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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Oct 21, 1969

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Array Ubyssey team finds rampant sex in quiet rooms
—dirk visser photo
Erotic couple struggles oblivious to photographer.
By BRIAN McWATTERS
undercover reporter
A hideaway for young couples has been discovered deep in
the bowels of SUB.
The quiet rooms adjacent to the bowling alley and pool hall
have been converted into a new "lovers' lane".
In a phone call to The Ubyssey city desk, Hugh Nixon, arts
2, said Monday, "I'm appalled at the number of girls that go into
the men's sleeping quarters.
"The area is supposed to be for people who want to relax
from the pressures of the school system-not for couples to make
out."
The Ubyssey immediately sent a reporter-photographer
team to keep surveillance on the men's sleeping area.
After only a half-hour wait, a striking blonde and a tall,
thin bearded man gazed furtively about the bowling alley
entrance.
The man walked into the washroom. A moment later he
beckoned to the blonde to come with him.
After waiting another ten minutes, The Ubyssey team
rushed in and began taking pictures.
Cries of surprise and anger forced the investigators to flee.
"Just because you found this place doesn't mean you have
to expose it," said Arch Richards, arts 2.
"It's been going on for some time now," he said.
Richards was coming in the door just as the Ubyssey
staffers were leaving. He was alone.
Alma Mater Society co-ordinator Dave Grahame told The
Ubyssey he would investigate the matter.
"Maybe we should install some of the birth control
handbooks down there," Grahame said.
THE UBYSSEY
228-2305
Vol. LI, No. 12 VANCOUVER, B.C. TUESDAY, OCTOBER 21, 1969 <*^jP	
Minority groups
plan counter-trek
"The people's university must meet the needs of all the people." — Dr.
Frank Wesbrook, UBC president 1913-1919.
"Trek Week is a tive-day publicity stunt to underline what the Alma
Mater Society and administration consider to be the iundamental problem
lacing UBC: lack of funds for education."—leaflet published by the Ad Hoc
Committee for a People's Trek.
Nathan Nemetz, justice of the B.C. supreme court
and former chairman of the UBC board of governors, is
expected to be named winner of the great trekker award
Wednesday.
The award is presented annually by the Alma Mater
Society to a "distinguished alumnus of UBC".
Past winners of the award include MacMillan Bloedel
president J. V. Clyne, B.C. Hydro co-chairman Hugh
Keenlyside, former Liberal cabinet minister James Sinclair,
druggist George Cunningham and administration president
Walter Gage.
Under the Covers
Trek  in  retrospect	
Gibson loses confidence
Pfage Tuesday 	
Organizers of trek week, designed to
commemorate the UBC great trek in 1922, hope to
get several hundred people out to a march on the
courthouse Wednesday to improve the university's
public image.
Buses will transport people from UBC to the
north end of Burrard bridge, whence they will
march on the courthouse.
There they will hear a few introductory
folksongs, opening remarks by Alma Mater Society
president Fraser Hodge, and speeches by Alderman
Ed Sweeney, deputy administration president Bill
Armstrong, Socred MLA Evan Wolfe and
administration president Walter Gage.
But some people—both student and citizens
groups—disagree—so they've formed the Ad Hoc
Committee for a People's.Trek.
Committee member John Davies, arts 4, said
Monday the main problem at UBC is that "the
people who pay aren't benefitting from it."
To express their discontent, the Unemployed -
Citizens   Committee,   the   Welfare   Improvement
Committee, the Native Alliance for Red Power, and
other groups within the committee are staging their
own "trek week" activities.
These include a rally today at noon in the SUB _
ballroom, where speakers from the various groups
will voice their protests.
NARP, a group of Canadian Indians based in
Vancouver, has already released the following
statement:
"The history of Canada was written by the
oppressors, invaders of this land. Their lies are
perpetrated in the educational system today. By
failing to exprose the true history of Canadian
society, the schools facilitate our continued
oppression.
"Therefore, we want an education that teaches
us our true history and exposes the racist values of
this society. We demand that UBC institute a
Department    of    Indian    Studies,    staffed    and
maintained by native people and that all graduating
students must have taken one course from this
department."
The committee also plans to march in
Wednesday's trek to the courthouse, carrying their
own signs.
Says a committee statement: "We support Dr.
Wesbrook's statement that the people's university
must meet all the needs of all the people.
"To that end we believe that the university
should proceed immediately to create a department
of suppressed students, with mandatory courses in
the history and culture of the native Indians and
other minorities, the working class, the poor and
women.
"We believe in a program of open admissions
for people from these areas, to help correct the
racist, anti-working class, elitist, anti-women
educational system currently available in B.C.
The UBC Women's Caucus issued a statement
saying any further funds for UBC should go toward
free day care centres, abortion and birth control
clinics, and courses on women as an oppressed
group.
Says the Unemployed Citizens' Welfare
Improvement Council: "The university should serve
the community, especially oppressed people rather
than business interests. Poor people need money,
food, clothes, recreational facilities and proper
medical care, none of which we are getting today. In
all of these fields the university could move to help
overcome and solve these problems." Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 21, 1969
World in Revolution
Ethiopia: rebels suppressed
Ethiopia needs a dedicated group of
revolutionists to help overthrow the existing
powers, Hago Yesus said in Buchanan 100
Monday noon.
Yesus. president of the World Brotherhood
of Ethiopian Students, spoke of the nature of
problems facing the people of Ethiopia.
"The Union of Ethiopian Students is
opposed to the social, economic and political
injustices that exist in my county," Yesus said.
"Of all the problems in Ethiopia the
students consider land reform the most pressing
and claim 'Land to the Tiller' as their slogan".
Yesus said 95 per cent of the population
are serfs who till 90 per cent of the land which
is owned by three interest groups in Ethiopia.
The three groups, according to Yesus, are
emperor Haile Selassie, the aristocracy and the
Ethiopian orthodox church.
"The worst offender of justice is Selassie,
who recently passed a law which said that a
peasant is no longer required to give more than
75 per cent of his produce to the landlord,"
Yesus said.
Yesus said according to U.N. figures 95 per
cent ofthe Ethiopian population is illiterate.
He said all schools and universities have
been closed for the last six months to curb
rebel elements in the student population.
This was accomplished by the passage of
two laws: no more than five people can
assemble for political reasons and anyone can
be arrested and imprisoned if suspected of
rebellious activities.
"There is a tremendous amount of CIA
activity in Ethiopia which stems from the
special services U.S. military base, the largest in
Africa," Yesus said.
China: politicization goes on
China will never return to normal after the
cultural revolution, Asian studies grad student
Neil Burton said Friday.
Mao Tse-tung sees the cultural revolution
as part of the day to day politicization of the
Chine people, Burton told the audience of 200
inBu. 106.
"It is part of the continuing process," he
said.
He said the struggle between Chinese
president Liu Chao-chi and chairman Mao was
brought about by conflicting ideas on
'efficiency'.
Liu wanted short-tern efficiency brought
about by the use of highly trained experts while
Mao  wanted  a  long-tern  efficiency   brought
about by the political awareness of the masses,
Burton said.
"The concept of class in China has become
re-defined as a state of mind rather than on the
basis of economic background," he added.
At the same meeting, Asian studies
graduate Dick Woodsworth compared the
prevailing aims of North American and Chinese
students.
"The Chinese students seek dignity
through manual labour for the good of the
masses," he said.
"The North American student seeks
dignity through intellectual labour that sets
them above the masses."
The lectures were sponsored by the
Campus Left Action Movement.
Biosciences
uniting
Students from UBC's life
sciences department have united.
The purpose of the Life
Science club is to bring together
the separate diciplines, such as
biology, chemistry, and medicine.
