UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Jan 22, 1985

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0126712.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0126712.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0126712-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0126712-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0126712-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0126712-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0126712-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0126712-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0126712-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0126712.ris

Full Text

Array Charlie fidelman photo
IMPULSE, A NEW improvisational dance group, was part of the Third Eyeball, a
festival of fun to benefit the campaign to end blindness in Asia, Jan. 20, 1985,
Robson Square. Eyeball, was organized by the Seva Foundation, a non-profit
organization dedicated to improving health in creative ways.
Police crack down on club events
By PATTI FLATHER
The university RCMP are denying campus clubs liquor licenses using an "extremely unreasonable"
interpretation of the provincial Liquor Act, the Alma Mater Society
finance director charged Monday.
"It's becoming tantamount to
harassment," said James Hollis,
adding AMS lawyers say the RCMP
interpretation of the law is unusual
and unreasonable.
Hollis said the RCMP has told
dozens of UBC clubs they will not
be issued further liquor licenses until they bring the police receipts
showing they donated all profits to
off-campus charity.
The Law Review club held a
function for the sole purpose of
raising money for university
scholarships, said Hollis, but the
RCMP told them this would not
qualify as charity. They have been
refused future liquor licenses,
Hollis said.
"A scholarship given out to the
university is not considered a worthy cause," Hollis said.
According to the B.C. Liquor
Act, if a function is held with the
prime purpose of making money
the funds must technically go to
charity, said Hollis.
But Hollis added 99.9 per cent of
AMS club functions are social, not
revenue-generating, so the RCMP
crackdown is totally unreasonable.
UBC is the only place in B.C. subject to these liquor permits rules, he
said.
The initiative for the crackdown,
which began in November, appears
to originate in the provincial Liquor
Control board and not with the
RCMP, Hollis said, adidng AMS
lawyers are still investigating the
source.
Universities may compete for funds
VICTORIA (CUP) — B.C.'s
three universities will go to battle
for extra funding dollars next year
if provincial government appointees
get their way.
Officials from the Universities
Council of B.C., a mediating body
between the government and
universities which doles out
operating grants, wants to create a
pool of money for which universities will have to bid.
The UCBC proposal would force
the universities to give up a small
percentage of their operating grants
for the pool. The amount would
only total $3 to $5 million a year per
university, says UCBC member Lee
Southern.
The successful bidder will likely
be a post-secondary institution with
special projects oriented towards
job training and technology, says
Andy Soules, assistant deputy
universities minister. Soules says the
money' would be earmarked for
those special projects but arts and
humanities studies would not
necessarily be at a disadvantage.
"Universities run in cycles," he
says. "In five or six years, we may
be using the fund to support social
sciences."
Southern says the pool would
provide funding for both new and
existing programmes and enable
universities to gain back some
money they have been losing as a
result of decreases in provincial
operating grants.
"In the last two years, the
government has reduced university
operating grants. The UCBC has
asked the government to arrest that
erosion and maybe increase the
grant.''
Some administrators are already
worried. Says Bob McQueen,
University of Victoria vice-
president of finances: "If we're going into another cut in the budget,
which it looks like we are, I think
we're going to need every dollar we
can get."
The B.C. government has warned
the universities to expect a five per
cent decrease in funding next year.
Wastes dumped
March needs support
The faculty association will only
hold a march from UBC to
downtown if the proposal receives
strong support from faculty and
other UBC groups, the faculty
association president said Monday.
"If other universities, colleges
and students are willing to get involved in a march it could be a very
good project," Elmer Ogryzlo said.
But he said the idea will only be
considered if numerous faculty
show interest. He added: "I think
they (faculty) are anxious to make
some gesture aimed at the provincial government."
The faculty vote in a special
Thursday meeting on whether to
organize a Great Trek in February
with other groups.
"The mood seems to be if we
speak out we will get support,"
Ogryzlo said," but if we do nothing
we will suffer the consequences."
Ogryzlo said secondary and
elementary schools are launching an
effective campaign for public support and "I think people in universities could make an equally good
case for themselves."
But Teaching Assistants Union
president horacio de la cueva said
although he likes the idea of a community march against more cuts, he
doesn't know if it is possible.
"There are people that don't
believe in that kind of action in the
faculty," de la cueva said. "And I
think the teaching assistants are as
diverse in viewpoint as the faculty
on this kind of issue."
He added this does not mean this
action or another one cannot take
place.
By KEVIN ADAMS
Tons of nuclear waste has been
dumped from Rabbit Lake mine into Wallostan Lake in Northern
Saskatchewan since 1975, an anti-
nuclear activist said Thursday.
"The Indians are already finding
the mutated fetuses of moose and
other wildlife," Frannie Ruzinsky
said in a Buch A100 lecture on 'The
Political Ecology of Genocide in
Northern Saskatchewan."
Ruzinsky said the lake's fish and
wildlife provide the Lac La Hache
native band's livelihood, adding the
band fears radioactivity in the water
is destroying their homeland. The
Rabbit Lake mine is across the lake
from native land, she said.
Ruzinsky added the Collins Bay
mining operation six miles north of
Wallostan Lake has drained a small
lake to get at uranium ore beneath
the lake-bottom. "The contamination (at Collins Bay) will come when
they let the water back into the lake
after the ore is dug out," she said.
Ruzinsky, one of a group calling
themselves the "Collins Bay Activists", said the Canadian government gains very little from Saskatchewan's uranium industry.
"Originally the NDP government
sold the mining rights of most of
the richest uranium areas to foreign
interests. Essentially (Canada) no
longer owns much of Northern
Saskatchewan."
A pamphlet distributed by the
group stated most of the province's
uranium   industry   is   owned   by
foreign   companies,   especially   in
See page 2: DUMPING
"There is no way we're going to
sit by and let the AMS clubs and
undergraduate societies get harassed," he said.
University RCMP officials could
not be reached Monday.
Ian Fairclough, graduate studies,
said the UBC Gay/Lesbian club has
been assessed $250 by the RCMP
for two functions last November.
He said the club was only told this
after, the functions were held.
"It's getting taken away from
our office expenses," said
Fairclough, adding the Gay/Lesbian club is now a service organization offering resources as well as
social activities. "All funds we take
in are going back into the organization (to help people)."
The RCMP crackdown on clubs
follows stricter restrictions on liquor in residences this fall, including a ban on Wednesday beer
nights which only Gage Towers
residents managed to win back.
Housing said last fall the RCMP instigated the crackdown and the
RCMP blamed the Liquor Control
Board.
Bovey bomb drops
TORONTO (CUP) — A report
calling for a 50 per cent increase in
tuition fees at Ontario universities
over the next few years has sparked
immediate criticism.
Monika Turner, Ontario Federation of Students chair, said she was
shocked when she heard the long-
awaited recommendations of the
Bovey Commission report, which
also suggested that between 6,000
and 10,000 qualified students not be
accepted into Ontario universities
as a cost saving measure.
"Students are going to be upset
... at this helter-skelter plan of
'let's make the students pay for
everything'."
Turner said the call for a six per
cent drop in enrolment will seriously compromise students' right to an
accessible education, if the decrease
is implemented by university boards
of governors.
"The recommendations mean
6,500 fewer places a year, but where
is the base for this percentage?"
The Bovey Commission, set up
last year to plan the restructuring of
Ontario's universities, said in its 64
page report released Jan. 15 that accessibility must be reduced to ensure the quality of education, instruction and research remains
high.
The report says "certain urgent
needs" must be met through a
"small increase in provincial
government funding, increased tuition fees backed by a contingent
loan repayment plan and federal
and provincial funding of the
overhead costs of research."
Along with province-wide entrance exams in at least English or
French and mathematics, the report
calls on students to pay for 25 per
cent of universities' operating expenses, and the government to setup a $200 million fund to hire
younger faculty members, allow
older ones to retire and reshuffle
university grants to ensure libraries,
research and buildings on campuses
are upgraded.
