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The Ubyssey Jan 9, 1973

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Array NUS executive puts off final fee decision
By VAUGHN PALMER
A UBC meeting of the National
Union of Students executive broke up
Sunday without making final
decisions on the membership and fee
problems facing the organization.
The executive did not set any fee for
membership at this time because they
still don't know the size of the
membership, Alma Mater Society
external affairs officer Teri Ball said
Monday.
Ball, a member-at-large of the NUS
executive, said until the number of
members is known there is no way the
size of the fee can be determined.
Ball said total membership will not
be known for three or four months,
because all student unions planning
to join NUS must have their decision
ratified by a referendum among their
member students.
This means student bodies will now
have to ratify NUS membership
without knowing what the fees will be,
much the same way Simon Fraser
University students did last fall.
The UBC referendum on membership was scheduled for Jan. 17 but
it will probably be postponed till
March at Wednesday's council
meeting.
The NUS has been plagued with
problems since its first plenary
conference last May set out to form an
organization to replace the Canadian'
Union of Students which dissolved in
1969.
The new organization's stated goals
were to be to work within federal and
local government channels in order to
solve problems facing students, while
avoiding the 'politics' the planners
claimed doomed the CUS.
At the founding NUS conference
last November Quebec and Atlantic
province delegates walked out after
the meeting failed to resolve a
membership formula acceptable to
both those who felt voting power
should be apportioned on a regional
basis and those who thought the NUS
should have representation by
population.
Ontario and Western members
proceeded with the conference and
ratified the constitution.
Since then little progress has been
made. A proposed Christmas meeting
of the NUS executive failed due to
administrative problems and the
recent one at UBC was only partially
successful.
Ball said the NUS executive plans
another meeting next month.
"One of the things we plan to do is
make a complete accounting of how
much money we've spent so far and a
projection  of  future   expenditure."
Ball said this will allow prospective
members to see how far the
organization has progressed.
—kini mcdonald photo
PROSPECTIVE CUSTOMER ponders the complexity of buying a "real bargain" at the special UBC
bookstore clearance sale. "Will I ever read it? Probably not. But it will look great on the coffee table and is
ideal for pressing that warped Edith Piaf record." The sale continues this week in Brock Hall from 9 a.m. to
9 p.m. until Friday and 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday.
'No student vote'
—senate report
By GARY COULL
A senate committee has recommended students not be given
voting representation at faculty meetings or any representation
on committees concerning tenure and business meetings The
Ubyssey learned Monday.
The recommendations are contained in a report from the
senate committee on student membership in faculties to be
presented to the Jan. 17 meeting of the senate.
The question of student voting power was rejected by the
committee pending clarification of the Universities Act concerning the matter.
UBC's lawyers have interpreted the act to mean students
cannot be appointed or elected as voting members of a faculty.
The committee acknowledges legal opinions to the contrary and
cites this as the reason for the long delay bringing this question
before senate.
The report says the committee still considers "it is possible
to make substantial progress towards student representation
notwithstanding the possible legal constraint on voting rights."
The committee excludes student presence on business and
tenure committees because: "Membership of appointments,
tenure and promotions committee is governed by the principles
and procedures in the faculty handbook and these are stated to
have been mutually agreed to by the board of governors and the
executive of the faculty association. In the committee's view, it
would not be open to the senate to prescribe membership of
these committees unless prior changes were made to the
present arrangements for deciding these matters."
The report says student opinions should be sought
"wherever practicable in a formal way" concerning budget
salaries, scholarships, marks and appointments but students
should not be present at these meetings.
Grad studies senator Stan Persky said the report gives the
students the most limited role possible. "The conservative
senate will likely approve it as it reads. It says just what they
want it to say."
Persky applied this report to the present situation in the
faculty of arts. He thinks arts dean Doug Kenny is sure his
faculty will not go beyond the senate's recommendations so
there is no harm in passing the arts motions if they may be
overridden by senate. Kenny is a member of that senate
committee.
The report carries two amendments proposed by the
student members of the committee. One moves the principle of
student representation be extended to provide for divisions,
departments, schools and institutes in addition to the faculty
level. The other proposes student representation be understood
to entail full voting participation in all matters not expressly
prohibited by senate.
Arts undergraduate president Brian Loomes said Monday he
supports the two amendments to the report, adding there should
be no separation.
"Students ought to be part of everything. What I want is an
open university," he said.
Loomes bares plan
Students should attend the next arts faculty meeting unclothed, arts undergraduate president Brian Loomes said
Monday.
Loomes said the AUS executive recommends the move as a
protest of faculty's amended plan for student voting
representation and in order to eroticize the university.
Loomes said he hoped his proposal will lay bare the basic
inadequacies of the department.
Loomes obviously plans to expose the half assed way the arts
department is run. No doubt he sees this as the only way to
make a clean breast of things, perhaps to Strip away most
students' qualms and get right down to the meat of things.
Loomes said the AUS proposal will be put before students at
an open forum, Thursday noon, in Buch. 100. Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 9,  1973
Meszaros returns
OTTAWA (Staff) —
Hungarian-born Marxist
scholar Istvan Meszaros,
ordered deported last year,
will be permitted to enter
Canada legally, a spokesman
for immigration minister
Robert Andreas said Monday.
"Meszaros has been issued
entry documents enabling him
to be landed in Canada. He is
expected to arrive about Jan.
20 and apply for landed immigrant status at the port of
entry" the spokesman said.
Andras, who took over the
immigration portfolio when
Bryce Mackasey quit last
November, reviewed the
Meszaros case as promised
and decided to allow the
professor to return to Canada,
said the spokesman.
Meszaros, formerly a prof at
the University of Sussex, left
Britain last September to teach
philosophy at York University
in Toronto.
On entering Canada,
Meszaros was ordered
deported on the grounds that
he was not a "bona fide
visitor".
Meszaros returned to
England on Dec. 28 and
dropped the appeal which he
had filed with the Canadian
immigration appeal board.
Last September, 30 UBC
students and faculty members
sent a petition to Mackasey
calling for a reversal of the
"deplorable" refusal of
Meszaros, which it termed a
"disaster     for     Canadian
academic freedom."
The UBC petition was
sponsored by prof J. M. Bak of
the history department, a
former colleague of Meszaros'.
The UBC protest coincided
with similar action from
universities   across   Canada.
Single Moms aided
The Mothers • Action Centre, an aid program for single
parents, opened last week at the Children's Aid Society.
The centre, which will operate until May 31, is financed by a
Local Initiatives Project grant.
Eight community tutors have been hired to help single
parents themselves, project member Lois Deshield said
Monday.
"We are tutors, rather than social workers," Deshield said.
"We otter single parents practical help with the problems they
are facing now."
She said community tutors offer assistance on a wide range of
practical problems, such as:
o running a household: cooking and nutrition, cleaning,
knitting, and sewing, budgeting;
© handling health, behavioural and educational problems of
children;
o obtaining low cost goods and services: food and clothing,
medical and dental care;
o informing single parents of their rights with regard to
welfare, landlords.