"We plan not only to have
speakers of interest to all
departments, but to plan retreats,
social events, and intimate
discussions of scientific and social
interest as well," said club
chairman, Marvin Nider, science 4.
Alderman Harry Rankin will be
the guest speaker at the annual
meeting of the Vancouver Tenants
Council tonight at 8 p.m. in the
new veterans branch of the
Canadian legion, 1335 Burrard.
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Tickets at AMS in SUB
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SUB FILMS PRESENTS:
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TICKET HOLDERS ARE ENTITLED TO:
* One concert by the Sandpipers and the New Breed in
SUB Ballroom at either 8 p.m. or 10 p.m.
* Plus Entry to the Fabulous 3 Band Continuous Dance
which runs from 8 p.m. - 2 a.m. with SWEET ROLLE
from Seattle and HIGH FLYING BIRD in SUB Cafeteria.
Also NEW BREED in Ballroom after Midnight.
Tickets available from AMS Office in SUB
$3.00, $3.50 and $4.00
Also at Booth across from Information in SUB
between 11:30 and 2 p.m. Daily
CONCERT
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FOR ONE PRICE Tuesday, October 21, 1969
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
- Council approves Gibson non-confidence move
The Alma Mater Society council Monday night voted
non-confidence in internal affairs officer Dave Gibson.
A motion by law rep Dell Valair said Gibson's
performance in office had been "extremely
unsatisfactory."
Gibson now has the choice of resigning or waiting for
council to go through formal recall procedures. He left
Monday's council meeting before the vote was taken and
did not indicate what he will do.
Gibson was cirticized for failure in the public
relations aspect of his job, particularly in regard to the
recent provincial election and the border closing
demonstration.
Gibson admitted that his performance had been "less
than satisfactory, less than I'm capable of and less than I
Boyd re-hired
to do odd jobs
By SANDY KASS
Dermot Boyd's position in the Alma Mater Society is
no longer "unspecified".
The former SUB games area manager is now doing a
report on the situation in the games area.
Boyd was fired in August when his position was
reclassified to a part time job. He was re-hired in an
unspecified capacity two weeks ago.
"I  have  personally  hired  him  to do a complete
rundown  on  everything   to  do with the Alma Mater
Society from his point of view," said AMS president
Fraser Hodge.
No comment was made on what Boyd will be doing
when his report is finished.
It has been rumored that six AMS employees plan a
mass resignation if Boyd is re-instated.
"I was unaware that such rumors exist," said
ombudsman Sean McHugh.
"Nothing has been said officially, but there is always
that possibility,"
However, acting SUB building manager, Graeme
Vance, did not deny the existence of such rumors.
"I feel it is my duty to state my position before
student council before making it public," Vance said.
He had no comment to make on Boyd's report.
"Rumors are rumors. I can do nothing until official
resignations have been received", Hodge said.
owe to this council," but said he has been doing much
more in the last three or four weeks.
"I can see why there are serious questions why I
haven't done my job, but things have picked up
considerably and can only continue to improve," Gibson
said.
AMS president Fraser Hodge said he agreed Gibson
should be relieved of his duties, but doubted if council
had the right to make the decision.
"I myself have lost confidence in his ability to do the
public relations job that is required," Hodge said.
"*•'■' sW-sr ii «*
"However, at this point this council is not competent
to judge the competence of Mr. Gibson.
"There are many people around this table who have
done a worse job in terms of their responsibility than he
had."
Hodge said he would vote for the non-confidence
motion because Gibson had not shown a great amount of
ability or any clear indication there would be an
improvement.
"But a number of people who will vote for the
motion haven't contributed much themselves," he said.
- ■■.•-J**?,-«■■'-.i-.k-;*'
"    ■* ■*    '' ■ - i*******-'    »   — •»
.■:*..*   *■*.■ V*-"j,--***.   *       .    .,,■■>"■! Tj
■>.-■■- ....«■-■■■■■■•■■'..-■.
■    -    .   -4        '   "  '
—dirk visser photo
COULD THIS BE beautiful Vancouver? Well, at least it's the West End on a polluted Saturday morning, with North
Shore mountains replaced by a crane.
Great trek in retrospect: it meant something then
By FRAN McGRATH
Back in 1922,the great trek, or "varsity week" as it
was called then, was no student protest in today's sense.
The movement had the backing of the downtown
media, the public and businessmen's clubs.
An MLA of the majority party even threatened to
resign his seat for the students' cause.
The Province's first coverage of the planned trek was
buried in the middle pages on Saturday, October 19,
1922.
The story was headlined "All ready for 'Varsity
week". "University Students Attend Pep Meeting Friday
in full force-Extensive Plans Made for Campaign and
"Pilgrimage" to Point Grey," it read.
Tge story described the students' enthusiasm and gave
the aim of the week as being to be bring the needs of the
institution to the attention of the public.
The students felt that if something wasn't done
immediately the university would decline.
The story quoted campaign manager J. A. Grant as
saying," I should like every student to realize the
tremendous responsibility which rests upon him."
Campaign  committee  member J.  V.  Clyne  (now
president of MacMillan Bloedel) urged the students to be
sincere to get behind the movement wholeheartedly.
The article described the plans for the week, a canvass
for signatures on a petition to starts construction of the
Point Grey campus and the actual march on the Saturday.
A story on Wednesday of varsity week emphasized
the support the students were receiving.
The Rotary, Kiwanis and Gyro clubs were building
floats to put in their parade. Local merchants gave part of
their newspaper advertising space to the student
campaign.
A headline in the back of Friday's Province gave the
government's stand on the issue. "Lack of Funds
Precludes Point Grey Home, Premier Tells Women
Liberals."
By Saturday of Varsity Week the movement finally
hit page one. Headlined "ON PILGRIMAGE TO
VARSITY GROUNDS Students' Parade Attracts Much
Attention on Downtown Streets-Need of Better Quarters
Emphasized by Floats, Songs, Yells."
The story related that almost 1,200 students took
part in the march.
The one discordant note in the whole drive was given
by the little of one of the marching songs: "We Ain't no
government darlings."
Law faculty circulates drug form
A questionnaire dealing with the use and
opinions of marijuana is being circulated among law
students.
The questionnaire is being circulated by law
student association president Carey Linde, who will
use the information in a brief he plans to submit to
the federal government on the non-medical uses of
drugs.
Law dean G. F. Curtis supports the
questionnaire. Although he stresses its voluntary
aspect, Curtis urges all students to take the time to
answer the questionnaire "in view of the importance
of the issue it deals with."
Linde said he would like to see other faculties
follow the law faculty ."Hopefully the medical school,
social workers and others will conduct similar
surveys," he said.
Linde said if enough students in the professional
fields admit to the use of marujuana, society will
either have to re-assess its opinion of these people of
of marijuana.
"Compared to the real ills facing society, pot use
is a negligible problem-but still one that merits our
attention," he said.
There were a couple of back page articles the next
week telling about visitors day at UBC, held for the public
to see the overcrowded conditions for themselves, and an
account of an MLA introducing a resolution to start the
construction.
Then on Nov. 3, the story hit page one again.
"PREMIER ASSURES DELEGATION OF STUDENTS
GOVERNMENT WILL ANNOUNCE POLICY" headed an
account of how a delegation of students A. E. Richards, J.
A. Grant, and P. M. Barr received the brush off from the
government.
The article ended by describing a growing public
belief that spring would see the start of construction.
On Nov. 8 headlines in the Province said
"UNIVERSITY IS TO BE BUILT."
The story said the university would be built and
funded only by the sale of the endowment lands. In
another story the account of what actually happened was
given.
