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The Ubyssey Mar 18, 2005

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Array X-
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"^^^is^^S^
VOLUME 86
H ARABIC SINCE 191! 2
Friday, 18 March, 2005
CLASSIFIEDS
nnouncemenis
DEMONSTRATING ON THE
INTERNATIONAL DAY OF ACTION:
YES TO SELF-DETERMINATION! No
to Occupation of Iraq ! Saturday, March
19th,  12:00 noon @ Vancouver Art
Gallery (Georgia St. @ Howe).
VANCOUVER SPARTACUS YOUTH
CLUB CLASS: BREAK WITH THE
PRO-IMPERIALIST NDP! For a
binational, revolutionary workers party!
Tuesday, March 22, 5:30pm . UBC SUB
rm 211.
MEDICINE IN THE MARKETPLACE
MARCH 18 6:30 - 9:30PM AND 19
8AM-4:30PM, UBC LIFE SCIENCES
CENTRE. $20 fee includes Friday wine
and cheese and Saturday lunch and coffee.
FIREFLY PROJECT FRIDAY, MARCH
18 & SATURDAY, MARCH 19. Doors
at 6:30pm, show at 7pm. Isabel Maclnnes
Lounge, Walter Gage Towers, UBC. $7
for students, $10 forotheres. All proceeds
go to War Child Canada. Tickets on sale
at the door.
NUTRITION: THE FOUNDATION
OF HEALTH 8c HEALING. The
Alternative and Integrative Medical
Society (AIMS) 6th annual conference
will feature local health experts presenting
a breadth of nutrition information.
Sunday April 3, 9-5. Details and
Registration online: www.aims.ubc.ca.
MOBILIZATION AGAINST WAR
AND OCCUPATION ANTI-WAR,
ANTI-OCCUPATION CONFERENCE.
Brirannia Community Cenrre Sunday,
March 20th, 12-6. Pre-registration
apprecitated. Call 604.338.9006 or email
info@mawovancouver.com
POLITICAL PARTY DEBATE ON
ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES. Wed.
Mar 23, 7:30pm. Moot Court Room,
l.aw Building. Free admission. Info:
alissarcynolds@hotmail.com
ra-curricwar
WWW.PRIDEUBC.COM. An AMS
Resource Group for gay, lesbian, bisexual,
transgendered students and allies. Visit
our website for events and info!
COLOURS
mpjoymen
SMALL JOBS, custom lamps from
scratch, bookcase assemblv, tov trains
wired. Sue 604-736-9343'
DOES YOUR SUMMER JOB SUCK?
Challenging summer work. Make
S2300/month, get experience. 1-866-945-
WORK
JOIN NEXT YEAR'S UBC REC
STAFF! Get great experience in
event management, marketing and
development. Pick up a brochure at the
SRC for details.
ccommonauon
NEED SOMEONE TO SUBLET
YOUR ROOM? I am seeking
furnished accommodation from May
1 to September 1, 2005. Colse to SFU,
groceries and transportation. On-site
laundry and internet ready preferred. E-
mail: ml_renrer@hotmail.com
ON-CAMPUS APARTMENT
AVAILABLE FOR SUBLET! Available
May 1. Spacious 3 bedroom plus
den. Located in the UBC village,
near McDonalds. Email: lindsey.
munch@gmail.com
eruices
UBC FOOD COOP PRESENTS
SPROUTS, A STUDENT RUN, NOT
FOR PROFIT COOPERATIVE
GROCERY STORE. Find snacks, fresh
produce, ready-made- meals, baked goods
and more on the lower level of the SUB.
Open 11-6 Monday to Friday.
ix$&}.  special issue
uy&se
FOR SALE: DIGITAL CAMERA,
JUICER, RICE COOKER, TV,
VIDEOS, NINTENDO GAMES,
ELECTRONICS, AND MORE... hrtp://
tinyurl.com/5zb87
NEW & USED SCHOOL SUPPLIES!
Binders ($1), letter trays ($1), staplers
($3), hole punchers ($3).. and more!!
No tax, discounts with bulk buying! For
more info & complete price list, contact:
Viviene Chu vivs_l l@normail.com
1978 VOLVO 244 DL. $1300 O.B.O
190,000 km, freshly tuned, new speakers
$ CD Deck, extra snow tires, air cared,
very reliable, no current repairs or service
needed. Call Rad 604.736.3543.
isceuaneous
MALE COCKATTEL NEEDS A GOOD
HOME. Sadly cannot keep. Cage and
supplies included. Contacr Christina
604-438-6037
VANCOUVER PROGRAMMER
LOOKING FOR LOCAL,
INDEPENDENT BANDS FOR
RADIO SHOW. Email
localkidsmakegood@hotmail.com
canemic services
NEED HELP WRITING ESSAYS OR
PASSING THE LPI? Term Paper marks
dragging down your grades? Ger help
from DIANNE call (604) 662-8775
PROOFREADING SERVICE. Essays,
theses, letters, statements. Online, fast,
professional. We provide a no-charge
demonstration in advance. WWW.
CHECKEDIT.COM checkedit@cogeco.
ca (905) 335-3192
CLASSIFIEDS FOR STUDENTS!
looking for a roommate?
Got something to sell?
Dr just Have an announcement to
make?
If you are a student, you can place
classifieds for FREE!
For more information, uisit Room 23 in
tlie SUB (basement] or call 822-1654.
Labourers
The City of Vancouver is accepting applications
for general labourers in our Streets Operations
Branch.These positions are temporary for five
months, with possible extension(s).
You must have the foHowing: Grade 12 or equivalent;
labouring experience; knowledge of safe work
procedures; as we!! as the physical ability to lift and
push heavy objects, work outside in all weather
conditions, and deal tactfully with the public.
These are unionized positions (under the jurisdiction
of C.U.RE. Local 1004).You'!l typically work from 7 am
to 3:30 pm, Monday to Friday, and be rotated through
a number of maintenance anchor construction crews.
Pay rate is $20.47 per hour.
Applicants being considered will be required to take
a pre-employment medical with the City's medical
provider, at no cost to the applicant.
Send a current resume or a completed
"Application for Employment" form detailing
your skills and experience by Tuesday, March 29,
2005 to:
Manitoba Works Yard
2SO West 70th Avenue,
Vancouver, BC V5X 2X1
Attention: Streets Operations
The City of Vancouver is an equal opportunity employer. We thank
ali applicants for their interest, however only those selected for an
interview will be contacted.
CITY OF .;.rV-■"•'-'
VANCOUVER Vancouver ca
"I'liiy l 'In.>>v;v'is 'nad to infi}K)rt that due
•':t(l:svK!'rity^
."•with CiTRAvill \,6 i;ari('oiit<d.";.;        "'aa:
/ v unique decor and a menu Icaturin^
a lu>ion ol Or^K, Indian ana italian cuisine.
Masala
restaurant
Now offering 15% DISCOUNT
on food to all students with
valid student ID.
*Oflfer available Mon-Thurs only.
4432 Dunbar Street
(between 28th and 29th ave)
Contact Luke or Lucky at (604) 738-3186 or
nishanth-Juke@yahoo.com to get a special discount for parties.
a*5Clo:
::^PT£t\i:fe
What the hell were
we tliiiikiiior"
pn^to
i^ci,,e-oT^c.hvn>:
loi: io*! XfiMcmbv
^hoi'^LkV-n-r
isv sfcvsA^^^^
My Asian
mother and me
Same family, but two different
cultures. Momoko Price speaks out
about growing up a uhalf breed.
inn^:\:otivc^.]^hoic^i^v|^>ci>:;
'mv "•.!■•• n
CM.-I.-:. • M. ■ v   U
BY MOMOKO PRICE	
In a nutshell, I'm a 0.5 J student: a
half-Japanese girl, the kind that
Weezer warned you about. I was
raised in Hamilton, Ontario, the
city that the 2004 Ubyssey spoof
issue claimed to be Canada's No.
#1 Shithole. Shithole, my ass. I ask
you, what other city would so
gamely make a tradition out of
watching the CFL and tripping on
acid? Anyway, until the age of 19 I
was a Hamilton native and the
years spent hanging out with other
kids in school made me realise
how tragically ludicrous my cross-
cultural family was in comparison
with my primarily Caucasian contemporaries: A wise-cracking
stockbroker father, a terrorising,
diminutive Japanese mother and
three little half-breeds: my two
older brothers and me. Together,
we made a tempestuous troupe of
ferocious anger, high spirits and
tough love, and I think now, having finally grown up, we're still
recuperating from the trauma of
living under one roof.
