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The Ubyssey Nov 26, 1963

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Array THEY ARE UNITED IN SHOCK AND SHAME
... in
the U.S.
South
By FRED FLETCHER
DURHAM,   N.C.   (Staff)   —
"It can't be true."
This thought lingers in the
minds of many here, still stunned by the tidal wave of shock
that swept across the nation in
wake of news that President
John F. Kennedy had been
assassinated.
Duke is a divided university;
divided into those who disliked
the late president and opposed
his civil rights program and
those who worshipped him,
partly for that same program.
But they were united in
shock - and shame by the
tragedy of an assassin's bullet.
Shock that this senseless
atrocity had occurred at all —
and shame that it had occurred
in the South.
And there was sorrow.
More than 1,500 students
braved driving rain to crowd
into Duke Chapel for a special
memorial service Saturday.
Many wept during the short
service.
Much of the student council
felt special ties with the young
president. Some were members
of the youth brigade that worked so hard to elect Mr. Kennedy in 1960.
A number of students left
for Washington — 300 miles
away — on Sunday to attend
the funeral services.
Classes, dances, concerts, a
gigantic pep rally to herald the
football   game  of  the   year  at
Fred Fletcher, a former
Ubyssey editor-in-chief, and
Mike Grenby, editorial board
member last year, write of
student reaction to President
Kennedy's assassination from
Durham, North Carolina, and
New York where- they are doing graduate work.
Duke,  and the game itself —
all were cancelled.
About 500 persons heard
Professor Robert Rankin say
the growing intolerance in the
U.S. lay behind the assassination.
Rankin, a member of the
president's commission on civil
rights, said he watched intolerance grow into hatred as he
toured the country in the past
year.
It has come to be that we
(Americans) love to declare
anyone who disagrees with us
a "Commie" or a "Fascist", he
said.
"Americans must strive to
wipe out this intolerance — to
strive for liberty under the law.
"Who killed the president
doesn't matter. We do know it
was one who was very, very
intolerant."
The   news   of  the   shooting
(Continued on Page'3)
SEE: NOTHING
—don hume photo
BOWED   HEADS,   DRAWN   FACES  OF   UBC  STUDENTS TELL STORY OF THE DEATH OF A MAN
HONOR FALLS
TO PROTOCOL
(See Page 5)
... and
in the
North
By MIKE GRENBY
NEW YORK (Staff) — The
assassination of President Kennedy at first caused disbelief,
then horror and then agonized
silence.
Radios told people of the
news. People were crowded
around in little clusters listening.
"Please God, no," cried one
girl.
People sat and stood stunned,
it couldn't happen here, today,
1963,  said  students.
Everything was shocked to a
halt. Flags fell to half staff and
church bells tolled, People
prayed.
Broadway theatres closed
and much of Times Square was
dark.
Friday night's city of eight
million was subdued. Christmas lighting was off. Weekend
events were cancelled.
Dazed and disbelieving
strangers talked in cafes and on
streets. There were many emotional outbursts of anguished
horror and anger.
All felt a personal loss.
There was anger at society
and the assassin.
Radios and TVs blared solid
news, later church and classical music with latest news reports and no commercials.
The Saturday New York
Times ran 15 ad free pages on
Kennedy.
And the dull rainy day was
symbolic of the city's feeling.
It's pace is slowed, its tone
muted and there is little pre-
Christmasor Thanksgiving
spirit. (Thanksgiving in the
U.S. starts Thursday.)
There is   a conscious acceptance of the fact now but there
(Continued on Page 3)
SEE:   SHOCK
THE UBYSSEY
Vol.   XLVI
VANCOUVER, B.C., NOVEMBER 26,  1963
No. 33
UBC to hold
memorial
service
UBC will pay tribute to
America's deceased president,
John F. Kennedy, today at
a memorial service in the
armoury at 12:30 p.m.
Dr. Phyllis G. Ross, C.B.E.,
chancellor of the university
will preside at the ceremony
to be attended by the United
States consul general in Vancouver, Avery Peterson.
Platform party at the ceremony will be Chancellor Ross,
Peterson, President John B.
McDonald, Malcolm Scott,
president of the Alma Mater
Society, and the heads of
UBC's affiliated theological
colleges.
During the playing of the
American national anthem,
The Star Spangled Banner,
the gathering will stand in
silence.
SUB okayed
but fee hike
just misses
A record turnout of voters have come out strongly in
favor of the Student Union Building.
But they turned down by less than 300 votes a second
referendum to raise the AMS fee by $5 to finance the $3.8-
million building.
In results tabulated late
Monday 75 per cent of the
record 7,187 turnout endorsed
the building. A two-thirds
majority was required to pass
both referendums.
Student leaders hailed the
results as an unexpected and
overwhelming vote of confidence in the building.
SUB planning chairman
Dean Feltham said: "I felt we
wouldn't make it on either
vote.
"I'm tremendously pleased
with the outcome."
The result means plans can
go ahead in preparation for
actual construction, expected
to be started within a year.
Student president Malcolm
Scott said he was pleased with
the support given the fee raise
referendum (62 per cent voted
in favor of increasing the fee).
"We will put the fee raise to
another referendum, likely
with   the  first   slate of   AMS
elections   early   in  February,"
he said.
"I'm quite sure it will pass
easily now that we've got a
mandate on the building itself."
The record vote was nearly
50 per cent of student enrolment, surpassing by nearly
2,000 votes the highest turnout on an AMS issue.
Voting was spread over two
days—Friday and Monday—because of the death Friday of
U.S. President John F. Kennedy.
Only two of 18 polls voted
less than two-thirds in favor of
building SUB — The Common
Block and the pro-Engineering
Bus Stop, the largest poll on
campus.
Most polls were close to the
60 per cent mark in favor of
the fee hike — but big negative
votes in the Common Block,
Fort Camp and the Bus Stop
turned the tide.
