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The Ubyssey 1975-10-07

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 THE U8YSSEV
Vol. LVII, No. 13        VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 1975
228-2301
PROTESTING DAYAN'S VISIT ■ ■ - Palestinian Liberation Organization supporter
offers vocal opposition to former Israeli defense minister's visit and speech at UBC
Monday. Despite close physical proximity of avid Christians lauding Dayan and Zionism,
—peter cummings photo
both groups declined any physical violence during their protest marches around SUB while
Dayan spoke inside. Shepherded by nervous bodyguards, Dayan was hustled out north
door of SUB to avoid contact with his supporters and denouncers.
Dayan calls for Mideast peace
while protests, fights erupt
A bitter fist fight and alternating
shouts supporting Israel and the
Palestinian people punctuated
retired general Moshe Dayan's
speech Monday in SUB.
Two persons were ejected during
the 35-minute speech in which
Dayan told the largely partisan
crown of 1,000 that Mideast
hostilities will only cease with a
commitment by Israel's enemies.
Security was tight in the
ballroom as the one-eyed general,
known for his successful leadership during three of Israel's four
wars with its neighbors, called fpr
an end of the state of war between
Egypt, Syria, the Soviet Union and
Israel.
"To ensure real peace in this
area, there must first of all be an
end to the state of war, to the state
of. belligerency that now exists in
the Middle East.
"What is needed before anything
else is a clear commitment by
Egypt, Syria and the Soviet Union
to end the state of war."
But Dayan made no mention of
an Israeli commitment to peace.
Feds fool protestors
By RALPH MAURER
Moshe Dayan was the show for
about 1,000 people in the SUB
ballroom Monday afternoon, but
for most students the show was
provided by anti- and pro-Dayan
demonstrators and the RCMP.
While demonstrators waited for
Dayan to exit from the east side of
SUB, at least 30 plainclothed
RCMP officers — conspicuous by
their taste for double-knit suits and
strange bulges under their jackets
— kept them away from him and
created two diversions before
whisking him away from the north
end of the building.
About 50 people with signs
welcoming Dayan to UBC began
marching outside the south end of
SUB about 11:30 a.m. while about
100 people protested his visit.
The pro-Dayan demonstrators
were fundamentalist Christians led
by Pastor Marvin Forseth of
Connaught Heights Pentecostal
Assembly
He said this demonstration was
planned Sunday but was not intended as a confrontation to the
anti-Dayan demonstration, which
had been planned six days ago.
"No, we just found out (about the
Anti-Dayan protest) today," he
said.
The demonstrators sang pro-
Zionist hymns and carried signs
bearing pro-Zionist quotations
from the Bible.
One sign — quoting from the
book of Deuteronomy — read:
"They who curse Israel shall be
cursed, and they that bless Israel
shall be blessed."
"We feel Israel needs friends,
they don't need enemies," Forseth
said.
"But they have a lot of enemies
in Canada and the United States,
sad to say," he said, referring to
the anti-Dayan demonstrators.
"Israel plays an important part
in the Bible," he said.
The Bible predicts that the world
will not end before an Israeli state
has been re-established, Forseth
said.
"No hell on earth will destroy
Israel now," he said.
The mostly middle-aged pro-
Zionist demonstrators included the
Reverend Grant Livingstone,
Alma Mater Society president in
1947-48.
"The Bible speaks plainly that
Zionism is God's will and says let
them all be confounded and turned
back, that hate Zion," he said.
The larger group of anti-Dayan
demonstrators was generally
much younger but included a
considerable number of non-
students.
It was organized by the ad-hoc
Committee to Oppose Moshe
Dayan's Visit and participants
included members of the
Revolutionary Marxist Group, the
Communist Party of Canada
(Marxist-Leninist), the Young
Socialists and members of the Gay
People of UBC, as well as Arab
See page 2: DAYAN
The former defence minister
said after four wars "everybody
has learned their lesson," adding
he believes the Arab states are
ready to compromise.
During the meeting, he also said:
• "No real meaning" existed
behind the response at the United
Nations last year to Yasser Arafat,
head of the Palestinian Liberation
Organization;
• The PLO is a "terrorist
organization" which Israel can-
only deal with by killing.
• The formation of a separate
Palestinian state on the West Bank
of the Jordan River is infeasible.
• Although nuclear arms have
not been introduced into the area
yet, if the Arabs were to employ
such weapons "we will be ready for
them."
Dayan's visit was co-sponsored
by Schara Tzedeck Synagogue and
UBC's Hillel House.
Members of the RCMP, Vancouver city police and the
general's personal security staff
were in ihe ballroom and at least
one time called a person from his
seat for a quick frisk and ID check.
Two policemen using a metal
detector checked everyone who
walked through the door into the
ballroom.
A long line formed 30 minutes
before the speech was scheduled to
begin.
As Dayan spoke, security guards
were on stage and behind nearby
curtains, constantly scanning the
audience.
Several agents grouped around
See page 5: CHAIR
DAYAN
snuck out Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 7, 1975
Dayan labelled Nazi
From page 1
supporters    of    the    Palestine
Liberation Organization.
Demonstrators also carried
signs that equated Zionism to
Nazism and spelled Dayan's name
with a swastika instead of a "Y."
David Fuller, grad student rep
on AMS council, was one of the
organizers of this group.
"They (the pro-Zionists) are
Nazis, like the Zionists," he said.
"Any leader of Zionism is like
the Nazis; a lot of people have been
duped to believe them."
The two groups marched on
SUB's south plaza for nearly an
hour, shouting slogans at one
another.
The anti-Zionists then circled
SUB, entered the building and
marched to the main door of the
auditorium where they continued
to chant and wave placards.
They were joined there by the
pro-Zionists who sang hymns and
waved their own placards.
Meanwhile, Dayan arrived with
his entourage — including two
limousines and several police cars
— and after waiting for nearly half
an hour in a room near the CITR
radio station was swept- into the
auditorium in a flying wedge of
RCMP security men.
One onlooker remarked that
Dayan was much smaller than he
expected.
Dead architects best
The public cannot love a building
for its beauty until its architect is
dead, UBC school of architecture
head Robert MacLeod said
Saturday.
"It is possible to admire a
contemporary building, but it is not
possible to love a- contemporary
building until the architect is dead
because the architect may design
another building," he said.
He also said that in the past
"building styles were meant to
reflect the values of those who
brought them into being ... all
great styles originated in religious
buildings . . . they conveyed
religious values and faith."