In high school, I entertained
the cool girls in gym class by regaling them with the funniest stories
that came out of our redbrick
house. Like the time my mother
and I got in a fight and she hit me
with the $2700 silver flute she
bought for me. Or the time she
searched through my wallet and
found my prescription for birth
control pills, later summoning me
into her bedroom to tell me that
she has never in all her life been
more disappointed in me. (I don't
take that seriously anymore, she
says it all the time. It's the
Japanese equivalent of 'I'll turn
this car around! Don't think I
won't!*). They're good stories, but
on the whole they perplexed my
suburban friends. They didn't
understand my mother at all, calling her "Crazy Kyoko" in brutal
teenage sympathy.
My mother, Kyoko (her maiden
name is Hiraki), is currendy about
4'11* and shrinking due to osteoporosis (dairy products are not
usually a priority in the traditional
Japanese diet). She is deceptively
sweet in public, self-deprecating
and cheerful, putting down herself
and her children (a.k.a. me) to
compliment others. I realise now
that this is just the Japanese way.
Like that time when my mother
heard a friend of mine fooling
around on the piano and said with
an evil tittering laugh, "Who is that
playing? It can't be Momo, she's
terrible." I realise now that she
wasn't being a stone-cold bitch
after all: it's her way of telling
someone, "Your piano playing is
very nice*.
The yawning gorge of cultural
miscommunication between my
mother and I has probably caused
some permanent scarring, and
that sucks. I remember reading
The Joy Luck Club in high school
and reading the passage where the
Chinese-American daughter recog-
//
nises her mother's defensive posturing as exactly that, finally seeing in place of her Goliath only a
wizened old woman, armed with a
wok and a spatula, waiting for her
daughter to let her in (or something along those lines).
Touching, isn't it? Well, it's total
bullshit. Not to say that my mother
and I don't privately harbour feelings akin to Amy Tan's mother-
daughter dynamic, but the idea
that we'd be capable of doing anything about it is about as physically impossible as eating a hamburger with chopsticks.
I've done the sincere emails of
appreciation from across the country, and they have a temporary
"BUT I DON'T THINK
WE'RE DOOMED TO A
TERMINAL STATE OF
MISAPPREHENSION AND
VIOLENT FIGHTS. NOW
THAT WE'RE THOUSANDS
OF MILES APART WE'VE
NEVER BEEN CLOSER.
I'M SLOWLY REALISING
THAT IN MY MOTHER'S
CULTURE. IT'S NOT
WORDS THAT MATTER,
IT'S ACTIONS AND
GESTURES."
soothing effect, but their impact
never lasts long. As soon as I lose
my T4 slips I'll be the "worst child
out of all three of you* again. When
I was younger, my family, led by
my father, would try to buy her
presents on special occasions and
when we asked her what she wanted she would always say the same
thing: she doesn't want presents,
she wants us to be better children.
What can you say to that, really? I
was definitely not going to be a
better kid, that's for sure. I was a
teenager: I had parties to go to,
drugs to try, sexual bases to round.
I knew that life was short and the
window of idiotic teenage invincibility was even shorter.
But I don't think we're doomed
to a terminal state of misapprehension and violent fighting. Now
that we're thousands of miles
apart we've never been closer. I'm
slowly realising that in my mother's culture, it's not words that
matter, it's actions and gestures.
So I'm working on that. Keeping
my head on straight, not losing
stuff (that drives her crazy) and
calling frequently. I think it's making her happier, and that makes
me happy.
And hey, if all else fails, I can
always name my first kid after her.
That scores brownie points in any
culture, wouldn't you say? Just
kidding...well, maybe not. ife.
i
i! a <j9^Vj>^ spec ia I issue
COLOURS
Friday, 18 March,2005
3
*
i
;
i
1
Friday, 18 March, 2005
Vol.LXXXVI  N°44
Colours Issue Coordinators
lesse Ferreras
Ritu Kumar
Editorial Board
coordinating editor lesse Marchand
coordinating@ubyssey.bc.ca
news editors Sarah Bourdon
Dan McRoberts
news@ubyssey.bc.ca
culture editor Ania Mafi
culture@ubyssey.bc. ca
sports editor Eric Szeto
sports@ubyssey.bc.ca
features/national editor Alex Leslie
features@ubyssey.bc.ca
photo editor Nic Fensom
photos@ubyssey.bc.ca
production manager Michelle Mayne
production@ubyssey.bc.ca
Coordinators
volunteers Carrie Robinson
research/letters Paul Evans
The Ubyssey is the official student newspaper of the University
of British Columbia. It is published every Tuesday and Friday
by The Ubyssey Publications Society. We are an autonomous,
democratically run student organisation, and all students are
encouraged to participate.
Editorials are chosen and written by the Ubyssey staff. They
are the expressed opinion of the staff, and do not necessarily
reflect the views of The Ubyssey Publications Society or the
University of British Columbia. All editorial content appearing in
The Ubyssey is the property of The Ubyssey Publications Society.
Stories, opinions, photographs and artwork contained herein
cannot be reproduced without the expressed, written permission
of The Ubyssey Publications Society.
The Ubyssey is a founding member of Canadian University Press
(CUP) and adheres to CUP's guiding principles.
Letters to the editor must be under 300 words. Please include
your phone number, student number and signature (not for
publication) as well as your year and faculty with all submissions.
ID will be checked when submissions are dropped off at the
editorial office of The Ubyssey, otherwise verification will be done
by phone. "Perspectives" are opinion pieces over 300 words but
under 750 words and are run according to space. "Freestyles'' are
opinion pieces written by Ubyssey staff members. Priority will be
given to letters and perspectives over freestyles unless the latter is
time sensitive. Opinion pieces will not be run until the identity of
the writer has been verified. The Ubyssey reserves the right to edit
submissions for length and clarity.
It is agreed by all persons placing display or classified advertising
that if the Ubyssey Publications Society fails to publish an
advertisement or if an error in the ad occurs the liability of the
UPS will not be greater than the price paid for the ad. The UPS
shall not be responsible for slight changes or typographical errors
that do not lessen the value or the impact of the ad.
EDITORIAL OFFICE
Room 24, Student Union Building
6138 Student Union Boulevard
Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1
td: 604-822-2301
fax: 604-822-9279
web: www.ub3rssey.bcca
e-mail: feedback@ubyssey.bcca
BUSINESS OFFICE
Room 23, Student Union Building
advertising: 604-822-1654
business office: 604-822-6681
fax: 604-822-1658
e-mail: advertising@ubyssey.bcca
business manager Fernie Pereira
ad sales Dave Gaertner
ad design Shalene Takara
Ania Mafi was whispering to Nic Fensom about how much she
liked Dan McRoberts' sexy new steez until loudmouth Michelle
Mayne rudely interjected to say that Jesse Marchand (Bic) was
the magician responsible for Eric Szeto's '2-cooW-skoor pose
which had won the lustful eyes of Paul Evans away from homely
Carrie Robinson. Inspired, lil' Alex Leslie asked for a makeover to
impress ice-queen Aman Rai, so bookish Sarah Bourdon texted
Jesse Ferreras who pogo-balled it over to borrow Ritu Kumar's
used pore strips from the Claudia Li B-Beauty-Full Salon, really
just a half-assed front for Colleen Tang's underground airbrusning
cabal, which had turned Sara Norman into a ravishing Sam
Wasswa-Kintu doppelganger, convincing Elaisha Stokes and Lisa
Cooper that maybe the same could be done for poor Trevor Gilks.
But Momoko Price's big mouth told the self-proclaimed fashion
beyotch Priya Bubber who sent big ol' Simon Underwood along to
break that illegal shit up. Beauty is only skin deep. Put it in the can
cover graphics Sumayya Kassamali
cover design Nic Fensom
V
Canadian
University
Press
Canada Post Sales Agreement
Number 0040878022
Of
proud traditions
BY RITU KUMAR
Why have a "Colours" Issue?
The simplest answer to that
would be to recognize the federal
government's attempts at promoting multiculturalism and the
upcoming International Day for
the Elimination of Racial
Discrimination (March 21st.) But
that alone is no reason to have an
issue dedicated to the culture of
Canada, a climate where multiple
ethnicities can live in harmony.
Although this may not have
always been the case, Canada is
now both a diverse and accepting
community.
The creation of this year's
issue began with the hope that we
could stray from the usual focus
of racism, discrimination and
oppression, but as time wore on
we realized that this would be
harder and harder to do. This is
not because Canada is a racist
country. In fact, if anything, it is
easy to see that Canada's
attempts at the elimination of
racism is what makes it the multicultural community it strives
for. After all, where you have a
multicultural community, you
will have to combat the social
constructs that foster the notions
of hate and oppression.
This is a sensitive and often
unnerving topic. We are all
diverse and this issue affects all
of us in some way. As a Danish-
born Indian who is now a proud
Canadian I know that race and
nationality are social constructs
that stand in our way of acceptance. And even though we in
Canada don't have to deal with
issues of racism on a daily
basis, we must address it to
combat issues of systemic
racism and oppression. We
must address it in order to allow
ourselves to become more open,
caring beings.