MAC is now organizing group meetings at which single
parents are invited to discuss their problems and the kind of
help they want to receive, Deshield said.
For further information call 732-7211.
Thursday, 12:30—Sub Auditorium
WALTER THORSON
Professor of Chemistry, U. of Alberta
will speak on
"OBJECTIVITY and RELIGIOUS BELIEF'
Free Admission
$400 tax break 'expected'
Students will have to wait
until the end of the month
before they learn if they will be
eligible lor a $400 income tax
deduction.
Sometime towards the end of
January, the exact date has not
been released yet, the federal
government's budget will
receive its third reading in
parliament.
The budget contains a tax
deduction amendment
allowing students to deduct $50
per month from their earnings
for every month spent in
university. This amounts to
approximately $400.
A spokeswoman for the
personal tax reforms department said the decision on the
budget is delaying the release
of the income tax forms.
"However, we have high
expectations that the budget
will be passed. There's no
reason why it shouldn't be.
Once it is passed, the student
tax deduction will be
retroactive for 1972," she said
The deduction is over and
above a students's tuition. A
spokesman    for    the    UBC
finance department said
students will have to include a
tuition fee receipt with their
tax returns, but the $50 per
month deduction can be taken
off without proof.
"This is not unusual. You
could be a member of an
association   and   take   a   tax
deduction without submitting
proof," he said.
"A base salary of $1500 is
non-taxable," he said. "The
tuition deduction can only be
applied to the students' earnings, but the $50 a month can
be taken off by the parents or
the student," he said.
George & Berny's
VOLKSWAGEN
REPAIRS
COMPLETE SERVICE BY
FACTORY-TRAINED
MECHANICS
FULLY  GUARANTEED
AT REASONABLE RATES
731-8644
2125  W.   10th  at  Arbutus
U.B.C. Bookstore
BOOK SALE
25-75% Off On $383,000.00 Book Inventory
For four full weeks in January the UBC Bookstore is holding a sale of
thousands of new books.
Retail value $383,000.
Its probably the largest retail book sale ever held in Canada. And the books
are discounted up to 75%.
The stock includes — basic texts (all faculties), reference books, classical
novels, foreign language, history, art, pocket books, illustrated children's books
and best sellers in both fiction and non-fiction.
This is a genuine reduction on new, high quality books, many of which have
been especially purchased for the sale.
The sale is being held in Brock Hall on campus. You'll see the direction signs
on Chancellor Blvd., University Blvd., and Marine Drive.
January 8-26,1973, University of British Columbia, Brock Hall
9:00 A.M.-9:00 P.M. Monday-Friday, 9:00 A.M.-5:00 P.M. Saturday
WOULD seoBHAfMY TttROr"
RH<!<> Book of Roses
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LAROUSSE ^%,1|
CASTRONOMHiUE   S:*:#lls Tuesday, January 9,   1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
Sedgewick staff 'struggling'
By KEN DODD
The new Sedgewick undergraduate library should be
operating smoothly in one to
two weeks, assistant
Sedgewick librarian Richard
Hopkins said Monday.
"The students will have to be
patient for a while as there are
still a lot of functional
problems to be worked out,"
Hopkins said. "We weren't
really ready to open last
Wednesday but decided the
most important thing was to let
the people at the books."
He said the staff is struggling
right now because it was given
only one day of orientation so
the majority still aren't sure of
their bearings.
Hopkins said there have been
frustrations with subcontractors and little things
still need to be done.
Such little things include
lack of padding on benches, too
few outside door handles,
inadequate directional signs,
poor lighting in the stairwells
at night and a scarcity of
drinking fountains.
Hopkins apologized to
students for the inconvenience
of the long line-ups at checkout
turnstiles.
"The maintenance man in
charge of these installations
was sick last week and this has
been the reason for the delay.
"They're working on it now,
however," he said.
The library hopes to have a
minimum of two check-out
turnstyles working at all times.
Also an additional turnstyle
will operate just for people
wishing to leave who haven't
any books to check out, he said.
Library assistants will be
checking students' books and
briefcases more carefully than
in the past, Hopkins said.
"We've been losing several
thousands of dollars through
book thefts every year. Now,
by having hired more student
help we're better able to police
the situation," he said.
Despite the various inconveniences Hopkins said he
has found student response to
the new facilities to be
generally favourable.
WHAT THE HELL is some idiot doing defacing these windows
with dumb, amateurish graffitti? Goddam it he's obscured my view
of the old library as I sit here symbolically looking at it from the
—kini mcdonald photo
new library.   I don't care what his name is, he's a lousy writer. His
work is transparent.
"The study space, comforts
and aesthetics seem to be
serving students' needs."
Hopkins said the lack of
shelves in study carrels could
solicit a few complaints.
He said the head librarian
carried out a study on the
matter and felt people using
carrels don't use the shelves.
"The budget is tight and we
were able to get carrels
without shelves for half price."
The smoking survey is still
being conducted but Hopkins
said he believes it would result
in no smoking being allowed in
the stacks area.
No general tours of the
library are being planned.
Shelley Criddle, Sedgewick
reference librarian, who is
responsible        for tour
arrangements said Thursday
there has been little interest in
such tours in the past and the
library is laid out clearly
enough so people should have
little trouble finding their way
about.
"If someone wants to be
shown around they just need to
ask at the desk," Criddle said.
However, some tours are
being arranged through
English 100 classes.
These will be introductory in
nature and "geared to what is
in the library and what can be
used," she said. "If classes
want to be shown around they
should just pressure their prof
to get in touch with us. We'll be
happy to accomodate them."
There will be no formal
opening of the new library.
Both head librarian Basil
Stuart-Stubbs and Malcolm
McGregor, faculty member in
charge of ceremonies said
Thursday it would be redundant and anti-climactic to have
an opening now.
Rag gets down
to business
Notice to all Ubyssey staffers, past, present and future:
There will be a major staff
meeting 12:30 p.m. Thursday
to discuss a number of important issues, including the
recent CUP conference and the
sports pages.
This notice applies to all
sports, Page Friday, and
photog people as well as the
news staff. Bring your probing
intellects.
Exposure
By ART SMOLENSKY
Latest word from Heather Freeze,
executive assistant to education
minister Eileen Dailly, is that one
student will definitly be named to the
five person commission on proposed
changes in the University Act.
In a telephone interview with The
Ubyssey yesterday Freeze said the
main concern of the minister was the
student on the commission be selected
by other students.
She confirmed the B.C. Association
of University Students (the successor
to the B.C. Union of Students for all
old-time campus politicos) had made
a submission asking they be allowed
to name the student to the commission at their Jan. 20 conference.
However, the nod to BCAUS has not
been given because according to
Freeze,   Dailly   is   under   the   im
pression the BCAUS does not
represent all students in the province.
