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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Feb 2, 1990

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Array theUbmy
1
IN
i s
1
Dammned
if we
D
E
know
Founded in 1918
Vancouver, B.C., Friday, February 2,1990
Vol 72, No 33
Sexism screened
DON MAH PHOTO
Dr. Aubka gives a demonstration during Chemistry Magic Show
AMS to return $30 RecFac funds
by Warren Whyte
UBC students will have an
extra $30 to spend this summer.
Students' council passed a
motion 16 to 6 on Wednesday to
reimburse fees collected for the
student recreation centre to students by April 30,1990.
A referendum on the SRC was
defeated last September, leaving
$800,000 of students' money in
limbo.
Because the September referendum failed to outline specific
consequences if defeated, council
was faced with two options—returning the money to students or
spending it on a similar facility.
This does not, however, lay to
rest the possibility of another recreation facility being built.
Arts president Johanna
Wickie said a tentative proposal
for a new building with more facilities and more student input has
been drawn up.
"I don't see this going anywhere because the initiative has to
come from the AMS, and I just
don't see that happening," said
Wickie.
But according to director of
intramurals Nestor Korchinsky a
future referendum for a rec centre
depends on students' interest.
"There is an assessment going
on right now. There has been a
series of meetings to determine
whether the will is there to hold
another referendum," he said.
But legal concerns regarding
the $30 have surfaced because of
the possibility of a third referendum.
Student BoG representative
Tim Bird said any student could
file a lawsuit against the AMS if
the last referendum's wording is
interpreted as $30 going into a
trust fund specifically for a recreation centre.
"We should have waited for
legal advice. If a student files a
lawsuit against the AMS, based on
the wording ofthe ballots, it could
be concluded that we had no right
to give the money back, given that
the construction of a rec centre is
not ruled out at this date," said
Bird.
"The money may have had to
be directed to a rec centre. In this
case the money has to be recovered, and thoee council members
who voted to refund the $800,000
may be making a larger personal
donation to a rec centre than they
ever imagined," he said.
Bird referred to a "personal
donation" because he requested
the vote be done by roll call so that,
in case of a lawsuit, council members who voted to return funds will
be held directly accountable for
the lost money.
Arts representative Ken
Armstrong said, "It's not as harsh
as it may seem, because (the motion) can be rescinded if circumstances change."
"We've wasted too much time
in the AMS by not dealing with
this problem sooner. I'm glad that
we've finally done the right thing,"
said arts proxy R.J. Moorhouse.
Whether or not a lawsuit is
launched or another recreation
centre is built, students will receive $30 back, likely by mail.
In informal meetings with the
administration, AMS president
Mike Lee "requested that fees be
returned directly to each individual student through the mail by
Financial Services."
The $75,000 accrued in interest on the $800,000 should cover
the cost of mailing individual
cheques.
by Martin Chester
Godiva will not ride again on
campus—if Student Court deems
the event to be demeaning.
AMS student council passed a
motion Wednesday instructing
the university administration to
withhold the funds of student
groups organizing events that
student court decides is demeaning to women.
Though the motion does not
specifically mention the Lady
Godiva ride held annually by the
Engineering Undergraduate Society, coordinator of external affairs
Vanessa Geary and AMS ombudsperson Jessica Mathers indicated
the motion targeted the ride.
Engineering representative
on council Scott Kent said, "(the
motion) won't make any difference
to our plans whether to go ahead
with the Godiva ride... The (sexual
harassment) policy is there regardless of the student council
decision. They were just trying to
make a statement. The AMS
hasn't added any penalties, they
have asked for it to be enforced."
Geary said an earlier motion
which she proposed to council two
weeks ago did include a specific
reference to the ride, but the reference was removed.
"This isa compromise motion,
but it will allow people of different
opinions a chance to present their
views to an impartial body [student court]," Geary said.
"I think it shows the majority
(on council) do want to play an
active role in making UBC a place
that welcomes men and women on
an equal basis," she said.
BoG student representative
Kurt Preinsperg, who opposed the
motion, said, "I would describe
myself as a liberal feminist. As a
liberal feminist, I would stop short
of using coercive laws to promote
feminism because (they) only lead
to an attempt by opponents to use
coercive laws and that is the road
to anti-liberal, dictatorial society."
Preinsperg added, "we have
thrown a political hot potato in the
lap of a non-political institution."
Said Mathers: There's no
problem with it going to Student
Court. It is what Student Council
does with it that is a political decision."
Mathers explained that if the
EUS were brought to Student
Court over the Godiva ride, "the
issue of whether or not it is de
meaning to women wouldbe taken
into account with the decision, but
it would be the engineers on trial,
not the Lady Godiva ride."
Kent said that, should the
engineers have their funds seized,
"we could always collect our own
fees... There are ways we could
survive as a society."
Kent added "under the policy,
once they've taken away the fees,
there isn't much more they could
do."
He said only $30,000 of the
total engineers budget of aproxi-
mately $100,000 comes from the
AMS.
Preinsperg asked: "How can
we stand for free choice, for abortion, and at the same time insist on
our right to inflict our personal
morah ty about what is offensive or
demeaning on others?"
In a noon hour speech to the
New Democratic Club on Wednesday, Point Grey MLA Darlene
Marzari challenged the AMS and
administration to take a stronger
stand on the Godiva ride.
"I say (the) freedom of expression for every woman and man on
this campus who feels intimidated
and repressed and harassed by
this exercise must be protected,"
said Marzari.
"Leadership has become confused with proper process in such a
way that students and women
have become victims rather than
citizens."