The words of Paul Martin St.,
the man who made it possible to
be a Canadian citizen, ring true
today: 'Our 'new Canadians'
bring to this country much that is
rich and good, and in Canada
they find a new way of life and
new hope for the fiiture. They
should all be made to feel that
they, like the rest of us, are
Canadians, citizens of a great
country, guardians of proud traditions, and trustees of all that is
best in life for generations of
Canadians yet to be."&.
Multiculturalism
how to represent it?
BY JESSE FERRERAS	
Multiculturalism is a widely-discussed topic that encompasses a
number of issues and ideas which
are difficult to define in one issue. It
is a word used throughout Canada
to describe one of the merits of this
nation—that its citizens and inhabitants exist as part of a cultural mosaic, in which people are allowed to
freely express their cultural and ethnic ideas, traditions and values to
the effect of constructing a pattern
in a country in which those cultures
and ethnicities can be freely
expressed and promoted.
I am a Canadian citizen of Irish
and Puerto Rican descent who has
been in this country for the better
part of 20 years, and yet I feel as
though I rarely had (or took) the
opportunity to better understand
multiculturalism until now after my
experience with Colours. Ultimately,
we have discovered that this is a
topic that affects anyone in a society
that is populated by various cultures
and ethnicities.
The title "Colours* is misleading,
however. Multiculturalism encompasses far more than the colour of
people's skin. Beneath colour, there
are a variety of traditions and values
which are difficult to immediately
assess if one focuses solely on one's
skin. Ritu and I have attempted to
employ the word "colour* to
describe "culture* and thereby present a variety of cultural expression
to be found throughout the university and Canadian society in general.
We have placed a particular emphasis on film, which has emerged
since its inception as one of the
most accessible forms of artistic
expression and offers a window to
view the issues, conventions and
beliefs throughout the world.
Ritu and I wish tp thank the contribution of a number of people
without whose assistance the production of this issue would never
have been possible: Equity
Ambassador Jenn Lau for providing us with material and encouraging writers to contribute; Ubyssey
Culture Editor Ania Mafi for her
support, guidance, and patience;
the Ubyssey staB for the opportunity to explore in-depth an issue that
affects a wide spectrum of this
nation's population; and last
but not least, our volunteers, without whose exceptional writing
skills and generous contributions,
"Colours" would never have materialised in the first place. .&.
BY AMAN RAI
As Canadians, we pride ourselves as being part
of the cultural mosaic and not the cultural melting pot that is the United States. Our schools
and our government preach "multiculturalism"
as if it were going out of style.
We are told that we should be "accepting*
and "inclusive* of all, regardless of their race,
colour, caste or creed because we are all
Canadians and as such we have equal rights
and freedoms thanks to Pierre Elliot Trudeau
and his government in 1982, who introduced
the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.
The Charter was designed to recognise,
promote (and publicise) Canada's multicultural make-up through ensuring that all
groups within Canada, regardless of race,
were guaranteed rights under Canada's
Constitution. It is pretty safe to assume that
our bureaucrats presumed that if we all had
the same rights, we would all get along and
we would all be one great Canadian family.
Equal rights meant equality, right?
Wrong.
As much as Pierre Elliot Trudeau wanted
Canada to be a colourful mosaic, the reality
turned out quite differently. We segregate ourselves, we discriminate, and we hate. We whisper at people with accents, we use racial slurs
and then turn around and say "just kidding,"
and we criticise cultural norms because they
aren't Canadian, whatever that means. We have
places we call Chinatown or Little India. Have
we chosen to segregate ourselves or have we
been indirectly or directly forced into specific
areas of concentration?
If racism doesn't exist, then why was I told —
by a perfect stranger—that I had better start
speaking English because I was in Canada? I
suppose she was trying to warn me. She said
that before long, Canada would not be promoting multiculturalism. And she would know best,
as a victim of European colonisation—she was
an indigenous person who had long since lost
her language.
Observing our government, our schools and
our communities, how representative are they
of the multitude of races that Canada is home
to? How accessible are the institutions that govern our education and our lives? The concentration of white, middle-upper class men in
positions that matter and that affect public policy is too high considering that the people that
these policies affect are very much removed
from the white middle-upper class lifestyle.
Where is the mosaic in this?
It is fair to say that "multiculturalism" is
merely a catchphrase and one of those warm
and fuzzy words we throw around to make
ourselves feel politically correct, like saying "I
recycle" to suggest that you are an environmentalist.
It takes more than a word and a slogan to
truly believe and practice something. &. 4
Friday, 18 March, 2005
COLOURS
■&-\J$*&s&) special-issue
WE HAVE A SPOOF ISSUE AND YOU DON'T. JEALOUS? YOU CAN COME HELP US WITH -IT.    \
GOME TO THE UBYSSEY OFFICE; AND ASK FOR.THE SEC^
COORDINATING@UBYSSEYBC.CA,: :       :: V;':
^D^mm
The 2005 AMS Grad Class Council is
calling for Community Project and
Initiative proposals
We'd like
Up to $15,000 is available for distribution
among one or more chosen Projects or
Initiatives.
Proposals must include a description of the proposed
project as well as a breakdown of how awarded funds
would be allocated.
Deadline for proposals is March 29th at 4:30PM.
Please submit proposals in paper format to Box 127
at the AMS Executive Business Office.
Successful applicants will be contacted beginning
April 26, 2005.
Late proposals will not be accepted.
For more information please contact Richard Davis, Grad
Council Committee President at ubcgcc2005@gmail.com
for more information.
UBC
UNIVERSITY BOULEVARD ARCHITECTURAL COM PETITION
<***
Three Teams:
Three Visions
April 1-10, 2005
Come see the future of UBC
Aerial View of University Boulevard
MORRIS AND HELEN BELKIN ART GALLERY
University of British Columbia 1825 Main Mall
Vancouver, BC Canada V6T 1Z2
Tel: 604.822.2759 Fax: 604.822.6689
www.belkin-gailery.ubc.ca
EXHIBITION HOURS
Opening Night (April 1): 5:30-8pm
Monday - Friday: 10am -7 pm
Saturday - Sunday: 12-5 pm
UBC
UNIVERSITY TOWN
A Sustainable Future
CAMPUS COMMUNITY POLL
Students, faculty, staff, alumni, professor emeriti and
university residents can vote at the exhibit or on-line
from April 1-10, 2005.
THREE TEAMS
• Allies and Morrison Architects (London)
Proscenium Architecture & Interiors Inc. (Vancouver)
• Moore Ruble Yudell Architects & Planners (Santa Monica)
Hughes Condon Marler: Architects (Vancouver)
• Patkau Architects Inc. (Vancouver)
For more information about the competition, the campus
community poll or University Town, please visit:
www.universitytown.ubc.ca
This weekend many Iranians will be celebrating Norooz, the
Iranian New Year. The word Norooz itself means "new day"
in Farsi, and for many Iranian people the NewYear marks the
start of a new beginning. Like Canadians who make New
Year's resolutions to stay in shape, live a healthier year, and
be more positive, Iranians also look to the new year as a
symbol of a fresh start. Norooz falls on the first day of
spring—new flowers are in bloom and longer, sunnier days
mark the end of winter darkness.
Displayed in the photograph above is the special spread (or
sofreh) that Iranian households lay on either a table or carpet.
The spread is called a haft-seen and features seven dishes, each
one beginning with the Farsi letter Sinn.The word haft means
seven, a number that has sacred meaning in Iran since the
ancient times. Each dish represents something different-
health, happiness, prosperity, beauty, patience, life-rebirth, and
joy.These dishes range from seeb, which means apple, and represents health and beauty to serkeh, which means vinegar, and
represents patience and age.
—ANIA MAFI
Comic of a
A CnMKS l<:!X',M?Hv OF.MAKftB I.ITH!:K K.INC. Is.
KING: A  Comics Biography  of
Martin Luther King, Jr.
hy Ho Che Anderson
[Fantagraphics Books]
BY ANIA MAFI	
Trying to chronicle the life of one
of the most prominent and successful civil rights activists is a
tough feat. How can one outline
the struggles and successes of
Martin Luther King Jr. and have
readers feel the words and imagine the days and times of this
man?
In Ho Che Anderson's latest
graphic novel titled KING, the
drawings are simple in artistic calibre, but so powerful in their
expressions and meaning.
If you have never read a graphic novel, I suggest you start with
this one. Anderson recreates
major scenes in King's political
life, while also adding a fictional
element to the biography with por
trayals of imagined conversations
that King may have had. Although
you may think fiction does not
belong within the context of a biography, King is done very tastefully
without assuming too much. As
Stanley Crouch, author of the
introduction preceding the comic,
says with regards to making a
graphic novel about King: "It is
neither an insult nor an evasion of
the size of the man or his struggle;
it is a recognition of the fact that
King now resides in many aspects
of our culture.* Indeed, the
appearance of King within the context of a comic is proof of how far
his legacy has come.