But the commission did not come
up with a comprehensive plan to
See page 2: REPORT Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 22,1985
Dumping raises risk
From page 1
Japan, the U.S., Britain, France
and Germany. But Canadian
federal and provincial governments
are involved via the Eldorado
Nuclear Ltd. corporation.
The group gave a slide show on
the effects of nuclear waste dumping and then petitioned the audience for support in an upcoming
action this summer. The activists
plan to blockade a vital access road
leading to both the Rabbit Lake and
Collins Bay mines.
Ruzinsky said the group has not
ruled out the chance of more arrests, adding people must weigh the
risk of protest against their sense of
moral obligation to act. UBC's
Anarchist Club can provide more
information on the protest, she
said.
The lecture was the second in a
weekly series organized by the UBC
Anarchist Club, Socialist Education
Society, and the Latin American
Support Committee.
Report recommends autonomy
From page 1
restructure Ontario's university
system, as was called for in its mandate. It recommends that no universities or faculties be closed and that
universities maintain their
autonomy from governments as
well as their undergraduate arts and
science programmes.
According to Bovey, universities
and colleges minister Bette Stephen
son was pleased with the report
when the commissioners presented
her with it in early January.
Though she did not attend the
press conference where the report
was made public, Stephenson said
in a press release that the government will not try to implement the
recommendations for the upcoming
school year.
Make Yourself
At Home
at the
The Deke Fraternity House
5765 Agronomy Road
Live without rush hour.
withm minutes of SUB!
Booms are Nnw AU^Aff F FOR REWT
Ptoaso phone either David Kety or
Erik Madaan at  224-9930 tor data*.
Any Oak*  wil tel you.
The food is fantastic and
waking to claaa
saves money on gas!"
PHONE US TOOoyi
Student
Movement
IPIAZaVZZ!
SHOW ROOM
INTERNATIONAL
PLAZA HOTEL
Comer Marine Drive
and Capilano, N. Vane.
JANUARY 21-FEBRUARY 2
fill
I
TICKETS AVAIL. AT V.T.C./CBO
Dinner/Show Packages Avail.
By Calling
987-0611
Getting an education can
be expensive, but getting
there doesn't have to be*
Give your budget an easy
ride on the bus! Avoid
traffic hassles, looking for
hard-to-find parking spots
and those devastating
surprise car repair bills.
Instead, just "ease on
down the road"-catch up
on some studying, visit
with friends or just relax.
And with FareCard it's
even easier. FareCard is
a convenient monthly bus
pass you can use as often
as you like. Or lend it to
a friend. No more looking
for change-FareCard is
ready to go when you are!
Call it an education in
transportation.
$50 SuperCard
K)H IHAVil IN Ail /GNFS
$40 Suburban
Valid for travel in all
'zones at all times.
Fare -
Card
Valid for travel in all zones at all
'times except in the City of Vancouver
and University Endowment Lands
during peak periods.
$40 Urban
Fare
Card
'(.'...FRAIL i\ VAMTilJVFK   J t L    RILHVO'.D   MiRIM -.tuRF   \[ !i
lH PARFSOI B0RNARV AM.'OFF PEAkFRAUL   '.A:L /'.!'',f?
Valid for peak travel only
in Vancouver, University
Endowment Lands, parts of
Burnaby, New Westminster,
Richmond, North Shore and
off peak travel in all zones.
Valid for peak travel within only
one zone unless additional fare
is paid to cross zone boundary.
Valid for off peak travel in all zones.
*m $34 Local
Fare
Card
VALID FOR PFAKTRAVU WITHIN ONLY ONE ZONE UNI ESS ADDHlONAl FARE IS PAID
AND OFF PEAK 1HAVEI IN ALL ZONES
VANCOUVER REGIONAL TRANSIT SYSTEM
APRIL   APRIL 0123456   APRIL
The bus.
A smart way to get to class.
FOR ZONE BOUNDARY AND MORE FARECARD INFORMATION, PICK UP A BROCHURE FROM ANY
FARECARD OUTLET. AVAILABLE THE LAST 5 AND FIRST 5 WEEKDAYS EACH MONTH FROM:
AMS TICKET OFFICE, MONDAY-FRIDAY 10:00-5:00
Vancouver Regional Transit System
rams
ramsi
CENTRE
BINDING now available
Free for the entire month of
January '85. Still free collating and
stapling.
Self Service Coin-Op 5$
STUDENT UNION BUILDING
228-4388
BCTransit
Super
Valu
3250 West Broadway
at Blenheim
5% DISCOUNT
Off Your Grocery
Order
Ask at the cashiers
for your Student
Discount card.
Student/AMS card I.D. required. Minimum purchase $30.00
Details at Store Tuesday, January 22,1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Fruitful exercise' lacks depth
By ROBBY ROBERTSON and
CHRIS WONG
"A fruitful exercise,"
"enlightening from both point of
view," and "good for them and
good for us." That's how Federal
Multiculturalism Minister Jack
Murta Friday described ongoing informal talks concerning redress for
Japanese-Canadians interned during the Second World War.
But Murta failed to reveal any intention to compensate Japanese-
Canadians through an official
apology or financial support in his
speech at the graduate student centre.
Murta's comments on this important issue were characteristic of his
speech to 70 people expecting to
hear concrete proposals on
multiculturalism from the new Conservative government. While he
raised some interesting points, he
avoided mentioning specific
government policies or funding prospects for the few programs he
alluded to.
"Mainstreaming multiculturalism" was the phrase Murta coined
to describe his prospective program. Mainstreaming has three
components:
• recognizing Canada has a
multicultural society.
• making Canadians aware they
should not condone racial prejudice.
• acknowledging
multiculturalism   is   good   for
business.
"We must view multiculturalism
as part of what it means to be Canadian — an indispensable part of our
personal identity," he said.
"Multiculturalism must cease to be
an oddity, something tolerated. It
must be acknowledged in word and
deed as an integral part of the fabric
of this country."
The first step in achieving a
multicultural society is ethnic
groups asserting their individual
identities, a process Murta claims
has already happened. Mainstreaming, the second step, advocates the
formation of a new unified
multicultural society, he said.
As an initial move towards
mainstreaming, Murta said he requested the Canadian Ethnic
Studies Advisory Committee to
prepare a position paper on current
Analysis
issues in multiculturalism. He also
intends to encourage the Canadian
academic community to place a
heavier emphasis on ethnic studies.
Finally, he said he plans to address
"major opinion-making groups,
national conventions, and business
networks."
While these plans show Murta's
good intentions, his failure to mention concrete proposals for implementing his lofty ideas reflects
two things. Federal policies will be
characterized by restraint, thus
making him reluctant to announce
programs that will later be cut and
it reveals Prime Minister
Mulroney's close control over his
ministers' public statements.
Commenting on affirmative ac-
60 refuse cruise
By JAMES YOUNG
Sixty people rallied at Robson
Square to "Refuse the Cruise"
missile test which took place over
the Northwest Territories, B.C.,
and Alberta on Jan. 15.
Responding to reports in the local
media, peace activists came expecting a major demonstration, but
waited for speakers and events that
were never really scheduled.
"There was a big mix-up
somewhere," said Kevin McKeown,
Greenpeace community relations
coordinator. "A lot of people
thought we were organizing this rally. We thought End the Arms Race
was, and they thought other people
were."
"We were going to come down
with our cruise-catcher and put it
up on display, but we didn't get a
permit from the city in time,"
McKeown said. "We didn't want to
come here, put it half-way up and
then have to take it down, because
it costs $300 for the helium to make
it fly."
The cruise-catcher, a 100 x 25
foot net held up by balloons, failed
to intercept the cruise missile tested
Jan. 15.
"We were using the wrong kind
of balloons up north, but now we
have some which are good to 60
below zero and 28,000 feet. Next
time, we stand a good chance of
catching the cruise," McKeown
said.