If the impression is maintained then
the minister has indicated she
will accept nominations from other
student groups.
This impression has been gathered
from several letters to Dailly from
students at various institutions in the
province including one from UBC
student senator Stan Persky.
Presently the UBC nomination
(unofficial) by the Student Coalition
AMS executive is past Student
Coalition president Grant Burnyeat.
Burnyeat is rather a funny choice to
represent students in that he has no
real record of pressing for student
rights. In fact a lot of his AMS
presidential campaign material in
corporated a slogan of 'co-operation
with the administration'.
That's the same administration
whose nucleus was employed and
maintained by the previous Social
Credit government for over a decade.
One thing seems assured by our
government conversations. The
sweeping changes which were once to
be made in the Universities Act have
been slowed down and the concept of
prior hearings in a public commission
has taken hold.
This pushes the actual date of
change in the Universities Act
probably to next year much to the
relief of certain faculty and board
members having a vested interest in
the status quo.
For those who had looked to the new
NDP government for an instant oasis
in the academic desert there will be
some disappointment, bitter and
otherwise.
To put it the words of one old CCF-
NDP'er on election night, "the
greatest amount of criticism of the
new government will come not from
our enemies but our friends and party
supporters who want to get the
goddam show on the road."
Of direct concern to UBC's 10,000
student motorists is the government
leak to the private auto insurance
industry that February, 1974 is the
target date for the government auto
insurance scheme to come into effect.
Students meanwhile are likely to
continue to get rough treatment by
the industry's dual levy on drivers
under 25. Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 9,  1973
Polite
The interim report of the senate committee on student
representation can be described with one word. No, that's
not true. It can be described with several words. None are
polite.
The report suggests that teaching staff having professorial rank should be in a majority at all meetings. An
impolite word seems appropriate.
There are enough divergent interests at this university
to make it obvious that no single group should be given the
power to lord it over others.
The undergraduate students, the grad students, teaching
assistants, instructors and campus technicians and workers
should have the power to override the professorial decisions
if it were in their collective interest to do so.
The reports further suggests that student representatives not be permitted at meetings dealing with financial business, scholarships and other student awards,
adjudication of marks and academic standing and
appointments, tenure and promotions. Further impoliteness
is called for.
Why shouldn't students participate in the financial business of the university? This, after all, is where the power
lies. Oh, guess we've answered our own question.
Well, why shouldn't students participate in deciding
which students get scholarships and other awards? And why
shouldn't they participate in adjudicating marks and academic standing.
Conflict of interest, you say.
But then why are profs the only persons allowed to
attend meetings on appointments, tenure and promotions?
What's to stop some prof from suggesting an old buddy
back at Rutabaga U be given a lucrative appointment?
If the senate committee really wanted to be fair, it
would suggest that only prdfs be allowed to decide on student matters such as scholarships and that only students be
allowed to decide on professorial appointments and promotions. Then there would be no danger of conflicts of
interest.
This is a silly suggestion. But it is no less silly than the
pretense that profs have a monopoly on objectivity, whatever that is.
When profs make an effort to rid themselves of this
pretense, when they make an effort to recognize they form
only one of several campus groupings, this university will be
closer to being part of a community of scholars.
Until then, impoliteness and similar nastiness will
prevail.
Brrrr
Arts undergraduate president Brian Loomes may have
had the best intentions in suggesting students attend the next
arts faculty meeting unclothed to protest sexual repression
on campus. However, the idea is quite ludicrous.
Faculty meetings at the best of times are circuses;
nudity would only increase this aspect of the meetings.
We also wonder if Loomes is advocating faculty support
on this issue. The very thought of meeting one's prof naked
would probably be enough to keep some students away.
Repression at UBC is certainly a problem but it can
probably be combatted in a less sensational way.
We hope students will realize the importance of Thursday's meeting and attend despite Loomes' suggestion. Besides it's too cold for nudity.
JANUARY 9, 1973
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year by
the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial
opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian University Press. The
Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review.
The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located in room 241K of the
Student Union Building.
Editorial departments, 228-2307; Sports, 228-2305; advertising,
228-3977.
Co-editors: Jan O'Brien, John Andersen
There were three of us there that night. We all saw it. There was no
doubting it, it happened. And there was no helping it, to my way of
thinking. Smolensky saw it first. A big bright light, over there, he said, and
pointed. Jan and I saw it, too. Wide and purple, and sort of sleezing its way
over the bar. Then everything went black."Or rather, first totally purple,
then black.
Sasges found us the next morning. His eyes were big as he stared down
at us. He'd been slapping us for about five minutes, finally shoving a
whiskey bottle under our noses. He was with Spencer and Andersen.
Vaughn was peering over their shoulders.
We couldn't tell them, of course. They probably wouldn't have believed us, and on the off chance they had, it would have meant no more
purple light. Coull came down from the Star-Advertiser, with Kini and her
Nikon, and Bannerman was there for the Times-Picayune. There were some
bystanders — I saw Len Johnson and Steve Morris standing with Janice
McEwan and Doug Higgins, but only in the eyes of the two I only knew
as Camille and Brent could I sense any glimmer of the truth. They understood, slightly, though only I, Shmerton, knew the true importance of the
experience.
Letters
Unions
I am writing in reference to an
article that appeared in your Dec.
1 issue in which AUCE was described as "a splinter group from
the American-based Office and
Technical Employees Union". Unfortunately many staff on campus
interpreted the statement to mean
that our organization is affiliated
with this international union. I
would like to make it clear that
the Association of University and
College Employees is not, and
never has been, connected in any
way with OTEU or any other
American labor organization.
During an OTEU membership
drive in the spring of 1972, a
group of staff who had originally
been interested in the American
union decided, after studying
their constitution, to investigate
other options available. With further study, it was concluded that
the most appropriate form of
organization for the approximately 1,000 clerical/library staff
hitherto unrepresented would be
an independent union with jurisdiction limited to British Columbia. Over the summer a constitution was written and on Oct. 19
the founding convention of AUCE
took place.
UBC staff interested in finding
out what AUCE is, and what it
isn't, are invited to an information
meeting in the garden room of the
graduate student centre, Tuesday,
from  12 to 2 p.m.  Bring your
lunch — free coffee will be served.
Jennifer Clemmons
president AUCE
local no. 1 (UBC)
Smashed
This letter is directed to somebody in "C" parking lot who
thinks that he/she is so far above
the average person that they need
not identify themselves after
smashing into another person's
vehicle. It is quite obvious that
you are an unintelligent thing,
otherwise you would be attending
a driving school instead of a university. I expected to find a note
of apology, no such luck. I tried
to track you down, no such luck.
Thank you for showing me that
there is still one immature, gutless
misfit attending UBC. It's only
too bad that you park in "C" lot.
May you have only the worst of
luck for the rest of your driving
life (I hope it's short). Also, I can
only say that I hope the same
thing happens to you or at least
that somebody vomits on your
head.