Drawn completely in black and
white, with the odd frame accented in colour, Anderson differentiates the African American and
Caucasian figures through subtle
attention to facial features without
overly emphasizing visual differences in a caricature-esque way.
Keeping the drawings simple
while at the same time full of
detail is the most amazing part
about Anderson's comic.
Before reading KING I was not
sure if calling it a comic was fitting
considering it was not comical, but
after reading it I understand why
this graphic novel is also referred
to as a comic: with little text, it's a
fast and suspenseful read because
the reader wants to progress to the
next illustration and see what is at
the end of this run-away-train of
images.
If you'd like to learn more
about the life and times of Martin
Luther King Jr., I highly recommend you start by reading KING.
It is a captivating, fast paced, and
honest read. >&. a <^H^r special issue
COLOURS
Friday, 18 March, 2005
5
Freedom and liberty in the classroom
BY JESSE FERRERAS	
For over two decades, UBC's
Department of Central, Eastern and
Northern European Studies has
been graced with the presence of
Dr. Peter Petro, a widely-respected
professor who is widely-known for
his ability to engage his students in
texts that bring them a new awareness and interest in Slavic and
Russian life through his employment of some rare, although interesting literature the likes of which
one would not experience otherwise. Students of all backgrounds
and disciplines compliment Petro
for his uncanny ability to turn a
three hour lecture into a joyous
experience with the literature of
such Eastern European authors as
Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Mikhail
Bulgakov and Milan Kundera.
Petro first arrived in Canada in
1968 following the invasion of
Czechoslovakia by the Soviet Union.
"I didn't make the choice, I was
in a refugee camp and I applied
everywhere. Canada suddenly
decided to take 8,000 refugees and
since I was one of the first I came
on the first plane that landed in
Vancouver. Needless to say, I was
happy it was Canada that acted
first, and I will be always grateful
for that.*
Following his arrival he
enrolled at the university in third
year  and  studied  Russian  and
Spanish concurrently at a time
when the University did not accept
double-majors. As a professor he
has worked diligently to better
inform his students of literature
through various methods, but
places the bulk of his teaching on
Slavic culture.
Petro is particularly notable for
his entertaining teaching style in the
classroom, but also for his incorporation of film and literature as crucial components of his curriculum.
He often punctuates his literary subjects with corresponding films, most
particularly in regards to his lesson
on the Soviet Great Terror.
"In my courses, I'm trying to
insert a little historical background
and occasionally supplement it with
a film...When you look at the period
of the Great Terror in the Soviet
Union, you read a book by [Mikhail]
Bulgakov called The Master and
Margarita, and you see a movie,
Burnt by the Sun, you get a pretty
good idea of what went on, despite
the fact that the film deals with just
one particularly nice sunny day in
the summer, and Master and
Margarita deals with this incredibly
fantastic and even surrealistic mixture of what happened 2000 years
ago in Palestine and in the 1930s in
Moscow. Those are works that bring
closer to us the great tragedy of
Stalin's rule."
Having witnessed a period of
totalitarian rule under the authority
of the Soviet Union, Petro came to
Canada in search of freedom.
Although he does believe he has
found it, his experience within two
different societies and with varying
governments has allowed him to
examine the concept of freedom
and to what extent it exists in
Canadian society.
"There are always attempts to
limit freedom. Everybody's always
saying that he should be free to say
what he wants, but he's not necessarily always in favour of what
some other person might want to
say. So we differ on what we should
say but we should remember that
always, even in the biggest dictatorships,  in totalitarian governments...you were always allowed to
say that "the sun is shining, it's a
nice day,* but when you criticized
something you  got  in  trouble.
Freedom is not something that
should be ever taken for granted."
Petro extends his vision of freedom to his classroom—he formulates assignments with the utmost
liberalism, preferring to hear the
opinion of the student rather than
bind them to conventions and hinder their ability to express themselves. He is an inspiring professor    whose    experiences    have
allowed him to develop a classroom persona that resonates with
students of all backgrounds and
gives  them  license  to   express
themselves freely. &.
DEVIL IN A TOP HAT Woland and his minions stalk Soviet Russia
in Mikhail Bulgakov's The Master and Margarita.
Opening minds, opening borders
No One is Illegal collective
is defending the rights of
Canadian refugees
BY RITU KUMAR
Since the establishment of the nation, the
Canadian government has had an on-again,
off-again love affair with immigration policies. At times we open the doors wide, at others we slam them shut. But where are we
now, in the recent wake of cases such as that
of Haleh Sabha, the Iranian women's rights
activist who, although wanted in Iran and
having repeatedly attempted to gain refugee
status in Canada, was deported back to Iran
in December 2004. Another case emerged
shortly after Sabha's, this time a deportation
order for AH Reza Monemi, an Iranian man
wanted for befriending a married woman.
Are these cases simply the propagation of the
type of policy that Canada has always issued?
To find out more about this, I spoke recently
with Harjap Grewal, a member of the No One
is Illegal (NOII) organization.
NOII "is a global campaign,* Grewal says,
explaining that "the  events  of September
11th, 2001 catalyzed many of the campaigns,
particularly here in North America as it was
quite apparent minutes after the first plane
hit the World Trade Centre that particular
communities, those from the Middle East
and South Asia, would collectively be held
responsible for the attacks." He also points
out the fact that these policies have had longstanding resonance, affecting not only immigrants but native communities as well.
"[NOII] has looked at the issue of immigration from [an] anti-imperialist/anti-colonial
perspective... linking the experiences of
immigrants and refugees to the neo-liberal
policies, the environmental destruction and
the wars of the Western World that displace
migrants...[while working] actively with
indigenous communities that are confronting the same neo-liberal forces within
the Canadian State that are displacing them
off of their lands."
In the wake of these recent deportation
issues, NOII, in conjunction with the
International Federation of Iranian Refugees,
has been campaigning to raise awareness.
Grewal notes that, "This is a very important
campaign in light of the fact that Canada has
been actively addressing the issue [of]
human rights violations in Iran at the United
Nations, yet our government feels that it is
safe to return asylum seekers fearing persecution back to Iran." He also says that since
we have about 10,000 deportations a year the
problem in Vancouver is not that people
don't care, but that they are unaware: "Much
of the press that covered the two cases of
Haleh and Ali were very surprised that such
situations actually existed and some were
even more surprised to see the number of
detainees that are handcuffed and put into
orange jump suits when they are detained at
the Citizenship and Immigration Canada
Offices." The media has been interested in
finding out more and "people are interested
in knowing more." And NOII has been out
there, making sure the people know what is
happening.
Despite the vague and arbitrary causes
for deportation, NOII has still managed to
have some victories,  notably the accomplishment, in Montreal, of the regulariza-
tion of 500 Algerian refugees and the staying order for Ali Reza Monemi here in
Vancouver. "The immigration policy is very
flawed here in Canada, but this is the case in
much of the 'developed world'...[There is a]
contradiction between the ideas of globalization, free trade, open borders, and the
free movement of capital on the one hand,
and the deportation, detention, and exclusion of asylum-seekers on the other.* He
mentions a quote he heard, "the global village has to overcome its deep-seated fear of
the villagers.' Deportations are a part of this
global apartheid system that allows for the
western   world   to   appropriate   all   the
resources of the world by ignoring borders
and at the same time use those same borders to decide who is allowed to benefit
from these appropriations," Grewal comments. "I don't think we have really moved
that far beyond the days of the Head Tax.
The Head Tax, the Continuous Journey Rule
and other historical methods of exclusion
are being replicated today through the Safe
Third  Country Agreement.  Additionally,
racial profiling within the Immigration system clearly identifies how race is still a factor used as the basis for exclusion. The system is definitely racist and I feel that systemic racism exists in many Canadian institutions.   Many who  experience  racism...
view Canada as a racist country but ideas of
multiculturalism serve as a social anaesthetic  preventing  the  public  from  confronting the race-based inequalities and
exploitation in our society. It's similar to
how welfare is used as an anaesthetic for
the economic inequalities and exploitation."
Grewal warns, "There is no real overall
solution until there is a serious shift in the
economics and politics of this country away
from allowing private interests to accumulate property and profits. These forces in
our society create the need for borders,
fences and private property that end up
defining the privileged and exploited populations that are given or denied access.*
To get involved with NOII, or for more
information, contact No One Is Illegal at
604-682-3269 (x 7149) or through e-mail at
noii-van@resist.ca. Information is also
available at www.noii-van.resist.ca. .&. 6
Friday, 18 March, 2005
COLOURS
a <5>w>J* special issue
COLOURS
Friday, 18 March, 2005
7
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March 21 12-1pm Buchanan A100 or 4-5 pm Buchanan A102
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Click on "Financial Assistance" at
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The path you choose cari m
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604-432-8898 or fmgt@bcit.ca
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Apply now for Fali 2005
A POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTION
Learning
A profile of the English
Language Institute
BY RITU KUMAR
Twenty-one-year old Japanese national Noriko
Hayashi and twenty-three-year old Mexican Salvador
Chavez came to Canada in hopes of learning English
from a world class institution. It was the first time
either of them had been to Canada.