She said the university must
act to stop incidents that are seen
tobe demeaning to women or "they
will pay in credibility, and they
will ultimately pay for this in
people cutting off their donations."
"If this university allows the
engineers' ride to take place this
year, all Canada will be watching,
the whole country will be watching
this university of British Columbia making an asshole of itself,"
Marzari said.
Geary said, "I realize that
censorship is dangerous, but we
can not forget that events which
demean and degrade women are
not only offensive, but also harmful and place UBC in an extremely
negative light, especially^ we are
trying to become "World Class'."
Marzari said, "Unlike anti-
semitism, unlike racism, unlike
other forms of hatred, misogyny,
hatred of women, is so much a part
of the fabric of our institutions
that sometimes it is difficult to
identify."
Is my resume thick enough now, sir?
AMS Executive
Election Results
(unofficial)
vice-president
•Johanna Wickie
Neville Hamilton
Robin Muehlebach
president
♦Kurt Preinsperg
R J. Moorhouse
Andrew Hicks
director of finance
907   *John Lipscomb
844   Robert Laing
682   Ken Armstrong
1,116
726
526
968
838
519
director of administration
♦Roma Gopaul-Singh 1,326
Julie Memory 1,048
coordinator of external affairs
♦Jason Brett 785
Susan Jennifer Morley 576
Hai V. Le 481
Kelly Gryschuk 401
Referendum to reduce quorum to
10 per cent of the total student
body:
Referendum to grant financial
and editorial autonomy to The
Ubyssey:
Yes
No
1,528
559
Yes
No
1,238
1,033
(the referendum failed because it
did not meet quorum)
(the referendum failed because
it did not meet quorum) CLASSIFIEDS 228-3977
Classified Advertising
RATES: AMS Card Holders ■ 3 lines, $3.00, additional lines 60 cents,
commercial -3 lines, $5.00, additional lines 75 cents. (10% Discount on
25 issues or more) Classified ads payable in advance. Deadline 4M0
p.m,. two days before publication. Room 266, SUB, UBC, Van^ B.C. V6T
2A7, 228-3977.
the Uby&sej
is now accepting
Valentine Messages
Dm. 266 SW
__£>a5*_,
5 - COMING EVENTS
GROUP FOR WOMEN WITH BULIMIA,
(mid 20's +). Weekly sessions from 7-10pm.
Beginning Feb 6 - March 27 at St. Paul's
Hospital. Please leave a message for Cynthia at 228-7512.
THE VANCOUVER
INSTITUTE
Free Public Lecture
Saturday, Feb. 3
Professor Paul Krugman
Department of Economics
MIT
on
THIRD WORLD DEBT:
THEIR PROBLEM OR OURS?
Lecture Hall 2, Woodward IRC
at 8:15 p.m.
Between
Deadline for submissions: for
Tuesday's paper is Friday at
3:30PM, for Friday's paper is
Wednesday at 3:30pm. LATE
SUBMISSIONS WILL NOT BE
ACCEPTED.
Note: "Noon" = 12:30 p.m.
FRIDAY, FEB. 2
International Development Club.
International Development
Days.   10:30-2:30pm, SUB Con-
International Development Club.
Speaker & slide show - Gail Harwood ofthe United Nations Association - Linking Africa with Canada. Noon, Buch A204.
University Christian Ministries.
Noon hour discussion on intimacy
with God. Noon, SUB 215.
Jewish Students' Association/
Hillel. Ony Shabbat Dinner,
Cost: $5. 6:00pm, Hillel House.
Musician's Network. The John
FYSSAS All Nude Mazola Party
and Bzzr Garden and Jam Night.
All welcome, paid members only
will play. 7pm - midnight, SUB
Rm.212.
11 - FOR SALE - Private
67 VW WAGON, manual, radio, seat cover,
working condition, $425 266-8567.
FOR SALE: One deluxe permanent wave
worth $72. Will sell for $50. Expires Feb. 6/
90. Chris 872-5972.
ATTN: COLLECTORS, 1957 Chev, 4 dr
baby blue, good condition. 60,000 orig miles
Spare parts & shop manual incl. Call Paul
594-3411 or 467-4458	
20 - HOUSING
ROOM FOR RENT, close to UBC, in Family home. Room & Board $450.00/month.
Avail. Feb 1, 224-7992 anytime.
ROOM AVAILABLE FEB. 1 or later.
$300/m utl/NC Close to UBC. Short term
now, but possible long term after March 1.
Greg 732-5199.
Students for Unity and Equality.
Open forum on racism on campus.
Noon, conversation pit in SUB.
Muslim Students' Association.
Weekly prayers. Everyone is welcomed to attend and raise questions or borrow books on Islam.
12:30 p.m. - 1:15 p.m. The lower
lounge ofthe International House.
Graduate Student Society. Poetry
Sweatshop - Prize for 1st. Everyone welcome. 6 p.m., Fireside
Lounge, Graduate Student
Centre.
Graduate Student Society. GSS
Bzzr Garden. 4:30-7:30. Garden
Room, Graduate Student Centre.
Badminton Club. Gym Night.
League playin session. 7-10 p.m.,
Lord Byng, 3933 W. 16th.
English Students Society. Bzzr
Garden. 4:30 - 7:30 p.m.,
Buchanan Lounge.
World University Service of Canada (WUSC. Showing of WUSC
film. 12:30 p.m., BUCH B232.
UBC Progressive Conservative
Club. General Meeting. Noon
(12:30), SUB 205.