Bob Kozak
arts 4
Itchy
Your irate correspondent,
PRFO in the Nov. 28 issue,
brought up a matter dear to my
heart and pubic region — crabs.
Now that he's spread the alarm a
little more information is in order.
Are you sure that you don't have
crabs?
There is a real scarcity of written material on crabs and a wealth
of beer parlor rumour that seems
designed only to confuse and
further torture the inhabitee.
What I know is based on personal
experience only — perhaps a medical person would care to correct
me or add new information.
They're incredibly itchy - you
can easily scratch yourself raw in
the crotch before you realize that
you've got visitors. To confirm
their presence go digging at he
base of pubic hairs. The little
rascals seem to be dug into the
skin and you'll need fingernails to
pull one loose. He/it/she will be
about the size of one of these
letters and will look something
like a semitransparent crab with a
flat roundish body and feets out
the sides. Once you've managed to
get one you'll realize the futility
of ever trying to pick them all off
— especially when you consider
their descendants lurking in egg
form attached to hairs.
A simpler test is to look for
crab shit (little black things about
the size you'd expect) in your
underwear. The more shit, the
more crabs. If you've got 'em you
won't need encouragement to
take counter-offensive measures.
The big problem is to find effective ones, most of the things that
damage crabs are equally damaging to your by-now-super-
sensitive parts.
Before you start forget any
home remedies. Hot baths with
lots of soap only encourage the
bastards to dig in deeper. Shaving
would probably work if it were
feasible for one to shave the hair
around one's own asshole. Since
crabs can migrate to any hair but
head and face hair (small mercies)
you'd better be damn thorough,
should you find a friend willing to
assist you in this bizarre and
possibly fruitless attempt. Crabs
will live for hours in whiskey
(according to one devoted researcher) so you can give up on
that one before you try. Word of
warning to would-be experimenters — don't look at one under a
microscope; it'll only depress you
even more.
There's potions and lotions
that do work. There's a clear
blue-green oil called Cuprex. It'll
feel slimy when you put it on, it'll
hurt and sting, it's hard to rinse
off properly and it smells like
hyper-powerful pine turnips. If
you're trying to be discreet about
the whole business, give up all
hope of remaining undiscovered,
Cuprex ^vill leave little crab corpes
satisfyingly stewn about the tub
but there are severe doubts as to
its total effectiveness ( they come
back). Perhaps clothing and bed
clothing should get a thorough
laundering at the same time.
There is a chalky suspension in
a brown bottle that has little
odor, a mild shampooing action
and 100 per cent devastation.
Damned if I can remember the
name though. It's available without prescription — it may even be
on the drugstore shelf. It should
work against other little nasties as
well in case you've got head lice
and crab lice both. If you're shy
pick the discreetest person in the
store to ask — having your request
broadcast to other clerks and customers can be disconcerting even
for us exhibitionists. There's probably other safe and effective
remedies — let's hear about them.
Name withheld for fear of finding out who my true friends really
are. Page 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 9,  1973
Hot flashes
Anderson
on Ottawa
B.C. provincial Liberal leader
David Anderson will be speaking
Wednesday noon in the club's
lounge, instead of Thursday, as
reported in Friday's Ubyssey.
Anderson will discuss Liberal
strategy in the forthcoming parliamentary session in Ottawa.
School tilms
Two films, "School Daze" and
"A Walk In Another Pair of
Shoes" will be shown today at 8
p.m. at the B.C. Teachers' Auditorium, 7th and Burrard, by The
Vancouver Association for Children With Learning Disabilities.
The films will be followed by
discussions.
Wafer
R. W. Newbury, University of
Manitoba civil engineering professor, will present a lecture on
the proposed diversion of the
Churchill River into the Nelson 3
p.m., Wednesday, in Lecture Hall
1, at the Woodward Centre.
Effects of the plan including
possible widespread flooding, disruption of the environment and
effects on local Indian residents
will be discussed.
This is the seventh lecture in
the series on environmental man
agement sponsored by the West-
water research centre.
Speakeasy
Speakeasy needs volunteers to
work in its information booth in
the SUB foyer.
Volunteers should be third or
fourth year students who know
the campus and are interested in
providing information services,
crisis intervention and one to one.
counselling on student problems.
Training sessions will be provided. Interested volunteers
should contact the Speakeasy
office in the SUB foyer, or phone
228-4557.
United front
Liberal MLA Allan Williams
will speak on the need for a
united opposition to the New
Democratic Party government Friday noon in SUB 111.
Experimental College is sponsoring the West Vancouver-Howe
Sound MLA's visit.
World College
Prof. Bill Gibson, chairman of
history of the medicine and
science department, will speak today on education through United
World Colleges at noon in SUB
111.
A prime mover behind the College of the Pacific to be built at
'Tween classes
TODAY
CANOE & KAYAK CLUB
Meeting, noon, SUB 125.
GERMAN CLUB
Meeting on proposed party and ski-
trip, noon, IH 404.
NEWMAN CLUB
Communication    workshop,    noon,
SUB 105B.
Bible    discussion,    6:30   p.m.,    St.
Marks.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Bill    Gibson    on    World    Colleges,
noon. SUB 111.
WEDNESDAY
PREDENTALSOC
Vorts on dental hygiene, noon, SUB
205.
KUNG FU
Practice, 4:30—6:30 p.m., SUB ballroom.
ONTOLOGY
Dale Miranda on the family of man,
noon, Buch. 216.
NEWMAN CLUB
Meeting, noon, SUB 105B.
FREESEE
Civilization   film   series,   noon   and
1:30 p.m., SUB auditorium.
YMCA—YWCA
Introductory     yoga     classes,     7:30
p.m., 1546 Balsam apt. 3.
FANCING CLUB
General    meeting,   tournament   for
team selection, 6:30 p.m., new P.E.
building, gym E.
ALPHA OMEGA
Meeting, noon, SUB 105B.
THURSDAY
GAY PEOPLE
Meeting, noon, SUB 215.
VCF
Dr. Thorson, U. of Alberta theoretical physicist, on objectivity and
religious belief, noon, SUB auditorium.
CAMPUS CAVALIERS
Square dancing, noon—2:30 p.m.,
SUB 207-209.
SIMS
Intro, on transcendental meditation,
noon, Buch. 3201.
DAUGHTERS OF MARTIN BORMANN
(T-Bird Wargamers)
Meeting, noon, SUB 119.
CVC
General meeting,  noon,  SUB club's
lounge.
Seminar     on     Asian     assimilation,
1:30, same place.
ABORTION ACTION
Meeting, noon, SUB 237A.
CHARISMATIC CHRIST ASSOCIATES
Free   full   course   dinner,   6   p.m.,
Lutheran campus centre. If attending,      phone      Bernice     Gerard,
236-8219 or 536-7389.
FRIDAY
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Allan Williams, West Van MLA, on a
Pender Bay on Vancouver Island,
prof Gibson hopes it will be the
second in a chain of World Colleges throughout the world. Top
academic students from Grades 12
and 13 will be accepted from
Pacific Rim countries.