However, today many buildings
are built by people who have no
relationship with the community at
all, he said.
"The design of today's buildings
of steel, glass, brick and concrete
is based on images of reality . . .
fragments of ideas and the architect can specify the physical
characteristics but not the occupants," he said.
The dismay and dissatisfaction
among both the public and architects has led to the belief that
"any building done now is going to
be worse than the one it replaces,"
he said.
The
Vancouver
Symphony
presents...
HARRY ADASKIN is a
veritable "Who's Who" of
music and musicians. His
lifelong career as musician,
educator and radio commentator recently earned
him Canada's highest recognition as a member in the
Order of Canada.
Despite "formal" retirement, Mr. Adaskin continues to be active in
communicating his great
love for music and the arts.
This fall he hosts the Vancouver Symphony's new
4-concert series, MUSICALLY SPEAKING, sponsored by CP Air, which
begins October 8. For
further information, call
the Symphony Office,
689-1411. Tickets are now
on sale at the Vancouver
Ticket Centre, 630 Hamilton, 683-3255.
He said the last two decades of
architectural thought have been
dominated by the idea that if a
building is designed to solve the
problem of use then the building
cannot help but be beautiful.
He also said there is little
relationship between the commissioner of a building and the
design and construction because
often the commissioner is
speculating for profit and is not
concerned about the building's use.
Many buildings designed today
are twice removed from reality as
they are only abstractions of
someone's perfect idea of design
and they are not designed for the
locale they are built in, MacLeod
said.
BLACK & LEE
TUX SHOP
NOW AT
1110 Seymour St.
688-2481
Security men guarded the east
hall of SUB during Dayan's entire
stay.
Security men guard the east hall
of SUB during Dayan's entire stay.
At one point, when the anti-
Zionist demonstrators tried to gain
access to this hall, they were
prevented from doing so by
security officers.
The RCMP slammed the door
shut and hustled the man out the
main door.
Both groups then left the building
and waited outside the east doors
of SUB, through which Dayan had
entered and where his car
cavalcade was waiting.
But a short time later the entire
cavalcade drove away and most
demonstrators left the area, apparently on the assumption that
Dayan had left.
Later, after demonstrators
realized they had been duped, they
returned to the east exit of SUB.
But Dayan was rushed away
through the north doors in a different car while his cavalcade
waited by the east doors.
CHARISMATIC CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Guest Speaker
Dr. Ken
Gagliardi
UBC Grad, Working in Liberia
THURS. OCT/9    7:30 p.m.
LUTHERAN CAMPUS CENTRE
SUBFILSOC presents
I AM
NO ANGEL
( with Mae West)
Thurs/Sun 7:00
Fri/Sat 7:00/9:30
SUB AUDITORIUM
75c & AMS Card
TV & STEREO
RENTALS
ROYCES
1467 Johnston Rd.,
White Rock, B.C.
531-3028
APPOINTMENT SERVICE
731-4191
3644 West 4th Avenue
At Alma
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
presents
Welcoming
Dance
ALL STUDENTS; OVERSEAS AND
CANADIAN ARE INVITED
CARIBBEAN CAVALIERS
STEELBAND
Saturday,   October 11
8:30 p.m.
$1.50 I.H. members
$2.00 Non-members
WOMEN: Only 7 of a total of 44 students on committees are
women.
Qualified women will be given preference in appointments to
the following committees:
[1] Housing
[2] Financial Aid
[3] BCSF/NUS [external affairs]
[4] SUB Space Demand
[5] Elections
[6]   Charitable Donations
[7]    Men's Athletics
[8]   SUB Management
Please submit resume to AMS President, Jake van der Kamp
by Friday, October 17,1975. [Don't forget your name, address
and   phone number.] Tuesday, October 7, 1975
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
Nicolson enters housing fray
By MARK BUCKSHON
Housing minister Lome Nicolson
is  hinting  that  the   attitudes   of
Vancouver mayor Art Phillips are
■ one of the main reasons for the
student housing shortage.
In a letter to The Ubyssey,
Nicolson says "municipal
restrictions" are the reasons for
failure of a program offering
homeowners low-cost mortgages
as an incentive to build extra
suites.
And Nicolson hints he has plans
to build a "total integrated housing
development near the  campus."
Nicolson's letter, dated Thursday and received Monday, was in
response to a Ubyssey request for
comment about a recent meeting
he had with education minister
Eileen Dailly to discuss student
housing.
In the letter, Nicolson says the
province has a "direct mortgage
lending program whereby single
family homes can be converted to
suites which would meet National
Building Code standards."
"If these suites were rented out
for student housing, there certainly
would be no objection and it would
help fill one of the original intentions, but because of municipal
restrictions, probably less than" 100
of these mortgages have been
taken up," Nicolson wrote.
"I feel that it could go a long way
toward relieving the problems for
both UBC and Simon Fraser
University."
Nicolson appeared to be
referring to mayor Art Phillips and
Vancouver city council, which has
refused to legalize suites and
multiple family dwellings in the
Dunbar and Point Grey areas
despite repeated requests from the
university administration and the
provincial government.
Phillips said in an interview
Monday referendums will be held
in various neighborhoods
sometime next year to allow
residents to decide if they want
multiple family dwellings in their
neighborhoods.
"There may be some parts of the
city who want to do this (allow
multiple zoning)," he said.
But Phillips said he doesn't
believe that even with rezoning,
more than 1,000 new suites will be
made available under the incentive
plan because "statistical surveys"
show residents aren't interested in
the changes.
He reiterated remarks he made
at UBC last week that he doesn't
believe any new suites built under
the incentive program would help
alleviate the student • housing
shortage because, he said, long-
term tenants would be attracted to
the self-contained suites and
students would be displaced.
Nicolson says in his letter he
agrees with UBC administration
president Doug Kenny "that what
is needed is a total integrated
housing development near the
campus and this would be one
which would serve more than just
the academics and students at the
university."
• "It is important for you to realize
that the Department of Housing
budget   is   multiplied   in   most
programs by a ratio of nine to oi. ■>
by federal government mortgage
financing," Nicolson says. "Our
total budget falls very short of
having an impact on the housing
crisis if it were not for th'e
utilization of federal and provincial
Droerams."
The housing minister writes:
"For instance, we currently have
at any time about 3,000 • senior
citizens' housing projects under
way.
"Of course the greatest need at
this time is in family housing accommodation."