The same committee that went to Victoria before,
plus James L. Lawrence and Clyne went to the legislature
with a petition of 53,000 names.
This time the legislature adjourned to talk to them
although Premier John Oliver made no commitment.
The next day the announcement was made.
The story quoted. Barr as saying the campaign had
been kept free of political emphasis.
"All classes of people and all the leading
organizations of the province had expressed their hearty
support of the campaign carried on by the students," he
said.
Vietnam talks start
Anthropology prof Bill Willmott will give the first of
a series of lectures on the causes of the Vietnam war in
SUB 207-209 today at noon.
There will be nine lectures in all, dealing with
Vietnamese history and geography, the background of the
first and second Indochinese wars, the Geneva agreements,
the entry of the U.S. into Vietnam and recent
developments in the war. Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 21, 1969
mm
THEUBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial
opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian University Press.
The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services of Pacific Student
Press, of which it is a founding member. Ubyssey News Service
supports one foreign correspondent in Pango-Pango. The Ubyssey
publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City
editor, 228-2305; editor, 228-2301; Page Friday, 228-2309;
sports 228-2308; advertising, 228-3977.
OCTOBER 21,1969
Suck, blow, grovel
Theoretically, today is supposed to be a day of
teach-ins in the classroom.
That means all sorts of neat and groovy things are
supposed to happen. Cogent opinion, meaningful
dialogue, penetrating analysis and other cool things are
scheduled to rise from the primeval slime of apathy. A
learning experience, as it were. A process of
understanding.
Theoretically, all these things are supposed to
happen because the boys sponsoring Trek Week think
that they should.
We doubt that they will.
Trek Week, like so many other "higher education
promotion" schemes that have crawled out of the minds
of the AMS bureaucrats, politicos and other assorted
"concerned students," reeks.of scrubbed faces, shiny
shoes and happy smiles—the good student image.
It smells like one of those schemes that involves
the student going downtown and seeing how many
businessmen he can suck up to with cries of
over-crowding and lack of funds.
A little less blatant than the nigger antics of the
Shinerama people with the frosh in September, but the
same idea.
Trek Week officials deny this is the image they are
trying to project. They say they want to get the gut
issues, publicize the problems of the University and start
people tninking.
But when plugs come on UBC Radio-CYVR saying
that Trek Week will show the people downtown that all
students aren't long-haired rioters, or something like
that, it makes you wonder.
-lakes you wonder about just what the Trek
i7eek people think the gut issues are. Are they
over-crowding, lack of funds, lousy library facilities, bad
teaching?
They probably think so. We don't.
While these are certainly problems, they are
problems within the present university structure.
The real questions lie outside that structure,
looking at the university objectively, from a distance,
and asking what its function is.
Are you here to be programmed into the economy
or are you here to be educated, to learn?
The two are mutually exclusive. And it is this basic
contradiction that leads to the greatest of the
university's problems. The question is not what
hardships we have to put up with while we are here but
whether or not we should be here in the first place.
This is the sort of thing that theoretically should
be discussed in classrooms in connection with the
teach-in today.
Somehow, unfortunately, we doubt that it will.
Editor: Michael Finlay
News Paul Knox
City Nate Smith
Photo Bruce Stout
Wire .Irene Wasilewski
Sports Jim Maddin
Associate Peter Ladner
Senior John Twigg
Ass't News Maurice Bridge
Managing Bruce Curtis
Page Friday Fred Cawsey
Norbert Ruebsaat
Trek, you tracks, cried Irving Fetish
as he dodged a frisbee which bore a
strange resemblance to an ice cream
roll. Dodging with him were John
Andersen.     Murray     Kennedy,     Fran
McGrath,     Shane     McCune,     Jennifer
Jordan and Urve Torva.
Sandy Kass nearly got raped by the
saucer-shaped object while Brian
McWatters nearly frisbeed Christine
Krawczyk in the basement. Then, too,
there were Nick Orchard, who came in
and sat around without assistance, and
Lesley Minot, who furgled Dave Keillor
to set an all-time Ubyssey record of
four in one day.
In deepest darkroom, various items
were being concocted, among them
David Bowerman, Dirk Visser and Dave
Enns,
screamed   to   George,
Mah,    they're    only
Dick Button
"It's all right,
bleeding."
Tony Gallagher and Steve Millard
disported in the jockshop while Kelvin
Beckett exposed the women's field
hockey team.
H6y**)*JS
Existential trials, or,
Rastus finds a home
By JIM DAVIES
There is nothing quite like the
Vancouver off-campus housing
situation to cultivate the "nigger
complex" in university students..
The first sign of the nigger
complex occurs when you are told
on the phone, over the apartment
intercom or face to face that
students cannot be accepted
because of many and varied
reasons.
The following are some of the
refusals I have had so far this
year:
• 'The last students that were
here wrecked the place."
• "Students are not
responsible."
• "Students are always causing
trouble."
However, my all time favorite
inanity from an apartment
manager (ne janitor) was "Sorry,
we specified in our ad that we
were renting to adults only."
How do I feel? I am 22 years
old, having reached puberty a few
years ago, climb telephone poles
in the summer and I am not an
adult.
Apartment managers refuse to
look at your references and if by
chance you have a full head of
hair, they will not even let you
into the lobby.
The full blossoming of the
complex comes a bit later. This
occurs when the building owner
or manager starts climbing on you
for insignificant things or things
you don't even know about.
An incident of this sort
happened to me this week and I
believe it to typical of the attitude
of many apartment managers in
Vancouver.
The essential background to
this story is that I had a party
about a month ago, and although
there were no complaints, the
manager clearly no longer thought
of me as his fair-haired boy.
I detected antagonism when he
refused to get on the sqme
elevator with me.
Then last week it happened.
My room-mate pushed the
elevator button, the door opened
and there was the roof of the
elevator.
A friend who was with him and
who used to work for Otis
Elevator Co. was about to flip the
little button that restarts the
elevator.
The manager came out of the
other   elevator   and   told   them
rather brusquely to depart from
the scene, which they did.
We soon received a letter from
the company that owns the
building asking us why we had
crawled through the elevator
hatch, messed about on the roof,
and royally buggered the elevator.
Although some individuals
refer to me as god, omnipresence
is not one of my multi powers and
as I was attending a political
geography lecture at UBC, I think
it unlikely that I was able to
perform the old elevator trick.
Well, several phone calls and
letters later and we are leaving the
building under seige at the end of
the month.
I have been going through the
nigger syndrome again looking for
another place and I have found
one that seems to be slightly more
reasonable.
If you live in residence or at
home and are not familiar with
the sydrome, you can find it any
time you are at a store counter,
whenever you try to cash a
cheque, and in particular, when
you apply for a job.
There is not much you can do
.about it so just sit back and enjoy
your watermelon.
LETTERS TO THE  EDITOR
Grad stuff
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I would like to sympathize
with Velma May and Beverley
Pillar, ed 4, whose letter appeared
in the Friday edition of The
Ubyssey. I, too, was very
disappointed at the turnout of
grads to the first Grad Class
meeting despite the fact that it
was publicized before-hand in The
Ubyssey. However, the report of
preceedings was hardly fair. True,
the engineers came to the meeting
prepared to nominate a full slate
of candidates, but they also
expected to have completition
from the other faculties. Both
Ann Jacobs, the introductory
chairman, and I have ample time
for nominations for all positions,
but it was quite obvious that all
positions were going to be taken
by acclamation. Incidentally, Eva
Rathgeber, arts 4, was elected to
the position of Public Relations
Officer.
