University and satisfied the academic requirements of the Faculty of Graduate Studies; he shall
also have been granted clear admission to, and be
enrolled in, the Faculty of Graduate Studies of this
University as a full-time student.
2. Three students from the student body at large (including the Faculty of Graduate Studies) to toe elected
by the student 'body at large. To toe eligible for election to one of these positions, a student in the academic
year most recently taken prior to the election shall
have taken a full winter session programme of studies
at this University and attained at least a second class
standing; he shall also be registered as a full time
student at this University.
Terms of Office:
1. The student elected by the faculty of Graduate
Studies shall hold office for two years.
2. Of the students elected by the student body at
large, the candidate receiving the highest number of
votes shall hold office for 2 years, the candidates receiving the second and third highest number of votes
shall hold office for one year.
Nominations:
Nominations are open immediately.
Nominations will close on Wednesday, October 4, 1967
at 4:00 p.m.
Voting will take place on Wedesday, Oct. 18, 1967.
Nomination forms and copies of election rules and procedures are available at the AMS office, in Brock
Hall. Completed nomination forms should be deposited in AMS mailbox number 52. For further information contact Kim Campbell, 2nd vice-president,
224-3242. Local 47.
Committee Positions Open
Applications are now being accepted for the following
student administration advisory committees:
Bookstore — 4 students
Food Services — 3 students
Housing — 4 students
Library — 4 students
Traffic & Parking — 2 students
Applicants should satisfy the following rule of eligibility: The applicant shall have attained in the previous sessional examinations an average of no less than
60% for 15 units or more, or 65% for less than 15
units. Letters of application should be addressed to
Kim Campbell, AMS mailbox No. 52. On the evenings
when appointments are to be made applicants will
appear at a meeting of Student Council. The dates are:
Bookstore and Food Services: Monday, October 2, 1967.
Housing, Library, Traffic & Parking: Monday, October 9, 1967.
For further information contact Kim Campbell, 2nd
Vice-President, 224-3242, Local 47.
_* Thursday, September 21, 1967
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 7
jji&i talk
By MIKE JESSEN
Ubyssey Sports Editor
The UBC Thunderbird football and basketball teams will
compete this year with our hilltop friend, Simon Fraser
Unversity.
On October 16, the football Birds match cleats with the
felansmen at Empire Stadium for the Gordon Shrum trophy.
The basketball Birds will play a home and home series
on February 10 and 23 with SFU. The winner takes home the
John Buchanan trophy.
* The clash at Empire Stadium is backed by the Vancouver
Sun Junior Stadium fund. One-third of the gate receipts will
go into the fund while UBC and SFU will split the rest.
All we can say is,  it's about time.    It has taken three
._years.
SFU coaches were approached before last year and a tentative date was set up for a football game but SFU coach Lome
Davies called off the game. The situation was the same with
basketball.
M This year there will be no backing out since the games
are under contract.
Because of its sports scholarships policy, SFU will probably
never be allowed to play in the Western Canadian Intercollegiate
-Athletic Association or in any other league against Canadian
-university teams.
It's a shame that one team will refuse to play another just
because it is afraid of being beaten. But these are the facts
and for now we will have to be satisfied with the one or two
gechibition games that the two Vancouver university teams can
play against each other each year.
If well-attended and well-supported by both sides with
pre-game pep rallies and whoop-to-do, these meetings could be
the most exciting events in campus sport this year, short of
winning a couple of WCIAA championships.
•r UBC students have a chance to purchase special tickets for
the upcoming football game.
For only $1 students will receive a reserved seat in a special
section set off for them.
These tickets are on sale at the athletic office in Memorial
Gym. Only 2,500 tickets are available so why don't you get
yours now and come out on Oct. 16 to root for your team?
COACH OPTIMISTIC
Bright outlook for soccer
"We're mobile and we're strong and, besides
that, we're damn good."
So said Joe Johnson, the Thunderbirds soccer
coach about his team's upcoming season which
opens this Saturday with an away game against
the Victoria O'Keefes.
"The university has its best season about
once in every four years and this is the fourth,"
he added.