Kenny said: "I'm pleased to
learn that Mr. Nicolson has views
on housing which are very close to
my own."
He declined further comment
Monday until he has time to
"digest" the contents of the letter.
—peter cummings photo
PLENTY OF PLACARDS paraded around SUB Monday as anti-Zionist protestors carry on protest
march during Moshe Dayan's visit and speech. Hastily organized smaller group rallie vyith signs and
slogans to praise Dayan and his Zionist policies. Both groups stuck to shouting and sign-waving.
Rape crisis centre nixed
By PATTI-REAY STAHL
Despite recent complaints by
women of sexual attacks on
campus, a UBC rape crisis centre
is not a good idea, according to two
students who recently completed a
feasibility study into setting up
such a centre.
Robijn Gould and Susan Kirkpatrick, who spent three weeks
researching the idea on a Careers
75program grant, said a UBC rape
crisis centre would only duplicate
existing services.
"There are a number of
agencies right on campus, like
Speakeasy, the health service, the
women's office, the dean of
women's office and the office of
student services that are ready and
more than willing to be supportive
and aid someone who had been
raped," Gould and Kirkpatrick
said in their report.
The report also cited Rape
Relief, a 24-hour downtown service
which offers police and legal advice and counselling to rape victims.
The report recommended that
instead of setting up a rape crisis
centre:
• lighting be improved in the
areas  of  Panhellenic   House  and
NDU protest vowed
By MARCUS GEE
Notre Dame University's
student president vowed Monday
to protest at Education Minister
Eileen Dailly's Victoria office if
their demands for input into NDU's
future continue to be ignored.
NDU student president Andy
Sharack said the protest will be
necessary if Dailly does not act on
his proposal that she appoint a
committee of NDU faculty,
students and adminstration figures
to study the transformation of
Notre Dame to a public institution.
Dailly announced last Spring the
Nelson campus would go public in
September 1976 and become a
satellite of B.C.'s three
metropolitan universities.
But Shadrack said the education
department has ignored input from
Notre Dame since then.
Shadrack said this prompted him
to prepare a proposal that Dailly
appoint an authorized committee
of representatives from the Nelson
area to negotiate grograms to be
offered at NDU.
Shadrack said he and Janet
Neilson, B.C. Student Federation
staffer and interim UBC student
external affairs officer, submitted
the proposal to Universities
Council chairman William Armstrong Monday morning.
But Armstrong said Monday he
will suggest to Dailly the committee be established by "local
initiative" and not be authorized
by the education department.
He said he will suggest the
committee have no decisionmaking power.
"I am concerned about the
frustration of students at Notre
Dame who want to become involved. But the initiative to set up
this committee should come from
the (Nelson) area. The committee
would provide input into the new
entity at Nelson."
Shadrack said the committee
must have education department
authorization if it is to have any
effect.
"We want official status so that
we can negotiate with the
Universities Council. We have
submitted briefs before but they
were ignored because we have no
official powers."
The committee would consist of
representatives from students,
faculty and administration at
Notre Dame and at Selkirk and
from the Universities Council,
Shadrack said.
He said it would discuss the
structure of the new institution at
Nelson and what programs should
be offered there. The committee
would then make proposals to the
Universities Council, he said.
The committee could give impetus to education department
planning for the new institution
that will replace Notre Dame next
fall, he said.
"The transformation of NDU is
at a dead stop. The whole thing is
up in air."
along Tenth Avenue at bus stops;
• information meetings dealing
with rape and possibly self-defense
tactics be field in UBC residences;
• the Wesbrook health service
centre be renovated to be less
"formidable" to encourage
students to use the service ;
• greater communication and
co-operation be encouraged between existing campus  agencies;
• new students be given campus
tours to point out locations of
various support services;
• and The Ubyssey do a series of
articles on how to avoid rape, what
to do if raped and what services
are available for rape victims on
and off campus.
Gould and Kirkpatrick said in
their report they were "surprised"
at  the  low  number  of  reported '
rapes on campus.
They said the university RCMP
detachment recorded eight
reported rapes in 1974 and three
rapes so far this year.
All of the cases were on campus
or the endowment lands, but not all
of them involved students, the
report said.
Rape Relief had dealt with one
reported rape in the UBC-Point
Grey area during the last year and
the YWCA said they had not dealt
with any rape cases from UBC.
Both health service director Dr.
A.M. Johnson and Joyce Searcy of
the dean of women's office said
they could not recall hearing about
a rape on campus since they came
to UBC.
"But we realized that there is a
problem with the definition of rape
and the low incidence of reporting
of rape," the report said.
"We had to keep in mind • • ■
some students would not choose the
student health service or the office
of the dean of women to discuss
rape."
The report continued: "We had
to conclude that a separate rape
crisis centre which would have to
run for 24 hours per day to be
useful, would not be feasible at
UBC.
"We were very impressed with
the thoroughness, availability and
resources of Rape Relief, so rather
than try to duplicate their efforts
on a much smaller scale, we could
publicize that centre."
iSf*fcV 2*-**&'   MSbfife *
ESSE * ?>Lw Hfc*^, ^ f^ wa
*■'•. . &*#
—matt king photo
LOOKING FOR SNIPERS? NOPE. RCMP plainclothesman with
binoculars scan women on grass hockey field while roof tops on Gage
towers go unwatched. Spyglasses turned skyward again as food services
head Robert Bailey (jogging in mid picture) ran into view spoiling field
view and upsetting cop's stomach. Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 7, 1975
Propaganda
at UBC
Hawk, fascist, warmonger.
These were some of the epithets hurled at the man who
spoke to a UBC crowd Monday.
He spoke of peace ... by asking his enemies to let Israel
do what it wants.
He spoke of Soviet military intervention . . . and failed to
mention the U.S. military industrial complex that keeps his
country supplied with arms.
He mentioned the Palestinians the bloody Middle East
conflicts have left homeless . . ."we kill them," he said.
He watched as a minority in the audience who tried to
verbally oppose him were booed down or thrown out of the
auditorium.
There was one of the largest security forces this campus
has ever hosted guarding this "man of peace."
It was a sham.
Moshe Dayan, who has proven himself good at finding
ways to kill any who stand in the way of his country's army
as it neurotically tries to defend its expanding borders, has
found another vocation.
Forced out of his political party when it could no longer •
endorse his sword-shaped solution to any crisis, Dayan has
now become a political propagandist.