This show af apathy (there's
that disease again) on the part of
graduating students can be
interpreted in two ways. Either
the grads are no longer interested
in the fuctions sponsored by the
Grad Class, such as Class Day
Exercises, appointing of
honourary positions, class gift,
etc., or they are content to let the
engineers take care of the details
of it all. If the former is the case,
then let us hear more about it.
Perhaps the university should stop
collecting the $7 grad fee and
start sending degrees to graduating
students in the mail with no
further ceremony. If the latter
interpretation is correct, then the
grad class executive was
appropriately chosen. At any rate,
a grad class council is being
formed, and the next general
meeting, in the spring, will be
well-publicized in advance.
BRYON HODGES,
eng. 4
grad class president.
Criticism
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
What is wrong with UBC? I am
a first year arts student who came
to the university expecting to be
engulfed in an atmosphere of
academic freedom.
The only difference I can see
between this place and high
school is that you can smoke in
classes and the newspaper comes
out twice a week. I have as many
petty assignments and meaningless
lectures as I did in grade twelve.
In fact, I can learn as much by
reading the literary criticisms in
The Ubyssey as I can by listening
to my English 100 professor.
STANLEY TOKER
Your letter has caused an
incredible amount of debate
among editorial board members,
the main question being what to
put in a reply, a reply necessary
because we have a one and a half
inch hole just below your letter,
which this should fill—Ed. Tuesday, October 21, 1969
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
International war cartel plots next move.
Oh! What a Lovely War
By ROON
"Songs, battles and a few jokes," is the pitch.
The crowd cheers and clamors for tickets. As the
marching band toots and the sign over an
amusement peir in Brighton lights up, "World War
One."
Oh! What a Lovely War, which opened Friday
at Denman Place, is a biting, outrageously funny
satire about the war to end all wars, and the
merry-go-round madness that made it such a
bloodbath.
Director Richard Attenborough has, in this
film, gathered and molded a massive amount of
antiwar sentiment and fact to produce a very
ironic but funny attack on the stupidity and waste
oflife of the 1914-18 calamity.
Attenborough shows us the way patriotism
and pride were played upon to excuse the war and
the way the poor clods who fell for it died.
He shows us the callousness of the general
staff who don't care about the numbers of men
dfot   (pQDfL
UBC MUSIC DEPT.
Piano recital by Michi North featuring music
of Lees, Mozart, and Schumann. Tomorrow at
noon in Mus. Bldg. Recital Hall. FREE!!!
SPECIAL EVENTS
Murray Louis Dance Company does their
thing in Old Auditorium tomorrow night at 8:00
p.m. Reduced student rates ($1.50).
MUCH MORE MUSIC DEPT.
Faculty Cello Recital featuring music of
Brahms, Martino, and Wilson. Mus. Bldg. Recital
Hall Thursday at noon. FREE!!!
MORE SPECIAL EVENTS
Sandpipers (Wowie Zowie) and other assorted
trivia in SUB as part of Trek Week. Friday.
killed only about winning as if it were some game
of polo.
We also see the men in the trenches and their
attitude to the whole thing; quite a different story
than the history books tell us.
Attacking war may be old hat, but what is
different about Oh! What a Lovely War is the style
and tremendous irony with which it is done.
Sir Douglas Haig, the commander-in-chief, is
played excellently by John Mills. Haig is
continuity raving about the success of his
campaigns even as the astronomical casualty lists
are posted on the wall behind him.
At one point he prays "God grant as
victory—before the Americans arrive."
The men hate the war. In one delightful scene,
on a sunlit Sunday morning as the troops gathered
for mass, the pastor announces the hymn What a
friend we have in Jesus, and one lone tenor begins
to sing "When this lousy war is over."
The men have no respect for their officers.
In another scene we see a platoon of
battle-hardened Aussies backs.. . only playing
leapfrog. As they sing this a scene of troop
inspection comes on with the inspecting officers
doing a little Keystone Kops skip to the music
every once in a while.
The scenes shift back and forth between the
realistic looking front lines and the amusement
pier so we never lose sight of the "War as Carnival"
mood which prevails throughout the film.
Every rank and insipid cliche about the
romanticism, patriotism, heroism and necessity
of war is exposed and smashed by Attenborough
and his cast.
In many ways the movie is very
impressionistic, almost surreal. But the important
thing is it gets the message across and leaves no
doubts as to where it stands.
Oh! What a Lovely War is an excellent film
that somehow keeps us laughing at the tragedies of
World War One while shooting" down the romantic
idealism foisted upon us by war mongers. The
subject is not a funny one, but Attenborough's
treatment of it is priceless.
VSOunds
by
MICHAEL QUIGLEY
Julian Bream appeared in concert with the Vancouver
Symphony Sunday afternoon, the result being some superior
music-making and a sold-out house, as was also the case on
Monday evening.
Eager students hoping to get in at the last minute were
disappointed (there was a line-up outside), though a few lucky
ones received free tickets from altruistic concert-goers who
showed up and distributed extra tickets gratis.
A relaxed and very quiet atmosphere prevailed inside, a nice
contrast to the opening concerts two weeks previous, where the
Queen E sounded like the tubercular ward of a hospital.
No doubt the reason for the hushed stillness was Cool Hand
Julian doing this thing on the lute and guitar. Opening piece,
though, was Mozart's Symphony No. 29.
"Not bad," I mumbled as Meredith Davies led the reduced
orchestra in a poetic if somewhat hushed rendition.
English composer Malcolm Arnold's Guitar Concerto
followed, displaying some lush Debussyan chord effects,
especially in its second movement, coupled with overtones of the
blues idiom. (Just like the program notes said.)
Terrific concentration was required of the audience in
Vivaldi's Lute Concerto which followed, which was even more
silent than the guitar work which preceded. At its end, the
audience bloodlessly yelled for more, obviously wanting to get
their money's worth of one ofthe world's great guitarists. Bream
replied by giving the last movement of the Vivaldi over again.
The Concerto for Orchestra by Bartok which concluded the
program was a bit of let-down. The only movement which had
requisite amount of melancholia and soulful lyricism was the last
one. Not that it wasn't well played, but there was just a bit of
something missing.
Exactly what it was could have been some acoustical
presence. Since the back wall of the stage had been opened up
slightly, the sound of the horns might have been allowed to go
trickling off into the wings. They didn't seem very loud from my
seat.
Or maybe rainy Sunday afternoons aren't the right time for
digging Bartok.
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For Information Phone: 228-3708 Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 21, 1969
Belshaw report
Plans to cut enrolment
By PETER LADNER
Third of a series
"It seems probable that if
enrolment policies for 1969-70 at
the University of British Columbia
were continued, total enrolment a
decade hence would be about
40,000.
"Is this in the best interests of
students, the faculty and
society?"
This is the key question in the
second chapter of the senate's
long-range objectives committee
report.
Their answer is no.
The authors of the report
figure a little university (17,500
students on the existing campus)
is better than a big one (40,000).
Although a big campus would
provide more academic variety, it
would also provide larger classes,
more red tape, less communal
feeling, and longer walks to
parking lots.
Having decided to limit
enrolment, they had to work out
where to start.
Do you look at the buildings
and figure out how many bodies
will fit into them, or do you set a
limit on the number of bodies and
then adjust your buildings to fit
them?
The report chose the second
method. Basing the limitation on
a concern for high-quality
education and the lack of
facilities, they come out for
holding enrolment at 27,500.
This means limiting undergrad
enrolment to 22,000 students and
stopping grad enrolment at 5,500
students, increasing at an annual
rate of not more than 1 5 per cent.
(At present there are 1,100 grad
students.)
To do this, the report wants
the first-year entrance
requirement raised to 65 per cent
from the present 60 per cent, and
the second-year passmark raised
to 60 per cent from 50 per cent.