Poetry Sweatshop, We time'em:
You write 'em Fireside Lounge GS
Centre 6pm Everyone Welcome
TAKE NOTE
East Side home is in search of a 3rd female
roommate. $250/month + utilities. Give us
a call at 327-8621.
MATURE PROFESSIONAL COUPLE
N/S willing to sit house or apt. With or
without pet during sabbatical. Call (403)
289-1113 or 220-3545.
 30 - JOBS	
RUN YOUR OWN BUSINESS
STUDENT SPRINKLER SERVICES
is now hiring on campus for the summer of
1990. We have 45 manager positions available nationwide. In 1989 our top manager
grossed over $40,000. The average manager
made $10,000 - $20,000. Complete training
provided. Call 681-5755.
SECURITY GUARDS. P/T & F/T available Must by 19, mature and responsible.
CONCORD SECURITY, 689-4005.
BUSINESS, BUSINESS, BUSINESS
EXPERIENCE, EXPERIENCE, EXPERIENCE
Last summer with Student Painters managers averaged $10,200 in profits. All positions and territories will be filled by Feb.
16th. For more information call 874-4166.
T.A.S.P. INTERNATIONAL. An entrepreneurial development company. Earn
$6000-$18,000 running your own summer
business.
- Practical Business Experience
- Great Resume Material
• Complete training & support
Territories available until Feb 16 throughout BC. Call 874-4166.
LAST SUMMERS AVERAGE $10,200
Earn up to $18,000 while running your
own business with Student Painters
(All positions will be filled by Feb. 16)
Call 874-4186
WANTED STUDENT for Kerrisdale vent
cleaning company. 20 hrs_w_. 11:00 p.m. to
4:00 a.m. $9/hr. Pis. apply at 2075 W. 37th
Ave. 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.
P/T SITTER/COMPANION req. after
school 2 days/wk. Dunbar area. Call 736-
8811 days, 263-9321 evenings.
40 - MESSAGES
MESSAGE OF ISLAM 19: God says in the
koran: Whoever kills a human being without a reason like man-slaughter, or corruption on earth, it is though he had killed all
mankind.
LOVE FOR SALE CHEAP1
Don't forget to send your message in The
Ubyssey's special VALENTINE'S ISSUE,
Feb 14th - $3.00 for 3 lines. Forms available
in SUB Rm . 266. Deadline Feb 12th.
SALEEMA, congratulations on your initiation into Delta Gamma.
Love, your Big Sis.
SATURDAY, FEB. 3
UBC Medieval Studium. Medieval tavern. 7 p.m. - 11:30 p.m.
SUB Party Room.
SUNDAY, FEB. 4
Lutheran Student Movement.
Communion Services. 10 a.m.,
Lutheran Campus Centre.
MONDAY, FEB. 5
Environment Centre. Office
hours.also Tues.and Thurs. 12:30
-1:30 p.m., SUB 063.
Classic Subfilms. Film: Peter
Greenaway's "The Draughtsman's Contract". 7 & 9:30 p.m.,
SUB Theatre.
German Club. Travel photos &
commentary - Deutschland, Os-
terreich, Italien. 12:30 p.m.,
BUCHB224.
Tools for Peace - UBC Committee.
General Meeting. 12:30 - 1:30,
PONDE111.
Graduate Student Society. Free
Films: (1) Floating Weeds; (2)
Paris, Texas. Starts 6:30 p.m.,
everyone welcome. Fireside
Lounge, Graduate Student
Centre.
70 - SERVICES
VISITING TORONTO? Bed & Breakfast
in our restored home. Minutes to the IP of
Toronto & downtown. Rates from $45.00
Ashleigh Heritage House (416) 535-4000.
75-WANTED
VOLUNTEERS - HEALTHY NONSMOKING Caucasian males (19-25 yrs)
needed for an antiarhythmic drug study -
mexiletine. Subjects are asked to donate
blood, saliva, urine over 3 days with honorarium $70 paid. Info, call Dr. McErlane
228-4451 or Mr. Kwok 228-5838.
I NEED A BIG STORAGE space on or near
the campus, please call 222-8083 ifyou have
any to rent. Mike.
80 - TUTORING
EXPERIENCED ENGLISH PhJ>. student will edit your MS or thesis for spelling,
grammar and general style, 536-5137.
85 - TYPING
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST, 30 years exp.,
word processing/typing. Student rates.
Dorothy Martinson, 228-8346.
TYPING 24 HOUR SERVICE. Essays,
papers, tapes-cassettes TRANSCRIBED.
Editing, proofing optional. 224-2310 any
time.
WORD PROCESSING
$2.50/dbl. sp. page. APA, MLA, CMS
COMPUTERSMITHS 3726 West
Broadway (At Alma). 224-5242.
ON CAMPUS WORD PROCESSING
Typeityourself... simplified instructions,
spell check, and laser printer make your
work look topquality. $7/hr. and 15 cents/
page. Friendly help always available.
SUB lower level, across from Tortellini's
Restaurant; 228-5496.	
ON CAMPUS WORD PROCESSING
Need the professional touch? ... have it
done for you - you can even book ahead.
$27/hr., 6-8 double spaced pages of normal text per hour, laser printer. SUB
lower level, across from Tortellini's Restaurant; 228-5640.
JJ_. WORD PROCESSING ... 224-2678.
Low student rates/laser printouts. Selfserve
WP (WP and MS Word on PC).
WORD PROCESSING, laser printer - thesis, reports, manuscripts (WordPerfect,
MSWord). $2/pg ds. Jeeva's Word Processing 876-5333, 201-636 W. Broadway.