His own country is tiring of hearing his war cry. The world
is getting tired of hearing Israel demand peace with a smiling
Uncle Sam sitting on its shoulders.
And the Palestinians, bashed out of their homes by the
warring factions, are getting tired of seeing what was once
their homeland trod upon by soldiers.
The state of Israel will always exist. The Arab nations will
always exist. And some day, the Palestinians will have a
homeland.
But a man of war knows nothing of peace.
Moshe Dayan will not always exist.
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Letters
Toynbee
said it
I would like to make two
corrections to the account Written
by Sue Vohanka on the talk which I
gave on the question of Palestine
on Oct. 3.
It is not my opinion, as was
reported in the first paragraph of
Vohanka's account, that Zionism in
^Palestine is comparable with
Nazism. This statement I attributed  to  the British  historian
Arnold Toynbee in the following
contexts:
"(The massacre of Deir Yasin)
was an evil deed .. . comparable to
crimes committed against the
Jews by the Nazis" (A Study of
History, Vol. VIII. p. 290.)
"The Jewish treatment of the
Arabs is as morally indefensible as
the slaughter by the Nazis of
6,000,000 Jews ... I feel that the
massacres of Arab civilians by the
Israeli armed forces were carried
out cold bloodedly and with a
purpose ... a murder is a murder.
If I.murder one man I don't have to
reach 6,000,000 or even 1,000."
(Lecture at McGill University,
Jan. 25, 1961.)
My reason for quoting Toynbee's
opinion, although so harsh a
judgment would not be'mine, was
to demonstrate the vast gap which
separates anti-Arab attitudes
fostered in North America by the
business press and those which are
current in most other countries,
including those held by respected
scholars.
Another correction — a minor
one perhaps — must be pointed
out: I did not mention the
possibility that Palestine could
"revert to a self-determined
state," as is reported. The
Palestinians, of course, never had
one. My argument was that
Palestine  should  be- a   state   in
which the Palestinians, inhabitants
of the region for centuries, might
create an independent state.
Although I disassociate myself
from Toynbee's statement, this
fact in no way implies that I have
no right to make it, or to express
any other opinion which might
distress or outrage members of the
university. This is an important
issue; and I am reminded of it by
the reactions of a number of
faculty.
Those who reacted adversely,
even with hostility, took one of two
positions. The first was to question
my right as a faculty member to
make public statements uporr
controversial political issues while
remaining a membeF.
Had my talk been publicized as
one to be given by "Mr. Paul
Cappon," instead of "Professor
Paul Cappon, department of
sociology," they would have been
satisfied.
Readers will recognize this
position as one which leads to overt
and extreme censorship, a position
which is unlikely to be given full
expression until one says things
very displeasing to the university
establishment or to its extra-
university friends.
This position is held by a
minority. A more liberal attitude
gained currently during the
Vietnam war years, especially
near its end, a time at which many
academics considered it their duty
to speak out against the war. Even
many university administrators
allowed themselves public
statements.
The second position of those who
objected to parts of my talk,
although more liberal, is really a
version of the first. They claim that
faculty members have a right,
even an obligation, to make controversial public appearances
without hiding their professional'
association — provided that what
they say is not unreasonable.
Many objected to what they took
to   be   my   opinion   about   com
parisons between Nazism and
Zionism as passing the limits of
what is acceptable. I had no right,
while a faculty member, to be so
outrageous.
I suspect, however, that if I had
referred to "PLO terrorism," no
one would have batted an eyelash
— or opened a mouth to condemn
improper use of my university
affiliation.
This is therefore a liberal version
of censorship: one has a right
publicly to express one's opinion as
long as it does not differ radically
from "the norm." The "norm," I
would argue, corresponds closely
with ideas which are associated
with the social and political status
quo.
Paul Cappon
assistant professor sociology
Great
Every four or five years,  for
some    unknown    reason    The
Ubyssey institutes an attack on the
campus security patrol. As the
patrol is not able to defend itself
such actions appear rather unfair
and unreasonable.
For the record, the main duties
of the patrolmen are those of
"responsibility for security inspection of buildings, fire inspection of buildings, regulating of
traffic and parking."
During the year 1974-75 as an
example, among many other
duties, the patrol investigated 26
break and enter cases, attended
494 complaints from the university
community, attended 478 fire calls,
gave patrol assistance to 1271
requests, transferred 108 persons
to hospital, looked after 15 injured
persons.
The patrol staff is only 30 persons. As this staff works on a 24-
hour around the clock schedule
seven  days   a  week,   it  can  be
THE UmHY
OCTOBER 7,1975
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the writer and not of the
AMS or the university administration. Member, Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly
commentary and. review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are
located in room 241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial departments, 228-2301; Sports, 228-2305; advertising,
228-3977. Editor: Gary Coull
"Hands up against the wall terrorist punk!" said burly horseman Tom
Barnes shoving Ralph Maurer to the wall. "But ossifer," Maurer said, "that
Gary Coull and his running dog lackeys Sue Vohanka and Doug Rushton are
enemies of the people." "Maurer's right," said Marcus Gee sipping a Molotov
cocktail, "he shot to defend the plebes like you and me." "Nyet!'.' screamed
Len MacKave smashing a placard over Matt King, "Long live the Czar." "Ya
man that's real," said Doug Field calmly spraying Chris Gainor and Larry Hill
with a can of mace. "Up yours, fascist aardvark eater," yelled Cedric Tetzel
tossing a grenade at Patti-Reay Stahl and Anne Wallace. Jo Bernardo hit the
grenade with his tennis racket sending it down Peter Cummings' deep throat.
"Turns?" asked Greg Edwards as Cummings' head ricocheted off the ceiling
crushing Ryon Guedes'two-foot peat cigar.
readily seen that the number of
patrolmen men available for duty
at any one time is extremely small.
I would humbly suggest to you
and your readers that the patrol
has over the years done an outstanding job in a conscientious and
unobtrusive manner. We should be
giving them high praise for their
excellent work instead of belittling
their efforts.
J. F. McLean
personnel director
labor relations and
ancillary services
Reply
In answer to Lome Rogers who
accused me of petty jingoism in my
film criticism of Hearts and Minds,
I think it only appropriate to say a
few words.
May your nuts drop off in broad
daylight, at high noon, when you're
screwing.
Aside from that, I was most
disillusioned by Roger's lack of
understanding of the most basic
principles of jurisprudence.