Starting in Sept., 1970, the
report calls for a quota of
students to limit entry to the first
two years in arts, agriculture,
education, phys. ed., recreation
and science and commerce (first
year only). The quota would be
the number of students in the
faculty this December, or the
average of students enrolled in the
faculty from 1966-70
Stuck in the middle of all these
recommendations is a minority
beef by Cyril Belshaw, who calls a
27,500 limit "arbitrary and
unjustified".
He attacks the policy as
short-sighted for not considering
we might expand to more than
one campus.
He likes the 65 per cent
entrance requirement, but he
wants enrolment based on the
number of students each academic
program can accommodate. This
ties in with his proposal for
federated colleges, each with
fairly independent academic
programs.
Regardless of details, everyone
on the committee agreed that
enrolment be limited only on the
basis of academic ability, not on
geographic origin or the quality of
the school a student comes from.
Even if all these
recommendations are passed by
senate, the final decision is still up
to the board of governors. Don't
count on their automatic
acceptance of the senate
proposals. They have yet to
implement the enrolment
restrictions passed by the senate
more than a month ago.
Next issue: What should be
included in the curriculum?
Horny men want women;
horny women want men
The horny old men in the Pit want women.
Of course, the horny young jwomen in the Pit also want men.
What all this brings us to is the sale this week of Pit
memberships for all those socially-starved men and women looking for
each other.
Memberships are being sold for $2.50 in the main foyer of SUB,
across from the information desk.
Pit organizers are attempting to get a draft beer licence under
status as a club.
"We hope that the liquor commission will submit a first briefing
to the legislature in this sitting and hopefully there will be some
changes," said AMS co-ordinator Dave Grahame.
At present the Pit, located in SUB 200, is open from 4:30 to
11:30 p.m. on Tuesday and Thursday.
Grahame said the club could also be opened on Wednesdays,
possible with entertainment, if there is a good response to this week's
membership drive.
'tween classes
DEBATING SOC
Meeting  to  discuss  BSU  tournament,
noon, Bu.  224.
ANTHOSOC  UNION
Workshop on race, noon,  SUB, 119E.
PSYCH  CLUB
Dr. Edro Signori on Psychology as a
Profession.   New   members   welcome.
Ang.   24,  noon.
PRE-DENTAL   SOC
Mrs.    Robinson    on    dental    hygiene,
noon,   SUB   113.
PRE MED SOC
Meeting,  noon.  Wesbrook 201.
SLANT
Meditation meeting,   7:30 p.m.,  Brock
305
THUNDERBIRD   MOTORCYCLE   CLUB
Meeting noon, SUB 211.
THURSDAY
ROD  & GUN
Important    financial    meeting,    noon,
SUB   105B.
SIMS
Weekly     group     meditation,      every
Thursday,   7:30 p.m.,  Brock 305.
SUB FILMS
Bye  Bye   Braverman,   noon   today,   7
& 9 p.m.  Friday,  8 p.m.  Saturday,  7
p.m. Sunday, SUB theatre.
DEPARTMENT   OF   MUSIC
Cello recital by Eugene WUson, 2:30,
From page 8
musical recital hall.
NISEI   VARSITY
Important general meeting, noon, Bu
205.
YOUNG SOCIALISTS
Socialist   organizers  Gary  Porter  and
Mike Jones on Campus Revolt and the
Socialist Revolution,  noon,  Bu   205.
ENGLISH   100   COMMITTEE
English  145   lecture,   noon,   Ang.   110.
Dr   W.  F.  Hall on Faulkner.
ARTS U.S.
All-candidates   meeting   of   would-be
AMS reps, noon, Bu. 106.
FRIDAY
SPECIAL   EVENTS
Sandpipers in concert, 8 p.m & 10
p.m. Plus continuous dance from 8
p.m. with the New Breed, Sweet
Kolle and High Flying Bird. All in
SUB ballroom for $3, $3.50 and $4.
AIESEC
Organizational meeting for all economics and commerce students who
want a summer job in Europe or anywhere  else,  noon,   Ang.   415.
SATURDAY
FOLK SONG SOC
Get-together, 8:30 p.m. Come to SUB
210 for place.
PROVOCATIVE
Contemporary Dance
in the
Old Auditorium
Wednesday 8 p.m.
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Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
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Five positions available...
one each from:
APPLIED SCIENCE (Engineering, Architecture, Agriculture, and Forestry)
ARTS (Arts, Library Science, Home Economics, Music, and Social Work)
GRADUATE STUDIES
COMMERCE OR LAW
SCIENCES (Science, Dentistry, Medicine, Pharmacy, and Nursing)
NOMINATIONS CLOSE . . .
12:30 P.M. - THURSDAY, OCTOBER 23
Forms available in A.M.S. Office
Iron bu[l
SOMEWHERE IN
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Live Music and Dancing
7 NIGHTS A WEEK
Newest and most beautiful club in the Northwest
3 BANDS WEEKLY
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$12,000.00 Myns Eye Light Show, Thurs. and Fri. Elevated dance floor and a
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GRAND OPENING WITH 3 BANDS
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SAT. OCT. 25
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Mon.   -  Sat.   -   11:00  a.m.   -  2:00  a.m.
Sundays 2:00 p.m.   -   10:00 p.m.
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Oct. 27 - Nov. 1  (Mon. - Sat.
THE LIVERPOOL 5 Tuesday, October 21, 1969
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
SPOR TS
Footballers
nearly win
Shrum bowl
By STEVE MILLARD, TONY
GALLAGHER, and JOHN TWIGG
The UBC football Thunderbirds tried, oh how they tried, but
they could only get a 6-6 tie with the Simon Fraser University
Clansmen in Monday's Shrum Bowl game at Empire Stadium.
The   Birds   almost  pulled
BIRD FULLBACK DAVE CORCORAN follows strong blocking of left tackle Dick Stein, guard Don
Lumb and centre lan Jukes after taking a handoff from quarterback Al Larson. Heavy rain kept the
score to 6-6.
Field hockeyettes win
The UBC Thunderettes won
the Western Canadian
Intercollegiate Athletic
Association Field Hockey
Tournament Saturday at Chris
Spencer Field and they did it in a
most convincing fashion.
Led by Diane Rortlaniuk, the
Thunderettes won all six of their
games, five by shutouts, in the
seven team tournament. The only
goals scored against UBC were by
the  University  of Saskatchewan
(Saskatoon) Friday in a close, 3-2
UBC victory.
In what was regarded as the
game to watch between UBC and
U. of Victoria, the defending
co-champions, UBC displayed a
good deal of stamina in downing
UVic, 2-0.
Miss    Romaniuk,    an    inside
! forward,   scored   eight   of   the
Thunderettes eighteen goals and
has been selected this year's first
"bird of the week."
Intramural Notices
BADMINTON—Oct. 22 and 24: Second
round competition played As yet seven
first round games have not been played.
Please check the Intramural office to
find the date you are playing.
BASKETBALL — Preliminaries begin
Oct. 27. Schedule outside Intramural
office
FIELD HOCKEY — Oct. 21: PE vs.
Arts; Beta vs. Eng.
—Oct. 22: Figi vs. PE; Beta vs. Kappa
Sigma.
—Oct. 24: Eng vs Arts; Phi Gamma
vs.  Beta.
FOOTBALL—Oct. 21: PE I vs. For. 1
(4:30); DU vs. Arts; Commerce vs. Dekes
(4:30); Comm II vs. Pharmacy; Eng V
vs.  Eng VIII; Eng VI vs. Eng VII.