Up  and  Coming
The UBC Junior Varsity football Thunderbirds travel to Wenatchee, Washington this Saturday for a game against Wenatchee Valley College.
The UBC volleyball team will hold a meeting
on Sept. 26, at 6:30 p.m. in the War Memorial
Gym. Anyone interested in playing for the best
volleyball team in Canada is invited.
The Thunderbirds wrestling team will hold
its first meeting today at 12:30 p.m. in the UBC
bowling lanes located in the south-east corner of
War Memorial Gym. Everyone is welcome.
Those interested in playing ice hockey should
meet today at 12:30 in the Winter Sports Centre.
Anyone interested in joining the swimming
team should meet today at 12:30 in room 213
in War Memorial Gym.
Harvey Thorn, who was one of the best
players in the Pacific Coast Soccer League last
year, is returning for another season. Thom,
however, is a doubtful starter for the first game
because of his late arrival for training.
This year's goalie has had plenty of good
experience, having played for the B.C. All-Stars
against the visiting Chelsea and Scotland clubs.
Johnson also has Jim Berry, a fine all-round
fullback who was chosen as a member of Canada's National Soccer team which competed at
the recent Pan-American  Games in  Winnipeg.
"The team is better than last year's," said
Johnson, "because it is more mobile. I can take
a player and put him at almost any position
and he'll do a good job for me. Modern soccer,
it's called."
Again this year the Thunderbirds will travel
south to play exhibition matches against San
Jose State, Hayward State, Cal Poly, and the
University of California at Riverside.
"There won't be a game against St. Louis,
however. I can't say I'm really disappointed
either.   I think they're a bit afraid of us."
St. Louis was the top college team in the
National Colleffiate Athletic Association last
year and they barely squeezed by UBC 2-1 at
St. Louis.
If Johnson's optimism proves true, there's a
great season in store for the soccer Birds.
27
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE1
XS
THE YEARS BEST TRIP
VOLPONE
(THE FOX)
by Ben Jonson
with Derek Ralston and Lee Taylor
directed by Donald Soule
designed by Richard Kent Wilcox
Sept. 29-Oct. 7
Student Tickets 75 cents
(available for all performances)
Special Student Performances—Mon., Oct. 2, 7:30 p.m., Thurs., Oct. 5, 12:30 p.m.
Tickets: Frederic Wood Theatre — Room 207 or 228-2678
SAVAGE      •     GROTESQUE      •      HILARIOUS
THE FIRST AND GREATEST BLACK COMEDY
SUPPORT  YOUR  CAMPUS THEATRE
?\_FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE_____/J^
SCUBA DIVING
COURSE
(N.A.U.I. CERTIFIED)
Apply Aqua Soc
Brock Hut No. 10
Under the Diving Flag
Or call John - 224-9956
Less than $10.00 with Club Membership
We'd like to Club you .
that's our business
King of Club
1275 Seymour St.
Uhlcoifui Sack StudsmJtA !
North Western Sporting Goods Ltd.
INVITES NEW STUDENTS TO COME AND SEE
THEIR COMPLETE SELECTION OF SPORTING GOODS
FOR YOUR INDIVIDUAL ATHLETIC  REQUIREMENTS
SOCCER - RUGBY - SKIING
and BASKETBALL SPECIALISTS
NORTH WESTERN SPORTING GOODS
JIMMY COUSE — GERRY MILLER
3715 W. 10th at ALMA 224-5040 Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 21, 1967
'TWEEN CLASSES
Cops under discussion
CRIMINAL PROCESS
Discussion of the police, today, noon, law hut G-14.
SUS LECTURE
Discussion   of   problems   in
organ transplants, today, noon,
Hebb theater.
LSM
Film, Lord of the Flies, today, noon,   Ang.   110.   Admission 25 cents.
CURLING CLUB
Organization and election
meeting today, noon, Bu. 100.
CAMPUS CAVALIERS
Organizational meeting and
practice   dance   today,   noon,
club hut.
WAA
Applications now open for
the following positions on the
women's athletic directorate:
vice - president,    WCIAA    co
ordinator, field hockey manager, and badminton manager.
Apply to president of WAA,
women's gym.
PHRATERES
All-Phi meeting Friday, noon,
Bu. 104.