(Continued on Page 2)
SEE: ONE SNAG Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 26,  1963
For  'unbecoming  conduct'
Charges slapped
on two students
Two students have been charged in student court as a
result of a melee at the Homecoming football game Oct. 26.
Paul Danyliu,  Education II,
PAUL FRASER
two charged
Program
postponed
to Friday
The International Week program for today has been postponed to Friday so students can
attend the Kennedy memorial
service.
Events will continue as
scheduled on Wednesday.
International Week is held
annually at UBC under the
sponsorship of International
House.
Seminars, films and guest
speakers are included in the
program.
The regular schedule of
events for the remainder of the
weeks is as follows.
Wednesday: 12:30, Bu. 100—
Crossroads, Africa, slides and
talk; Bu. 102—film of the
Skopje earthquake disaster —
Brock Lounge variety show,
3:30.
Thursday: 12:30, Bu. 102 —
Middle East talk; Bu. 106 —
Pakistan seminar; International
House—film of "Letter to
Nancy"; Auditorium—showing
of Cohen's "Inside East Germany."
Friday: 8 p.m., Auditorium—
India students present film on
"Pather Panchali," International House—China night.
The times and places of the
re-scheduled Tuesday events
will be announced later this
week.
Arty types
There are 58 typographical
errors in the latest two-page
issue of The Artisan, arts president Mike Coleman said.
and Dave Johnston, Arts III,
have been charged with conduct unbecoming of a student.
Danyliu was Frosh president
on Student Council last year.
The two students will appear
before Student Court on Nov.
28 at 12:30 p.m. in the Stage
Room of Brock Hall. The hearing is open to all students.
The charges stem from a
brawl between engineers and
students following the Homecoming game.
The engineers were defending the goalposts at the request
of Athletic Director Bus Phillips.
Several engineers were injured in the melee, and a $120
set of goal posts was destroyed.
The charges were laid by student discipline committee,
headed by Paul Fraser, follow;-
ing an investigation into the incident.
If found guilty the students
are liable to fines ranging from
$5 to $25.
Student court can also recommend expulsion from the
university and removal of all
AMS privileges.
Actual expulsion is the responsibility of a faculty council, not the AMS.
The student court was recently reconstituted following
an amendment to the AMS constitution passed at the Nov. 15
meeting.
There had been no court in
existence since last spring.
ONE SNAG
(Continued firom Page 1)
The only remaining snag is
the administration's insistence
that the building be paid off in
15 years. At present, the only
way students feel they can do
this is to raise fees $5.
Scott said: "Now that we
know the building is going up,
we can approach private donors
and organizations such as the
Canada Council asking for
financial assistance.
"I am sure we can get a substantial    amount   from    these
l sources."
u
SPECIAL EVENTS
presents
INSIDE  EAST  GERMANY
A Forceful and Objective Color
Documentary Film Personally Narrated
By Famed News Correspondent, Robert Cohen.
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 28TH
AUDITORIUM — 12:30 NOON
ADMISSION 25c
Students strike
MONTREAL (CUP)—McGill
students recently staged a sit-
down strike in their student
union restaurant, protesting
the regulation which asks them
not to eat box lunches there.
Students or not, UBC
set to re-open Jan. 3
B.C. school students have had their Christmas vacation extended, but UBC is still planning to open Jan. 3.
Administration officials said Monday there is no change
planned.
Last week Education Minister Les Peterson ordered
students to return Jan. 6, instead of the earlier date.
Student Council last week requested administration to
change the date.
AMS president Malcolm Scott said students should
consider a strike or boycott if the request is not granted.
Many students say they will not return to classes on
the Friday and deprive themselves of three days at home
for one and a half days' classes.
r
FlNTERNATMAL WEEK
1 And Special Events
PRESENT
Film and Lecture
"Inside East Germany"
Auditorium — Thursday Noon
SKIER'S INVITATION
TO
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* NEW HALL T-BAR LIFT SERVICING NEW SKIING
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ir SPECIAL STUDENTS' GROUP RATES!!!
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For Infromation, Inquiries and RESERVATIONS, write ...
Manager: DOUG ROBINSON
BOX 407, KIMBERLEY, B.C.
LEftKUBT ELECTBIC
requires
Undergraduate, Graduate and Post Graduate Electrical
Engineers studying under Options I and II. On campus
recruiting will be conducted at U.B.C. Personnel office
on Monday and Tuesday, February 17th and 18th from
9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. - 1964 Graduates ad Post Graduates
may be scheduled for interview at our Burnaby plant
prior to February. Please call W. O. Clement, CY 8-2464
for appointment.
Lenkurt Electric Co. of Canada, Ltd.
7018 Lougheed Highway
North Burnaby, B.C.
SUBSIDIARY OF GENERAL, TELEPHONES
& ELECTRONICS LNTERNATIONAL
~l
L
J Tuesday, November 26,  1963
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
He's dead
Nothing
Canadian
could say
(Continued from Page 1)
rocked the campus. Classes and
books  were  forgotten   as students tried to find out what had
happened.
I was eating lunch with two
other students from Canada
when the news came. A grey-
haired woman, her eyes moist
with tears, came to our table
and said quietly:
"Have you boys heard the
news?" Told we had not, she
said: "President Kennedy's
been shot. Oh, it's terrible . . ."
• •    •
Incredulous,   we   made   our
way to a radio where we learned the president still lived but
was critically wounded.
Students, not knowing what
to do or say, gathered around
the television set in the lounge.
Students waited anxiously.
Several muffled expressions of
shock were heard as Walter
Cronkite told the nation it had
lost its leader.
"It's official," he said. "He's
dead." Most students stood in
small groups and just looked
at each other. Later, as the
shock wore off slightly, they
began to discuss what would
happen to the country.
There was little a Canadian
could say.
• •    *
In Durham City, shops closed
and special preparations for
memorial services were made.