—Oct. 22: DU vs Aggies; Phi Gamma
vs. AD; Beta II vs. Eng IV; Aggies II
vs. ZBT; PE II vs. Beta III; St. Mark n
vs. Kapp Sig Pledges (4:30); Beta
Pledges vs. For n (4:30); Carey Hall vs.
Union II (4:30).
—Oct. 23: St. Marks II vs. Beta
Pledges (4:30..; Carey HaU Vs. Kappa
Sigma Pledges (4:30); Union II vs. For
II (4:30).
—Oct. 24: PE vs. Eng; For vs. Eng;
Aggies vs. Phi Delta; Sigma Chi vs.
Arts; SAM vs. Beta; Kappa Sigma vs.
Law; St Marks n vs. Carey Hall; Union
II vs.   Beta Pledges.
SOCCER—Oct.   21:  Aggies vs.   Dekes;
Law vs. Union (4:30); DU vs. Carey
Hall; Eng I vs. Kappa Sigma I; For vs.
AD.
—Oct. 22: Union vs. Kappa Sigma;
Eng II vs. Eng IV; Grad vs. St. Marks;
St. Marks vs. Psi U (4:30); Grad vs
Eng  in   (4:30).
SWIMMING—Oct. 22: AD vs. Eng;
Union  vs.   For.
—Oct. 23: Eng vs. AD.
TENNIS—Schedule posted outside Intramural office. First games must be
played  by  Oct.   29.
RESULTS—Football—Oct. 16: Figi/PE
III; Oct. 17: Figi-2/K.Sigma-2. Swimming—Oct.  15: For-50/Beta-20; Eng/AD.
WOMEN'S  INTRAMURAL
1) University managers meetings.
2) Bowling schedule posted.
3) Debbie Wills is new bowling manager.
4) Table tennis wiU start in SUB for
the first week and then will move to
Hamber  House.
VOLUNTARY  RECREATION  PROGRAM
1. Student Badminton: Tues. 8:30-11:00
p.m.; Thurs. 9:30-11:00 p.m. in Memorial
Gymnasium.
2. Modern Dance: Every Wed. 5:30-
6:30 p.m.; for information phone Mrs.
Goodwin—UBC Extension  3903.
3. Folk Dance: Every Wed. 12:30-1:30.
Dance   Studio   in   Armouries.
DIANE ROMANIUK-scoring threat
Rugby team wins
UBC rugby Thunderbirds
finally hit the winning trail this
weekend as they downed the
Vancouver Rowing Club 21-18 at
Wolfson field Saturday.
It was a very fast and
hard-fought game right up to the
end. The Birds won on an
uncoverted try with less than
three minutes to go.
Birds will try to continue their
winning ways in the Trek Week
game against U Vic Saturday at
2:00 p.m. at the stadium.
upset over SFU as their drive in
the last two minutes died on the
3-yard line with no time left.
SFU got the first touchdown, a
9-yard pass play at 13:16 of the
first quarter, but the convert was
unsuccessful. UBC scored its TD
late in the second quarter as
rookie quarterback, Al Larson
passed 28 yards on a first down
play to split end Dave Rice.
The convert was wide. The
score remained the same despite
late drives by both teams.
SFU quarterback Wayne Holm
took his team from the SFU 17 to
the UBC 20 with 2:11 left to
play.
But a dive into the line was
smothered and the ball squirmed
into the arms of UBC's Ron
Fowler who lugged it out of
danger to mid-field.
From there, UBC marched
with its steady ground game to
6-yard line with 13 seconds left.
Because UBC had used up all
its time outs, the clock kept
running and UBC's kicking team
was waved off the field. Larson
called a dive into the line that was
stopped, but he could have passed
to stop the clock.
But that is second-guessing.
After the game UBC coach Frank
Gnup was fervent.
"Since we were underdogs you
can't be too unhappy about a
tie," he said, "but when you come
so damn close, just so god damn
close ...
"Only one more play at the
end of the game or one block on
Fowler's fumble recovery would
have given us the game."
About the confusion at the end
of the game, Gnup said: "Those
kids just got too excited, their
inexperience cost them the
game."
On the game as a whole, Gnup
exclaimed: "We were well
scouted. To stop our running,
(SFU coach Lome) Davies used a
six-two  defence-it  didn't  work.
"I sure would like to see
Lome's face now."
However, Davies skipped out
soon after the game and said only:
"The UBC kids really deserved a
tie, especially those backs
Corcoran and Fowler.
Asked if the muddy field and
rainy conditions hurt his club,
Davies said: "The conditions hurt
us a little, but then both clubs had
to play on the same field."
The statistics showed the teams
were equally matched.
The Birds' total offence was a
spectacular 276 yards, 210 of
them on the ground.
SFU's Holm, named National
Association of Intercollegiate
Athletics Quarterback of the
Week last week, was held to only
14 completions in 34 attempts for
a scant 120 yards.
Fowler was the individual star
as he rushed 34 times for 166
yards. -*»■   -
Said centre Ian Jukes about
Fowler after the game, "He was
half of our team, he simply hit the
hell out of them."
Fowler, fullback Dave
Corcoran, Jukes and tackle Don
Lumb all played two-way
football. Many other Birds saw
action on both offence and
defence.
The game was a moral victory
for UBC because in the last two
years of the Shrum Bowl game
SFU defeated UBC by scores of
32-12 and 27-7.
Only_4j£_ll fans watched the
slugfest in the mud, but most of
them were vociferous UBC fans.
Last year about 8,000 people
attended the game.
The UBC rowing crew is
looking for both managers and
coxswains for the upcoming
collegiate season.
To qualify for coxswain one
must weigh under 120 pounds and
have a loud voice.
For those interested please
come to the rowing workout at
War Memorial gym today at 4:30
p.m. or phone Rod Bell-Irving at
261-3767 this evening.
THE   DINER
4556 W. 10th Ave.
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FOR YOUR COMFORT
Satisfying Meals at
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736-7788
Weekdays to 1
a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
FLASH!
One hundred very pregnant elephants have charged thru the Ballroom so the
Murray Louis Dance Com.
pany performance has been
moved to the old Auditorium.
International House
CAFETERIA
LUNCH:
j Mon. to Fri. 11:30 to 3 p.m.
SPECIAL:
West Indian Food
On Mondays
COFFEE SHOP:
a.m. to 5 p.m. Weekdays
ALL CANDIDATES
MEETING
FOR
-SENATE ELECTION-
12:30   Monday - October 27
S.U.B.  Auditorium Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
TODAY
WOMEN'S CAUCUS
_ SFU Prof. Prudence Wheeldon on
Women as an Oppressed Group, 8
p.m., Labor Temple, 307 W, Broadway.
KARATE   CLUB
No   workout   tonight.
'tween
classes
YOUNG SOCIALISTS  STUDENT
CHRISTIAN  MOVEMENT
First lectures in a series on Vietnam
by Prof. Willmott, noon, SUB 207-
209.
IWW
>   Cheap radical literature on sale, SUB
south entrance.
PEOPLE'S   TREK  AD-HOC  COMMITTEE
Community   rally   for   people's   trek,
noon, SUB Ballroom.
BLACK  CROSS   POOD  CO-OP
Cheap   lunches    on   sale    each   noon
hour, 12-1 p.m., south entrance to SUB
cafeteria.
ARTS  US
Meeting   of   all   Arts   rep   candidates,
noon,  Bu.   107.
B'NAI   B'RITH   HILLEL   FOUNDATION
Rabbi   Neur   Felman   on   "A   tale   of
three cities",  noon,   Hillel House.
CIASP
First general meeting, noon, SUB 111.
GEOGRAPHY   CLUB
Mr. Gerald Thompson shows slides of
Gastown, noon,  G & G 200.