TYPINGQUICK. RightbyUBC. Allkinds,
editing, $1.50 pg. dspc.
Amnesty International. Abuela
(Maria Villacorta) speaks about
Human Rights in El Salvador.
Noon, SUB 207/209.
TUESDAY, FEB. 6
Environment Centre Eradicate
Styrofoam Group. Meeting. 12:30
p.m., SUB 211.
Environment Centre Promo
Group. Meeting. 12:30 p.m., SUB
212A.
Speakeasy. Outreach Program:
Office for Women Students. 11:30
a.m. - 12:30 p.m., SUB lOOB
(Speakeasy).
Classic Subfilms. Film: A Room
With A View, based on E.M. For-
ster'sNovel. 12:40, 7 & 9:30 p.m.,
SUB Theatre.
Jewish Students' Association/
Hillel. Famous Hot Lunch. 12:30
p.m., Hillel House.
Students for Forestry Awareness.
Speaker Series: Mr. GaryMerkel,
Regional Forester, Indian and
Northern Affairs. Title: Native
Forestry, Native Land Claims and
Related Issues. Noon, MacMillan
166.
Pre-Med Society. Lecture - Forensic Pathology - Dr. Ferris. Noon,
IRC Wood 1.
IHOT
■FLASHES
T-SHIRT LOGO CONTEST
THE
PHILOSOPHY
STUDENT'S
ASSOCIATION (PSA)
is holding a contest to select a
logo design for its club t-
shirts.
The contest closes February
7,1990.
Designs should be submitted
Thursday February 8th to the
Philosophy Student's Lounge
(Buchanan E359)
between 12:30 and 2:00.
The PRIZE for the winning
log is a $50.00 gift certificate
from the UBC Book store and
a PSA Club t-shirt
featuring the design.
The winner will be announced
at the
PHILOSOPHY
STUDENT'S
ASSOCIATION
WINE AND CHEESE,
Friday, February 9th, 1990 (4
to 6pm).
For further information, call
224-6899.
THE DEPARTMENT OF
DEKBiATOLOGY
Acne Study - U.B.C. Hospital
Requires persons:
• 13-30 years of age
• With moderate to severe
acne
• Able to attend 5 visits
over a 12 week period.
A $50.00 honorarium will be
paid on completion.
Information:
874-8138 • Sherry
Speakeasy. Outreach Program:
AMS Women's Centre. 12:30 -
1:30, SUB 100B (Speakeasy).
Lutheran Student Movement.
Co-op Supper. 5:45 p.m., Lutheran Campus Centre.
Volunteer Connections. Orientation/Information Meeting.
Promote Volunteerism and gain
career experience. Noon, Brock
Hall Room 106A (Basement).
Are there different ways of life
and should we protect them?
Come join the newforum of intelligent discussion. Noon at Buch
A203.
WEDNESDAY, FEB. 7
Gordon Price, Alderman - Vancouver, on urban development &
environment issues facing Vancouver - he's always interesting.
Sponsored by the Environment
Centre. 12:30 p.m., BUCH B224.
Gay and Lesbian Week begins
with a presentation on "Gays,
Lesbians and the Bible" at 12:30
in SUB 111.
Jewish Students' Association/
Hillel. Torah study with Rabbi
D. Bassous. 12:30, Hillel House.
2/THE UBYSSEY
February 2,1990 srvwipw'W'ii-M:''?"
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'j \%&<s.i:.sk *:...>?    l.s-..*-...r..r..._*_ '..t.£. ?■■■■■_>..
'     '   *„   **
NEWS
Hicks summoned
by students' court
,_______.
by Rick Hiebert
Two UBC arts students have
initiated proceedings to take Alma
Mater Society director of administration Andrew Hicks to student
court on Monday.
Darlene Prosser and Jason
Gadd feel Hicks violated bylaw
Andrew Hicks
21(lXcXD of the AMS Code and
Bylaws, which prohibits "behaviour deemed unbecoming to a
Member ofthe Society."
The students also feel Hicks
contravened the AMS Code of
Procedure by being the second
signing officer of a deconstituted
club (Victoria Invasion).
"We've been planning this
since early last week," said Prosser. Theidea waste bring Andrew
Hicks tostudentcourt....not tofind
out just what he did, but to find out
what's going on in general."
Hicks was unavailable for
comment at press time, despite
several written and phone messages left at his office and home
during the past four days.
Gadd is concerned Hicks appears to have used funds from the
Victoria Invasion club account,
which he, as Student Activities
Commission chair, "should have
known was deconstituted."
"He's a signing (officer) for a
club that has no members, no executive, doesn't even exist...and
the rules are that there is one signing member to an AMS club and
both Karl Kottmeier and Andrew
Hicks were signing officers of the
club," said Gadd.
"Plus, we want to know, if he
was taking beer into committee
meetings—is it right that they
should be drinking alcohol while
making proper decisions?" he said.
It will be up to student court to
decide whether their charges are
legitimate, according to student
court clerk and AMS Ombudsperson Jessica Mathers.
The student court proceedings take place Monday afternoon
at 3:30p.m. in SUB 206.
Frache and Robidoeux
speak on pro-choice
by Carta Maftechuk
Choice on abortion is a student issue, according to representatives of the Canadian Federation of Students.
Unwanted pregnancies
would force a woman to pull out
of school and seriously disrupt
her program of study if she does
not have abortion rights, according to Michelle Robidoeux ofthe
CFS, who spoke to UBC students
on Wednesday in a noon-hour
discussion.
Robidoeux said students in
need of an abortion should have
quick and easy access to the procedure to prevent the loss of a semester or even a year of school.