Demonstrator Alex MacLeod
said her her main concern was that
problems in verifying the cruise
missile will make future arms control negotiations impossible.
"I feel I'm lucky to have lived to
be nearly 70, but I don't know if my
kids will," MacLeod said.
Another protester was Charles
Boylan, national spokesperson for
the communist Party of Canada,
(Marxist-Leninist). Boylan said
cruise tests are evidence of the
American domination of Canada.
"We consider cruise testing an
act of aggression by the United
States against Canada. We consider
the U.S. to be an aggressive superpower, just like the Soviet Union."
Before the demonstration
dispersed, Boylan organized some
protesters, mainly members of the
People's Front, into a picket line.
The group called out a series of
slogans, including, "No more
cruise testing in Canada."
Strange faces return in
brand new AMS election
Just when you thanked yourself
in your last overcrowded class that
the sea of strange ambitious faces
running for office was over, it's
back reincarnated in the Alma
Mater Society executive elections.
As nominations closed Monday,
16 sweet hopefuls are vying for the
five executive positions, to be voted
on Jan. 30 and 31 and Feb. 1.
The four bumpkins running for
AMS president are David Bulman,
Glenna Chestnutt, Mark Reder,
and Doug Warkentin. For vice
president incumbent Doug Low
faces challengers Doug Dosdall and
Jonathon Mercer.
Dinosaur director of finance
James  Hollis  is  turning  his  well
trimmed beard to "greener"
pastures as three fresh faces, Jamie
Collins, Sylvia Gajdics, and Barry
Mah contest Hollis' finally vacant
post. In the director of administration battle, lonely Simon Seshadri
races against the word no.
And a crowd of five contests the
worldly coordinator of external affairs position. Patrick Doyle, Kathy
Martin, Lonn Myronuk, Duncan
Stewart, and Barbara Waldern are
all in the running.
Watch this motley crew campaign
before your eyes Thursday as they
speak to the rabble during an all-
candidates meeting at noon in
SUB's Conversation Pit.
tion, he said, "I can give you a personal opinion, but in terms of the
government's opinion, I'd be
premature because we haven't
discussed it yet at the cabinet
level."
Given  the  uncertainties of the
federal budget coming this spring,
Murta's repeated refusal to describe
"where we are going" is partly
justified. But a program that aims
to protect ethnicity (which he pronounces "ethinticity") needs to be
more clearly defined with specific
policies to help eliminate racism
and discrimination, and to promote
—james young photo
CHILD PROTESTS CRUISE missile test at Saturday Robson Square
demonstration. Sixty people showed up but Greenpeace's cruise-catcher
didn't.
Pope likes Marx-Baum
By STEPHEN WISENTHAL
The writings of pope John Paul
II show many Marxist influences, a
well known theologian said Friday.
The press has transformed John
Paul into a cheerful old man from
Europe who is sexist but the pope
has changed Catholic teaching in a
significant way, Gregory Baum, a
theology professor from St.
Michael's college in Toronto, told
150 people in Buchanan A102 Friday.
Baum said the pope follows the
line of a country's bishops when
speaking in that country. But John
Paul shows specific opinions in his
own writings, Baum said.
"The pope's sexism must be
understood as a literal application
of a commodity analysis of
society," he said, adding John
Paul's writings condemn the consumer mentality in society for commercializing everything and forcing
us to appreciate ourselves only as
separate individuals.
The pope introduces to Catholic
teaching the concept of alienation
of labor, said Baum, but differs
from Marxist teaching in saying
labor isn't just physically productive but includes management and
others,   he   said.    John   Paul's
THEDINER1
Serving   U. B. C.   and   West  Point   Grey
for the last 25 years.
We put our Sole in your
FISH & CHIPS
English Style Home Cooked Meals
at Reasonable Prices - including
Roast Beef and Yorkshire Pudding
Open Monday to Saturday
8:00 am   to 8:30 p.m.
Closed Sundays It Public Holidays
For the early ones,  we start serving
breakfast from BOO am
4556 W   10th Ave.  - 224-1912
We accept Chargex
writings argue the worker is entitled
to make decisions regarding the
surplus value of his or her labor and
the work process, said Baum.
"He tries to formulate his critiques so that neither side (Communist or Western) can justify what
they do and his writings can't be used as propaganda anywhere,"
Baum said.
The pope defends any type of
ownership, state or private, but says
"only if capital is used to serve
labor is the title just," said Baum,
adding capitalism exists when
capital has priority over labor.
"If in Poland capital doesn't
serve labor, then this is capitalism,"
he said.
Baum said the pope's writings
call for the worker to be seen as
"the subject, not the object, in
labor." The worker assumes the
responsibility that is meant to be his
or hers and isn't seen as a piece of
equipment as in capitalism, he said.
He said although this goes
against the corporatist structure of
the Catholic church but the pope
has not addressed this.
The pope defines human beings
as laborers or beings who must
create the conditions for their own
survival, said Baum, adding this is a
very radical new approach.
mutual understanding with racial
groups within Canada.
It also needs funding. As Murta
aptly said, "We need to put our
money where our mouth is."
Murta's speech was the first in a
UBC lecture series on ethnicity and
the media.
Canadians
you say?
NEW YORK (CUP) — The
American lobby group which gave
start-up money for conservative
newspapers on Canadian college
and university campuses just found
out that Canada exists.
The Institute for Educational Affairs was caught off-guard by the
publicity in the Canadian media of
its funding for the McGill
Magazine, the University of Toronto Magazine, and seven other conservative campus papers, the student relations co-ordinator said.
"Prior to the interest in the
Canadian media, it didn't occur to
us that they were Canadian universities," Jonathan Cohen said.
The institute, founded in 1979 by
two prominent U.S. neo-
conservatives, gave $3,000 to the
McGill Magazine last year, $2,700
to the U of T Magazine this year,
and $2,000 to Francis Willers, a
part-time McGill student, who used
the money to publish seven campus
papers in Ontario and Quebec.
"A university is a university. A
marketplace of ideas," Cohen said.
"It's an environment where a free
and vigorous exchange is meant to
take place."
"We have not made any distinctions between Canadian and U.S.
universities."
Cohen cited the Helsinki accords
in defence of U.S. funding for
Canadian campus papers. "The
Helsinki accords (signed by both
countries) guaranteed a free exchange of ideas," he said. "Universities are supposed to be free of
geopolitical tensions."
He said the IEA would fund
more Canadian conservative
newspapers "if it's a worthwhile
project."
Cohen denied the IEA funded
Willers' seven "clone" papers,
which appeared at Queen's University in Kingston, Bishop's University in Lennoxville, York and Ryer-
son in Toronto, and_ Carleton,
University of Ottawa and Algonquin College in Ottawa.
The papers, however, are virtually identical and Ryerson journalism
school director Don Obe told Canadian Press: "It's a fair bet they're
getting funding from the same
source."
The IEA has given start-up or
operating grants to conservative
student newspapers on 69 U.S. college campuses. But Cohen said:
"Right-wing papers have been
denied traditional sources of funding.
The newspapers are pro-life, pro-
American, pro-family, anti-gay,
and have described feminists as
"low on the pulcritude index."
Cohen said the Canadian
newspapers were "pro-American by
co-incidence. They're concerned
about the communist threat."
»
r * TRAVEL CUTS Going Your Way!
** PLANNING A TRIP TO EUROPE?
SAVE DOLLARS ON OUR LOW COST FARES TO
LONDON • PARIS • AMSTERDAM
Departures from: Halifax, Montreal, Ottawa, Toronto,
Winnipeg, Saskatoon, Calgary, Edmonton and Vancouver.
INQUIRE about our SPECIAL STUDENT FARES to
points worldwide.
TRAVEL CUTS VANCOUVER TRAVEL CUTS VANCOUVER
<
Student Union Building
University of British Columbia
Vancouver B C  V6T 1W5 Call loll free
604 224-2344 i-800-972-4004
Granville Island
1516 Duranleau St
Vancouver B C  V6H 3S4
604 687-6033 Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 22, 1985
Not again
Again. While Gage Towers residents savor Wednesday beer night's
return and dwellers in two other residences lament their continued restrictions, the RCMP is at it again.