JUDO CLUB
Meeting Friday, noon, math
232.
ENGINEERS
Dance to the Nocturnals and
the Night Trains, Friday, 8:30
p.m. to 1 a.m., armory. Admission: guys, $1.50, girls, $1.
WUS
British Columbia's first inter-
pub beer rally starts Friday
noon. Best beer drinker in your
group can make money for you.
Rules and route map available
in WUS office, Brock 257.
Give the KING a ring
681-4010
and Swing
ling of Clubs
1275 Seymour St.
STUDENT SPECIALS!
SAVE UP TO 50% DURING OUR GIANT
FALL SALE OF FULLY RECONDITIONED
TYPEWRITERS
Electrics of all makes from 129.50
Standard Typewriters of all makes --from    27.50
Portable Typewriters of all makes from    29.50
New Portables of ail makes . ... from      57.50
. . . OUR   BEST   BUY . . .
Near New Smith Corona-Standard Typewriters
Reg. $149.50-Stodent Price ... ._  $89.50
YOU SAVE $60.00 . . . ONLY 70 LEFT
Over 250 fully guaranteed machines to choose from
Top  Prices  For Trade-Ins
POISON TYPEWRITERS
2163 West 4th Ave.-Phone 731-8322
Open   Mon.   through   Sat.  'til   6,   Fri.   'til  9  p.m.
MAX DEXAIL
OFFERS
10% Discount
to UBC Students
2609 Granville at 10th
A complete stock of all the popular makes
of shoes for the college student, as well as
hosiery, handbags, slippers,  rubbers  and
umbrellas.
Whatever your need in footwear you'll find it at
Dexall's. Pay them a visit — see the exciting new
styles — and ask for the 10%  discount.
Better Shoes for less
DEXALL'S - GRANVILLE AT 10TH - 738-9833
VCF
Organizational   meeting   Friday, noon, Ang. 110.
VOC
Splash and Dance, Saturday,
7 p.m. to midnight. Swimming
till 9 p.m., dancing starting at
8:30 p.m. All at Empire pool,
memorial gym. Admission,
$1.25 per person.
Councils consider CUS
Delegates from councils of UBC, Simon Fraser University,
and University of Victoria will meet in Brock Hall Sunday to
discuss the merits of membership in the Canadian Union of
Students.
Hugh Armstrong, CUS national President is expected to
fly here from Ottawa to attend. AMS president, Shaun Sullivan
called the meeting for Sunday, Sept. 24, at 12 noon.
The meeting is the outcome of Monday night's council meet-
ing, at which Steve Beckow, arts 4, resigned as CUS chairman,
saying he was disgruntled with present CUS policy,
Sullivan said Wednesday CUS fees, now 75 cents per student, should be relocated to areas where it is needed more.
The meeting is open to anyone interested.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students, Faculty & Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 75$, 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00, 3 days $2.50.
Rales for larger ads on request.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone.
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in advance.
Publications Office, BROCK HALL, UNIV. OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
TWO   BAND   SPECTACULAR
NOCTURNALS
NIGHT TRAINS
Fri. Sept. 22 8:30-1:00
Girls   $1.00 Guys   11.50
U.B.C. ARMOURIES
LIVE    BAND    FOR    LIVE    PEOPLE
at  I.H.   8:30 p.m.,   Saturday  23rd.
HOOTENANNT—SOCIAL EVENING
at International House 8:30 p.m.,
Friday   22nd.
Greetings
 12
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVE-
ment sponsors movie "Lord of the
Flies", Angus 110' Thurs., Noon.
Admission   25c.
Lost & Found
 13
LOST: BROWN LEATHER WAL-
let. Please contact Gerry, Rm. 8,
Hut  40,  Acadia,   224-9826,  reward.
FOUND:   PAIR   OF   BLACK  GLASS-
es    (male)    on    beach.    Phone    733-
5179.
SCIENCE SWEATER LEFT IN
red Toyota when h-hiking. Please
return to Man. 224-0634 after 5 p.m.
FOUND OUTSIDE BROCK DANCE
Sun. night, pair of men's glasses,
charcoal   frames,    phone   263-9323.