The two are students of the English Language
Institute (ELI) within the University. This does not
mean that they are students at UBC, but that they are
visiting students being taught English within the confines of the ELI programs.
"My university planned this course so I came here
with my university students/ said Hayashi, explaining that she is visiting for three months with her
institution, Toka University.
"WeU, for me it was a little bit strange,* Salvador
said. He has already received his degree in engineering from the Instituto Politecnico Nacional in
Mexico, but is here on a scholarship to study English
in another country.
Interested in coming to Canada, he was advised to
go to the Canadian embassy, where he met Wally
Mitchell, the socio-cultural coordinator for the ELI.
"[Mitchell] gave a presentation about UBC—the
university, the courses...I saw the beautiful pictures
[and] I just decide to come here."
So now that they are here, living the life shown to
them in the beautiful pictures, is the picture as perfect as it seems? Although both students live in
home- stay arrangements, they would love the opportunity to live on campus but are not given the option.
Instead they pay "too much" for home-stay.
"With the money that I am paying now for home-
stay, I could rent a house in Mexico," Chavez said
with a chuckle. They also don'l have the opportunity to interact with people outside of the ELI setting,
since most of their interactions are with the
Cultural Assistants at ELI or with other ELI stu-
DID YOU TAKE MY PEN? Students working hard oh a project inside the ELI. nic fensom photo
dents. Hayashi points out that the Cultural
Assistants are UBC students as well, but Chavez
recognises that he needs to practice speaking
English with people not related to UBC.
"Maybe it's because I'm kind of shy. And also I do
not feel confident with my English," he said.
In an effort to immerse students in an English-
speaking environment, the ELI has made the building an English-only zone and runs weekly programs
such as Communication Contacts, in which volunteers with native or native-like proficiency get together with small groups of ELI students to practice colloquial English in a relaxed environment.
Still, with the intensity of the program and the
segregation between the ELI and the rest of the UBC
environment, it is difficult for Hayashi and Chavez to
experience the life of the regular UBC student.
"When I can, I go to the SUB," said Chavez, "but
it's just like, I go there, and I sit in some place, and
that's it... [I can try] to talk with somebody else... [but]
I feel like if I want to talk or something they're going
to tell me, 'What are you talking about? I don't know
you. Go away.'"
Hayashi concedes that even though she thinks
"Canadian people are very kind," she often feels the
same way.
"In Vancouver there are many Asians, and there
are many Japanese people. But I heard some things,"
Hayashi said, slowly. "Before WWII there were many
Japanese here but Japan was [at war] so Canadians
discriminated against the Japanese but not the
Germans," she said, referring to the Japanese internment. But she said that she has never experienced
any discrimination in Vancouver first-hand. Hayashi
added that she enjoys the city and wishes to come
back to pursue her degree in International Studies.
Chavez, on the other hand, admits that he felt discriminated against when he first came to Canada
and was detained in Toronto despite having all the
proper documentation.
"They still looked at me a little bit well, like, 'Oh,
maybe 3'ou want to immigrate illegally here.'"
However, he has not experienced any discrimination in Vancouver. "I feel very comfortable. The
people are... used to having lots of people from
other countries."
Having gone to the University of Toronto for a little while before going to UBC, Chavez says that UBC
is better in comparison. Even though the ELI has a
few problems, "they made a great [place]. They have
many other activities that you can get in. It's good to
practice your English." j§k.
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1
n Canada: an analysis
BY LISA COOPER
Many Canadians trace memories of multiculturalism back to elementary school: the dragon dance
for Chinese New Year; eating perogies awkwardly
with sour cream; maple syrup on snow.
Multiculturalism never tasted or looked so good.
Being a culture writer means I get my hands on
important documents such as a crested copy of the
actual Multiculturalism Act, as well as the 2002
Annual Report on the Operation of the Canadian
Multiculturalism Act.
Leafing through the two-hundred page bilingual
bible of government policy, what strikes me first is the
breadth. There are a plethora of pubHc outreach programs: we have Black History Month, the Chinese-
Canadian National Council, an Aboriginal Cadet
Development Program, and a Multicultural Health
System linking individuals with culture-specific healthcare. Even our correctional institutions serve to meet
cultural needs—Kingston Penitentiary recently held its
first Multicultural Day.
Some initiatives aren't so successful: Part 1,
Section I of the Act declares it is the Government of
Canada's policy to "preserve and enhance the use
of languages other than English and French, while
strengthening the status and use of the official languages of Canada..."
French Immersion enrolment may be up on the
West Coast, but First Nations languages are 70-90
per cent in decline, and only 12 per cent are flourishing, according to the Protective Legislation for
Aboriginal Languages in Canada.
The preamble to our Act triumphantly declares:
"the diversity of Canadians as regards to race,
national and ethnic origin, colour and religion [are
recognised] as fundamental characteristics of
Canadian society..."
Some social researchers criticise the policies,
Multiculturalism promotes
a sense of Canadian unity,
but Canadians also need
to tolerate diversity,
which only occurs with
more cross-cultural
interaction.
claiming that they are promoting an increasingly
divided, disconnected citizenship of "ethnic pockets," where communities dominated by one ethnic
group or another exist seemingly without integration into "mainstream" society.
But Dr Neil Guppy, a sociologist at UBC, thinks
multiculturalism is generally working in Canada.
Guppy notes that roughly eighty-five percent of
immigrants take out citizenship, the highest rate
among nations including the United States,
Australia and the UK. He speculates that this is
because of the generally positive environment our
nation fosters for newcomers with respect to education, employment, and quality of life. It is also
important to note that those immigrants who benefit the most are those with economic advantage,
regardless of skin colour or religion.
While our country is effective at celebrating different cultures through visual and oral stimuli,
Canadians' oft-superficial understanding of
Aboriginal, Asian, Middle-Eastern and African diversity needs to become more focused and realistic.
What are the issues that are preventing ethnic
groups in Canada from thriving? What is perpetuating systemic racism? Why is there continued under-
representation of Aboriginal students at UBC?
The politics of multiculturalism have never
been so important to understand as now.
Nobody seems to be promoting a melting pot,
but shouldn't everyone connect better with everyone else in creating a unified Canadian identity,
through common languages, values, or social attitudes? When forcing new citizens to abandon their
unique cultural heritage is clearly not the answer,
the solution is tricky.
Guppy wonders about national pride. Perhaps
Canadians should focus Canadian-ness on the very
idea that it symbolises difference in the first place,
he says, without assuming citizens have to assimilate to notions of "Canadian-ness." Maybe these
"pockets," what he calls the "vertical mosaic,"
aren't such a bad thing.
Multiculturalism promotes a sense of Canadian
unity, but Canadians also need to tolerate diversity, which only occurs with more cross-cultural
interaction. >Sl
^5
120 years ago, this great nation was
forged together "from sea to shining
sea" by legions of Chinese railway
workers. Since then we've had
immigration policies ranging from
bans to head taxes. Take a look
at some of the news of the day in
this timeline of Canadian immigration and the world events that
shaped our policies...
1880-1885—Construction of the Canadian Pacific Railway.
1885—A $50 head tax is introduced on any Chinese immigrant.
1903—Through a series of increases, the Chinese head tax is now $500.
1910—A revised Immigration Act allows the denial of those "belonging to
any race deemed unsuited to the climate or requirements of Canada."
May 23, 1914—The Komagata Maru, carrying hundreds of Indians, docks
at Burrard Inlet.
July 1914—The Komagata Maru is ordered to return to Hong Kong.
1919—The Immigration Act now excludes the Doukhobors, Mennonites,
Hutterites, and anyone coming from an enemy country.
July 1, 1923—Humiliation Day: the Chinese head tax is replaced by
the Chinese Immigration Act, in which immigration from China is
completely denied.
December 1941—After the bombing of Pearl Harbor, the Canadian
government impounds all Japanese fishing boats.
Februaiy 1942—The Japanese Internment begins, in which tens of
thousands of Japanese-Canadian citizens are unwillingly placed in
internment camps. All property belonging to any Japanese person is
sold by the Canadian government.
August 1945—Japan surrenders to the US.
December 1945—All internment camps are shut down and those
released are given the choice to relocate within Canada or move back to
Japan. Japanese immigration is still banned, however.
1947—The Chinese Immigration Act is repealed.
1967—Japanese immigration is allowed again.
1970s—After the Vietnam War, Canada allowed entry to thousands
of immigrants dubbed "the boat people" for their leaky transportation
to Canada.
1992-1997—Over 10,000 Bosnian refugees entered Canada while
Canadian peacekeepers provided aid in Bosnia.
1999—600 illegal Chinese migrants are found on four boats entering
into Canadian waters. The migrants had made the voyage hidden in
storage containers.