Both Robidoeux and Pam
Frache, CFS-pacific chair, also
examined changes proposed to
the current abortion law and
their implications.
Abortions are legal under
current law. Yet, a new bill before the House of Commons
demands the approval of a doctor
before a woman may have an
abortion.
This proposal is similar to
the law struck down in January
1987 which stated that three
doctors had to approve a
woman's request for an abortion.
According to the proposed
bill, a woman may only have an
abortion if the pregnancy endangers her mental or physical
health.
The definitions in the bill are
arbitrary and not clearly defined,
said Robidoeux.
"What is a woman's mental
or physical health?" asked Robidoeux. "A woman would have to
be crazy or sick to get an abortion with this law."
The proposed law imposes
criminal sanctions against violators of the bill, by carrying
with it a penalty of up to two
years in prison.
The most recent poll
showed that although many
Canadians feel there should be
some type of law regulating the
procedure, 62 per cent oppose
the criminalization of abortion—the highest percentage
ever recorded. Also, 82 per cent
of British Columbians take a
pro-choice stance.
Robidoeux talked about the
lack of attention given to the
problem of accessibility, especially in the smaller Eastern
provinces.
"In Prince Edward Island,
there is no access at all. And
there is only one doctor in Newfoundland who will perform
abortions," she said.
Frache noted that late
abortions are imposed by existing structures within society.
Lack of money and the necessity
of travelling can create delays
that could be avoided. "By eliminating barriers, we will eliminate the need for late abortions," said Frache.
Robidoeux also expressed
concern about the government's
avoidance of the accessibility
question.
Frache ended by urging
students to take action for
choice. This discussion was the
first in a series of talks presented by UBC Students for
Choice.
Morning frost
CHUNG WONG PHOTO
Gay charges paper with homophobia
by Karen Hill
TORONTO (CUP) — Andrew
Davidson has taken the University of Toronto's Catholic college
newspaper, the mike, to the Ontario Human Rights Commission
after it refused to print his ad.
The chair of Gays and Lesbians at U of T last week lodged a
grievance with the Ontario Human Rights Commission, because
the newspaper's board of directors
rejected an ad for a GLAUT dance.
He said the St. Michael's College newspaper is discriminating
against lesbians and gay men.
"There are gay Catholics and
gay non-Catholics at the school
who'd be interested (in the dance)."
In December, the mike's board
of directors rejected an ad for
GLAUTs Homo Hop. They briefly
reconsidered running the ad in the
January edition, but again refused
it, saying GLAUT could submit an
opinion piece instead.
"If they back down and run the
ad 111 drop the complaint," he said.
But "the long-term goal is to change
attitudes."
Human rights officer Andre
Goh said the complaint is under
investigation. The first step is
"an early settlement initiative"
where Davidson, Goh and a
member ofthe mike's board meet
to resolve the complaint. If both
parties disagree on a settlement,
the complaint will go to a formal
hearing.
Goh said about 40 per cent of
all cases are resolved at the mediation stage. It can take up to
three years for a formal complaint to be settled, he added.
DAVID LOH PHOTO
February 2,1990
THE UBYSSEY/3 NEWS
SHOWTIMES EFFECTIVE February 2 - 8
RICHPORT   ,L fin N STATION
CINEMAS    *-*ukJll SQUARE 7
LOUGHEED MALL    ■ WILLOWBROOK 6
« Daly- 2*00  4*30
7:00  930
Evenings -7:15  9*0       Ewnlngs - 720 935      Evening* - 7:10 930       Evenings - 7:00  9:15
Matinees Sal- Sun. - 2:00 Matinees Sat7 Sun. - 230 Matinees Sal- Sun. - 230 Matinees Sat. Sun. - 2:15
CmatwhQ
B.CWMMNO
•cmiw,
cmtm languan
■    Ttvto	
UBC Student Counselling
& Resources Centre
Room 200, Brock Hall •:• 228-3811
February Workshop Schedule
All workshops are from 12:30 -1:30
February 5 Motivation
February 8 Study Skills Strategies
February 9 Stress Busters
February 12,19 & 26 Alternative Expressions to Anger
 — A group for men
February 13 Personal Time Management
February 15 Job Search Strategies
February 19 Strategies for Empowering Women
February 20 Interview Survival
February 22 Resume Preparation
February 23 An Ounce of Prevention
 — Self-Esteem Enhancement
February 26 Study Skills Strategies
February 27 Stress Busters
February Films
Wednesday Noon 12:30 -1:30
Feb. 7 How to Get the Job You Want
Feb. 14 Interview Skills
Feb. 21 Sexual Roulette: Aids and the Heterosexual
Feb. 28 Alive and Well - Stress Reduction
Preregistration Required (Limited Enrollment)
For more information or to register for these workshops call 228-3811.
Watch this space for news on March's workshops.
Frosh program
gets growing
by Mark Nielsen
The First Year Students Program is now off the ground after
one year of operation but AMS
president Mike Lee expects there
will still be some growing pains to
undergo as it heads into its second
year.
In fact, Lee doesn't expect the
program to be fully operable until
after its fourth year of existence,
after the first group of students to
ever take part have graduated.
By then he hopes it will be
both a tradition and full-fledged
way to welcome first year students
to UBC.
"It's got to become a program
where people just join up. It hasn't
developed a reputation where
high school students in grade 12
know that it's there and every
student gets involved," he said.