The crusade to keep the university dry is reaching new heights. The
RCMP, apparently under orders from the provincial Liquor Control Board,
tightens its sober grip on student clubs and undergraduate societies.
The RCMP are telling clubs who hold alcoholic events the proceeds must
go to. . .get this. . .an off-campus charity. Just to make sure there is absolutely no self interest involved, of course. Don't dare follow an example
set by the law students; they brashly decided to raise money for university
scholarships — student aid. This does not constitute an acceptable charity,
say the RCMP.
If Alma Mater Society lawyers are correct, however, the RCMP and the
liquor board are stretching the law past its limits to curtail club socials. This
is being done at UBC and perhaps nowhere else in this province.
The Liquor Act says proceeds must go to charity only if the event's main
purpose is to raise money. This is hardly the main purpose of most club
events.
University if nothing else offers a setting for exchanging ideas. Students
don't join clubs and attend events just to make money. Nor are they all just
out to get drunk.
We're being treated like children.
We're being harassed by the RCMP and the Liquor Control Board.
Breaking barriers
Breaking barriers.
In reality, the theme of exceptional persons week does not apply
to the exceptional people
themselves. It does not apply to
wheelchair athlete Rick Hansen
who, because of his success, is
world famous. It does not apply to
swimmer Gary Simpson who,
despite his partially amputated leg,
is still one of the best swimmers on
the UBC team.
It applies to us, the able-bodied
people who regard handicapped
people with a negative attitude
created, perhaps, by our own anxiety.
Just as we have come to accept
the existence of diverse races,
creeds, and religions, we must
come to accept people who overcome mental strains which we have
never encountered, let alone anticipated.
This week is exceptional persons
week, presented by a group of
students who have achieved national acclaim. The special education students do an exceptional job
assisting and promoting the
endeavours of the handicapped.
However, one must wonder,
who really needs this "special
education" the most?
Aggies masters with manure, and more
By NANCY CAMPBELL
Aggie week starts next Monday,
and maybe it's time to tell all you
innocent readers what we're really
like so you won't be scared to join
us in our revelry. (Big word huh?
Well, us aggies can talk good
too . . .)
Yes, I know most people think all
we're capable of doing is throw
manure around and be crude, but
even at that we are masters. For example, when it's time for the
Chariot Race, our education lets us
know the important nuances of
shit: the engineers thus receive the
nice, dry, relatively inoffensive cow
pies to hurl at our team while we
keep the deadly porcine pooh pooh
for ourselves.
But seriously, there's a lot more
to us. Although many of us hope to
get involved in farming one way or
another, most students come from
Letters
Deficit threatens AMS Programs
Because of an uncontrolled rising
deficit in Alma Mater Society Concerts/Programs it may become nec-
cessary to reduce budget allocations
to all other AMS-funded areas.
This is a serious situation which
warrants the concern of every student who is associated with a club
or undergrad society, uses any of
the AMS' service organizations,
reads the Ubyssey or listens to
CITR.
Concerts/Programs has consistently had difficulties with remaining within their budget allocation. In the past two years alone
Concerts/Programs has overspent
by $36,000, accumulating a total
deficit of approximately $90,000 (83
and 84 fiscal years). So far this year
concerts productions is an incredible $18,000 over budget. How can
such numbers go unchecked?
when the AMS Budget was
presented for this year several
recommendations concerning Concerts/Programs were made.
Recognizing that overspending in
this area could reduce the available
funds for other groups and activities, it was reccommended that
Concerts/Programs be suspended
as of Dec. 31, 1984 if it was obvious
that they were unable to remain
within their generous $28,600
budget.
At the last meeting of students'
council reported there indeed was a
severe deficit and motioned to hold
the line for this year by suspending
Concerts/Programs operations.
Council instead appointed a committee which will be proposing to
maintain Concerts/Programs at a
further deficit and to the immediate
detriment to all other areas.
The AMS will be unable to provide these additional funds without
cutting operating grants to CITR,
The Ubyssey, SAC Speakeasy, Om-
budsoffice, Womens' Centre, etc.
This seems to be an unreasonable
solution and too high a price to pay
to remain in the concerts business. I
welcome any input concerning this
unfortunate situation.
James Hollis
AMS director of finance
an urban background. Farming requires a lot of enthusiasm (how
would you like to wake up at four in
the morning for the rest of your
life?) so it's only natural some of it
should spill over into extracurricular activities. We may not be
the best in intramural sports
leagues, but we are reknowned for
our unusual way of play and our
sportsmanship.
Agricultural sciences also have
their intellectual side. We are one of
three faculties participating in the
Co-operative Education Internship
program; this past summer, two out
of the top three reports were written
by aggies.
Many people think of aggies as
animals, but that's not strictly true.
In addition to the animal scientists,
veterinary medicine and still others
into government. B.Sc. (Agr.)
degrees are often used as stepping
stones to degrees in medicine, law,
social work and business administration.
So don't stereotype us, and we
won't do the same to you. What we
would like you to do is join in the
fun we're planning for next week
and escape those "back-to-school"
blues.
Tuesday: Boat races, featuring
the yeasty cocktail itself. Join us at
noon outside SUB to test your skill
and stomach lining against the pros.
Wednesday: If you like to eat
fish, pie, or even fish pie, be at SUB
at noon to join in. Please do not eat
anything larger than your head.
Thursday: Are you fit and fettle?
THE UBYSSEY
January 22, 1985
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Fridays throughout the academic year by
the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are
those of the staff and are not necessarily those of the university administration or the
AMS. Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is SUB
241k. Editorial department, 228-2301/2305. Advertising 228-3977/3978.
It was a calm, misty night in east London. "I do believe that we'll find what we're looking for in here", said Robby Robertson. "Quite the contrary", said Patti
Flather, "we must go to Derbyshire". "Poppycockl", blurted Rory Allen, Steve Neufeld and Steve Wisenthal, becoming silent in an instant. The group slipped
quietly into the pub where their target was said to be located. "Haven't laid my eyes on him", said bartender Chris Wong in his usual cockney tone. Sarah Millin
immediately got up and left when she learned that the group was after a male. "I found himl" shouted Yaku and Kevin Adams as they bustled into the bar. "He's
not here", said Monte Stewart when the grup reached the hotel. "He left half an hour ago", Robert Beynon responded ruefully. Two hours later, the mob found
the remains of James Young and others heaped in Denise Courts' bathroom. Hui Lee remembered a clue. But it proved meaningless when the author of this story
disappeared.
there are departments focusing on
plant science, soil science, food
science, agricultural economics,
agro-mechanics, bio-resource
engineering, poultry science and
range management. Basically we're
all concerned with what you eat-it's
quality, quantity, cost and optimization.
It's agriculturalists who will help
solve the world's biggest problem:
hunger. It doesn't take the tragedy
of Ethiopia to make people realize
that without food, the other aspects
of life tend to pale into insignificance. But we in agriculture
also recognize that our studies must
also encompass an appreciation for
these "finer things", like
philosophy and anthropology, and
you will find aggies in the most
unexpected of classrooms.
The varied nature of our faculty
means we have very different opportunities upon graduation. Some
of us go into banking, others into
Find out on the great obstacle
course and Bale Throw. See us in
action round the side of SUB at
noon.
Friday: The day of the great race
dawns at last: eight beers in eight
blocks (MacMillan to Sedgewick).
For the masochistically inclined,
pre-register by dropping into the
Aggie Lounge, in the basement of
MacMillan.
Saturday: Finally, the day all
have awaited, the frantic fabulous
Farmers Frolic dance. Get your
friends, family and res floor
together and come on down to the
finest dance this year. Music starts
at 7-ish in the Armoury.