Nermefics
An exhibition titled Canadian
West Coast Hermetics: The Metaphysical Landscape, opens today
in the fine arts gallery in the main
library basement.
The gallery hours are Tuesday-
Saturday 10:30 a.m.-5 p.m. and
Tuesday evenings 7-9 p.m. The
exhibition closes Jan. 27.
Brock sale
The sale at the Brock hall
bookstore is on from 9 a.m. to 9
p.m. Monday to Friday and Saturday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. until Jan. 26.
The sale, which is open to the
general public, has been called
"the largest book sale in retail
history in Canada" by assistant
manager Bob Smith. The main
feature of the sale is a large
collection of art books selling at
an average discount of 50 per
cent. Other discounts range from
25 to 75 per cent. Smith says the
books are selling quickly.
Apologies to the 600 people
who turned out Friday night and
Saturday due to erroneous reporting in Friday's Ubyssey.
united opposition to the provincial
government, noon, SUB 111.
KUNG FU
Practice, 4:30-6:30 p.m., SUB Ballroom.
Bail.
Specialize dService
THE CANADIAN MINERAL INDUSTRY
EDUCATION FOUNDATION
offers
UNDERGRADUATE SCHOLARSHIPS
in
MINING ENGINEERING
$1,500 - 9 months
to students wishing to enter the first or
subsequent professional year of a degree
course in Mining Engineering
For applications contact:
The Secretary,
Canadian Mineral Industry Education Foundation.
P.O. Box 91, Commerce Court West, Toronto, Ont.
or
The Dean of Engineering
Applied Science
CLOSING DATE 15 MARCH, 1973
Sales aniSer-uice-
89l4 0aKSt.   263-8121
BINGO
EVERY TUESDAY
at 7:45 p.m.
Prizes in Excess of $2300.
At 10th Ave. & Sasamat
BUYING OR SELLING
REAL ESTATE?
Ph. Mrs. Joan Bentley-224-0255
RUTHERFORD-McRAE
733-8181
PAYMENT OF FEES
THE DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE, GENERAL SERVICES
ADMINISTRATION BLDG., WISHES TO REMIND
STUDENTS THAT THE
Second Instalment Is Due On Or Before
Friday, January 12, 1973
CLASSIFIED
Rates:
Campus - 3 tines, 1 dsy $1.00; additional lines, 2&c;
Commercial - 3 lines, 1 dsy $1.50; additional line*
35c; additional days $1.26 & 30c
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m.ttkeday before publication.
Publications Bffiee, Room 241 SMB.. UBC, Van. 8, AC.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
ANNOUNCING TOTEM PARK'S
first annual Grease Ball with Slick
Dick and the Firestone Four. 9:00
Saturday, Jan. 13. Full Facilities
(appropriate dress).
Lost & Found
13
LOST, DEC. 14: SEALSKIN MITT.
Univ. Blvd. and bus loop area.
228-0370 after 6 p.m.
Rides & Car Pools
14
DEEP COVE TO UBC — WANTED
driver with car for rotating pool
or will join car pool. Phone Dave,
929-2521.
Special Notices
IS
GREAT STUDENT RATES ON
Grouse sklng lessons. Information/
registration in SUB — VOC club-
room.  Noon, January 8-12.	
RENT WHISTLER SKI CABIN
near gondola. — day/week. Phone
224-0657 before 8 a.m. weekdays.
$75 FOR 75*
40 Bonus Coupon* In This
Year's Bird Calls
AVAILABLE   NOW
BUY   Y0UR8  TODAY1
Bookstore and SUB
Travel Opportunities
18
"GOING TO EUROPE?" STUDENT/
Faculty discounts available on
purchase/lease/rental of any car
in Europe. Write Auto Europe, P.O.
Box 728, Dept. SG, Mercer Island,
Washington 98040 for a free 44
page brochure.
Wanted—Information
17
Wanted—Miscellaneous 18
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
'68 MUSTANG A.T. V8, 6 NEW
tires. Best offer to $1800. Phone
after  5  p.m.   980-1543.
CLASSIC 1960 HUMBER SUPER
Snipe. New brakes, new muffler
system, exc. cond., $495 or offers.
261-7713.
Motorcycles
25
BUSINESS
SERVICES
Photography
35
tbe TLtxui anb gutter
Camera*
NOW IN
STOCK
DURST Color Analyzers
Also Sigma 200 mm.  F4
MACRO Telephoto Lens
$109.95
YS mount for most SLR cameras
Perfect for nature & wildlife
photography
3010 W.  Broadway
Note our New Phone No.
736-8375
Scandals
37
Typing
40
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING,
my home. Essays, theses, etc. Neat
accurate work. Reasonable rates.
263-5317.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
81
MALE    WITH    ACTING    ABILITY
for   part  time   employment.   Send
resume and time available to Skilled  Personnel,   310-837  West Hastings,   Van.   1.
GIRL TO   DO  ALTERATIONS FOR
pant shop.  Must have own machine.  Contact Pants Plus in U.B.C.
square.
MATURE    WOMAN   TO    BABYSIT
5-day week,  your house or mine.
Call  987-1794.
Work Wanted
82
INSTRUCTION at SCHOOLS
Tutoring Service
88
Tutoring
84
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
 THE BOOKFINDER -  -  - -
4444W. 10th Ave., 228-8933. Shaum.
Coles notes, text books, paperbacks,
poster sale on. Open 11:00 a.m:—
9:00 p.m. daily. Sunday, 1:00—5:00
p.m.
RENTALS St REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
MEN ONLY, BSMT. ROOM. WARM,
quiet, private entr., near Gate.
Ready  now.  224-7623.
FURNISHED STUDENT ROOM.
Private entrance. Near 13th and
Sasamat. Share fridge, washroom,
common-room.  Phone 224-0763.
Room & Board
82
ROOM AND BOARD AVAILABLE
at Delta Kappa Epsilon Fraternity
House. 5765 Agronomy Rd. Color
T.V., laundry facilities, reasonable
rates. Ph. 224-9691 after 5:30 for
details.
R&B ON CAMPUS — ALL THE
finer amenities including color TV,
sauna, rec. facilities, first-class
food—apply at 5785 Agronomy Rd.
or call Garth after 6 at 228-9903.
Unf. Apts.
84
Communal Housing
85
GIRL NEEDED TO SHARE LARGE
house. Own room. Rent $62.50.
Area 29th and Dunbar. 224-3166.
Houses—Furn. & Unfurn.     88
Use Your
Ubyssey
Classified Tuesday, January 9,  1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
Letters
Jesus
I am surprised to find that
there are still university students
laboring under the illusion that
"truth (can be learned) through
logical processes." Logical
positivism is dead! Check Michael
Polanyi's book, Personal Knowledge, an Introduction to Post-
critical Philosophy." Polanyi
argues that positivism is inadequate because it does not consider
the knower of what is known.