LIFE   SCIENCE   CLUB
Meeting  of those interested in being
on  the  executive,  noon.  SUB  123.
SPEC
Meeting, noon,.  SUB  125.
OFFICIAL  NOTICES
Alma  Mater  Society
Education Commissioner Wanted
To Chair Education Committee
The Education Committee Shall:
(a) Promote student influence in the University
community.
(b) Encourage and assist in the initiation, compilation
and publication of course and teacher evaluations.
(c) Aid in liaison between Students' Council and the
Senate.
(d) Look into such specific issues as:
(i)      Overcrowding of facilities
(ii) Policies of grading and evaluation
(iii) Admissions policy
(iv) Curriculum
(v) The quality of teaching
(vi)      And   generally  to  seek  the  improvement  of
the  educational environment.
Applications must be submitted in writing to T. Hodge,
vice-president AMS, SUB on or before Friday, Oct. 24, 1969.
External Affairs
Students (especially from lower years) are invited to work
on research projects on:
(a) Student residences  and housing in B.C.
(b) Scholarships, bursaries, and student loans in B.C.
(c) Liaison   between  universities,   colleges,   and   other
educational institutions  in B.C.
Contact Mike Doyle, External Affairs Office, SUB 250,
phone 228-3968.
Senate Nominees Meeting
All persons having been nominated for Senate constituency elections MUST meet in Room 111, SUB, on Thurs.,
Oct. 23 at 12:30.
Group Projects
Any undergrad society, club, etc. seeking funds for any
special projects, contact Dave Gibson, Internal Affairs
Office, SUB 252, or 228-3969.
SUB Management Commtitee Vacancy
There is one position on the SUB Management Committee now vacant.  Anyone  interested  in applying  submit
a letter with your qualifications to the A.M.S. Secretary
no later than Wednesday, October 22.
Senate  Elections
Nominations are now open for the five remaining constituency senators.
1 from Applied  Science —  Faculties  of  Engineering
Architecture, Agriculture, and Forestry.
1 from Arts  —  Faculties   of   Arts,   Library   Science,
Home Economics, Music, and Social Work.
1 from Graduate Studies — Faculty of Graduate
Studies.
1 from Commerce and Law — Faculties of Commerce
and Business Administration and Law.
1 from Science — Faculties of Science, Dentistry,
Medicine, Pharmacy, and Nursing.
Pick up nomination and eligibility forms from the A.M.S.
General Office,  second floor  S.U.B.,  and  return to  the
office of the A.M.S. Secretary. All forms must be received
by the   Secretary  no   later  than   12:30   p.m.,   Thursday
October 23.
Assistant Treasurers
Any student interested in applying for position as
Assistant Treasurer should apply in writing or in person
to Chuck Campbell by Friday, Oct. 24.
Two positions are available:
1. a special assistant to work on some areas of
benefit to all students, requiring much research
and day-to-day work. The first such project
is reduced admissions to theatres, concerts, and
movies.
2. requires some knowledge of campus activities
and the planning and arrangements necessary
for dances, concerts, etc., and will involve working with organizers from clubs, undergrad
societies, etc.
Both are rewarding positions, in terms of practical experience gained, and provide an opportunity to contribute significantly to campus life. Further information
from Chuck at 228-3975.
Tuesday, October 21, 1969
GERMAN   CLUB
Film, Tuesday,  IH.
WEDNESDAY
CHRISTIAN   SCIENCE
Regular  meeting,   noon,   IH  20.
EXPERIMENTAL   COLLEGE
Dr.    Robert    Clark,    "Why   I    am   a
Christian", noon, SUB 125. Discussion,
all welcome.
PRE-LAW   SOC
Speakers   from   Law   I,    II,   ni   and
noon,   Ang.   215.
articling   students,
LEGAL AID
Monday,    Wednesday,
SUB 237 & 237A.
MUSIC DEPT.
Michi- North Piano Recital,
musical building recital hall
of Mozart and Schumann.
LIBERAL   CLUB
Meeting   to    discuss   B.C.    University
Liberal    Federation    convention    and
elect PR officer, noon,  SUB 212.
Friday    noon,
noon,
Music
SPECIAL   EVENTS
Murray Louis dance company, 8 p.m.
in old auditorium. Note change from.
SUB ballroom.
AD   HOC COMMITTEE  FOR A
PEOPLE'S  TREK
March and rally at courthouse,  Wednesday  afternoon.
ARCH   CLUB
Meeting  at noon,  Wed.,   Bu.  205.
Continued on page 6
CLASSIFIED
Rate:s Students. Faculty & Club—3 lines, 1 day 75-t 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines. 1 day $1.00; additional lines 25*;
4 days price of 3.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and
are payable in advance.
Closing Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Office, STUDENT UNION BLDG., Univ. of B.C.,
Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
Greetings
12
Wanted Information
13
Lost & Found
14
LOST—Basement Washroom, main
library, dark briefcase with books.
Busted without same, must drop
out.   Barry   Brown,   588-3825.
LOST:— Tabby and white cat and
tabby cat, both with 6 toes on
front paws, UBC area. Reward.
224-5243.	
FOUND: CESSNA 172C. DOST:
Pilots contact, UBC Flying Club
noon,   SUB 10SB.	
LOST: BROWN PLASTIC AT-
tache case containing vital notes
on learning disabilities, Wednesday, vicinity Buchanan. Please
contact John,   325-7861	
TO THE PERSON WHO STOLE
my wallet from my car. Please
send my I.D., Suite 103, 884 Bute
Stella   Beddow.	
LADIES' WATCH OUTSIDE MED-
ical Library. Phone John, 327-6907
after   !»   p.m.	
LOST: MAN'S SEIKO WRIST-
watch. Call Andy, 224-0589. Reward.
Rides & Car Pools
15
MOBILITY — FREEDOM. $18.00
per month inc. insurance. See the
volume dealer in "Two-Wheel
Freedom" for details. Hi-Performance Honda 3712 W. 10th at Alma.
Phone   228-0077.	
NEK I) A RIDE FROM 5338 CY-
press St. to UBC for the rest of
the year. Jean Wright. I am a
blind student in I! year arts. I'll.
266-HQ2:;	
RICHMOND CARPOOL! VICTNITY
Blundell and Garden City. Especially drivers. Phone Ralph, 273-
3289;   Chris   277-5585
Special Notices
16
WHY' PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ancc rate if you are 20 years or
over and have good driving record you may qualify. Phone Ted
Elliott.    299-9422.
BINOO ENTERTAINMENT, We>\..
Oft. 22, 8 p.m.. Lord Byng H.S.,
1 fit li Ave. and Crown St.. Cash
Prizes.
SKI FLICKS NEXT WEEK TUES.
and Thurs. at 12:30 in the Old
Auditorium.. Including "Outer
Limits"!	
SUBFILMS PRESENTS "BYE BYE
BRAVERMAN". Come and say so
long! Oct. 23, 24, 25. 26; Thurs.
12:30; Fri. .7:00, 9:30: Sat.. 8:00;
Sill).   7:00.   SUB   Aud.   75c.	
DAVID A. DODGE TS ON CAMPUS this week. Watch for debates
and   other   activities.
Travel Opportunities
17
S T IT D E N T INTERESTED IN
filling out a charter to Europe
leaving approximately Jan. 1,
1970, returning approximately
May 1. One-way or return. Contact, Raven Committee, School
of   Architecture,   U.B.C.
Travel Opps Cont'd
17
KHATMANDII OVERLAND FROM
London. Depart Vancouver May
'70. return August. 12 seats only
for mixed group of under 25's.