So, now that you know what
we're all about, take the time to
check us out. See you during Aggie
Week, January 21-25.	
Nancy Campbell is a fourth year
aggie and once used to write for the
Ubyssey until she decided to shovel
manure instead of print it. Tuesday, January 22, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
J«iMPiS»,U«Wl
Letters
Cyanide pills misunderstood
For what I hope is the last time, I
wish to correct Barb Waldern's
deliberate misrepresentation of the
position of UBC Students for Peace
and Mutual Disarmament on the
cyanide pill referendum. ("Student
rejected 'vile' cyanide pill plan,"
Jan. 18).
As SPMD has made clear at every
opportunity, in the Ubyssey, in the
provincial and national media, and
at our weekly speaker and film
meetings, the object of the petition
was not to get cyanide pills stocked
at UBC for use in the event of a
nuclear war. To continue to imply
that it was, is a cynical and indefensible distortion of the facts.
Anyone who takes the trouble to
check will find that the petition,
and the SPMD campaign, were
targeted only at obtaining a UBC
referendum on the proposal, with
no support from SPMD for either a
'yes' vote or a 'no' vote.
(Naturally, as a club whose activities are focused on positive
steps   towards   arms   control   and
Willaim (,. Black
MEMORIAL PRIZE
William . Black Memorial Prize — a prize
in the amount of $1,250 has been made
available by the late Dr. William G. Black
for an essay on some aspect of Canadian
citizenship. The topic will be designed to
attract students from all disciplines. The
competition is open to all students who
are enrolled in undergraduate programs
and who do not already posses a graduate
degree. A single essay topic of general
nature related to Canadian citizenship will
be presenled to students at the time of the
competition. Duration of the competition
will be two hours.
lime and Place:
SATURDAY, JANUARY 26. 1985
BUCHANAN 104
<>:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m.
IN A HURRY?
See us for fast
high quality copies
kinko's copies
15706 University Blvd
Vancouver, B.C
V6T1K6
JITTERS
Classic and modern
hair cutting for
men and women
Cut, Wash, Blowdry
$15
With Luigi Only
561 W. Broadway
876-7125
diarmament, our members would
probably be unanimous in voting
'no'. Similar campaigns across
Canada and the United States have
taken the umbrella name, 'Students
Against Nuclear Suicide', which
aptly sums up the SPMD position.)
Waldern is proud of the fact that
600 students signed an 'anti-cyanide
pill petition'. This seems ironic,
since one object of the SPMD campaign was to give every one of the
25,000 students at UBC a chance to
cast a 'no' vote on the cyanide pill
proposal. In what way 600
represents an improvement on
25,000 is beyond me.
-m - '»".»*.*
Letters. We love 'em. We get a
kick out of funny letters, insightful
letters, stupid ones too. Please type
them triple space on a 70-space line
and address them to "Dearest editorial collective." We edit for brevity and style only. No sexist or racist
letters, please. Bring them to SUB
241K today.
I believe that the People's Front,
which (anonymously) initiated the
'anti-cyanide pill' petition, is
sincere in its anti-war, pro-peace
stance.
However, an organization which
refused to listen to the SPMD explanation of the point of the petition for a referendum, opposed the
Canadian Conference on Nuclear
War at UBC, and distributed a
leaflet attacking Dr. Helen
Caldicott at her talk in the War
Memorial gym last November, has a
curious set of priorities. 'Self-
serving' is the word which comes to
mind.
Anyone wishing to check out the
SPMD position for themselves, and
to pick up a schedule of all our
events this term, is welcome to drop
by SUB 230B any weekday lunch
hour. Events are usually Friday
noons in SUB 205. Come and get
involved!
Mark Fettes
grad studies
Shakespeare's
TWELFTH NIGHT
A glorious comedy directed by Larry Lillo
Mon.-Fri. at 8:30; Sat. at 6:00 & 9:30; Wed. at 5:00 p.m.
ARTS CLUB THEATRE GRANVILLE ISLAND
A Repertory Program
Banned   in   Brazil   —   a Canadian Premiere
study of power — how it 3 one-acts about modern-
corrupts; how it seduces. man by celebrated British
playwright Harold Pinter
PINTER
PLACES
Tues., Thurs., Fri. at 8:30
Wed. at 5:30 (2 for 1)
Sat. 2:30 (!/2 price) & 6:30
Sun at 3:30 (Vi price)
jfasr
Mon. & Wed. at 8:30
Tues. & Thurs. 5:30
(2 for 1)
Sat. at 9:30, Sun. at 7:30
Prices from as low as $3.50
5:30 show 2 for 1
2:30 & 3:30 PINTER Vi Price
ARTS CLUB THEATRE SEYMOUR STREET
Arts Club Box Office 687-1644
PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM
IN CHILD CARE
SCHOOL OF CHILD CARE
. . . offers a B.A. in Child Care which includes academic
study and field work practice
. . . prepares students to work as practitioners with
children, adolescents and families with special needs,
i.e., social/emotional problems, mental handicaps, and
delinquent behaviour
. . . deadline for applications is MARCH 31
Apply to
Admission Services,
University of Victoria,
P.O. Box 1700,
Victoria, B.C. V8W 2Y2
\   VIDEOmALLEV! \
* ... Means Movies -
-VHS
The Largest Video
library serving Vancouver's
Westside. Over 4,000
movies in stock   m
Vancouver's Stereo Hi-Fi Video Center
r *n^z
YOUR A.M.S. CARD IS WORTH
$25.00*
at
VIDEOmALLEV
'Club membership
Privileges
Rent a VCR & 2 movies
for Only $9.50 (Mon. Thurs. 24 hrs.)
Weekends slightly higher
T.V. rentals available
GAMES AND TV RENTALS
AVAILABLE
Rent A Compact Disc Machine and *4 Discs
for only $15.00
(Mon.-Thurs 24 hrs.—Weekends Slightly Higher)
*3 Disks only $5.00
COMPACT DISK SALES & RENTALS 41st AVE. STORE ONLY
3660 W. 4181 Ave. and Dunbar
(across from Safeway)
266-6276
4666 Arbutus St.
(across from Greek church)
266-3306
"f*^?!
ATTENTION
GRADUATING STUDENTS
ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING
OF THE
GRADUATING CLASS
Thursday, January 31, 1985
12:30 p.m.
HEBB THEATRE
Agenda:
1. Choosing the 1985 gift of the graduating class.
2. Explanation of graduation ceremonies.
All Graduating Students are
URGED TO ATTEND!!
REBATE
A $4.00 per graduating student rebate is available
from your grad council for a class composite
photograph, dinner, or other valid use. This rebate
is available to all Undergraduate Societies or
Departmental Associations.
Further information and application forms are
available in the AMS Business Office after January
21, 1985. Applications will be accepted in SUB Box
128 until February 28, 1985.
Grad Class Council
applications for
GRAD GIFT
are being accepted now
Please Include:
-Amount of money requested.
— Name of group requesting funds.
— Who will benefit from the project.
— Budget.
— Source of other funds.
— Description of project.
-Deadline to be January 25th, 1985.
— Name of contact person.
 Submit Applications to SUB Rm. 238 Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 22,1985
*^W<^&^
TODAY
UBC SPORTS CAR CLUB
Executive meeting, noon, SUB 216.
DANCE HORIZONS
Rehearsal with Renald Rabu, 6:30-8:30 p.m.,
SUB 212.
INTRAMURALS
Registration for Broomball Night, 9 a.m.-3 p.m..
War Memorial gym.
EAST INDIAN STUDENT'S ASSOCIATION
General meeting, noon, BUCH B225.
INTRAMURALS
Drop-in  badminton,  every Tuesday,  6:30-9:X
p.m., Osborne gyms A and B.
PRE MEDICAL SOCIETY
Lecture on neonatology, speaker Dr. Pendray,
noon. Wood 1.
JEWISH STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
AND HILLEL
Hebrew   newspaper   reading,   sandwiches
available, noon, Hillel House.