If I may direct the gentleman to
any number of basic texts on the
subject, notably, the Concept of
Law by H.L.A. Hart, I think he will
discover that there is a great deal
of difference between law and
force, a distinction he claims he is
unable to see.
I am embarrassed that my article referred to the American
Constitution as a paradigm of
social order, rather than our
British North America Act, but
Vietnam was engaged in a
revolution, which is easier to
compare with America's struggle
for independence, since Canadians
have never undergone such an
experience.
Whether or not Canadians need
to wake up to this fact, I hesitate to
say. I hate violence, but I love a
good fight.
Jean Randall Tuesday, October 7, 1975
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
Entrance exams touted
A UBC senate member will
present a notice of motion at
Wednesday's senate meeting
calling for establishment of an
entrance exam for UBC.
Education professor John
Dennison said in an interview
Monday his motion will call for an
investigation into the feasibility of
setting up an entrance exam.
He said his motion is the result of
"numerous" faculty complaints of
incompetence in university
students, and a recent report from
the academic board which blamed
the incompetence on decreasing
educational standards.
Dennison said a university is not
a remedial institution, and there
must   be   a   uniform   admittance
Chair fight erupts
From page 1
Dayan as a woman in the back of
the    room    began     chanting,
"Palestine will win."
The chant, repeated several
times, was met with a chorus of
"shut ups" from others in the
audience.
Suddenly chairs began falling
and a scuffle between pro and anti-
Israel thinkers ensued.
Witnesses said a man and a
woman who began shouting pro-
Palestinian slogans and a group
attempting to subdue them
clashed. Security men moved in
when a scuffle started and people
used chairs to defend themselves.
From the platform, Dayaa-urged
spectators to "sit down and listen
to me" offering dissenters an
opportunity later to question his
opening remarks.
Security officers attempted to
carry the male protestor out
through the southeast entrance,
but demonstrators outside forced
the guards to take him out another
entrance.
The woman continued to shout
slogans until a man wearing a T-
shirt carried her out.
During the question period," two
men who identified themselves as
Palestinians tried to challenge
Dayan on several statements.
When one of them said
Palestinians wanted a "secular,
democratic state" for its people
and asked Dayan, "where is Israel
now?" members of the audience
booed. When Dayan began his
reply, he was met by a further
barrage of questions from the
Palestinian.
The incident during the question
period was one of several when
members of the audience hostile to
Zionism tried to get their points
across, but faced shouts from the
partisan groups.
Dayan's speech fell coincidentally on the second anniversary of the outbreak of the
Yom Kippur war.
Dayan started his speech with an
account of the four wars that
marked the turbulent history of
Israel since its creation by the UN
in 1948.
He said all Middle East wars
ended by UN resolutions have in
time broken down and' that this
problem has started action^by the
"big powers" to seek a permanent
solution.
He traced the growing involvement of the Soviet Union from
the time in June, 1970, when
Egyptian officials went to Moscow,
seeking Soviet air ordnance.
But Dayan said the Soviets also
ordered Soviet ground troops into
the conflict "to provide the right
co-ordination between the air and
the ground . . . They took over the
entire sky and ground."
He said Israeli gunners shot
down several planes thinking they
were Arabs, but discovered they
were Soviets.
"This worried the Israeli
government."
Prefacing his statements about
peace talks without third party
intervention, Dayan said he
believes the Sinai accord recently
negotiated between Israel and
Egypt "is a bad agreement"
because Israel is forced to make
concessions, but Egypt is not.
"I think it is not the right way to
make peace. It would be better if
Israel and the Arabs could
negotiate without third parties."
"But", said the general "even
though I'm against it, it's better
than no agreement at all."
Dayan made few references in
his formal speech to the occupied
territories or to the Palestinian
question .
During the question period, the
general was asked what he thought
of the visit by Arafat to the UN last
yeaR
"I didn't think too much of it and
I didn't like it," he replied.
"The PLO is just a terrorist
organization and we only deal with
them by killing them."
In response to another question,
Dayan said the Palestinians
themselves must decide who is to
represent them and in the end, he
predicted, they will "still want
Jordan to represent them."
He said he didn't think the formation of a Palestinian state on the
West Bank was feasible.
"I don't think it is possible to
squeeze another independent state
into the Middle East," he said,
suggesting the Palestinian
refugees should be incorporated
into Jordan.
One of the more bitter confrontations between Dayan and a
questioner came when a man
stepped forward and introduced
himself as "a Jew, but not a
Zionist."
He then spoke about the anti-
Semitism of Zionism, and after
being boded by the audience and
prodded by Dayan to ask his
question, said: "What has Zionism
done to eliminate anti-Semitism?"
Cries of "you're not a Jew" and
"if you don't like it here go to
Russia" rang from the audience.
Dayan stood back listening to the
audience's response and then,
after another faction yelled for him
to answer the question, he replied:
"Zionism was not formed to
overcome anti-Semitism . . . (but
for Jews) to live in their own state
and to give them the opportunity to
be free."
standard to ensure a minimum
level of competence.
The district base curriculum
policy which allows individual high
schools to decide curriculum,
makes a single education standard
in high schools impossible.
Dennison said he thinks the
freedom which this policy allows
high school teachers is good. But
he said the policy has contributed
to declining academic standards,
particularly in mathematics and
communications.
The only alternative to an entrance exam would be reinstating
of government exams, Dennison
said.
He added that government
exams would be an unfair burden
to high school graduates who were
not planning on entering university.
Vogt seeks
Rohringer
replacement
The replacement for UBC
housing director Leslie Rohringer
will most likely have no association
with UBC, according to administration vice-president Erich
Vogt.
Vogt, vice-president in charge of
student and faculty affairs, said
Friday a committee to find a new
housing director will be appointed
by him in two weeks.
"We're not really expecting
applications from persons in the
UBC system, but if someone from
UBC does apply, is recommended
and has the proper'qualifications
then by all means we will not
ignore the situation,"  Vogt said.
"The trend seems to show that
most applications will be received
from external candidates."
■■ Vogt did not deny recent rumors
that food services director Robert
Bailey will apply for the housing
position. "He might certainly wish
to be a candidate," Vogt said.
He said he will make the final
decision on the new housing
director.    '
"The committee is in fact an
advisory group. They will look over
all of the applications carefully,
then recommend the candidate of
their choice to me."
He said students may comprise
as many as half the number of
committee members. He said
student committee members will
be selected according to residences
rather than faculties.