Knots of people discussed the
situation. Women wept.
"White and black mourned
together," a local newspaper
reported.
Black crepe, mourning the
president's death, contrasted
sharply with tinsel decorations
in this small city.
Lights on Christmas decorations in the shopping area were
to be turned on Friday night.
They remain dark today.
Co-education
GENEVA, Switzerland
(CUP)—A six-storey residential building to house men,
women and married couples in
a Swiss students' village last
winter.
. . . maybe, my friend
Bennett says
hes thinking
about grants
Premier Bennett says he
will give "serious consideration" to UBC's proposal to
have the new student union
building included in the government's matching grants
scheme.
Student president Malcolm
Scott last week asked Bennett
if the more than $2.3 million
cost of SUB could be made
eligible under the University
Development Fund.
The provincial government
has already agreed to mateh
$300,000 paid for the Brock
Exten s i o n, and $800,000
which students pledged to the
winter sports centre and the
first stage of SUB.
Bennett telegrammed Scott
Monday and said, "Your telegram is very much appreciated. This matter will receive
serious consideration."
If the matching grant were
to come through,, it would
mean an additional $2.3 million in the University's coffers for capital expansion.
Spot open for
CUS co-ordinator
Applications are still open
for the position of student
co-ordinator for the annual
Canadian Union of Students
seminar in Quebec City in
August.
All applications should be
in the CUS office in Brock
extension by 4 p.m. Tuesday.
The poignant farewell
UBC watches in silence
as JFK's casket lowered
By MIKE VAUX
The world said goodbye to
John F. Kennedy Monday.
UBC students joined it.
Students jammed the Brock
Lounge to watch the president's funeral on television.
The  silence  was  complete.
The three-hour coverage of
the president's funeral followed the funeral party to the
Cathedral and then across the
Potomac River to Arlington
National Cemetery where the
assassinated chief executive
was  buried.
The sad and moving ceremony brought to a close the
tragic events of the weekend
and left all those who watched
it with a profound sense of
loss.
More than 100 heads of state
and their representatives attended the funeral, and followed the caisson to the cemetery,
although' not all made it in
time to see the president's casket lowered into the grave.
The events of the weekend
caused a storm of conversation
around the campus.
Professors discussed them in
class.
Students discussed them in
coffee shops and lounges.
And the answer was a question.
Why?
All over the campus amateur
and professional political scientists tried to analyze the political implications of the assassination.
Not many succeeded.
People remembered the poignant farewell of Mrs. Kennedy
to her husband, when she
curtsied to his coffin and then
kissed it.
And while they admired her
courage, remembering why she
was there made them angry.
"God what an ordeal," said
one student. "She must have
guts galore."
Not many people who saw
her light the perpetual flame
to the late President's memory
will easily forget it.
Nor will they forget the
world has lost one of its finest
citizens.
SHOCK
(Continued firom Page 1)
is little  emotional  absorption.
It's the first and greatest
shock for this generation, said
a Columbia University sophomore.
Mourning continues and almost everything was closed
Monday to observe a national
day of mourning for Kennedy's
funeral.
Speculation here is that Republican chances have increased for 1964 Presidential
election but not necessarily
Goldwater.
It is felt there must be a
wider-appeal candidate to win.
New President Johnson's
future is still open to question.
Engineering profs
FRANKFURT (CUP) — West
German engineering schools
used 3,092 teachers last year.
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Wl/WU
INTERNgnONLL
week.
WEDNESDAY EVENTS
THURSDAY
SPEAKER:
Dave Chapman
Crossroads Africa-Egypt
Bu. 100 — 12:30
FILM:
WUS and Skopje
Bu. 102 — 12:30
ALL CLUBS DAY,
BROCK LOUNGE
12:30
FILM:
"Letter to Nancy"
International House
Film Room,
12:30
SPEAKER:
Dr. Povoy
"Rising Expectations
in the Middle East"
Bu.102 — 12:30
SPEAKER:
Mr. Wainman
on
Bulgaria
Bu. 100 —12:30
iM(» I  M
jMM»M THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial opinions
expressed are those of the editor and not necessarily those of the AMS
or the University. Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office, CA
4-3242,  Loc. 26.  Member Canadian University Press.
Authorized   as   second-class    mail   by   Post   Office   Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence, news photography, editorial writing
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 1963
He was ours
It is significant that the brutal assassination of President Kennedy had such a profound effect upon UBC
students.
As news of the tragedy flashed across the campus
Friday, classes stopped, study abruptly ceased, and coffee in the cafeterias got cold. Everywhere, students
huddled in groups, exchanging the latest bits of news,
blurting anxious questions, muttering unbelievingly,
"Why . . . who . . . how . . ." Hundreds packed Brock
Lounge to watch tihe story unfold on TV, hundreds more
lingered unaccustomedly beside Radsoc's speakers, and
the fortunate few who had transistor radios were surrounded by dozens more in the hallways and on the
sidewalks.
The surprising thing was the genuine concern of the
students, the deep sort of personal loss they all said
they felt. Some students actually cried; most were unnaturally quiet, tense, with a hollow feeling deep inside
that was much more tfban a habitual noon-hour hunger.
Something that was more than the electric excitement
of the biggest event that had ever happened upon them
commanded their emotions.
More than once was heard the comment, "If Pearson
had been shot, it wouldn't be like this." The atmosphere Friday, the way people were talking, points out,
perhaps, the dependence, the need Canadians feel for
the leadership of the United States, the often-repressed
attachment for the country and its people which guides
ours.
But more than that, for university students, the
death of John Kennedy was not the death of the leader
of the U.S. For us, it was rather the death of a personality which, like no other man of our time, has captured our imagination, which has earned our deepest
respect and admiration.
For us, this was the New Frontier that had been so
abruptly cut down. It was a deeper, more philosophical,
more idealistic attachment we felt. It was our generation. It was Youth, it was Genius, it was part uf us
which had been torn away, and it was tragic.