There is no scientist or pursuer of
knowledge who does not feed
knowledge through a grid — a
theory or world view through
which he sees and finds. The
concept of the totally innocent,
objective observer is utterly naive.
He continues and says that the
observer is never neutral: he has a
grid, he has presuppositions
through which he feeds the thing
which he finds.
If you want truth, particularly
about the nature of man; who he
is, why he is here and where he is
going, then these are questions
which concern both religion and
philosophy. Men have built many
systems to deal with these questions but they are all based on
unproven assumptions, operated
on by faith. How are we to
determine which system we
adopt? I would suggest that we
test whether the nature of man as
we know him experiencially,
squares with our system. I would
say that man has not and will not
come up with a system that will
align with man as we know him;
possessing a sense of beauty, a
longing for meaning and love,
moral motions and a fear of
non-being.
The Christian says that truth
about man is revealed to us by the
Bible. The Bible does not speak
exhaustively, but when it does
speak, it speaks truly. The Bible
says that Christ is the only solution for man's ultimate needs.
Now, as far as the charge that
Christians have deluded them--
selves and are perpetrating falsehood, there you have stepped
beyond what you have a right to
say. You may say that Christianity for you is a delusion but
when you accuse us of being
deluded, then you have stepped
beyond what you can legitimately
say. How do you know we are
deluded? Someone has said,
"Everyman has a right to his own
opinion, but no one has a right to
confuse the facts." You have only
stated an opinion and you have
TRANSCENDENTAL
MEDITATION
Maharishi Mahesh Yogi
Greg Cooper, B.Sc., 1971, UBC,
B.S.C.I., 1972, Maharishi International University, discusses scientifically validated results of this
practice.
12:30 p.m.-Thurs. Jan. 11
Bu. 3201
information:
277-0623 or 731-9302
ignored the facts. You have ignored that Jesus' existence is a fact of
history. He claims to be the Son
of God and offers the only way
for man to regain a wholeness and
integration as a human being.
Drop by the booktable in SUB
and check out Christianity. We are
open to rap.
Harold Dawes
education 2
Christ
Concerning the letter "God
again" (Nov. 28, p. 12), we would
like to address ourselves to two
basic issues raised:
* "Religion assumes the existence of 'God'. This can be neither
proven nor disproven. You have no
right and it is false to believe in
something not yet proven." Mr.
House seems to assume the nonexistence of God. To this we
would respond, using his logic,
"This can neither be proved nor
disproved. Mr. House has no right
and is false in believing in something not yet proved." One can
easily see the futility of such
reasoning.
* "We of this university are
seeking to learn the truth through
logical processes, it would be an
illusion to assume that religion is
an alternate means of attaining
this truth." In "seeking the truth
through logical processes", it is
necessary to establish acceptable
hypotheses. Few of these, if any,
have been proven, yet they are of
tremendous value to man; the
mystical atom, the patterns of
inheritance, the kinetics of chemical reactions, time, mass, space -^
all these are real and valuable.
We would agree that it would
be ridiculous to assume that Christianity is an "alternate" means of
arriving at truth, or that Christians
have a monopoly on truth. "For
since the beginning of the world
the invisible attributes of God,
e.g. his eternal power and divinity,
have    been   plainly   discernable
through things which he has made
and which are discernable, commonly seen and known, thus leaving men without a rag of excuse.
They knew all the time that there
is a God, yet they refused to
acknowledge him as such, or
thank him for what he is or does."
(Paul, the Epistle to the Romans,
New Testament.)
Keith Wong
science 3
Keith Wyton
arts 2
Andrea Smith
arts 4.
Pat Schroeder
science 4
Gord Matties
arts 2
Ziff
There was a reply to my letter
(More God) in the Dec. 1 issue of
The Ubyssey. Here is my rebuttal
of that letter.
If one wishes to believe in the
doctrines of a man, aware that
they are just that, doctrines of
man, be my guest. But, one must
maintain that Jesus was the son of
God, a God whose existence you
have not proven. The fact that
Christ was "resurrected" and performed "miracles" does not prove
that a "God" was responsible.
Christianity is logical but it is a
false logic for its primary assumption has not been proven.
The reaction to my letter was
strong, as I had hoped, for you
have something to lose, which I
do not. Namely a psychological
protection against the forces of
nature, against death and against
the ills of society. All these securities are manifest in the illusion of
a God who has been created in the
likeness of a father, who provided
security as an infant.
The beliefs expressed are ignorant, for they are based on a
"proof which is laughable.
Ziff House
geology 2
BE CRITICAL OF
SPEED READING COURSES!
Ever Investigated speed reading? Maybe now's the time. And •
when you do, be sure to ask about other things besides speed
—like unaersranding, retention, concentration. Obviously you
have to enjoy and remember what you reod or there's •not
much point in Increasing your speed. Sure speed's important.
Some people do reod many thousands of words a minute but
that's not all there Is to It. Come to a free demonstration by
the world's most honored reading school — and be critical.
ATTEND A FREE DEMONSTRATION
EVELYN WOOD READING DYNAMICS
TUESDAY, JAN. 9 - 7:30 P.M.
McKenzie Room, Grosvenor Hotel - 840 Howe St.
WEDNESDAY, JAN. 10 - 7:30 P.M.
Institute - 556 W. Broadway, Vancouver
THURSDAY, JAN. 11 - 12:45 P.M.
SUB Room 205- U.B.C.
GRADUATES:
TAKE    ADVANTAGE    OF    YOUR    LIFETIME    MEMBERSHIP   AND
ATTEND THE FREE CLASSES AND THE WORKSHOPS.
□
Evelyn Wood Beading Dynamics
Soons^red by Dynamic Learning Centre (B.C.)
556 West Broadway, Vancouver, B.C.      Call 872-8203
VALUABLE COUPON
2 DINNERS FOR THE PRICE OF 1
AT THE
ADMIRAL   HOTEL
HARBOUR LOUNGE 4125 E. HASTINGS
Clam Chowder
Sal ad-Dressing
LOBSTER TAILS
Risotto Rice
Sherbert, Beverage
$8.35
5:30 to 8:30 p.m.
(By Reservation) 298-7232
f^SaSK?
POOP   DECK   CABARET
FRI & SAT NIGHTS WITH
5th Ave. Muscle
Clam Chowder
Side Sat ad-Dressing
SIRLOIN STEAK
Baked Potato. Sour Cream
Onion Rings
Sherbert, Beverage
$7.35
THE CANADIAN MINERAL INDUSTRY
EDUCATION FOUNDATION
offers
POSTGRADUATE SCHOLARSHIPS
in
MINING ENGINEERING
to GRADUATES in any branch of
ENGINEERING or APPLIED SCIENCE
$4,500 - 9 months
PLUS Planned Summer Employment
For information contact:
The Secretary,
Canadian Mineral Industry Education Foundation,
P.O. Box 91, Commerce Court West. Toronto, Ont.