Selection of a new housing
director may take several months,
he said. So far, Vogt added, "no
inquiries or formal interviews
have been made, but informal
contacts have been started."
FEMALE
TRANSPORT
by Steve Gooch
An M.F.A. Thesis Production
Directed By Kathleen Miller
OCTOBER 8 - 11   8:00 p.m.
Tickets: $3.00
Students: $2.00
Tickets: Room 207 — Frederic Wood Theatre
UBC DOROTHY SOMERSET STUDIO
Philip Agee
former CIA Agent
and
Author of
CIA DAIRY
SUB AUDITORIUM
Thurs., Oct. 9
12:30 p.m.
Sponsored by A.M.S. Speaker Committee
Studying is one job
you don't get paid for.
But we'll pay you if
you get disabled
on the job.
Our Pre-Grad Plan is specially designed for final year students
who can't afford to be disabled during the critical period of their
training.
If you qualify, we'll pay you an income while you're
disabled — even if you're not earning anything at the moment.
For more information on Canada Life's Pre-Grad Plan, call
Maria Trowbridge at 684-8521.
m
The Canada Life Assurance Company
Faculty of
Agricultural Sciences
NOTICE
That nominations for 2 student positions on the Advisory Committee to the
President for the selection of a Dean of Agriculture Sciences, are open as of
10:00 a.m. Thursday, Oct. 2, 1975 and will close at 1:00 p.m. on Thursday,
Oct. 9th.
These positions are open to any student registered in the Faculty of
Agriculture Sciences only.
Nominations and Eligibility forms available in room 64 of the McMillan
Building (Agriculture Undergrad office).
Polls will be open 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 16th in McMillan.
Bruce Rutley      President Ag.U.S. Page 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 7, 1975
Phillip
Lurking in dark corners is not
Philip Agee's style. The ex-CIA
agent, author of CIA Diary, leaves
overcoats to flashers and porno
flic patrons.
The controversial ex-agent will
be flaunting his stuff at noon
Thursday in SUB auditorium.
So skip those crummy burgers.
Hot flashes
wander upstairs, and gain a
valuable insight into Big Brother's
political perversity.
Women
A special series of on-campus
events are being held this week in
celebration of Women's Week.
The program has been organized
by the student-run women's office
as part of International Women's
Year.
Events include an exhibition of
work by B.C. women artists, a
lecture on women artists of the
past, feminist theatre,
performances of omen's music
and demonstrations of karate and
self-defense.
See Tween Classes for times
and places, or phone the women's
office at 228-2082 or 228-6228
further information.
Tween classes
KAYAK AND CANOE CLUB
Film, organization for N. Thompson
trip, noon, SUB 205.
PRE-MED SOC
Joel Thorkelson on volunteering,
slides, noon, I RC 1.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Barbeque on the beach, leaving at
6:30 p.m. from the Lutheran
campus centre.
CUSO
Information night, two films,
discussion, Third World
development series: Tanzania, 7:30
p.m., International House 404.
HAMSOC VE7UBC
Organizational meeting for cope and
theory classes, noon, Brock ext.
358.
PRO-LIFE SOC
General meeting and elections,
noon, SUB 117.
CONTEMPORARY DANCE CLUB
Classes; yoga: 2-3:30 p.m. SU
party room, modern dance:
3:30-5:30 p.m. SUB party room.
Meeting to discuss organizational
policy and future production plans,
6-7:30 p.m. SUB sunken lounge.
MY JONG  KUNG FU
Practice, 5-7 p.m. Place Vanier
ballroom.*
CHARISMATIC
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Prayer and        sharing, noon,
conference  room,  Lutheran campus
centre.
ANARCHIST COLLECTIVE
Discussion       of       French       Utopian
socialists of early 1900s, noon,     U
119.
DEAN OF WOMEN FREESEE
Film "The Ascent of Man," noon,
SUB auditorium.
NEWMAN CLUB
Helen Duffy speaks on psychiatry,
7:30 p.m., St. Mark's College.
GERMAN CLUB
General meeting, 7 p.m.,
International   House   upper   lounge.
LESBIAN DROP-IN
Informal discussion, noon, SUB
230.
SUB ART GALLERY COMMITTEE
Display "Omens" presented by the
women's office, 11 a.m.-5 p.m.,
Monday to Saturday, SUB art
gallery.
WOMEN'S OFFICE
Avis Rosenberg lectures on women
artists of the historic past,
7:30-9:30 p.m., Lasserre 102.
WEDNESDAY
WOMEN'S OFFICE
Feminist theatre,        tomorrow's
leaders, noon, SUB art gallery. Also,
karate and self-defense
demonstration   by   women,   8  p.m.,
SUB art gallery.
PSYCHOLOGY CLUB
General   meeting,   noon,   Angus  24.
DEMOLAY CLUB
General meeting, noon,      SUB 119.
PAKSING FUTGA
KUNG FU CLUB
Practice, new members welcome.
4:30-6:30 p.m., SUB ballroom.
FEMINIST KARATE ASSOCIATION
Practice,   beginners   welcome,   8-10
p.m., SUB 207-209.
CONTEMPORARY DANCE CLUB
Class,    $3.50   fee,    7:30-9:30    p.m.,
Armories 204.
ENGLISH DEPARTMENT
Canadian poet Victor Coleman reads
from   his   work,   first   in  a series  of
UBC    poetry    readings,    noon,    Bu.
202.
IVCF
Study-lecture "In the spirt of love,"
noon, SUB ballroom.
CCCM
Eucharist, 8 p.m., Lutheran campus
centre.
NEWMAN CLUB
Meeting, noon, SUB 125.
REVOLUTIONARY MARXIST GROUP
Forum on Spain and Portugal, "The
powderkeg," noon, SUB 215.
DEAN OF WOMEN FREESEE.
Film,  "The Ascent of Man," noon,
SUB auditorium.
^^     SOFT    LENSES
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FRAMES
as low as
CONTACTS^B^^
$5.95
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Glass lenses
start at
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^F                         PUBLIC
^T               CONTACT LENS CENTRE              *^^
^^r              1557 W. Broadway, Vancouver - 732-3636           ^^^
^T                    552 Columbia St., New Westr. - 525-2818               ^^
DR. BUNDOLO
S.U.B.
12:30 P.M.   THEATRE
FREE
LIVE RADIO COMEDY
a CBC production
TUESDAY
OCT. 7th
Broadcast:
Sat., 11:30 a.m.—CBU 690
J
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES:   Campus — 3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional lines 25c.
Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $1.80; additional tines
40c. Additional days $1.50& 35c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241, S.U.B., UBC, Van. 8, B.C.
5 — Coming Events
/'I
PR0TEA
//
4472 West 10th Ave.
224-6234
Quality  Ladies and Girls  New
&  Used Clothing
Jeans & Cords from $5.00
Skirts $4.00, etc.
HELP YOURSELF
TO HIGHER GRADES
LARGEST SELECTION IN B.C. OF
* COLES NOTES
100 Titles
* MONARCH NOTES
300 Titles
*SCHAUMS OUTLINES
60 Titles
* COLLEGE NOTES
50 titles
All available from
BETTER BUY
IVancouver. B.C.
4393 W. 10th Ave.
FREESEE
Sponsored by the Dean of Women's Office
With the support of The Leon and Thea Koerner Foundation
Presents J. Bronowski's
THE ASCENT
OF MAN
Series of thirteen fifty-minute films produced by the B.B.C.
Every Wednesday, Oct. 8 - Nov. 26, 1975 and Jan. 21 - Feb 18,
1975.
Every Wednesday Noon
12:35 p.m.
SUB Auditorium
OCT. 8 - NOV 26
FREE FREE
All Students, Faculty and Staff are invited.
LEARN THE ART OF Turkish Oriental
Belly Dance. Tues. 7 to 9 p.m. Four
sessions, $16. 2947 West 41st. Enroll
any time. 433-8157 or 261-8044.
LIVE RADIO COMEDYI Dr. Bundolo's
■Pandemonium Medicine Show this
Tuesday, Oct. 7, 12:30, SUB Theatre.
It's FREE!
FREESEE:    "THE   ASCENT   OF   MAN."
Now showing every Wed. at 12:35
p.m. SUB Aud. FREE!
10 —For Sale — Commercial
"HOW    TO   CHOOSE   YOUR    BOOZE."
Best-selling paperback book on how
to get best values in buying beer,
wine, and liquor. Pays for itself on
your next liquor purchase. Only $1.50.
Saltaire Publishing Ltd., Box 2003,
Sidney, B.C.
HOW   TO   ESCAPE   THE   RAT   RACEI"
Helps you choose a career and lifestyle where you can be really happy.
Only $1.25. Saltaire Publishing Ltd.,
Box 2003, Sidney, B.C.
30 — Jobs
BE PART TIME DISC JOCKEY no experience necessary taut must enjoy
contemporary music and working
with large groups of people. Open to
men and women 19 years and over.
Call: THE REVOLVING SOUND
COMPANY, 669-5847, 7 days a week,
8:00 a.m. - 12 p.m.
ELDERLY LADY, West Vancouver,
needs older student as occasional
driver-companion. Job would involve
several hours only. v°ekends possible.
261-6410.
EARN $20 FOR  LYING ON A BED in a
dark room for 24 hours. Psychology
study. Come to Room 13, Basement,
Henry Angus Bldg., Oct. 8, Wed. 12:30
— See Dari Rank.
35 - Lost
LOST: BLACK BINDER with book in
Pit, Friday 26th. Please return. 263-
0762. Not mine!
ENJOY VANCOUVER
NIGHT LIFE
AND SAVE !
Send for entertainment rack of 35
money-savers. Includes 8 restaurants,
9 nite clubs, many other attractions.
Save as much as half of your dining
& entertainment costs — some freebies too! The perfect way to enjoy
Vancouver on a budget. Send $3.50
& tax to Roadrunner Advertising,
Dept. B, 9—1035 Richards St., Van.
V6B 3E4. Your money cheerfully
refunded if not totally satisfied.
40 — Messages
65 — Scandals
THE SHOW THATS TOO ROTTON to
take off the air!! Dr. Bundolo's Pandemonium Medicine Show, Tuesday,
Oct. 7, 12:30, SUB Theatre. It's FREE!
JOHN    S.   have   you   checked   out   the
Joyce loop lately?
70 — Services
PERMANENT HAIR removal by Electrolysis Kree Method in my home.
Prices are reasonable. Phone 738-6960.
11— For Sale — Private
NEW IN VANCOUVER! Interior Decorator. All new European styles. Wood
graining, wall coverings, painting.
Reasonable rates. Phone 876-3938.
I
85 — Typing
90 - Wanted
TWO ONLY! ELTON JOHN tickets for
Monday, Oct. 13th performance. Call
after 6:30 — 980-4152.
DESK MODEL TYPEWRITER, 15-inch
carriage, $30.  Phone 228-0992.
20 — Housing
LARGE, FURNISHED s/c basement
suite. Very reasonable rent in exchange for some house work and
babysitting. Near campus. 224-4751.
ROOM AVAILABLE, St. Andrews Hall,
men's residence on campus. 224-7720
OT 224-5743.
SENIOR STUDENT who has resided in
Regina,  Sask. Phone 254-9596 (days).
USE
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED
TO SELL - BUY
INFORM Tuesday, October 7, 1975
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 7
'Birds stopped by Bears
UBC handed 2nd loss of season
The UBC Thunderbirds football
team, 7th ranked nationally last
week, came up on the losing end of
a 22-13scoreagainst the University
of Alberta Golden Bears last
Saturday in Edmonton.
The 'Birds started slow and gave
up 20 points in the first half before
coming up with 10 points of their
own in the second quarter.
It was three minutes into the
second quarter before the 'Birds
finally managed to move into the
Bears' side of the field.
Scoring for the 'Birds were Greg
Garner with a touchdown and Gary
Metz with a conversion and a field
goal.
Metz rounded off the game with a
late fourth quarter field-goal.
Despite chalking up 301 yards in
total offense, the .'Birds only
managed 20 first downs and more
importantly, only one touchdown.
Dalton Smarsh, the University of
Alberta fullback outrushed the
entire UBC team with 24 carries
for 152 yards. UBC only piled up 134
yards rushing.vTop rusher for the
'Birds was Gord Penn who went .75
yards on 16 carries.
After the game UBC coach
Frank Smith said he needed a
"burner on the offense": someone
who can break upfield for the long
gains.
In the passing department, the
'Birds   threw   for   167   yards   to
Cross-country runners do well
in Simon Fraser Invitational meet
UBC runners John Wheeler and
Chris White grabbed third and
tenth places respectively in the
-Simon Fraser Invitational crosscountry race held Saturday at
Mundy Park, Coquitlam.