It is certainly true that his death had a greater
effect upon us than any or all of the actions of his lifetime. With sobering suddenness, what John Kennedy
was dawned upon us.
We must all now feel a debt to the dead president
when we think back to the Cuban crisis just a year ago,
to the terrible uncertainty of those one or two crucial
days when nuclear fever was at its peak; and we must
surely be thankful for the courage and steadiness displayed by the one man who, for all we know, may have
had our fate in his hands.
Undoubtedly now, and in future months, we will
appreciate more easily what it means to have someone
like him on Our Side—not only in the immediate political
world, but in that deeper sense of our beliefs and ideals.
He represented, in the brief five or 10 years which
we have been cognizant of these things, perhaps the best
example of the qualities, private and public, which we
and our society cherish. These are the qualities which
are so desperately needed in this age of political and
social uplheavel, in this time of The Bomb, the tranquilizer,
and the juvenile delinquent.
If there is one thing we can learn from his untimely
death, it must be that the things which to us he stood
for and the things which for us he was must be cultivated
and replenished. The task here is one for people like
those who jammed Brock Hall on Friday, to us. Somewhere, somehow, among us we are going to have to find,
or build, the kind of men who can be John Kennedys.
EDITOR: Mike Hunter
Editors:
Associate Keith Bradbury
News   Dave Ablett
Managing
City	
Photo	
George Railton
... Mike Horsey
 Don Hume
Critics     Ron Riter
Sports    Denis Stanley
Asst. News   Tim Padmore
Asst. City Richard Simeon
Senior Donna Morris
Senior Maureen Covell
REPORTERS: Mike Vaux, pon
Hull, Graeme Matheson, Mike Sol-
ton, Tom Wayman. Much more
important is the fact that the following were not here. Lorraine
Shore, Terry Hilborn, Al Ronald,
Pat  Horrobin  and  Ann  Burge.
^-v^NS   '€&
Classes as normal..
. %- *
:"i >: t, - .;«:,*
LETTERS  TO THE  EDITOR
Self-centred
Editor, The Ubyssey:
It might be of interest to
note the self-centred provincial attitude of the Deans and
Heads of Departments of this
university on Friday when
we all learned of the horrible
and tragic assassination of
President J. F. Kennedy.
• •   •
Despite   the  fact  that such
bodies as the United Nations
and Parliament adjourned out
of respect for the passing of a
great man, these members of
the faculty felt important
enough to ignore what to them
must have been a trivial
event, and to continue their
meeting into the evening.
Following their august example, the brainless, green-
shirted group of idiots known
as Foresters did not cancel
their dance scheduled for Friday night and no doubt had
a marvellous time.
It's fortunate, indeed, that
such groups are few and far
between.
A.V.O.
Science IV
On schedule
Editor. The Ubyssey:
Let's pat the Admin on the
back — they've done it again.
In Friday's Ubyssey, there
was a notice which said that
the examination timetable
would be posted today. A
quick phone call today to Mr.
McCrae's office brings the
good news "Tomorrow, but
check with us before you come
out."
• •    •
I'm objecting because I'm
going out of town over the
holidays and in order to make
reservations it is usually convenient to have a rough idea
of when you will be finished
exams.
The registrar's office warns
that   the    preliminary   draft
should not be used to make
travel plans. It seems that this
year, the final draft will appear about two days before
we write. Have you ever tried
to make a plane reservation
in this season about a week
before you depart? Impossible.
Another point to be considered is that a great number
of students don't start the
panic cram until the little
green god appears. Maybe this
is another way of insuring that
only the serious succeed, but
in many cases, these Christmas marks are used in applications for Grad schools.
• • •
So some people don't report
class changes. Let them pay
for their folly, not us. Mr.
McCrae was not available for
comment at the time of writing.
M. I. HUMPHRIES,
Arts III.
Pre-empted
Editor, The Ubyssey:
At the filming of the Josh
White concert in Brock Thursday afternoon, we were disgusted to see that the so-
called folk lovers of the Folk
Song Society had taken it
upon themselves to rope off an
entire front section in reserve for their esteemed members. Who in hell do they
think they are?
In future, we would appreciate equal rights, i.e., on a-
first-come, first-serve basis,
with no discrimination against
non-F.S.S. members.
J. BOURHIS,
G. THIERY,
Science I.
Dare ya,Jack
Editor, The Ubyssey:
That atheistic loud-mouthed
Communist Jack Ornstein
would  never  get  away with
his blaspheming and propaganda at the University of Alberta, I'll tell you that.
We've got a province where
lately the Provincial Secretary said there should be the
greatest freedom of speech at
the university as long as it
conforms to the standards of
the people who pay taxes, the
general public.
•    •    •
Also this week our Premier,
Mr. Manning, said women
should guard their children
from intellectual perverts
who question institutions that
have withstood the test of
time, naming the Scriptures
and the Social Credit party
as two examples. Also recently in Edmonton, three English
profs were heaved in jail for
making a public denunciation
of Edmonton's mayor.
We know how to take care
of people like you here, Mr.
Ornstein.
We dare you to come here
and say that.
GEORGE  BOWERING
Tea & crumpets
Editor,  The   Ubyssey:
Do you know what there is
at Victoria College? SFA.
Sweet Flowery Antiques.
HARRY  HICKMAN
Victoriah
God again
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Re the recent controversy
over God and ornstein.
I submit, sir, that the question is not whether God
exists, but; whether ornstein
exists. After all, The Ubyssey has been noted for perpetrating hoaxes in the past.
I submit, sir, that Ornstein may be a creation of the
Engineers.
GEORGE   SMALLSON
Arts II Tuesday, November 26,  1963
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
BACKGROUND
Will right-left split
wreck India's democracy?