CLOSING DATE 15 MARCH, 1973
The fAbulous
duMAUMER Pops
DEqiNS with
qEORqe sheARiNq
ANd his JAZZ QUINTET
MONdAy, TUESdAy, wcdNEsdAy
JANUARy 15,16 &17
AT 850 pM. IN THE QUEEN ElizADeTH THEATRE
THE VANCOUVER SyMpllONy ORCHESTRA
kAzuyoshi AkiyAMA on the podiunt
Charming ~k witty jr inimitable entertainer &
pianist GEORGE SHEARING plays the Mozart
Piano Concerto in A Major, then the delightful
music he's famous for — What the World
Needs Now, Hey, Jude, What Kind of Fool Am I,
Yellow Taxi, a Chopin prelude — a whole evening of Shearing and his quintet!
SERIES TICKETS at incredibly low prices:
only S12, S15 or S18 for all five fantastic
concerts!
Save up to S20 a pair when you get the special
series price. Singles go on sale January 8.
Singles: S3.50, S4.50 or S5.50.
HURRY for the best seats to the Vancouver
Ticket Centre, 630 Hamilton Street. Or call
683-3255 to charge to your Eaton's account.
the Vancouver symphony POPS are a WOW!
be tNere Tuesday, January 9,  1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 7
SPOR TS
In basketball:
Thor, friends
haunt Birdhouse
UBC 63, Vancouver Grads 89.
Ron Thorsen paid his ex-
teammates a visit Monday
night — but they're probably
wishing he'd stayed at home,
studying for his masters
degree in physical education.
But, unfortunately for the
UBC basketball team, Thorsen
decided to spend a night out on
the court, and everyone knew
he was going to give his old
buddies some trouble.
Thorsen did' his share,
punishing the Birds at every
turn, moving, turning, shooting
— and scoring from all sorts of
weird positions. At his best,
Thorsen is just plain beautiful.
In the opening round of the
Clansmen Classic basketball
tournament, Thorsen and his
friends — Derek Sankey, Bob
Molinski, Bob Phillips, Bill
Ruby, and others — put
together a classy attack that
completely outdid the Thunderbirds 89-63.
SFU played Warner Pacific
College in the second game
with the winner of that game
slated to play the Grads tonight
at 9 p.m., also at the SFU gym.
UBC     was     beset     with
Volleyball—for free
The co-ed recreational
volleyball league enjoyed an
exciting season last term with
a massive turnout of three to 12
people. This poor response
is hopefully due to a lack of
awareness of this program.
Co-ed volleyball DOES
happen and it's free, fun, and
for everybody — beginners and
experts alike. So come, try
your skills, and test your sense
of humour every Tuesday night
8:30 in Gym B at the Winter
Sports Centre.
problems throughout: they
were beaten to the ball, and
when it did come to them,
bounce, off their hands it went,
or, worse, slipped right
through.
Bird coach Peter Mullins
substituted freely, giving all
the bench a chance to try their
hand. Doug Cripps came in late
in the second half, and played
an admirable game filling in
for Bob Dickson, who had
fouled out.
Centre John Mills, in bed
with the flu, did not play. Apart
from the fact that Mills is one
of the Birds best scorers as
well as a good defensive
player, his absence on the
Birds' zone press hurt the
team; one member of their
unit was missing.
Stan Callegari led the Birds
with 14 points, followed by
Jack Hoy with 11, Darryle
Gjernes and Rod Matheson
with eight Peter Herd with
seven, Ed Blewitt with five,
and Dickson and Mike Ireland
with four each.
Score card
HOCKEY
Friday
UBC 4, Alberta 5.
First period— 1. Alberta, St. Ar-.
nauld (Crawford, Steward) 6:52;,
2. UBC, Dick (Buchanan, Cartwright) '
8:52; 3. UBC, De Biasio (Lemmen,
Ennos) 9:23; 4. UBC Longpre
(Thomas, Lawrence) 10:49; 5. Alberta, Barros (Hornby, McNight) 11:58;
6. Alberta, Couves (Wanchulak,
Wyrozub) 14:52; 7. Alberta, McNight
(Wanchulak, Hornby) 15:32. Penalties— Thomas (UBC) 14:34, Le
Grandeur (Alta.) 18:40.
Second period— No scoring. Pen-
alties— Pederson (UBC) 5:27,
Couves (Alta.) 5:27, Crawford (Alta.)
And ice?
10:40, Couves (Alta.) 15:31, Lawrence (UBC) 15:31, Bock (Alta.)
17:37.
Third period— 1. Alberta, Steward
(Crawford, St. Arnaud) 3:14;
2. UBC, Buchanan (DeBiasio, Murray) 17:20. Penalties— Wanchulak
(Alta.) 11:53, Longpre (UBC). 17:32,
Le Grandeur (Alta.) 17:32.
Shots on goal
UBC 12 16 10—38
Alberta 7   9 10—26
BASKETBALL
Friday
Calgary 55, UBC 74.
Saturday
Calgary 51, UBC 75.
Sport meets
There will be a very important sports meeting 12:30
p.m. Wednesday in SUB 241K
for all concerned with our
humble department. Coverage
of campus sports events will be
decided.
UBC: great on paper
By DOUG HIGGINS
On potential this year's
edition of the hockey team is
probably the best UBC has
ever had.
The Thunderbirds have good
size, averaging 5-11 and 180
pounds. Coach Bob Hindmarch
calls them the best skating
team he's ever had.
Although potential looks
good and is a favourite subject
of sports writers, it unfortunately does not win
hockey games. Hustle and
team play win games, two
factors that have at time been
sadly lacking from the current
squad as evident in the Birds'
5-4 dropping to the University
of Alberta Golden Bears.
UBC displayed flashes of
their talent in the first period
as they started to skate and
almost blew Alberta off the ice.
Alberta had trouble getting out
of their own end as UBC scored
three goals in less than two
minutes.
They let up on the Bears
when they had them reeling,
which proved to be a costly
mistake as Alberta quickly
scored three goals of their own
to take the lead in the game.
UBC remained dormant until
late in the game, with Doug
Buchanan scoring a late goal,
but it was too little too late.
The main downfall of the
Birds is their defence and
goaltending. The defence had a
great deal of difficulty clearing
the puck out of their own end,
allowing Alberta to pick up
some easy goals.
Goalie Fred Masuch,
although steady, seldom comes
up with the big save. Friday he
was beaten on good shots but
if UBC had been able to beat
Alberta goalie Barry
Richardson on their good shots
they would have won easily.
UBC is still at the top of the
Canada    West    Conference
standings. They should have
little trouble staying there but
will need more than potential
alone if they are to advance to
the Canadian Collegiate
Championships.
*  FREE SEE *
*   FREE SEE *
CIVILIZATION
RETURNS TO S.U.B. Auditorium
12:35 p.m. - 1:35 p.m.