LOST: BLACK SHEAFFER PEN IN
S-Lot, Monday at 4 p.m., reward,
Russ,   922-8673.
Rides & Car Pools
14
RIDERS    WANTED   FROM   NORTH
Burnaby.  Monday, Friday for 8:30's.
Phone   299-0721  after 6  p.m.
RIDE FROM EAST KEITH N.VAN.
Jamie, YU. 8-9308. Need alarm
clock  also,   thank  you  sweets.
RIDE      WANTED     8:30      CLASSES,
from   16th   and   Balsam,   K.P.   738-
5809.
CARPOOL NEEDED — VICINITY-
67th & Oak, will stay out two
nights   per   week,   FA.   1-9461.	
RIDE WANTED VICINITY FRANCIS
and Heather, Richmond. Phone
Sandy,   277-7928. 	
GIRLS DESIRE RIDE FOR DAILY
8:30 classes. 985 Nicola Street, 688-
1082.
TWO DRIVERS NEEDED FOR CEN-
tral    West    Van.    carpool.    Phone
926-2245.
RIDE NEEDED FROM 12th AND
Laurel for 9:30's. Call Wendy at
733-9080.
Special Notices
15
ANYONE WISHING TO WORK ON
the Special Events Committee come
to Room 255, Brock Extension any
day between  3:30  and 5:00.	
ANYONE WISHING TO WORK ON
the Festival of Contemporary Arts
Committee come to Room 255, Brock
Extension any day between 3:30
and 5:00.
SICK OF HAIRCUTS? GET YOUR
hair styled at the Upper Tenth Barber, 4574 W 10th Ave. 1 block from
gates. 	
HANK   WILL   BE   THERE   UNCUT.
NATIONAL DAY BANQUET, 18th
Anniversary of People's Republic
of China. Speaker: Professor Mor-
decai Briember, Dept. of Sociology,
SFU. Ming's Restaurant, 147 East
Pender St. $4.00 per person. Order
tickets by September 23 from China
Arts and Crafts, 681-4916.
Film showing: Two color spectaculars, "Victory of Chairman
Mao Tse Tung's Thought" (the
three atomic tests) and "Chairman
Mao is the Red Sun in Our Heart"
(17th National Day Celebration,
Peking) October 1, 12 noon, Olympla
Theater, Hastings at Nanaimo.
Admission,   $1.00.	
OPEN   HOUSE  AT  I.H.   THIS   SUN-
day.  Come with a friend,  3:00 p.m.
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
USED TEXTS: GEOL, 105, COMM.
190, Ec. 200, Eng. 200. Phone 278-
0853 anytime.
16
Travel Opportunities
Wanted—Information
17
AUTOMOTIVE & MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
MGA — SPORTS — BLUE. WELL
maintained. View at 2250 Wesbrook.
1962 TR-4 WITH OVERDRIVE, VERY
good shape. 4430—13th Ave. West.
Tel.  224-1678,  after 5.
'55    METEOR,    GOOD    COND.,    $300.
736-6269.
1966 AUSTIN COOPER. WILL TAKE
trade.   Phone   526-9070.
Automobiles Wanted
22
Automobile Repairs
24
Motorcycles
26
1966 SUZUKI HUSTLER 250CC X-6.
Good condition, $500 or offer. Phone
Bob,   266-4419 after  5 p.m.
1966 HONDA 300 SUPER HAWK.
Excellent condition, 4,000 miles,
$550.00.   Call   Jim  at   939-1210.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Rentals—Miscellaneous
36
Scandals
37
TWO BANDS FOR THE PRICE OF
one. U.B.C. Armouries. Fri. Sept.
22. 8:30-1:00. Girls  $1.00. Guys $1.50.
IF YOU'VE FLIPPED YOUR WIG
let us replace it. Campus Barber
Shop.   Brock  Extension  153.	
FOR A CERTIFIED SCUBA DIVING
course less than $10.00 inquire at
Aqua Soc behind Brock under the
Diving Flag.	
WHERE    IS    SHE?    UP    A   TREE
perhaps.
Typing
40
GOOD, EXPERIENCED AND RE-
liable typist available for home typing.   Please  call 277-5640.	