By HARDIAL BAINS
and
BRIAN MACKENZIE
Despite recent loud attacks
on Nehru's government in India, one fact remains unchal-
lengable: Since independence
in 1947, Nehru has provided
stable and progressive government for his  country.
• •    •
The 74-year-old prime minister has made a tremendous
improvement in all economic
and social conditions, which
under colonial administration
progressed chiefly from bad to
worse. Most progress has been
made within the framework
of the five-year plans, the
third of which ends in 1967.
Universal suffrage is now
extended to all citizens,
women included, over the age
of 21. Eighty per cent of school
age children attend schools
and within the country there
are 41 universities. Untouch-
ability restrictions have been
abolished. More than 30 huge
hydro-electric dams throughout the country provide a consistent water supply and generate electricity for industrial and domestic use.
Four steel plants are now in
operation and, with Canadian
help, an atomic reactor is now
functioning in Trombay (near
Bombay.)
• *    •
Perhaps most significant in
this list of accomplishments
is that the trend towards
national fragmentization has
been halted. Despite the existence of 14 separate states, all
with different languages, despite the sometimes uneasy coexistence of Hindus, Mohammedans, Buddhists, Christians,
Sikhs, Parsis and Jews, a
sense of national purpose, of
Mother India, has been established and seems likely to continue.
However, the problems facing modern India cannot be
minimized. A start has been
made, but most of the essential improvements have yet to
be brought about. India is still
a country of national saints,
sacred cows and snake
charmers.
It is still a poor country,
with insufficient food for its
four hundred million people,
and a country where population and birth control attempts have so far been futile.
Eighty per cent of the children
are in school, but 89 per cent
of the population is still illiterate.
• •    •
These problems, and others,
all further complicate India's
tangled political situation.
There are four recognized
national parties in India —
Nehru's National Congress,
the Communists, the Parja
Socialists, and the religious-
communal Bharidya Jan
Sangh. There are also several
splinter parties, like the increasingly dynamic, right
wing Freedom  Party, all of
which are free to run candidates.
In addition, there are no
less than 16 recognized state
parties, tor the legislative
assemblies, and a multitude of
political pressure groups.
The National Congress
holds 365 of the 454 seats in
the parliament. The Communist Party, the only other
well-organized group, has 28.
The Congress itself is divided
into right and left wings,
which are held together mainly by the personal dynamic
leadership of Nehru.
Althought the moderate
National Congress sits at pres-
Two UBC students, Har-
dial Bains and Brian Mackenzie, wrote this article for
International Week, currently being held on campus.
ent in a fairly secure position,
there is a growing tendency
towards radicalism from both
sides. Last year's border invasions by the Communist
Chinese, by the way, had little
effect on the popularity of the
Indian Communist Party,
which is strongly Soviet-
oriented.
Last month in New Delhi, a
Communist-sponsored demonstration drew 100,000 people
on a 10-mile march to the
Parliament buildings to protest high food prices. Mean-
- while, two extreme right-
wing parties, the Parja Socialists and the Freedom Party
both won crucial byelection
seats from the National Congress earlier this year.
The rightists have been the
leaders in criticizing corruption in government administration and demanding parliamentary reforms. The direction of government policy in
India is going to largely depend on the directions taken
by these right wingers and
on the influence that foreign
capital and power is allowed
to have on the administration
following Nehru's.
• •    •
Nehru's    daughter,    Indira
Gandhi, has been postulated
as possibly taking leadership
Of the country when Nehru
steps down. However, at present the most likely successor
is Mararji Desai, Nehru's pro-
American, right-wing finance
minister. Desai has expressed
extreme opposition to the
Communists and will likely
try to curtail their rising
popularity. It is expected that
he will ban the Communist
Party and other left-wing
parties opposing his policies.
The Communists and their
potential sympathisers won't
take this passively. The first
result of this strife will be the
consolidation of right-wingers
and left-wingers within the
frameworks of each, without
too much regard for nominal
party affiliations.
• •    •
Thus, we face the unhappy
possibility that India, the
potential "model democracy"
of Asia, will fall victim to an
ideological dispute, causing an
extreme setback in her social
and economic progress, and
effectively nullifying her mediating role in world politics.
c
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After Ski
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Red-faced army brass
haul down Old Glory
Someone in the administration has a red face today.
An American flag flew over
the Armory Monday, in honor
of the late President Kennedy.
But it violated almost every
rule in the Canadian Army's
book of regulations.
The flag was hauled down
as soon as COTC officers, resident in the building, were informed of the mistake.
Verbal rockets began flying
between B.C. Area Headquarters and the COTC.
An army spokesman said
army regulations forbid replacing the Canadian Ensign with
the flag of any other country.
It can only be flown with
special permission, and then
only if it is lower than the
Canadian flag, he said.
A buildings and grounds
spokesman said she did not
know who ordered the flag
put up in the first place.
Geoffrey Davies, assistant to
the president said he did not
know how the flag got up
either.
He said it had been planned
to fly the flag from the Armory
for the Kennedy memorial
service today.
"The Canadian Ensign would
be flying from the main UBC
flagpole near the faculty club,"
he said.
Soccer Birds have
rest this weekend
This Sunday at Mclnnes
field the UBC Braves soccer
team plays Luso of the fourth
division lower mainland soccer
league. Game time is 2 p.m.
Also Sunday the soccer
Tomahawks play North Shore
United of the Junior Coast
league at 10 a.m. at Mahon
park  .
3sT
Students
Your Formal
and
Semi-Formal
Clothing Needs
Can be Met Best at:
McCUISH *—$:—
2046 W. 41st — Ph. 263-3610
Mon.-Sat 9:30 to 8:80
— »*W __ —
•pedal Slsconat to atodemta
Made-to-Measure
Suits, Jackets and
Slacks Styled for
The Young- Man
In tribute to the
memory of
John F. Kennedy
Tuesday events of
International Week
have been postponed.