For the most part, this year's
edition of the program revolved
around Frosh Week, held at the
start ofthe first semester. Events
like the Frosh Olympics, a mass
social ice breaking exercise called
Playfair and a speakers forum
were held. As well, during the first
few months, a scavenger hunt and
a frosh dance were held.
Approximately 25 per cent of
first years and close to 100 returning students took part, a number
Lee is happy with under the
circumstances.
"It wasn't a program that was
established yet, so people didn't
really have an idea of what it was
all about," he said.
FYSP external relations officer Brent Ross (in Arts 2) said such
programs have been well established in Eastern Canada and the
United States.
In contrast, Ross said establishing such a program in a major
centre such as Vancouver or
Toronto is more difficult because
the university doesn't play as big a
role.
"The reason it works is because (the university's) isolated
and it really is the centre of the
students life."
Nevertheless, such a program
is important, especially for first
year students who grew up in
towns located outside greater
Vancouver and are heading to
UBC alone.
For many Ross said UBC is
nothing more than a commuter
campus. They come here, they go
to school, they go home," he said.
"When all they see here is
school and they're not made aware
of all the other events and really
exciting things to get involved
with, there is no motivation to
stay."
However, after a few months
the various groups making up the
FYSP - consisting of a frosh coordinator (FROCO) and about 15 first
years - began to break up.
"I think in part there wasn't
enough structure to the program,
and the FROCO themselves don't
feel part of the program because
the program was very event oriented," Lee said.
To improve the situation, Lee
wants to see the FROCO's go
through training sessions with
other FROCO's and develop more
skills in the future. He also wants
the FYSP to encompass not only
social, but academic and recreational endeavors as well.
Above all, Lee wants more
people involved, and hopes to
double the number taking part
next year.
"A major way to change the
attitude at UBC is through the
FYSP," Lee said.
"Its really helpful in orientating them to the campus to get to
know what all the activities are
about and what the AMS is all
about."
The FYSP is accepting applications at 211A SUB.
rt
CMHC 2> i SCHL
Helping to house Canadians
Scholarships for
graduate studies
in housing
FOR THE 1990-1991 ACADEMIC YEAR
Individual scholarships of $13,200 each for graduate
studies in housing are awarded by Canada Mortgage
and Housing Corporation (CMHC) to candidates of
demonstrated ability and high academic promise.
Scholarship winners are chosen competitively by a
national committee representing business, universities
and government. These awards may be used for
studies in such disciplines as engineering, environment, business and public administration, social and
behavioural science, architecture, economics, law,
planning and history.
A Guideline and Application form may be obtained
from your university office responsible for graduate
studies or student awards. Or write to:
Administrator, Scholarship Program
Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation
Ottawa, Ontario K1A0P7
Your request for a form must reach Ottawa by March
9, 1990. In turn, your application for the 1990-1991
academic year must be sent to CHMC by your
university no later than April 6, 1990.
Canada
4/THE UBYSSEY
February 2,1990 Iona fawns over Martin
by Joe Altwasser
Iona Campagnola is not running for the Liberal leadership,
but she is campaigning.
Ms. Campagnola, the national campaign co-chair for the
Canadians for Paul Martin, was
on campus Tuesday hoping to
acquaint people with Liberal leadership candidate Paul Martin jr.
Martin, the Member of Parliament for LaSalle-Emard is running behind the early frontrunner
Jean Chretien.
Campagnola and the other co-
chair, MP for Shefford Jean Lapierre, ofthe Canadians for Martin
are touring Canada to improve
Martin's low profile.
They are "speaking to groups
of Liberals and other groups about
the qualities Paul Martin brings to
the leadership and about specific
qualities he has put on the record
up until now."
According to Campagnola,
Martin's greatest potential is his
ability to recapture the centre of
Canadian politics from the Tories.
"This man is a philosophical
liberal," she said.
"Since Mr. Mulroney's second
government is much more conservative than his first government
was, he has freed up space in the
middle of the political spectrum
which Liberals have traditionally
occupied."
"A liberal party headed by a
leader who is well-balanced combination of the economic and social
could conceivably lead the way to
retake the centre of the political
spectrum which has traditionally
been Liberal territory," said
Campagnolo.
One of Martin's key platforms
is to renegotiate rather than rip up
the Free Trade Agreement.
The five sections of the FTA
Martin would hke to renegotiate
are:
— A mechanism that would prevent American firms from buying
Canadian companies deemed vital
to the Canadian economy. Under
the current deal Canada can only
block U.S. take-overs of companies
with assets of more than $150
million.
— A definition of subsidies acceptable to Canada. According to
Campagnolo, the U.S. considers
the Unemployment Insurance
Corporation a form of a subsidy.
— Protection for marketing
boards and income stabilization
programs for farmers.
"Unlike Mr.
Mulroney he was not
the front man of an
American multinational. He has
created and built
and expanded a
Canadian multinational which is a
very different thing"
— A clarification of the sections
on exporting Canadian water,
which a number of trade experts
argue gives the U.S. more than
just bottled water but also water
through pipelines, channels or by
tankers.
— Opening the energy provisions to take into account the export of natural gas from the
Beaufort Sea. Under the trade
deal Canada can only cut back
energy exports to the U.S. if it is
also rationed here in a similar
proportion. There is now thought
to be the possibility of U.S. utilities
tying up large-scale future gas
supply in areas such as the
Beaufort Sea.
Campagnolo said, "Liberals
have always been free-traders, but
that we dislike this specific agreement. Abetter one couldhave been
negotiated."
Campagnolo also said it is
bizarre we have free trade with the
U.S. while many tariff barriers
between the provinces still exist.