April 2001—36 Chinese migrants found in a cargo ship heading from
Vancouver to California.
September 11, 2001—The bombing of the World Trade Centre and
the Pentagon; immigration policies become much more stringent while
international travellers are subject to more scrutiny.
September 2002—After vacationing with his family in Tunisia, Canadian
citizen Maher Arar is arrested at JFK Airport in New York. He is later
deported to a Syrian jail.
October 2003—Maher Arar is released back to Canada after having been
forced to sign a statement saying he is a member of Al-Qaeda.
December 7, 2004—Iranian refugee and women's rights activist, Haleh
Sabha, is deported back to Iran where she was detained upon arrival.
Januaiy 10, 2005—A federal court judge "stayed" a deportation order
for Iranian refugee Ali Reza Monemi, who is wanted in Iran for having
a friendship with a married woman. &.
•:*» 8
Friday, 18 March, 2005
COLOURS
i*&*py: special issue
■ The Ubyssey would like to 'apologise to Kim Mulder for not including
her name as the photographer for last week's feature -"You shall know
our velocity!" We sincerely appreciate, her contribution-and 'the- Ubyssey
regrets the error
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The Welcome Centre and
Concourse in Brock Hall
OPEN HOUSE
Brian Sullivan, Vice President, Students is pleased to
announce an Open House for the recently created
Welcome Centre and the revitalized Concourse in Brock
Hall scheduled for Monday, March 21 from 4:00 - 6:00
p.m. The Welcome Centre is the first point of contact
for prospective UBC students and provides information
and guidance to prospective Canadian and International
students. The Concourse specializes in services to current
UBC students. President Piper will unveil a plaque at the
event in recognition of the generous contribution made by
our International and Canadian students and the Ministry of
Advanced Education towards these priority projects.
If you are interested in attending, please RSVP to Catherine
Newlands at 604-827-5766 or via e-mail at Catherine.
newlands@ubc.ca. Due to space constraints, RSVP deadline
is 4:00 Friday, March 18.
^
%
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Jack Johnson
IN CONCERT
August 14 Deer Lake Park
IN STORES NOW
JACK JOHNSON returns
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Deeper than a four-leaf clover
Happy St. Paddy's Day!
BY JESSE FERRERAS
Ireland has been predominantly presented on celluloid
to North America in a generic fashion—in popular films
such as Ron Howard's 1992 epic Far and Away, or the
1952 John Wayne classic The Quiet Man. The Emerald
Isle is presented in a stereotypical fashion that characterises the nation as one in which its people live wistful
Hves doing very little work while immersing themselves
in pub culture, spending their days singing and fighting
inside and outside the swinging doors.
At the other end of the spectrum, Ireland is presented on film in a violent fashion in such films as Neil
Jordan's 1992 thriller The Crying Game or his 1996
biopic Michael Collins, which expresses the discontent
of the nation towards the dominance of British rule.
Such films are canonised in the curriculum of Film
332—Genre and Irish Cinema, a course designed by Dr.
Brian Mcllroy, chairman of the UBC Department of Film
Studies, which exposes students to both American or
British views of rural Ireland and films highlighting the
conflict in Northern Ireland.
To further examine the implications and themes of
Irish cinema, Mcllroy held the International Conference
on Genre and Irish Cinema earlier this month at UBC,
which invited professors from post-secondary institutions throughout the United States and Europe to share
their views on specific works by Irish filmmakers, as
well as perceptions of Irish themes as presented on film.
"The purpose of the conference was to adjust attitudes towards Irish cinema. In the past, when the name
of Ireland came up, there seemed to be certain set attitudes to the representation/ said Mcllroy. 'One...was
that they're always about troubles and violence and
deeply-held convictions. Another is what I like to call
'Irish whimsy/ like a humour, comedy and not taken
seriously. There seems to be a terrible binary opposition
at work. So by focusing on genre, I'm trying to create a
more level playing field, and to give equal access to popular films as well as serious films."
Mcllroy invited various professors to the conference,
including Maria Pramaggiore, director of the Film
Studies program at North Carolina State University, who
focused her lecture on the films of Neil Jordan
{Interview with the Vampire, The Butcher Boy) and his
development of Gothicism and postmodernism in his
films. She cited several ofhis films, notably The Crying
Game and his 2002 effort The Good Thief, describing a
number of his films as Gothic, given that many of his
themes are concerned with characters that are both
haunted and possessed by spirits in some form. She was
followed by Dana Och, doctoral candidate at the
University of Pittsburgh, who focused on Jordan's use of
horrific elements in films such as The Company of
Wolves to reflect a socio-political event or situation.
The conference succeeded in bringing interpretations from various scholars who deepened attendees's
understanding of Irish cinema and in turn allowed people to evaluate their referenced films at much deeper
levels. Mcllroy has succeeded through this conference,
as well as his creation of an Irish Cinema course, to
broaden students' views of Irish life through film—anyone who takes the course is unlikely to view Ireland in
such a stereotypical fashion as presented in tourist promotions and common iconography, if they are willing to
expose themselves to the Emerald Isle through the work
of talented filmmakers. .&.
The walls of UBC
YOUR IN CANADA SPEAK ENGLISH (pR
FRENCH) THIS ISN'T HONG KONG I AGREE
STUPID CAUCASION SHE OBVIOUSLY IS AND
SO ARE YOU HOOKER HAHA THE MATURITY
OF UNIVERSITY STUDENTS IS OVERWHELMING HOLY FUCK GET OVER IT PEOPLE: YOU'RE
-« YOU ARE CE.G. YOU'RE THE ONE) YOUR =
WHAT YOU HAVE (E.G. THIS IS YOUR BOOK)
(POSSESESSIVE) THIS IS ELEMENTARY GRAMMAR SO STOP HGHTING OVER IT IN UNIVERSITY I LOVE SEPH.
The preceding words were transcribed from
the women's bathroom stalls in the first floor
of the Henry Angus building. a <^^)':: special issue
COLOURS
Friday, 18 March; 20d5
9
Mr. Wing's Unfinished Business
IN THE SHADOW OF COLD
MOUNTAIN
BY SIMON UNDERWOOD
July 1st is Canada Day. Everyone knows that
because there's a big, secular party every
year, and most people pat themselves on the
back and talk about how wonderful Canada is
and Chantal Kreviazuk plays piano in front of
a totem pole and we all try to feel pretty good
about the things the country is doing right.
And I'm all for people feeling good about
themselves for a day or so, even if there is
substantial work to be done. But if we're
going to keep the 1st of July holiday, it's
imperative that we understand that the date
has a contradictory meaning for many elderly citizens of Chinese-Canadian descent; a
"dark and humiliating secret" that demands
immediate address.
On July 1st, 1923, tibe Canadian government passed a law that would last for 24
years, prohibiting emigration from China
and thereby establishing the first and only
"prohibited class* in Canadian history. In the
decades prior, the government took specific
actions to deter Chinese immigrants,
demanding a flat fee of $500 before they
" could step onto Canadian soil. Karen Cho's In
the Shadow of Gold Mountain is an intense
and pointed documentauy that traces the history of these first generations of Chinese-
Canadians, and constructs a considered
argument for the recognition and compensation that these citizens deserve.
It was Chinese Canadians that placed the
volatile nitroglycerin and swung pickaxes in
freezing temperatures as the Canadian
Pacific Railway bore through the Rocky
Mountains in the 1880s. The labourers were
known as "coolies," and while unwelcome,
were considered necessary agricultural and
industrial "instruments* by Sir John A.
McDonald, who was desperate for a tangible
means by which to unite a large and far-flung
country. But what is implicit in Cho's documentary is that if anyon.e built Confederation,
it was the Chinese-Canadian workers who
faced an inhumane probability of injury or
death for every day they worked.
Once the railway was complete, the federal government promptly instituted a "Head
Tax" in an attempt to deter Chinese immigration. First it was $50, then $100, and by
1903 it was $500, but Chinese-Canadians
refused to buckle and continued to scrape
together the massive sum to pay for their relatives' safe and legal passage. By 1923, revenues from the Head Tax topped 23 million
"These two parties [the liberals
and the conservatives] have had
two decades in which to make a
just and honourable end to this
legislated racism...it's shameful."
—Sid Tan
President of the Vancouver
Association of Chinese Canadians
dollars. That same year, the federal government passed the Exclusion Act, which stipulated that "no person of Chinese origin...shall
be permitted to enter or land in Canada." Cho
indicates that the parliamentarians at the
time considered this a step toward a "final
solution" to the "Chinese problem."
Cho, who wrote and directed the documentary, has two convergent histories with
which she must grapple. When her British
ancestors arrived in Canada, they were
rewarded with 'Dominion Lands' and treated as equal citizens without question, while
her Chinese ancestors were held indefinitely in a glorified prison called the "Pig
House," regarded as "less than second-class
citizens." But she mostly keeps the camera
focused on her elderly subjects, each of
whom is absolutely fascinating and engaging, at some moments playful and the next
deadly serious.