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES
(Regular and Summer)
with
PAN AMERICAN
PETROLEUM CORPORATION
CALGARY, ALBERTA
Interviews November 28 & 29
for
POST GRADUATES
GRADUATES
UNDERGRADUATES
:OMMERCE-ACCOUNT!NG MAJORS
GEOPHYSICS
Engineering Physics, Physics   Geology and
Geological Engineering
GEOLOGY
ENGINEERING
Petroleum, Geological, Chemical or
Mechanical Engineering
See the University N.E.S. Student Placement Service for
further particulars and to arrange an interview. Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  November 26,  1963
Basketball Birds win
openers in Manitoba
By DAVE CARLSON
UBC Thunderbird basketball
squad successfully opened
their season over the weekend
with a pair of impressive victories over the University of
Manitoba Bisons.
Friday night the Birds fell
three short of triple figures
drubbing the hapless Bisons
97-65. The team connected on
fifty-one per cent of their shots
from the floor .
Forward John Cook led all
scorers with 24 points, 12 of
which were earned from the
foul line. Gord Betcher, a surprise starter, pumped in 14
more points.
• •   •
On Saturday night, the Birds
wrapped up the series with an
82-48 whitewashing of the
prairie crew. Guard Bill McDonald sparked the attack with
15 points, followed closely by
Dave Way with 14.
The only bright spot for the
Bisons was five year man Dave
Mills, who collected 23 points
Friday night, and added 12
more in the second contest.
Coach Peter Mullins of the
Birds, summing up the series,
said, "We were just too big
and too experienced for them."
Mullins found ample opportunity to give his bench
needed action. Friday night
all ten players scored. The following night, only Steve
Spenser failed to reach the
woresheet.
• •    *
Morris Douglas, playing his
first game with the Birds,
particularly impressed his
coach during the first game.
The next scheduled action
for the Thunderbirds is the
annual Totem Tournament, this
weekend in War Memorial
Gym. Eastern Washington College, Central Washington College and McGavins will provide competition for the Thunderbirds. Friday night's draw
sees Eastern meeting Central
in the preliminary game, and
McGavins tangling with the
Birds in the feature event.
In other WCIAA basketball
Available Near  UBC Gates
1 double room
2 single rooms
with full cooking and washing facilities. Call CA 4-
5054 after 6 p.m.
AUTHOR'S AGENCY
Bring your manuscripts,
stories, articles, books, songs,
poems. Free advice and help.
Toronto, New York, Hollywood sales contacts. 1065 E.
17th Ave.   TR 6-6362.
THE IDEAL PLACE
TO MEET
YOUR FRIENDS
Try Our Delicious T-Bone
Steak with Coffee    ,
$1.35-If s Really Good
Full Course Meals
within your income.
DO-NUT DINER
4556 West 10th Ave.
JOHN COOK
31 points over weekend
action this weekend the Saskatchewan Huskies beat the
University of Alberta at Calgary 88-66 Friday and 62-59
Saturday.
Huskies and Birds are tied
for first place in the intercollegiate league.
•    •    •
FBXDAY
UBC (97)—Cook 24, B. McDonald
4, Osborne 8, Way 11,
Betcher 14, Spenser 4,
Barazzuol 5, K. Macdonald 5, Erickson 11,
  Douglas   10.
MAHTTOBA (65)—Mills 23, Kings-
mill 6, Angus 1, Ku-
zych 10, White 3, Bi-
lan 5, Mitchell 9, Zelmer 4 ,Falk 3, Gair 1.
SATURDAY
UBC (83)—Cook 7, B. McDonald
IB, Osborne 11, Way
14, Betcher 7, Barazuol
8, K. Macdonald 8,
Erickson  5,   Douglas  7.
MAKXTOBA (48)—Mills 12, Kings-
m i 11 4, Angus 4,
Kuzych 11, White 1,
Bilan 2, Mitchell 6,
Zelmer   6,   Falk   2.
Wrestling victories
for Christensen, Green
Central Washington State College swept  five  of
10 divisions at the UBC  Invitational wrestling meet
Saturday.
The only laurels for UBC
came from Cann Christen-
sen's draw with Central's
Mark Lundberg in the heavyweight final, and Bruce
Green in the 123 pound class.
Christensen won three
matches and drew in the
fourth. Another total point
tie came in the 137 pound
class against Alan Johnson
and Wayne Lalley of Central.
There can only be a tie in
these finals when the combatants are weighed-in and
they are found to be exactly
the same.
„„_ A weigh-off is used when
CANN CHRISTENSEN two wrestlers are equal in
. . . heavyweight points  in one weight class.
BEIL HEEDS EHGIHEERS
FOR TOMORROW'S WORLD OF COMMUNICATIONS
Plan now for an Engineering Career offering scope and
responsibility in a leading Canadian industry. Consider
the potential of a career in the Bell if you are graduating in
ELECTRICAL
ENGINEERING
t
Ask at your Placement Office for
informative booklets, and
arrange to talk with one of our
representatives when they visit
your campus.
BELL
Britt, rouged and owned by Canadians
Make a date to discuss a career
in telecommunications on
Monday through Thursday
January 13 to 16 Tuesday,  November 26,  1963
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
But oh that third
UBC a winner
for 2 periods
By GEORGE HEAMSBOTTOM
UBC's two-period wonders, the Thunderbird pucksters,
managed one tie out of their two-game series with the Kamloops Chiefs the past weekend.
the
In Saturday's game
T' Birds went into the third
period with a 4-3 lead, but
came! out 5-4 losers as all-star
centre Peter Kelly watched
from the sidelines.
Kelly was ejected in the
second period for fighting.
SPORTS
EDITOR: Denis Stanley
Basketball
Braves cut
Magee high
By BOB BANNO
UBC Basketball Braves
rolled to their third straight
victory Friday night at War
Memorial Gym, crushing the
gallant but thoroughly outclassed Magee High Blackshirts
86-47.