WEDNESDAY
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Time out, newcomers meet in SUB 237A, 4:30
p.m., Gallery Lounge.
ENGLISH 100
Lecture,  Dr.  Danielson on  Hamlet,  everybody
welcome, noon, BUCH A100.
VARSITY OUTDOORS
General meeting, speaker and slide show on
Meares Island, noon, Chem 150.
ALMA MATER SOCIETY AND ALUMNI
ASSOCIATION
"Briefing for the Real World", seminars, 11:30
a.m., 12:30 p.m.. 1:30 p.m., SUB 211, 213, 215.
UBC SPORTS CAR CLUB
Two speakers from Lower Mainland rally club, 7
p.m., SUB 211.
DANCE HORIZONS
Rehearsal clinic with Keith Ditto, 1:30-4:Xp.m.,
SUB 125.
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL UBC
Speaker: Prof. Czaykowsky, topic: human rights
in eastern bloc countries, noon, SUB 212.
FIRST YEAR STUDENTS COMMITTEE
Meeting, noon, SUB 212A.
EAST INDIAN STUDENT'S ASSOCIATION
Rehearsal for play, 6:30 p.m.. Computer Science
Lounge.
THUNDERBIRD BASKETBALL
Exhibition match vs. B.C. Olympics, 8 p.m.. War
Memorial gym.
AGRICULTURE UNDERGRADUATE
SOCIETY
Disgusting   and   legendary   races   featuring
goldfish swallowing and pie eating, noon, SUB
Plaza.
JEWISH STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
AND HILLEL
Torah portion of the week, noon, Hillel House.
AGRICULTURE UNDERGRADUATE
SOCIETY
Meet the prof night, bribe them with drinks even,
7 p.m., graduate student centre.
JEWISH STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
AND HILLEL
Lasegna lunch, noon, Hillel House.
THURSDAY
UBC ANARCHIST CLUB
Film, Death of a legend, threatened status of the
world, with Project Wolf spokesperson, noon,
BUCH A100.
JEWISH STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
ANO HILLEL
Information   meeting   with   Hebrew   university
representative Tara Morris, noon, Hillel House.
CUSO-UBC
Lecture on the environment, 7:30 p.m.. International House, upper lounge.
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
Weekly prime time meeting, noon Brock hall
302.
AMS ART GALLERY
UBC photo society show,  10 a.m.-4 p.m., Art
Gallery, SUB.
CREATIVE WRITING DEPT.
Poetry reading, by Walter Perrie, 7 p.m.. Recital
Hall, Music building.
ALMA MATER SOCIETY
AND ALUMNI SOCIETY
"Briefing for the Real World" seminars, register
in SUB 266,  11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.,  SUB 211,
213, 215.
ENVIRONMENTAL INTEREST GROUP
Meeting,   speaker   Dr.   Thompson   on   water
policy, noon. Geography building 212.
DANCE HORIZONS
Rehearsal with Savannah Walling, 5-6:30 p.m.,
SUB partyroom.
CHINESE CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Talk   on   relationship   with   god,   everyone   is
welcome, noon.
NEWMAN CLUB
Discussion, noon, St. Mark's music room.
UBC MARXIST-LENINISTS
Open forum:  what we must do to arrest the
danger of world war, noon, BUCH B216.
INTRAMURALS
Drop-in   volleyball,   7:30-9:30   p.m.,   Osborne
gyms A and B.
UBC CYCLING CLUB
General meeting to plan this term's activities,
noon, Hennings 302.
INTRAMURALS
Grouse Mountain ski challenge, all day, dinner
and dance, 7 p.m. to midnight. Grouse Mountain
ski resort.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Conversation meeting,  1:30 p.m.. International
House.
INTRAMURALS
Reminder that co-rec volleyball league begins,
9:30 p.m., War Memorial gym.
EAST INDIAN STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
General  meeting,   club pictures,   noon,   BUCH
B225.
AGRICULTURAL UNDERGRADUATE
SOCIETY
Obstacle course and bale throw challenge, noon,
SUB, cud club, time unspecified, the Pit.
FRIDAY
UBC STAMP CLUB
Organizational    meeting,    noon.    International
House board room.
ALMA MATER SOCIETY AND
ALUMNI ASSOCIATION
Seminars, 11:30-1:30 p.m., SUB 211, 213, 215.
INTRAMURALS
Registration for broomball night closes, 3 p.m..
War Memorial gym 203.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Conversation    meeting,    noon,    International
House.
EAST INDIAN STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Bowling tournament, 6 p.m., games room SUB.
INTRAMURALS
West-east mall road run, 3 km-4, 5 km, noon,
SUB Concourse race centre.
UBC STUDENTS FOR PEACE AND
MUTUAL DISARMAMENT
Film, USA/Russia: Who's ahead?, noon, SUB
206.
THUNDERBIRD GYMNASTICS
Men host Universities of Victoria, Washington,
Alberta,  6 p.m.,  Osborne centre,  Gymnastics
gym.
THUNDERBIRD HOCKEY
Canada  west  match  vs  Calgary,   7:30  p.m.,
Thunderbird arena.
AGRICULTURE UNDERGRADUATE
SOCIETY
Race: 8 beers in 8 blocks with minor events in
between, sign up in Aggie lounge, starting line
outside MacMillan, noon.
THUNDERBIRD VOLLEYBALL
Tournament  featuring  collegiate teams,   mens
and women's, all day, War Memorial gym.
Get in on the action of Exceptional Persons' Week. Be a PEP,
Persons for Exceptional People.
Wednesday: Leslie Jones speaks
on Laurel House, a centre for
children with severe communication disorders at 11:30 a.m. in
Scarfe 100; Kinds on the Block puppet show will appear at noon in the
SUB auditorium; and simulations of
being handicapped will happen for
anyone interested from 11:30 a.m. -
1:30 p.m. in the SUB foyer.
Thursday: Richard Earle speaks
on Hero's Restaurant, a work experience program for disabled
adolescents, in Home Ec 30 at 11:30
a.m.; Joan Mitchell speaks on Berwick center for special needs
preschoolers at 2:30 p.m. in Buch
D238; Jerre Partridge speaks on
Berwick center's water ways program at 2:45 p.m. in Scarfe 1020;
And Valeria Masey speaks on the
Vancouver Association for Children
and Adults with Learning
Disabilities at 4:30 p.m. in Scarfe
1004; Simulation of being handicapped will happen for anyone interested from 11:30 a.m. - 1:30
p.m. in the new psychology
building and SUB's foyer.
>>
r^ TRAVEL CUTS Going Your Way! r*
LEARN A LANGUAGE...
 LIVE A LANGUAGE...
With Eurocentres...
learn...
FRENCH in Paris, Lausanne,
Neuchatel and Amboise
GERMAN in Cologne and Zurich
SPANISH in Barcelona and Madrid
ITALIAN in Florence
TRAVEL CUTS VANCOUVER
Courses offered at all levels throughout the year
For a free brochure complete and mail this appli
cation form to your TRAVEL CUTS office.
Name:    _
Address:
«
Student Union Building
University of British Columbia
Vancouver BC  V6T 1W5
604 224-2344
TRAVEL CUTS VANCOUVER
Granville Island
1516 Duranleau St
Call loll free Vancouver B.C. V6H 3S4
1-800-972-4004 604 687-6033
TUDIO
oto
Free Graduation Photo Session
This is your invitation to have a guest sitting and see a complete
selection of colour previews without cost or obligation. This offer
is valid to all 1985 UBC graduating students Phone now for an appointment, 736-7281 or 731-1412.
2111 West 16th Ave., Van., B.C.
TUDIO j
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
TOO MUCH FEASTING"?
SUBWAY CAFETERIA
will help you keep your
diet resolutions.
Try a selection from our
"Steamed Vegetable Bar"
Try vegetables with
fresh lemon juice
(For the serious dieter)
For the not so serious, we have a choice of special sauces to pour over your
vegetables.