The ban was lifted in 1947 after Chinese-
Canadian participation in the Second World
War all but forced the federal government to
acknowledge them as full citizens. But in
two decades of isolation, spouses passed
away, families were involuntarily stratified,
and a generation of Chinese-Canadians
often lived in isolation from their kin. Cho
speaks to one woman, Chow Quen Lee, 91,
left alone and widowed with a family to support. She struggled for many years to scrape
by. She believes she deserves an apology
and compensation.
Sid Tan, President of the Vancouver
Association of Chinese Canadians helped
facilitate contact for Ms. Cho and helped distribute the film across Canada. He explains
the issue in the simplest terms: "We are asking for what any Canadian would ask for, the
refund of an unjust tax and amends for a
quarter-century of targeted, family-separating exclusion.
The film is well aware that the Chinese-
Canadian community is by no means some
single homogenous entity or monolith,
acknowledging that some elders oppose the
redress movement out of shame or reluctance to revisit an era that seems far
removed. But such that it is a diverse community, a grievant argues accordingly and
legitimately that those who have chosen to
fight for an appropriate apology must not be
silenced, nor should any differences of
opinion be exploited by the Canadian government as grounds to ignore the claims.
Another stresses the connection between
the Head Tax and the persecution and suspicions cast against citizens of Middle
Eastern descent in the present day.
Demands for justice were first voiced to
Parliament over 20 years ago, when NDP
MP Margaret Mitchell presented the Head
Tax certificates presented to her by over
1,200 Chinese-Canadians living in
Vancouver. Twenty years later, the Head-ta
payers are still waiting. The Conservatives'
Bill C-333 and the Liberals' budget item
addressing the "commemoration of historic
grievances* indicate "that there is much politics being played,* and litde meaningful
action being taken.
"These two parties have had two decades
in which to make a just and honourable end
to this legislated racism," said Tan. "It's
shameful." Because, as a 91-year-old head-
taxpayer laughs in the film, "It's not the pastl
Mr. Wing is still here!" According to Tan, "Karen
Cho and her film have been instrumental* in
making Canadians and their government
aware that Mr. Wing et al. are not giving up.
Gold Mountain, the name the Chinese gave to
North American during the gold rush, cannot
cast a shadow any longer. >3<.
:**mw^c^y*.vAsv«wi?v/>^A^v.v,-A>p.7.i^^
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IN STORES NOW
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m/I y^rrei&eico^m ey!}-, 10
Friday, 18 March, 2005
COLOURS
a ^A^t3' special issue
you haven't written a feature all year, have you?
ididn't thinicso, ingrate.
but there's still time. email me!
At features@ubyssey.bc.ca
karma chameleon since 1918
',".?X? *.-,-<> A .
COMMEMORIITE MftRGH 21 AT UBC MlfriRWIONAL BAY
for THE ELIMINATION OF RACIAL ilSCRIMINATION
iVn'fe'!''
" *• n * -
•3&
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\  •*
■* ¥
ITIES
SflTURDflY. MURCH 19
INDIGENIZ1NG THE ACADEMY:
ENHANCING STUDENTS'
EXPERIENCES
8:00 am to 5:00 pm, The Longhouse
HONBRY, MARCH 21
; KICKOFF EVENT
sy 10:00 am to 3:00 pm,
?k SUB Ballroom
^ FREE MOVIE NIGHT
' AT THE NORM THEATRE
7:00 pm-Shake Hands With the Devil
9:30 pm-A Time to Kill
TUESMt MARCH 22
COLOUR ME BLIND:
UNLEARNING RACISM HORKSHOP
11:00 am to 12:30 pm, BUCH D302
INCLUSIVITY 101 WORKSHOP
4:00 pm to 5:30 pfn, BUCH B222
AN UNDERSTANDING OF BROWN
7.00 pm, Place Vanier Ballroom
*&$&:■
MARCH 23-24
ART EXHIBIT BY THE FILIPINO
CANADIAN YOUTH ALLIANCE
10:00 am to 3:00 pm SUB Concourse
WEDNESDAY, HBRCH 23
INTERROGATING RACISM 101:
PEER PERSPECTIVES WORKSHOP
11:00 am to 12:30 pm, SUB 215
fi CONVERSATION
ON ANTIRACISM
AND INTERSECTIONALITY
1:00 pm to 4:00 pm, BUCH D114
MAGDA'S MOVIES AT TOTEM PARK
7:00 pm~ Mississippi Masala
9:30 pm-ln the Shadow of Gold Mountain
THURSDAY, MARCH 24
HEADLINES THEATRE PRESENTS
"RAINBOW OF MSIRE"
1:00 pm to 5:00 pm, Norm Theatre
VRAPUP CELEBRATION
6:00 pm onwards, SUB 215
"HOT EfENTS IRE FREE! www.students.ubg.ca/access/equity.gfm
UBC
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Sponsored by: The Equity Ambassadors, Access & Diversity, Equity Office, Colour Connected,
SafeTogether@UBC, First Nations House of Learning, Residence Life and the Innovative Project Fund.
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APPLICATION DEADLINES FOR 2005
Courses starting in May:
■ February 28,2005 (International applicants)
■ March 31, 2005 (Canadian applicants)
To find out more:
UBC Diploma in Accounting Program
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University of British Columbia
2053 Main Mall, Vancouver BC V6T1Z2
tel 604.822.8412    fax 604.822.2220
email dap@sauder.ubc.ca
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Courses starting in September:
June 7,2005 (International applicants)
■ July 6,2005 (Canadian applicants)
SAUDER
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Openinq Worlds
:T;HE:UNIV.ERSiTY'.0;F BRITISK;COL(J.M6lAf
Drum builds to
inspiring conclusion
DRUM
Screened at Sundance 2005
BY JESSE FERRERAS	
Drum originally premiered at the
Sundance Film Festival 2005, and
was the winner of the Gold Talon
prize at the 19th Pan-African Film
and Television Festival in Burkina
Faso, widely referred to as the
"African Cannes." A powerful, disturbing film, this is the work of filmmaker Zola Maseko, who puts forth
a laudable effort with the story of a
man's resistance against the forces
of apartheid in South Africa in the
1950s.
It is refreshing to discover an
accessible film on the controversial
subject of apartheid, as previously
there have not been very many
films on this subject widely available, with the possible exceptions of
1987's Cry Freedom and the 1992
Whoopi Goldberg musical Sarafina!
The subject has been surprisingly
absent from commercial film, as
the struggle of Nelson Mandela for
civil rights in South Africa was a
monumental event of the late 20th
century. Director Maseko puts the
issue in terms that a North
American audience can easily
understand in a powerful film that,
given its accolades and the star
power of its lead actor, will
undoubtedly receive a North
American release.
Taking place in the central Johannesburg neighbourhood Sophiatown,
billed as 'the last black man's stronghold in white-ruled South Africa/
Henry Nxumalo (Taye Diggs) is a
journalist covering sporting events
for the local magazine Drum under
the authority of British editor Jim
Bailey {Snatch's Jason Flemyng, in a
rare protagonist role). He hves a fairly routine lifestyle, spending his
days covering athletic events
throughout Sophiatown and spending his nights at jazz clubs cavorting
with friends and local gangsters,
whilst ignoring the concerns of his
wife Florence (Moshidi Motshegwa).
She takes issue with his apparent
philandering and the fact that he is
bending at the will of 'just another
rich white man.'
As he enters his office one morning, Henry is stopped by a woman
asking him to investigate the mysterious disappearance of her son,
whom she says went to work on a
white landowner's farm called
'Harmonic* She hasn't seen him
since. Henry gets a job at the farm
himself and he is soon exposed to a
variety of atrocities occurring there,
which he is lucky enough to escape
from and report upon for the magazine. He witnesses workers subject
to violent mistreatment by
landowners, an experience that
inspires him to seek out what other
atrocities African men are faced
with in Sophiatown.
Nxumal reports on an African
being thrown out of a white
church, a prison system he
describes as "a microcosm for the
larger South Africa we live in* and
soon finds he has become an anti-
apartheid activist whose reports
run afoul of the local authorities.
These atrocities, Henry soon
uncovers, are only leading up to a
much bigger event to take place in
Sophiatown—the complete eviction and liquidation of Africans
from the area in order to facilitate
new residential developments.
Henry adamantly wants to stop
this atrocity, but the authorities
are closing in on him and want
him silenced so that they may continue their suppressive, racist policies with neither opposition nor
intervention.