Winston Churchill's Mark
Churchland paced Braves'
scorers with 14 points. Forward Wayne Vollmer pumped
in 13 against his former teammates and Prince of Wales'
rugged Bill Humphries counted 12.
B.C. all-star Alec Brayden
turned in another stellar performance for the Braves, scoring 13 and  10 respectively.
"Our fast break is starting
to jell,' 'said Braves' coach
Norm Watt after the game.
Watt has also implemented
the double-post offence to
take advantage of his outstanding guards.
UBC—Vollmer 13, Dyck 6, Jones
4, Brayden 10, MacDonald 4, Humphries 12, Hubner 4, Hill 5, Walker 6, Campbell 4, Banno 4, Church-
land   14—S6.
MAGEE—Murray 13, Ramsay,
Korsmo 10, MacLean 4, Bthering-
ton 2, Hylton, Samster 3, Steele
4,   Kendall   8,   Graigr   3—47.
Sunday, the Birds, led by
veteran Bob Parker, came
from behind a 3-0 deficit to go
out front 4-3, then ran out of
gas and had to settle for a 4-4
tie.
The scrappy UBC team was
unable to cope with the greater
experience of the B.C. Intermediate   champions.
The Chiefs demonstrated
their experience by outclassing
UBC while they were accumulating 33 minutes in the penalties Sunday, compared with 10
for UBC.
Parker, in the second period,
twice broke into the clear
through the Chiefs' defence and
deftly beat the Kamloops
goalie.
Other Bird scorers in Sunday's game were Kelly and
centre Ken Ronalds.
Scorers in Saturday's game
for UBC were defenceman Al
Merlo, winger Ralph Lortie,
Stu Gibbs and Kelly.
The Birds were short three
regulars for both, games because Mike Smith, Ron Morris
and Dave Morris were all called out of town due to deaths in
their families.
In goal Saturday for UBC
was Brian Wallace, who played
well behind a shaky defence
as he and Jack Harris, in the
nets Sunday for the Birds, continue their fight for number
one goal tending honours.
Tip-Top men
club cripples
The Locarno Football League
continued its Saturday contests last weekend as the Tiptop Tigers ran away from the
outclassed Cellar-dwelling Cyclones to a 63-7 victory .
Despite the slippery turf and
the numbing cold, the Tigers
romped to an early lead and
never looked back.
Relying mainly on the short
passes of Burnt MacAroni to
Rays Hoss and assorted seagulls, the Tip-toppers rolled
up nine touchdowns while
holding their hapless opponents to one major.
Four of the Cellar Dwellers
had their legs in casts but they
played anyway because they
felt that after winning 18
games in a row they should
give the Tip Toppers a chance
to get an undeserved victory.
League play will resume the
week after next, as the loop's
two teams have byes for next
Saturday.
Barbarians
tie Varsity
Rugger Birds managed to
pull from their slump to finish
league play for this term in
a 0-0 tie with the North Shore
Barbarians.
Coach Albert Laithwaite
is confident that the tie puts
the Birds back into a fighting
position for intercollegiate
play in January.
Birds lost their last two
games in league play.
Keith Watson suffered a separated shoulder in Saturday's
game but continued to play until late in the game aggrivating
the injury.
The rugger Braves have one
game left in their league play.
There is a practice Thursday
for both Braves and Birds if
the fields are in shape.
GARY BEGG
. . . hat-trick Sunday
Olympians
split over
weekend
Canada's national hockey
team won one game and lost
another in a prairie tour during the weekend .
Saturday the Regina Caps,
strengthened by some players
from the Winnipeg Maroons,
dropped the nationals 7-6 in
Regina.
The seven goals is the
highest number scored against
the Olympians in a single
game this year.
Sunday the Olympians plastered the Drumheller Miners
9-2 in Drumheller.
Defenceman Terry O'Malley
scored twice against Regina
while Bob Forhan, Roger Bourbonnais, Terry Clancy and
Brian Conacher added singles.
At Drumheller Gary Begg
scored three times, Bourbonnais and Ray Cadieux added
a pair each while singles went
to Clancy and Forhan.
Richardson, Harper
stage grudge match
By ROGER McAFEE
The weapons will be 40-
pound chunks of granite and
the distance will be 126 feet.
The principals will be
world curling champion Ernie
Richardson and B.C.'s own
Glen Harper, the only man to
beat Richardson in last year's
Canadian curling championship.
The place will be the UBC
sports arena Wednesday at 8
p.m.
Ernie Richardson, who won
the Canadian and world
championships in 1960, 1962
and 1963, will be out to
avenge a loss at the hands of
B.C.'s representative in this
year's Canadian championship.
The B.C. champ, Glen Harper from Duncan, handed Richardson his only defeat in this
year's national final.
Harper tied with Calgary's
Jim Shields for runner-up in
the championships.
Another    game,    between
Shield's and Edmonton's Hee
Gervais,  world  champion  in
1961, will round out the exhibition.
The four rinks, probably
the top four in the world, will
give a short instructional
demonstration and Richardson and Harper will both outline their strategy and reasoning as the big game progresses.
A short discussion on skipping strategy and responsibilities will be held after the
games.
Student admission price is
75 cents. Reserve admission is
$1.50 and general admission
is $1.
THE WEAPONS
. . grudge match
Field hockey results
Varsity field hockey team
remained on top of the
league with a 2-0 win over
the Cardinals in first division play Saturday.
Tom Groenweld and Victor Warren scored for Varsity.
In other first division play
the Blues defeated North
Shore  4-2.
Golds tied the unbeaten
Hornets 1-1 and the Advocates dropped a 1-0 decision
to Vancouver "B".
Pedagogues' game was rescheduled.