EXPERIENCED TYPIST WILL DO
essays, thesis, etc. at home. 25c per
page. M. Hay, 3963 Bond Street,
Burnaby,   433-6565   after 5:30   p.m.
EXPERIENCED   TYPIST   —   ELEC-
trie.   Phone  228-8384   or 224-6129.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female
51
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
sponsors movie "Lord of the Files",
Angus 110,  Thurs.  noon.  Admission
25c.
POINT GREY FELLOWSHIP MEETS
again at Alma Y, Sunday at 11:00
a.m. Information, phone 876-7204,
224-5637.
MARDI GRAS COMMITTEE MEET-
ing, Friday noon, Brock council
chambers.
AMS PUBLICATIONS OFFICE RE-
quires experienced clerk-typist with
some bookkeeping knowledge for
eight months employment per year
(Sept.-April). This fact, plus the
campus location makes the job especially suitable for a senior student's wife (without children).
Preference will be given to a local
resident 21-35 years of age, who
will be available for at least the
next two years. For further information call the Manager of Student Publications (Brock Hall) at
224-3242  loc.   26.
Help Wanted—Male
52
2ND OR 3RD YEAR STUDENTS TO
sell advertising for the UBYSSEY.
This is an excellent opportunity to
gain sales experience and to earn
commission. (One salesman's commission exceeded $1,000 last year.)
Must be hard working, well organized and be able to work 8-10
hrs. a week. If sincerely interested
apply to Publications Office. Brock
Hall. After 2 p.m.         	
MEN NEEDED TO DELIVER FOR
Vancouver's foremost pizza palace
and eatery — evenings 224-0833.
Must have car—The Friar ... is in.
Help Wanted—
Male or Female
53
SUPERSTITIOUS    ABOUT    FRIDAY
13th? If you're cut you won't care.
BIOLOGY HELP REQUIRED.
Fourth year specialist or graduate.
736-6923, 4:30-6:30 p.m. except Tuesday.
MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE
tutors required. Fourth year or
graduate, 736-6923, 4:30-6:30 p.m.,
except  Tuesday.
Work Wanted
54
INSTRUCTION
Instruction Wanted
61
Music
62
Tutoring
64
LEARN TO DANCE? AT THE
Grand Mixer and Dance. Friday,
U.B.C.  Armouries,  8:30-1:00.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
THE FINEST MEN'S HAIRSTYLING
at the Upper Tenth Barber. 4574 W.
10th   Avenue.   1   block   from   gates.
THE BEST SELECTION OF CLEAN,
rebuilt:
washers
dryers
fridges
freezers
ranges
dishwashers
Mclver  Appliances
Sales & Services
3215  W.   Broadway,   738-0021.
PIANO, BENCH, UPRIGHT, EXCEL-
lent strings, felts, 3 pedals. For
someone requiring a good Instrument,   261-6023, evenings preferred.
W. F. LUDWIG SUPER CLASSIC
drum set — complete with cymbols
and cases. Call Earle, 224 - 0073
evenings.
I'M MARRIED NOW. SINGLE BED
for sale. Mattress only one year old.
$25.  738-6063  evenings.
DOUBLE BED, SPRING & MAT-
tress, $25.00. L.C. Smith typewriter,
good condition, $20.00. Phone 681-
5967. t
202    ENGLISH    II    BOOKS.    PHONE
evenings,   253-3415.   2940   East  1st.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
ROOMS — ON CAMPUS. CLOSE TO
Meal Service. 2250 Wesbrook. 224-
9662. •■
ROOM FOR TWO MALE STUDENTS.
All facilities, near campus. Phone
224-4788.
SLEEPING ROOM FOR 1 MALE
student on 29th just off Dunbar.
Phone 224-6129.
Room & Board
82
ROOM AND BOARD FOR 2 GIRLS
sharing bedroom. 38th and Dunbar.
266-5696.  $70 permonth.
Furn. Houses & Apts.
83
Unfurn. Houses & Apts.
84
Houses For Sale
Houses & Apis.—
Other Cities
87
BUY - SELL - RENT
WITH
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED

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