Meech Lake is another issue
which Martin needs minor rather
than wholesale changes. Martin is
in favour of Meech Lake because of
the need to bring Quebec back into
the constitution.
But given the divisive nature
of Meech within the Liberal party,
Campagnolo hopes that Meech
Lake does not obscure other issues
to become the focal point of the
leadership convention—"a situation which would only fit in with
the Conservative agenda."
Campagnolo thinks Martin
will do well out west because he is
concerned about regional development and is in favour of senate
reforms.
Campagnolo said we will hear
more about the west policy when
the liberals come together in Vancouver at a forum on March 3.
The idea of Martin being another businessman in the mold of
Brian Mulroney was quickly dismissed by Campagnolo.
Campagnolo thinks Martin is
the perfect Liberal—with a strong
economic grounding and a social
conscience which has seen him
involved in Amnesty International, The North-South Institute
and The Canadian Council for
Native Business.
"Unlike Mr. Mulroney he was
not the front man of an American
multi-national. He has created
and built and expanded a Canadian multi-national which is a
very different thing," claimed
Campagnolo.
"He also has a well demonstrated social conscience. I could
not support him if all he was a
successful business entrepreneur," she said.
"The world is in a state of
enormous transition and Canada
is not immune," said Campagnola.
"We need new thinking about
Canada and its place in the world."
It was Martin's creativity,
innovation and imagination that
sold Campagnola on Martin, and
the fact he brings with him no past
baggage.
Jack Daniel's lennessee Whiskey is represented in Canada by FBM Distillery Ltd , Brampton, Ontario
YOU CAN TELL a lot about Jack Daniel's
Whiskey from the sign on our front gate.
Visitors from Canada always comment on
this sign and especially our quiet,
unhurried way of life. You see, we
make an old time whiskey here,
slowly charcoal mellowed to sippin'
smoothness. And we age it slowly
too, over long years and changing
seasons. Yes, there are faster ways
to make whiskey. Many distillers
employ them. But once you
compare Jack Daniel's, you'll
understand our reluctance to
pick up the pace.
i^P^,
<m ma
.;A\    \c».7
Whiskey
JACK DANIEL'S TENNESSEE WHISKEY
If you'd like a booklet about Jack Daniel's Whiskey, Write us here in Lynchburg, Tennessee, 37352, U.SA
CAMPUS
CUTS
Cut Only
Haircutting for men & Women
s2.00 DISCOUNT with this AD
EXP. Feb. 10,90
At Hipperts on the Boulevard
5784 University Blvd.
(In The Village)
228-1471
THE IH LOUNGE IS OPEN AGAIN!
JOIN US THURSDAY, FEBRUARY
1ST AT 7:00PM
FOR LOTS OF SPECIALS!
Games, 30" Color TV Screen and
Special Sports Evenings To Come!
Regular Hours • Mon-Fri, 7-11 pm
Second Floor • Top Of The Stairs
IH (Next to the Asian Centre)
 (228-5021)	
COMMUNITY
SPORTS
STUDENT SPECIALS
Student Prices Only Apply With A Copy Of This Ad
Reg. Price
$199.50
Student Price
Jones Dermoflex Jackets $199.50 !
(Waterproof & Breathable; Just Like Gortex)
Kennex Copper Ace Tennis Frames $139.50
(Price includes synthetic gut string)
Black Knight Graphite Composite Squash Raquets $119.50 .
Waterproof Rain Jackets (lined) $ 79.50 i
BRC Biking Helmets $ 54.95 J
Hi Tec Indoor Court Shoes (men's or ladies) $ 49.95 S
10% Off all regular prices with AMS card
FREE SKATE SHARPENING WITH EVERY HOCKEY STICK PURCHASE
Open Seven Days a Week
3355 W. Broadway ]
$119.50
$89.50
$119.50
$ 79.50
$ 79.50
$ 44.95
$ 54.95
$ 39.95
$ 49.95
$ 34.95
733-1612
February 2,1990
THE UBYSSEY/5 The Trolls Are Coming!
And they 're on the prowl to make you howl!
Another great comedy show from the creators
of Dr. Bundolo and Comedy College.
Determined to get away with all sorts of
outrageous comedy are Joe Bird. Wes Borg. Xeil Grahn.
Frank van Kceken. Jamie Ollivier &■ Cathleen Rootsaerl.
TICKETS ARE FREE
Call the troll-free number 662-6604
Minimum age 16
TWO SHOWS: February 8 & 9 at 7:30 pm
CBC Studios
700 Hamilton St.
_*k   CBC Television
•■•   British Columbia 2/3
NOMINATIONS
NOW
OPEN FOR
APPOINTMENTS AS
Student Representatives on the
following Presidential Advisory
Committees:
• Food Services Advisory 1 rep
• International House
Board of Directors 1 rep
• Land Use 1 rep
• Student Placement 1 rep
• Student Services 2 reps
• Student Union Building 1 rep
• Traffic & Parking 4 reps
• United Way Campaign 1 rep
• Walter Gage Memorial Fund 1 rep
• War Memorial
Gymnasium Fund 3 reps
Applications available in SUB Rm 238.
Nominations close 4:00 p.m. Monday
February 12th, 1990.
by Otto Lim
ESUS had a rough ni^ht,
playing to overzealous
fans wallowing in the frenzy
of guitar feedback and mind-
bending drums that reverberated from wall to wall at the
Commodore.
MUSIC
The Jesus and Mary Chain
with Blackbird
January 25
The Commodore
It's been five years since
The Jesus and Mary Chain
started with their first LP,
Psychocandy, and made their
Vancouver debut.