For a tasty light lunch we suggest a hot or cold filled croissant served with
fruit or crispy salad.
Come in and experience our new menu items
"Vive la Difference"
Seftit*.
Agriculture Undergraduate Society's
Farmer's Frolic
with
The Pierce Bros. Band
Saturday, January 26, 8 p.m.
Armouries AMS Box Office
Tickets $5.00 Aggie U.S. Office
Door
THIS WEEK AT HILLEL
Tues., Jan. 22
"Over Coffee" —News from Israel in Hebrew—12:30
Sandwich Bar Open
Wed.  Jan. 23
Torah'Portion of the Week-11:30-12:20
Lasagna Lunch —12:30
"How many Zionist does it take to replace a light bulb?
Four—one to stay home and convince someone else to
do it, a second to donate the bulb, a third to screw it in,
and a fourth to proclaim that the entire Jewish people
stand behind their actions"
Thurs., Jan. 24
12:30—Tara Morris, Hebrew University Representative from
Toronto, will be speaking about programs at the Hebrew
University. She will be available for individual consultation
this week. For further information, phone Hillel at 224-4748.
Lunch available.
r-THE CLASSIFIEDS*
RATES: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines, 1 day $2.50: additional
lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $4.50 additional lines. .70c. Additional days, $4.00 and .65c.
Classified ads are payable in advance   Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the
day before publication.
Publications Room 26% SUB., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T 2A5
Charge Phone Orders over $10.00. Call 228-3977.
COMING EVENTS
WOMENS' RUGBY. Local team needs new
players. No experience required. Social
team sport. Call 733-3877.
11 - FOR SALE - Private
DOUBLE BOX SPRING and mattress,
Sealy Posturpedic Signature. New $900. 3
yrs. old, excellent cond. $200 O.B.O. Days
228-3977, Eves. 874-9581.
CALIFORNIA STYLE rolled arms sofa-bed,
brown print, new $800, $150 O.B.O. Days
228-3977, Eves. 874-9581.
NAKAMICHI TRI TRACER 700 3 head,
professional cassette tape deck. Tested
20-20, khz ± 2 db. Pristine condition. New
$1200. Now $500 O.B.O. 874-9581 eves.
19S2 RENAULT R5. gold, 25,000 km.,
sunroof, superb condition. $4700. Elvira,
222-1785.
HLLENI HAPPY BIRTHDAY. We love U
even with cheese on your face. Hey, we are
goofs too. The Kulture Klub.
85 - TYPING
20 - HOUSING
db
GORGEOUS 2-bdrm. apt to share. Kits
Beach. Sunny, 2nd Fir. Bus stop in front. I
am a female 4th yr. stud, looking for rm-
mate. Preferrable light or non-smoker. Easy
going, $250-$275/mo. negot. Avail anytime
Feb.-Mar. Please phone 731-5939 before
noon &■ around 6 p.m.
ROOMS FOR RENT shared accomodation,
$150 per month on campus. Phone Brian,
224-9119.
ROOMMATE WANTEDI Blenheim & 5th,
$275 plus util. Need bdrm. furn. Share with
3 others. Feb. 1st. Ph. 732-5730.
25 - INSTRUCTION
LSAT, GMAT, MCAT preparation. Call
National Testing 738-4618. Please leave
message on tape if manager is counselling.
Let Us Prepare You For The
March 2, 1986 LSAT
on Feb. 1. 2, 3/1985
For information call free
LSAT/GMAT
PREPARATION COURSES
112-800-387-3742
ITOUR WORDS PROFESSIONALLY
TYPED - TO GO. Judith Filtness, 3206
W. 38th Ave., Van. 263-0351 (24 hrs.l. Fast
and reliable.
TYPING — Fast accurate, reasonable rates.
734-8451.
DOTS WORD PROCESSING offers reasonable rates for students for term papers,
essays & masters. 273-6008 eves.
UNIVERSITY TYPING-Word processing.
Papers, theses, resumes, letters. P-U &del.
9 a.m.-11 p.m. 7 days/wk. 251-2064.
WORD PROCESSING (MICOM). Student
rates $14/hr. Equation typing avail. Fast
professional service. Jeeva, 876-5333.
PDQ WORD PROCESSING. Essays,
theses, reports, letters, resumes. Days,
evgs/wknds. Quick turnaround, student
rates. 731-1252.
WORDPOWER — Editing & word processing professionals. Theses, term paper,
resume & form letter specialists. Student
rates. 3737 W. 10th (at Alma). 222-2661.
WORD    PROCESSING    SPECIALIST.    U
write,  we type,  theses,  resumes,  letters,
essays. Days, evgs/wkends. 736-1208.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING. 25 yrs. experience. Reasonable, accurate, fast. Phone
Richmond 271-6755.
EXPERT TYPING. Essays, term papers,
factums, letters, mscpts., resumes, theses.
IBM Selec. II. Reas. rates. Rose 731-9857.
WORD PROCESSING/TYPING. Student
rates. Ideal for studetns on North Shore.
Days, eves., weekends. 985-8890.
RESUMES
There are resumes and there are resumes.
Employers find the ones we design and prepare
to be among the best. Why spend valuable time
readina all the "How To . . ." books. Bring us
your basic information and we will design a
resume for you that will catch the attention of
your potential employer. Call today for an appointment.
WORDPOWER-222-2661
U) - MESSAGES
90 - WANTED
CONGRATULATIONS to the newest actives
of KAPPA SIGMA from the chapter.
FRENCH CONVERSATION practice wanted
by first year student. Looking for same? Call
222-1158. Tuesday, January 22,1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
UBC swimmers drown SFU Clan
By HUI LEE
UBC's Swimbirds had a busy but
eventful weekend, travelling to the
University of Washington for a
dual meet Friday and returning to
duel both Simon Fraser University
Outstanding individual performers were Anne Martin, who
won the 50 yd. Freestyle in a record
24.74; Geof Donelly who came in
first in the 500 yd freestyle and second in the 200 Individual Medley;
SPORTS
and   University   of  Puget  Sound
Saturday.
The T-birds as usual lost to the
Washington Huskies, with both
men's and women's teams losing
62-32.
and Dave Young, winner in the
1000 yd Freestyle and runner-up in
the 200 yd Butterfly.
Saturday, UBC met SFU in a
double dual-meet with UPS.
This was the last dual meet for
the Clansmen because, despite
possessing a proud history and successful varsity teams, the swimming
team was cut from the athletic
budget because of its relatively
"low exposure" and its relatively
large budget.
There was much empathy and
sympathy during the meet from all
the teams involved at the meet,
especially from the T-birds. Not only had a friendly UBC-SFU rivalry
developed over the years but similar
cuts have been, and are, threatened
to be made at UBC.
The Clansmen were unable to
"go out in a bang", losing in the
women's division to UBC by a final
score of 59-36 and in the men's
competition 84-5. UBC women also
beat the UPS women 79-16, while
the men were narrowly beaten 49-46
by UPS.
The women's competition was
dominated by UBC from the beginning, with the nationally number
one ranked 400m Medley Relay
team of Barb McBain, Brenda
Jones, Ronda Thomasson and
Anne Martin winning handily.
Other T-Bird winners were Jill
Christensen in the 800m and 400m
Freestyles, Ronda Thomasson in
the 200 Individual Medley, Fiona
Waddell in the 200m Butterfly,
Barb McBain in the 200m
Backstroke and Jennifer Good in
the 200m Breastroke.
SFU competition in the men's
division was non-existent, but UBC
and UPS were very close in points,
although UBC came second.
Double winners for the Thunderbirds were Chris Bowie in the 800m
and 400m Freestyle and Geoff
Donelly in the 200m Individual
Medley and 200m Backstroke. The
winning 400m Freestyle relay consisted of Donelly, Craig McCord,
Duffy Cutler and Kevin Stapleton.