Every WED. Jan. 10 - Jan. 31
APPLICATION
FOR GRADUATION
"Application for Graduation" cards are now being mailed to
students in Fourth Year Arts, Fine Arts, Music, Commerce,
Science, Elementary Education and Fifth Year Secondary
Education. Application cards are available in the Faculty
Offices of all other Faculties. For students in Graduate Studies
Programmes the Graduate Adviser will have application cards.
All students who expect to graduate this Spring are requested
to complete and return both cards to the Registrar's Office
(Mrs. Kent) as soon as possible, but no later than February 15,
1973.
"Application for Graduation" cards are also available in the
Office of the Registrar and any student in the above
graduating years who does not receive cards in the mail should
check with the Registrar's Office to confirm that his local
mailing address is correct.
PLEASE NOTE: It is the responsibility of the student to make
application for his degree. The list of candidates for graduation
to be presented to the Faculty and to the Senate for approval
is compiled from these application cards.
NO APPLICATION - NO DEGREE
INTERCOLLEGIATE
SPORTS EVENTS
Fri. - Sat. Jan. 12 - 13 - BASKETBALL
— War Memorial Gymnasium
6:30 p.nv — Thunderettes vs. Un. of Lethbridge
8:30 p.m. - Thunderbirds vs. Un. of Lethbridge "Longhorns"
Fri. - Sat. - Jan. 12-13 - ICE HOCKEY
— Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre
8:00 p.ra — Thunderbirds vs. Un. of Saskatchewan "Huskies"
5:30 p.m. — Junior Varsity vs. Law Chiefs
Sat. Jan. 13 - VOLLEYBALL
— War Memorial Gymnasium
8 a.m. - 6 p.m. - Women's Thunderette Volleyball Tournament
FREE ADMISSION
FOR UBC STUDENTS
RESERVE OFFICER
UNIVERSITY TRAINING PLAN
. . for young men ages 17 to 23 attending university
. . become part of Canada's active Naval Reserve
. . learn seamanship, navigation & leadership skills
. . one night a week during the academic year
. . four months summer employment in the sea environment at
$400 a month
Interested?
come to HMCS DISCOVERY,
Stanley Park, Tuesday at 8 p.m.
call Capt. Harrison at 266-4375 Page 8
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 9,  1973
Layoff threat obstacle
in postal negotiations
OTTAWA (CUP) — Machines that replace
people are the major stumbling block in
current negotiations between the Canadian
Union of Postal Workers and the federal
government.
The post office is currently visiting
businesses to "assist" them in setting up their
postal codes so the machine can be used.
The majority of Canada's mail passes
through 15 centres. Current plans call for all of
these to be mechanized.
Postal workers are also worried about the
mental and physical effects of the proposed
mechanization. They contend no studies have
been done to determine exactly how such
mechanization affects workers.
Ihe government has not given the workers
written assurance no one will be laid off as a
result of the mechanization, despite earlier
verbal assurance.
CUPW public relations director Bill Kidd
told Canadian University Press the post office
plans to mechanize mail sorting to eliminate 23
operations now involved in mail handling.
CUPW does not know how many jobs are at
stake or what the government intends to do
with the workers who will be replaced.
Deputy postmaster general John A.H.
MacKay has been quoted as saying: "We have
to make certain that nobody gets hurt in the
change. I could not breathe with that sort of
thing on my conscience. The department has a
firm plan to meet all redundancy situations
(layoffs) that may develop both at
headquarters and in the field."
The workers have never seen the plan
MacKay mentions. Job security is a crucial
issue lor CUPW's members since more than
half of them are under 30.
Officials have said people replaced by
machines will be taken care of by attrition
through retirements, deaths or resignations.
The postal workers don't accept this explanation because the members are so young,
the number of people to be replaced is not
known and the high levels of unemployment in
Canada are not likely to cause people to quit a
job that, until now, has been fairly secure.
The machines the post office plans to use
would virtually eliminate human hands from
touching first class letter mail. The plans are
all tied into the postal codes being introduced in
Canada now.
Ihe U.S. has already mechanized its post
office to a great degree. In Detroit, after
mechanization, the incidence of mental
disorders increased until they were higher than
in any industry in the U.S.
The postal workers say they do not oppose
mechanization or other changes that will give
the Canadian people better service.
Kidd branded the newly-instituted assured
delivery system as "the greatest hoax ever
perpetrated on the Canadian people." The
CUPW thinks every area of the country should
receive the same service, as used to happen.
If changes are made, the CUPW would like
the government to change the work hours so
their members will be able to spend more time
with their families.
At present, the majority of people work on
the afternoon and night shifts which start at
many different times.
/
Ihe post office wants to operate a system of
two machines capable of sorting all the mail.
Mail would be dumped into a Japan-made
machine which automatically sorts all mail
according to thickness, and width. The
machine rejects all mail that won't fit the
standard envelope size. The standard envelopes are arranged so that the address is
facing up. The machine then cancels the stamp
and moves the mail onto the next machine.
This is an Optic Scanner (OCR) that will
automatically "read " the postal code on the
envelope and sort the mail according to its
destination. The OCR can only "read" the code
when it is placed in a certain area of the envelope.
If money is saved by the change, CUPW
wants the government to use that money to
make environmental changes in the work place
so the job will be more bearable.
Negotiations have been underway since
January, 1972. The present contract expired
March 26, 1972.
The articles of the old agreement are in
force until the chairman of the public service
staff relations board releases the report of the
conciliation board. Seven days after the
report's release, the CUPW may call a legal
strike.
Although details of the conciliation report
have not been released to the general membership of CUPW, postal workers in Montreal
voted 94 per cent against national leadership's
recommendation to reject the report.
This vote does not necessarily mean the
postal workers want to accept the report but
indicates non-confidence in the union
negotiators.
Voting results from other areas have not
been released.
WE CAN HELP MAKE IT HAPPEN
Why not let us prove it to you?
YOU CAN OPEN AN ACCOUNT, APPLY FOR A CANADA
STUDENT LOAN, OR GET ADVICE OR INFORMATION
ON ANY OF THE FINANCIAL SERVICES WE OFFER TO
STUDENTS.
Drop in soon to your Royal Bank Branch — They will be
pleased to help you.
ROYAL BAN K
serving
British Columbia
UNIVERSITY AREA BRANCH
DAVE STEWART, Manager - TERRY COTTON, Loans
10th at Sasamat 224-4348
PLEASED WITH EXAMS?
Learn efficient STUDY METHODS
6 sessions — 1 hr./week
Starts Monday, January 15
Register in advance at 'STUDENT SERVICES
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A SUB FILMSOC PRESENTATIONi
• FREDERIC  WOOD  THEATRE'
TARTUFFE
by Moliere
January 12-20
(Previews-Jail. f 0 & ffj
8:00 p.m.
Student Tickets: $ 1.00
Box Office - Frederic Wood Theatre — Room 207
«SUPPORT   YOUR   CAMPUS   THEATRE*

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