A REAL "DUTCH TREAT"
We mean Hollandia Pipe Tobacco, of
course. Its pleasing aroma makes you welcome anywhere and you will enjoy its unique
and friendly flavour. Doubly-satisfying
Hollandia is not just another Dutch pipe
tobacco—it's a truly noble Cavendish, pride
of Holland's master blenders. Cool as a sea
breeze, mild as Maytime, rewarding as a
lifelong friendship. Perfect if you're taking
up a pipe or seek a refreshing change.
Happy smoking begins with Hollandia—a
real Dutch treat.
Smoke Hollandia
and really enjoy
your pipel Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
'tween classes
AMERICAN POET, Prof.
Joseph Langland, will read
from his own work Wednesday noon in Bu. 104.
Memorial service today
Loyola
students
boo Chaput
MONTREAL (CUP) — Students at Loyola College booed
a French separatist speaker
and demanded he speak English at a public lecture last
week.
Marcel Chaput, president of
the Separatist Quebec Republican party, was giving the
first talk in a series scheduled
on "Canada, where we stand."
Students waved placards
with the word "Canada" and
heckled Chaput.
"You who are yelling at me
are helping my cause," he said.
"Each time the English act
as you are today, more and
more French Canadians
decide to become separatists."
Anti-Negro
Greeks hit
BERKELEY, Calif. CUP)—
All six sororities were suspended at Portland State College because of claims of discrimination against two Negro
girl rushees.
A faculty investigation was
started to see why the two
girls were dropped from rushing after the first round of
parties.
The girls were "eminently
qualified" according to Mark
Howard, public information
director of the college.
"Sororities started here in
1960 with the clear understanding of no racial discrimination," he said.
Campus clubs have cancelled
meetings today so their members can attend the memorial
service for President Kennedy,
to be held in the Armory at
noon.
• •    •
PRE-MED  SOC
Dr. W. Wood will give an illustrated talk on Dermatology,
Wednesday noon in Wes.  100.
• •    •
UNITARIAN CLUB
Meeting Wednesday noon in
Bu. 3252.
• •    •
CLUBS DISPLAY GROUP
Meeting of all club reps, for
clubs putting on displays for
Open House '64 in Bu. 217.
Space allotment and financing
to be discussed.
• •    •
GAMMA DELTA
W. Schumacher, theological
intern at Bellingham, Washington, will speak on "What do
you mean, the Church?" Wednesday noon, Bi. 3202.
• •    •
SPECIAL EVENTS
Last minute ticket sales "A
Man for All Seasons" with
Robert Harris, Wednesday at
the Queen Elizabeth Playhouse.
Vouchers at Special Events
office.
• •    •
CHORAL  SOCIETY
Rehearsals: Tonight in Brock
Lounge; tomorrow night in Bu.
104, both at 6 p.m.
• •    •
BRIDGE AND CHESS CLUB
Meeting Wednesday at 7:30
p.m., Brock TV Lounge.
• •    •
ONTOLOGICAL  SOCIETY
Second in a series of talks by
Richard Thompson, M.A. Cambridge, will be given Wednesday noon in Bu. 221.
NEWMAN  CENTRE
Leg auction: St. Mark's College Lounge, Wednesday noon.
All proceeds go for Crippled
Children's Christmas Party.
•    •    •
EDUCATION   UNDERGRADS.
Sample copies of previous
First and Second Year sessional
education exams (including
Eng. 100 and 200) will be sold
from November 26 to 30, in
the New Education Bldg. Proceeds go to a Christmas Party
for underprivileged children.
UNDERGRAD. WRITER'S
Poet Joseph Langland will
attend the meeting tonight, 8
p.m., at 4706 West Sixth Ave.
He will also read his own
poetry Wednesday at 12:30 in
Bu. 104.
Tuesday,  November 26,  1963
Student Court
Hearing
Student press "fired"
CHICAGO (CUP) —The student newspaper at the Chicago
Teachers' College was suspended when it printed a cartoon
critical of Chicago's superintendent of schools.
Take notice that Student
Court of the Alma Mater
Society will hear charges of
conduct unbecoming a student, under by-law 11, section 6 (b) (i) (c) of the AMS
constitution,   against
Paul G. Danyliu
Dave Johnston
as a result of occurrences at
the Oct. 26 football game.
Hearing will take place in
the Brock stage room at
12:30 noon, Thursday, Nov.
28,  1963.
Students multiply
INDIA (CUP)—The student
enrolment in colleges and universities during 1961-62 increased 11 per cent over the
previous year.
FOR RENT
Room on campus.
Male student.
Phone 224-5870
after 6 p.m.
THREE    DOORWAYS   tractive plans that
I \J- r\ lilaVVMRUiniU ing circumstances
■JJ1! |,T,| |DET ■ °f y°unS men interested in a career as a
■   \3 I \J t\^^      commissioned officer in the Canadian Army:
111 THE REGULAR OFFICER TRAINING PLAN - This is a tri-service plan under which
high school graduates receive advanced education and leadership training at one of the Canadian
Services Colleges or at a university to become officers in the Royal Canadian Navy, the Canadian
Army or the Royal Canadian Air Force.
(&\ THE CANADIAN OFFICERS TRAINING CORPS - University undergraduates may obtain a commission by training during their spare time and summer holidays. They are paid for
actual training time and, after graduation, may choose either full-time service in the Regular
Army or part-time service in the Canadian Army Militia.
W> MEDICAL AND DENTAL SUBSIDIZATION PLANS -These are tri-service plans under
which university students in medicine or dentistry can be subsidized during their course and
become commissioned medical or dental officers in the Canadian Armed Forces after graduating
and obtaining their licence to practise
^f. You may obtain full information on any of these plans from the
z%% local Army Recruiting Station listed in your telephone book.
NEW BATTERY
SALE
as low as
6 volt $ 8.95
12 volt    13.95
UBC
HOME
SERVICE
Phone: CA 4-3939
Allison & Dalhousie
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Outstanding opportunities exist for
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| As a subsidiary of United Aircraft Corpora-
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^J'r^ucts^   from    t|~
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