The UBC women's team finished
the dual meet season at 7-1, while
the men had a respectable 4-4
record. Next on the agenda is the
Canada West Universities Athletics
Association Championships at
Calgary on Feb. 14-16, where
qualifications for the Canadian In-
teruniversity Athletic Union championships have to be made.
Skiers decisive
The UBC ski team slid its way to
more decisive victories last
weekend, moving closer to another-
National Collegiate Ski Association
title.
UBC captured first place in both
the men's and women's divisions at
a Northwest Collegiate Ski Conference meet at White Pass,
Washington.
Stu Gairns recorded his third
consecutive skimeister award as the
men's overall individual winner.
Sally Willis became the first UBC
woman to win a skimeister award
this year.
Gairns won the slalom with times
of 38.15 and 36.23 seconds while
Ken Stevens and Tom Stewart were
third and fourth respectively. Two
other 'Birds, Brent Wovat (ninth)
and Andy Rusynyk finished in the
top 15.
Wendy Morrison triumphed in
the women's slalom while Willis
placed six. Linda Cook and Susan
Hagen finished ninth and fifteenth
respectively.
Gairns also prevailed in the giant
slalom, followed by Stevens in se
cond and Wovat in fourth.
In the women's giant slalom
event, Carolyn Johnson gave the
T-Birds their first win of the season.
Willis was third.
The competition marked the
third straight weekend in which the
Thunderbirds have won the men's
alpine. Meanwhile, the women,
with their second place finish, placed in the top three for the third consecutive week.
Hockey drops
The hockey Thunderbirds fell to
third place last weekend, losing a
pair of games to Saskatchewan
Huskies in Saskatoon. Friday the
Huskies doubled UBC 8-4 and then
shut out the 'Birds 4-0 Saturday
night. The T-Birds now have an 8-8
record with eight games left in the
season.
Only the top two teams qualify
for the playoffs.
This weekend, the 'Birds host
Calgary Dinosaurs at Thunderbird
arena. CITR will broadcast Friday's
game live beginning a 7:15 p.m.
— rory a. photo
GREAT LEAPS are in store for men's and women's gymnastics teams this weekend. Men meet UVic, Alberta,
and Washington at Osborne Centre Friday night, starting at 6:00. Women are in Spokane Saturday.
Thunderbirds start Canada West season with split
By MONTE STEWART
One second.
It makes a difference, as shown
by the men's basketball team's 1-1
record in conference play.
Last Saturday, the 'Birds downed
Alberta Golden Bears 79-69 in a
Canada West Universities Athletic
Union contest at War Memorial
gym. The victory atoned for a last
second 66-65 loss to the Saskatchewan Huskies Friday.
The T-Birds took advantage of
Alberta's ineffective full court press
Saturday. The UBC fast break
repeatedly trapped two or more
Bears upcourt.
Defensively, the 'Birds kept
Alberta in check by blanking 6'9"
centre Gord Klootwyk (during the
few minutes that he was on the
court) and by reducing leading
scorer Mike Suderman's output to
only 14 points.
Fifth year guard Pat West paced
UBC with 21  points.  Dale Olson
was the next highest Thunderbird
with 20 points while dominating on
the boards with a total of 14 rebounds.
Gerry Couzens led Alberta with
20 points while Mike Kornac evened
Suderman's output of 14.
"It makes things easier starting
the season at home", said UBC
head coach Bill Edwards in
reference to the fact that the
T-Birds were all but out of the playoffs, before their home opener last
season.
Inconsistent 'Birds win
By DENISE COUTTS
Inconsistency both between and
within games is the trademark of
this year's UBC women's basketball
team.
Two weekends ago, UBC played
a standout game almost defeating
the highly ranked Lethbridge Pronghorns and losing by a mere point.
And last weekend, the Thunderbirds battled their way to'their first
Canada West victory.
Friday UBC defeated the University of Saskatchewan Huskiettes
57-55 in a high energy, aggressive
game at War Memorial gym. Both
teams lacked finesse and were
equally guilty of playing uncontrolled, undisciplined basketball.
After a poor first half, UBC trailed Saskatchewan 32-24. The two
teams exchanged baskets and the
eight point margin persisted until
the Huskiettes received a bench
technical.
UBC's Colette Pilloud hit both of
the free-throws and from that point
on, the Thunderbirds were in the
game.
Nadine Fedorak, Karen Dawson
and Delia Douglas each had their
turns sparking the Thunderbird offense.
Inconsistent foul shooting was
responsible for UBC's demise
Saturday night against the University of Alberta Pandas. The T-Birds
only managed to shoot 50 per cent
from the line or eight for 16 while
Alberta succeeded in scoring 14 of
16 free throw attempts.
The final score of the game was
close. UBC lost by four, 60-56.
Offensive honors for this
weekend's basketball action go to
Delia Douglas, a four year UBC
veteran. She was top scorer in both
games, with 15 and 18 points.
The UBC team showed tough
zone defense.
This weekend the Thunderbirds
go to Victoria to face the number
one ranked Vikettes Saturday. Undoubtedly, UBC will be forced to
play one-on-one defense against the
tough outside shooting Vikettes,
meaning the Thunderbirds cannot
afford foul trouble.
Injuries are not a major concern
for head coach Jack Pomfret yet,
although rookie Joanne Devlin
missed Saturday's game with an
ankle injury.
Byron Tokarchuk's layup with
one second left on the clock provided the margin of victory. A UBC
turnover in the Saskatchewan zone
gave the. visitors one last ditch opportunity. Tokarchuk was left all
alone underneath the hoop as the
'Birds with big man Jage Bhogal on
the bench with five fouls, apparently became confused with their
assigned coverage.
The last second hero and John
Dewar led Saskatchewan point getters with 12 each. Olson, who impressed the small crowd of about
150 with a slam dunk, led the 'Birds
with 20 points. Kevin Danes added
14 in a reserve role.
UBC did not deserve to lose to
the larger Huskies. Saskatchewan
kept the score close early thanks to
some early UBC foul trouble. The
'Birds were in bonus with only eight
minutes gone in the first half.
This weekend, the T-Birds travel
to the island to encounter the Victoria Vikings. For the first time in at
least five years, the 'Birds find
themselves in a tie with the five time
national champions. After bearing
UBC Friday, the Huskies dumped
the Vikes 72-64 Saturday, handing
the Vikings their first regular season
loss in five years.
The 'Birds will be looking for
revenge Friday. Victoria defeated
UBC en route to the championship
of the Canada West Classic two
weeks ago. The game, played in the
provincial capital, was delayed for
nearly an hour because of a bench
clearing brawl.
Considering that UVic has lost
Eli Pasquale and the Kazanowski
brothers (to graduation) and Greg
Wiltjer (to the Italian pro league),
UBC should — unlike past seasons
— be in the game.
Right down to the last second.
THE TAMING
OF THE SHREW
By William Shakespeare
Directed by Beth French
JANUARY 29-
FEBRUARY 2
8:00 p.m.
Student Tickets: $4
I Box Office-Room 207,
Frederic Wood Theatre)
DOROTHY
SOMERSET
STUDIO
University of British Columbia
Res. 228-2678
EMTS
EMERGENCY
TRAININQ
EMTS & the UBC Aqua Society have combined efforts to offer
you the most complete range of CPR courses available on campus — at the lowest prices.
HEARTSAVER LEVEL" ... 7 p.m.-10 p.m. ..
Choose one evening only: Jan. 22, Feb. 12
$10
$20
• BASIC LEVELS I or II* ... 9 a.m.-3 p.m	
Choose one day only: Jan. 27, Feb. 10, March 10
*CPp Certificates Issued
To register or obtain an information brochure drop by Aqua Society in
S.U.B. or call EMTS at 272-HELP.
CARDIOPULMONARY RESUSCITATION Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 22, 1985
COMING
JANUARY 28!
Canada

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0126712/manifest

Comment

Related Items