Drum is a compelling story of
resistance to the prejudiced
apartheid policies in South Africa, as
well as the journey of a man who can
no longer ignore the harm being
inflicted on his people. Although the
casting of Taye Diggs appears at the
outset a bid for a wider audience, he
proves his versatility as an actor with
a quietly intense performance as a
IT IS REFRESHING TO
DISCOVER AN ACCESSIBLE
FILM ON THE CONTROVERSIAL SUBJECT OF
APARTHEID, AS PREVIOUSLY THERE HAVE NOT
BEEN VERY MANY FILMS
ON THAT SUBJECT.
man snapped to attention by the prejudiced policies that are oppressing
his peers. Maseko's film is most successful in the scenes in which horrific events are translated into cinematic form, most particularly a very powerful sequence in which Sophiatown
is raided by the local authorities.
The scene is very disturbing, one
of the most affecting of the film, and
stands strongly against a problem
that plagues the rest of the film—it
simply isn't visceral enough. The
film promises and delivers a dramatic story, but its action sometimes holds back from being too disturbing and doesn't quite knock out
the audience with an emotional
punch. The events being related,
however, are serious enough to warrant the audience's emotional
investment, so the issue of its ability
to disturb is hardly a quality that
diminishes the film's overall effect.
Drum concludes with a beautiful
scene in which the Sophiatown
community conveys its resistance
through a peaceful march, disregarding the commands of the local
authorities to step aside and allow
them to continue their liquidation.
Although- the director's control
sometimes falters in his abiHty to
spark emotion in his audience, he
ultimately succeeds at the film's
finale, which alternately delivers a
message of resistance through
social awareness, which give Drum
the clout it needs to warrant a North
American release. &, a ijs^y^PV special issue
COLOURS
Friday, 18 March, £005
11
General revisits site of genocide
SHAKE HANDS WITH THE DEVIL
At the Norm Theatre
March 21
BY ELAISHA STOKES	
How can you find words for events
that are indescribable; events that
supersede the confines of our abiHty
to comprehend?
In 1994, 800,000 Tutsis were
murdered in 100 days at the hands
of their Hutu neighbors in Rwanda
while the world silently stood by and
watched. What happened in Rwanda
is considered one of the greatest
genocides of the twentieth century
and revealed the ineffective nature
of the United Nations.
At the centre of this disaster is
Romeo Dallaire, the Canadian
Lieutenant General responsible for
leading the mission. Shake Hands
with the Devil is the story of
Dallaire's first visit back to Rwanda
in honour of the tenth anniversary
of the massacre. More importantly,
it is the story of one man's personal
journey to lay the demons ofhis past
to rest
The documentary begins on a
plane, where Dallaire is sitting with
his wife, returning to the small
African nation for the first time
since the genocide. "It's been ten
years. Ten years at which at times I
want to return and at times I don't
want to hear anything about it," he
says. Dallaire's experiences in
Africa led to post traumatic stress
disorder, and eventually landed him
out on the streets. "To me, it felt like
I was retiming to hell," Dallaire
describes.
The essence of this film lies not
in the gory details, but rather the
disturbing words of Dallaire. Unlike
anything Michael Moore has ever
produced, this quiet and reflective
film challenges its audience to just
watch, instead of being spoon-fed
propaganda. Herein lies the beauty
and simplicity of documentary, an
art that seems to have been stolen
and appropriated by the Super Size
Me's of the world. This is the way
documentary is supposed to be.
The success of the film is completely due to the haunting, ghostlike accounts of Dallaire. To say this
man is eloquent seems inappropriate (though he is certainly eloquent);
a better word may be chilling. When
Dallaire speaks, the camera holds
still. To miss a word ofhis deep and
authentic rhetoric seems a crime.
His eyes are fogged with not so distant memories of the horrors he has
bared witness too. This is a man of
extraordinary character.
Not everyone sees Dallaire as the
great man who stood by an abandoned nation. The film documents
the guilt Dallaire experiences after
the death of ten Belgian soldiers,
and his inability to do anything but
bear witness to the events. It seems
that controversy still -haunts the
nation ten years later.
Visiting UBC last year, Dallaire
spoke about the value of human
lives and the racial elements he felt
prevented a more effective response
to the situation in Rwanda. He cited
the fact that his requests for the
immediate assistance of the international community were repeatedly
turned down, a response he felt indicated a serious problem.
"They said, 'Rwanda is of no
strategic value. The only thing
[there], and there's too much of
them, is humans, so we're not
coming," explained Dallaire in a
talk at the Chan Centre. He added
that the African nation's few desirable resources did not provide an
incentive for many countries to
intervene.
In the presentation, Dallaire
recalled how officials from one
country explained that to garner
enough public support for a mission
to Rwanda, there would need to be
85,000 dead Rwandans for every
casualty sustained by their own
country.
"I was sure they would come and
provide me with the troops to reinforce us to stop the slaughter before
it spread around the whole country,"
he said. "But the question became,
are some humans more human
than others? Do some actually count
more than others?"
Shake Hands with the Devil is a
fantastic and sobering film that
should be required viewing. It is
only through an understanding of
our history that we can ever hope to
change the course of the future.
Dallaire is as close as it gets to a
Canadian hero.
The free screening of Shake
Hands with the Devil is a part of
Realities of Race, a week-long event
beginning Monday in recognition of
the International Day for the
Elimination of Racism.   For more
information on the screening and
other Realities of Race events,
please visit www.students.ubc.ca
/access/equity.cfin. j&t
—with files from Sarah Bourdon
m
ti+jL'jl . *„J.        *
♦•'*'
'm   * • ,  4' • «*
+   t      *
■■■ *.•   -'- o*£.*;*■
I     -    <*^**l|   **hrihW*      ***     «*    S  ■**
4 I
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-I*.
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Get a coupon for a free Domino's Pizza with
student tax preparation.
Come in today or call 1-800-HRBLOCK
H&R BLOCK
Offer good at participating H&R Block offices in Canada, from February 1,2005 to May 2,2005. Pizza coupon given with any purchase of student tax preparation service at $29.95 per student Pizza coupon valid for a medium one-topping pizza.at participating Domino's locations.
I'    !    *    ' 12
Friday, 18 March, 2005
COLOURS
W&*. special.issue.
Austen goes Bollywood
BRIDE AND PREJUDICE
Now playing
BY PRIYA BUBBER
Bride and Prejudice is the much-awaited
Hollywood-meets Bollywood romantic musical by director Gurinder Chadha {Bend it Like
Beckham). On a mission to make it clear to
her audience that India is more than Deepak
Chopra and yoga, Chadra turns Jane Austen's
Pride and Prejudice hero, Fitzwilliam Darcy
(Martin Henderson), into a neo colonialist,
culturally-ignorant yuppie, named Will Darcy,
who wants to Americanise India without dealing with Indians.
Elizabeth Bennet's character, named
Lalita Bakshi in the movie, is played hy
Bollywood goddess Aishwaiya Rai. She is the
innocent Indian girl waiting for the man of
her (and her parents') dreams to come take
her away. Her interactions with Darcy, where
she has no problems challenging his judgments of India, create some of the best dialogue in the movie. In one scene she states,
"why don't you find a traditional Indian girl
who can show you how to dance like the
natives," when Darcy makes a sincere effort
to learn the Bhangra, thinking it is as easy as
'twisting a light bulb with one hand and patting the dog with the other.*
As a Canadian of Indian descent, I have,
on numerous occasions, heard India being
called "uncivilised* and "behind the times.*
But having seen this movie, I could definitely
use some of the witty dialogue!
The clash of cultures theme is continued
when circumstances bring Lalita to America,
where she meets Darcy's mother, an overpowering, upper class woman whose only
interest in India is the amount of money that
she could make by setting up a hotel there.
Her superiority complex is clear in her treatment of Lalita and the Bakshis. However, it is
difficult to say if her snobbish behaviour is
due to ethnic stereotyping or because of her
privileged lifestyle. In any case, there seems
to be one judgment after another and the
Bakshis need to prove that they are more than
what meets the eye. Hie whirlwind of misunderstandings throughout the movie begs us to
question our own assumptions and stereotypes about other cultures.
However, this movie is not simply about
negative stereotyping or making one culture
superior to another. Granted, it plays up
stereotypes, and both Darcy and Lalita are
typecast but Chadha has a great time showcasing her vision of India while challenging
these stereotypes. It also includes everything
from the standard Bollywood checklist,
including eveiything from wet sari dances to
techno parties on the beaches of Goa.
Chadha is to be commended for her strong
attempt at fusing two film traditions to draw in
a global audience. In today's global village,
films that examine cultural stereotypes help us
to examine our own assumptions about our
neighbours, and thus open the doors to better
understanding. This movie is funny, extremely
witty and, with a little Bollywood flare, is one of
the most romantic musicals in a while. &.
Ubyssey Elections are
happening next week.
It all kicks off With the
Annual General
Meeting at noon on
Monday in the AMS
council chambers. The
AGM is then followed by
the all Cahdidatesv You
don■■ t hav e to be a
Lby ssey stiff er to
attend the AGM but you
have to be one to vote.
the following people
are staff arid cari vof e:
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Brad Badelt, Bryce
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