The first three places of the five
mile race were closely contested
by Wheeler, Tom Howard and a
runner from the University of
Montana.
The race was won by Canadian
marathon champion Tom Howard
in a time of 26:04.
"I was getting the lead on the
hills," said Wheeler "but we were
see-sawing all the way. I lost
contact with them going up the last
hill, with about a half-mile to go.
Then  they   got   thirty   or   forty
The "HEW"
PONDEROSA
SNACK BAR
Now open from 8 a.m.
Mon.-Fri.
"BURGER & BOTTLE*'
SPECIAL $1.15
12 noon to 2 p.m.
•available to those
  19 yrs. and over      	
Some diamonds
were born
to be
a cut above
and Ben Moss
has them
6 diamond bridal set in white
or yellow gold
Engagement Ring  ...$375
Wedding Ring  M10
Sen cJfioss
de&etfers
Pacific Centre
Oakridge Shopping
Centre
metres on me, and ran hard in.
They were quite close, actually.
There were four seconds between
them, at the finish, and I trailed
second place by eight seconds."
The UBC team had five other
runners placing further back in the
race, but team captain Chris White
feels optimistic about its future.
"The team's getting fitter," he
said. "The thing is, a lot of the
senior runners left last year. This
year we've got an awful lot of new
and younger runners. We're
gearing for the Canada-West meet
in Edmonton on November 1.
That's the important one."
UBC runners Doug Webber,
Rabinder Rai, Larry Hill, Jack
Isenor and Geza Balanyi finished
38, 42, 43, 45 and 50 respectively.
UBC runners Sheila Currie,
Linda Rosettii and Leslie Stubbs
dominated the women's race,
placing first, third and fifth
respectively.
The team races in its first major
MEN'S AND WOMENS' INTRAMURAL
RUN IN THE ANNUAL TURKEY TROT -
CROSS COUNTRY
RACE      lV$-2miles
THURSDAY 9th OCTOBER, 12:30 P.M.
WAR MEMORIAL GYM FIELD
1st Prize - TURKEY
2nd Prize- CHICKEN
3rd Prize -    1 DOZEN EGGS
RESIDENCE
SPRING TERM WAITING LIST
Students presently on the Fall Term Waiting List for
UBC residences who are interested in residence for the
Spring Term must come to the Housing Office between
October 1 and October 15 to re-confirm their place on
the list.
Rooms available for the Spring Term (to be occupied
January 4) will be offered to those students on the
Spring Term Waiting List daily at 1:00 p.m.,
commencing December 8. The residence fee must be
paid at the time of accepting a room assignment.
Office of the Director of Residences
September 30, 1975.
WE OFFER
RK SHAMPOO AND
RK RECONDITIONING
TREATMENT AS PART
OF OUR SHOP SERVICE
RK
Ask for
your stylist
Corky
Leo
Ernie
Maryke
Carlyne
APPOINTMENT SERVICE
3644 WEST 4th AVE., AT ALMA
731-4191
meet of the year this Saturday in
Fort Casey, Washington. Wheeler
won the race last year, defeating
former U.S. olympian Jim Johnson.
"I'm looking forward to the
race," said Wheeler. "My chances
of winning aren't as good as they-
were last year, although I wasn't
expecting to win it last year. It's a
really good race. There are usually
about 150 guys in it, with the
University of Washington
dominating the team scene."
The UBC team placed second in
the meet last year.
outdistance the Bears who could
only chalk up 118 yards in the air.
The kicking team who had a near
perfect game against the
University of Calgary Dinosaurs a
week ago, ground to a halt in
Edmonton. Kicker Metz had his
share of the scoring with two field-
goals and a convert. Punter Dan
Smith, on the hand, despite his
brilliant showing in the Dinos
game averaged only 27.3 yards in
each of his 14 attempts.
The loss puts the 'Birds in a third
place tie with the Bears, each with
a 2-2 record. The Dinosaurs, in the
meantime, picked up a 58-0 win
over the University of Manitoba
Bisons. This moves the Dinos into a
first place tie with the University
of Saskatchewan Huskies. Both
teams have a 3-1 record.
Next on the agenda for the 'Birds
will be an away game against the
bottom-of-the-league Bisons
Saturday.
W
L
F     A
P
SASK
3
1
126  57
6
CAL
3
1
127  73
6
UBC
2
2-
85    87
4
ALTA
2
2
73    79
4
MAN
0
4
35    150-
0
! FREE !     TABLE TENNIS
I
EXHIBITION
by
NATIONAL TABLE TENNIS COACH
Funded By O'Keefe Sports Foundation
ZLATKO
CORDAS
WAR MEMORIAL GYM
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 1975
12:30-Film-Room 211-213
1:00 — Exhibition - Gym Floor
Sponsored By Recreation U.B.C.
hair studio inc.
UNISEX HAIRSTYLES
FOR APPOINTMENT
224-1922
5784 University (Next to Bank of Commerce) Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 7, 1975
BANKRUPTCY SALE
of LES DEUX FABRIQUANTS LTD.,    MAJOR MANUFACTURERS
OF
JEANS/CORDS, DENIM
OVER $200,000 INVENTORY-13,000 GARMENTS
NOW DISCOUNTED
FE
OFF EVERYTHING
FEATURING:—   Star Jeans   •Denim Jackets • Shirts •
• Skirts (long & short) • Overalls • In New & Prewashed Denim*
• Matching Pants & Jackets in 100% Cotton — Many Colours •
EXAMPLES
MEN'S STAR                   1 LADIES JEAN
MEN'S CORDUROY      1
PANTS
QUANTITY OF
BROKEN SIZES & STYLES
JEANS
Reg. $19.95
30%
JACKETS
Reg. $25.00
30%
PANTS
Reg. $16.00
40 %
50%
OFF
M°"   $12.571"". $17.50
""   $9.60
300 yards of corduroy
Reg. $4 per yd. Now $2-79 per yd.
DOORS OPEN • MONDAYS, TUESDAYS, SATURDAYS 9 a.m.-6 p.m.
WEDNESDAYS, THURSDAYS, FRIDAYS 9 a.m.-9 p.m.
LOCATION:   1 2 1 9  W.  GEORGIA ST.      (OW Ski World Location)
SALE CONDUCTED BY
MAYNARD'S AUCTIONEERS LTD.
1233 W. Georgia
685-7378

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