Letters ojilv to Ed Wilks. 45,
2560.     White'ley  Crt.   N.  Van.
Wanted-Miscellaneous
18
WANTED:— Camp Trails "Medium
Cruiser", aluminum backpack and
bag.     Phone   Ian.   261-2503.
WANTED: WITCHES OH WITCH
Cult for serious Sociology Research Croup. Information replies,
Bob,   733-0477
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
1964 DODGE, 330, 4-door Sedan,
6 cylinders, standard radio, new
tires & snowtires. Tel. 732-6449
evenings.   Excellent   condition.
1966 ENVOY EPIC, $750 OR OFFER.
John Fox. room 320 Chemistry,
228-9254
Autos For Sale—Cont'd
21
'65 HONDA CAR, low mileage,
excellent condition, pirelli tires.
Call   Peter,   733-9293   after   6   p.m.
'58 VOLKSWAGEN with rebuilt
engine, excellent mechanical condition. Call 228-3432, 9 a.m. to
5'  p.m.	
1968 MGB-GT, 22,000 ml. excellent
condition, snow tires, ski pack,
etc., mineral blue, asking $2,400.
Phone   736-9509.
MUST SELL '57 SUNBEAM RA-
pier, $150, or best offer by Friday.
Call 731-3088 after 6:00.	
FOR SALE, '53 MORRIS MTNOR.
Good condition, reliable, economical transportation, $125. Phone
Fred,   224-9750	
1963 MORRIS, 1100, FT. WHEEL
drive,     new     disc,     brakes.     Good
 cond.   throughout,   261-7713	
1961 PTJGEOT 403. Clean, 30 mi./
gal, $325, or best offer. Phone
Bruce,   327-3126	
1964 PONTIAC PARISIENE WAG-
gon, 283 cu. in.; one owner: all
power euipt.: new tires, brakes.
Phone  325-4341
22
Automobiles—Wanted
Automobiles—Parts
23
Automobiles—Repairs
24
Motorcycles
25
BUSINESS SERVICES
Dance Bands
31
DIRT CHEAP ROCK BAND —
Rock Band Dirt Cheap — Band
Cheap Dirt Rock — Any way
you   want   it.    985-5727,  -Dave.
Duplicating & Copying
32
Miscellaneous
33
Photography
34
Repairing—All Kinds
35
Rentals—Miscellaneous
36
Scandals
37
WANT A HIGH? LIKE SPEED?
UBC Flying Club is legal. Join
today,   noon,   SUB  105B.	
DTRT CHEAP ROCK BAND —
Rock Band Dirt Cheap — Band
Cheap Dirt Rock — Anv way you
want   it.     985-5727,   Dave
Sewing & Alterations
38
Typewriters & Repairs
39
Typing
40
EXPERIENCED AND RELIABLE
typist available for home typing.
Please   phone   277-5640.	
TYPING WITH DELIVERY. REAS-
onable rates. Phone days 733-
2042,  eves,  and  weekends 732-6372.
TYPING DONE — 3589 WEST 19th
Ave.   Reasonable   rates.      733-5922
EXPERT TYPING, COMPETITIVE
rates. Essays, papers, etc. Thone
879-1807.	
EXPERIENCED ELECTRIC HOME
typing. Essays, theses, etc. Neat,
accurate work, reasonable rates.
321-2102.	
TYPIST — ELECTRIC. 224 - 6129.
Dunbar   Area.	
EXPERT IBM SELECTRIC TYP-
ist. Experienced essay and thesis
typist. Reasonable rates. TR 4-
9253.	
TYPING ON ELECTRTC TYPE-
writer. 30c. per sheet. Close to
university.   Tel.    224-4261.
TYPIST, EXP. ELECTRIC. PHONE
73S-7SS1"	
ACCURATE EXP. TYPING FROM
legible work; reas. rates: 73S-6S29
after  nine a.m.   to   nine   p.m.	
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female
51
Help Wanted—Male
52
Male or Female
53
EARN EXTRA MONEY QUICKLY,
easily. "Will not conflict with
studies. Larry after 6:00 p.m. Ph.
224-7352
Work Wanted
54
INSTRUCTION
Instruction Wanted
61
Language Instruction
61A
Music
62
Special Classes
63
Tutoring
64
FRENCH TUTOR FOR STUDENTS
with high school or first year of
French, $2.00 hour. Phone Mar
Mayet,   224-9073   after   6   p.m.
FLAMENCO GUITAR TUITION.
Michael   Kocial,   tel.   224-7762.
TUTORING IN MATH-PHYS. FOR
undergrad by instructor. (Ph.D.)
$5.00  hr.   Ph.  733-6037  eve.	
EXP. TUTOR FOR STUDENTS IN
math & chemistry by graduate.
738-5603.	
LOST? CALL 327-0678 FOR Expert tutoring Ih Math, Physics or
Engineering by Grad  students.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BIRD CALLS
Your  Student  Telephone
Directory
NOW AVAILABLE — $1.00
at the Bookstore,
AMS  Publications  Office
and Thunderbird Shop
FOR SALE—REIKER SKI BOOTS;
Buckle, 1967 model. Excellent condition,   $60.   Call   683-2872   after   7
p.m.
GIBSON THIN HOLLOW - BODY
electric guitar, 15 yrs. old, beautiful mellow sound $150.00 cash.
736-7574.	
B R A U N HOBBY AUTOMATIC
professional flashgun. 8 West 19th
Ave.   874-3268.	
MUST SELL 2 "DONOVAN"
tickets. Phone Jim, 985-4670, 7-10
p.m.   tonight.	
NEW LANGE SKI BOOTS, SIZE
9,   $100.   Phone  228-8700
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
SINGLE ROOM — OR ROOM AND
breakfast, men only, Dunbar area,
priv.   entrance.  Ph.  224-3389.
JUST OFF CAMPUS. LARGE
pleasant room for one male student. Private bathroom and en-
trance.   224-6757.	
SINGLE ROOM WITH PRIVATE
bath.   Male  student.   738-6680
Room & Board
82
LIVE ON CAMPUS, PHI KAPPA
Sigma. Color T.V., sauna. 5785
Agronomy   Road.    224-9684.	
ROOM AND BOARD, ALSO SUITE
for two girls to share. 1998 Cedar
Cresc,   20th,   Maple.
Furn. Houses & Aprs.
83
HOUSE TO SHARE, MALE OR
female. 596 W. 17th Ave. Private
rooms.   876-4607.        	
Unfurn. Houses  & Apts.
84
WANTED TO RENT: WORKING
couple desire 1 or 2 bedroom house
to $135 funr. or unfurn. Kits,
Jericho  or  UBC  area.  Phone  224-
3839  after   5:30.	
FURN. SUITE, No. 12, 1396 WEST
11th Ave. Available No. 1. Apply
after   6   p.m.    738-7447	
TO SHARE BSMT. SUITE, FURN-
islied.   Male  student,   call Chris at
228-9277,   4478   W.   13th   Ave.	
ROOM-MATE WANTED — MALE
(Arts}. Furnished basement suite,
:;   rms.,   bath,    utilities,   fireplace,
$50.   Phone  Dave,   321-6955	
ROOM - MATE     WANTED,     MALE
furnished one-bedroom apartment,
No. 104. 2335 West 3rd, $65.00.
Rick,   731-5403	
BASEMENT SUITE, OWN ENTCE.
Kitchen, bedroom, living room and.
bathroom. Telephone, cablevision.
Use of washer and dryer. All this
for $60.00 and occasional help in
looking after 4 school-age children. One child welcome. Phone
after   8:00   p.m.    929-1771	
SENIOR FEMALE STUDENT TO
share apt. cost, $35. Come and
see.   2434   W.   3rd.   evenings.

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