If you've never heard of
The Jesus and Mary Chain,
they sound like pulsating
chainsaws mixed with a hive
of swarming bees to produce a
trademark noise and distor
tion sound.    _
Keeping in theme with
their 1989/90 Automatic
Tour, Jesus lead singer Jim
Reid lifelessly sang from song
to song without talking to
between sets or really
acknowledging the throngs of
Jesusheads. Who needs showmanship when you can rely
on heavy guitar riffs, dense
dry ice fog, and dark sombre
lighting on stage?
The guitarist, William
Reid, and bassist, Douglas
Hart, seem to prefer facing
their Marshall amps and
roadies than the bouncing
Jesus'ers who showed their
love for by throwing beer
bottles and tennis shoes at
the band. Periodic stage-
jumping made Bruno the
black-shirt bouncer earn his
paycheque the hard way.
Poor lead singer Jim, who
likes to sing leaning on his
mike stand, had his mike
stand snatched away by those
crazy Jesus'ers.
Once infamous for their
20-minute concerts,     The|,
Jesus   Mary Chain   played a
lethargic bU-m'inute set
featuring their latest album.
Automatic. They started off
with Coast to Coast and continued with other numbers
from Automatic such as Her
Way of Praying, Head On,
and Take It. They finished off
their show with a short
encore of Gimme Hell and
Kill Surf City.
It was disappointing that
they left out some of their
other big singles like Just
Like Honey and Never
Understand. The Jesus and
Mary Chain look disinterested in their performance—
the energy came from the
head-banging Jesus'ers.
The opening act, Blackbird, made up of two brothers, Tony and Chip Kinman
(formerly of Rank and File),
did quite well when compared
to the rock standard of
opening acts. They drew
people to the stage with their
intriguing sound of a drum
machine, neat guitar riff's,
and catchy lyrics.
ThisVV
FRIDAY FEBRUARY 2:
THE SECOND-TO-LAST ARTS C
iDUS GEORGE. TOUCH N GO
do their thing. Donl forget -1181
n RACER aii BLACK EARTH
Yes, it's Paul MacKenzie and the
Black Earth.
SATURDAY FEBRUARY 3:
THE LAST ARTS CLUB SHOW I
SARCASTIC MANNEQUINS JIR1
close down the joint. Kinda puts
THE SKATALfTB
come all the way from Jamaica ju
NOTICE OF HEARING
Take note that the Students' Court is convening to
hear the charges brought against Andrew Hicks
by Jason Gadd and Darlene Prosser
The Hearing is to be held at 3:30 p.m. on the 5th
day of February, 1990, in SUB Room 206.
Persons desiring to give evidence or
submissions on this matter are directed to give
notice to the Clerk of the Court before
commencement of the Hearing.
Jessica Mathers
Clerk of the Court
APPICATIONS ARE
NOW BEING ACCEPTED
FOR THE POSITION OF:
AMS
OMBUDSPERSON
Applications available in SUB Rm 238
Applications accepted until Monday
February 12,1990 at 4:00 pm in SUB Rm 238
APPK
NOW AVA
ONEP(
OF EDI
INSID]
Applications avail.
Applications deadlii
Monday February 1 ]
6/THE UBYSSEY
February 2,1990 Photosoc: C
lioto art
AN upcoming exhibit by the
UBC Photo Society at
SUB Art Gallery will give club
members an opportunity to show
off their technical and creative
skills.
PHOTOGRAPHY
UBC Photo Society
Annual Photo Exhibit
February 11-14
SUB Art Gallery
'       The works to be displayed
will range from technical and
architectural photography to fine
arts photography involving
tinting with coffee and food
colouring.
When asked about the
conceptual, art-historical implications of using such non-traditional media in the production of
art objects, a member of Photosoc
was quick to reply "It's cheap."
Photosoc has a membership
of about 250 members, with 50
hard-core photographers. All
members are invited to contribute images to the exhibit, with
somewhere around 100 pieces to
be displayed. Something for
everyone.
A Photosoc executive, when
asked to comment on The
Ubyssey's photo content, said,
"For the visually oriented person,
your paper doesn't have much to
offer." (Sounds like a perfect
opportunity to call for submissions to The Ubyssey...)
$k's rock
ly compiled by Kathryn at CITR FM 101.9
IW EVER!
HE stn
e Town Pump with CiTR Shindig winners
tR CAUSTIC FERTILIZER
'our throat. Sniff, sniff.
[or you, the least you can do is go see them.
SUNDAY FEBRUARY 4:
NO FUN
are local love gods, worship them in person at the Railway.
MONDAY FEBRUARY 5:
HIDDEN FORBIDDEN, NGOMi AND EVAN SYMONS fi UNEVEN STEPS
are featured as part of the New Music Showcase at the Town Pump.
TUESDAY FEBRUARY 6:
THE BQOGtMDI. HIKED LUNCH WO A MURDER OF CROWS
play the Town Pump.
WEDNESDAY FEBRUARY 7:
THE METHOD. EUMFF AND BIG WILD
are doing the Commodore thing.
THURSDAY FEBRUARY 8:
RADICAL SABBATCAL witi WIDE WORLD
at the Commodore.
ONS
3LE FOR:
ITION
3ROF
n SUB Rm 238
0 at 4:00 pm
APPICATIONS ARE Hffl
NOW BEING ACCEPTED
FOR THE POSITION OF:
AMS ASSISTANT
DIRECTOR OF
FINANCE
Applications available in SUB Rm 238
Applications accepted until Monday, February
12th, 1990 at 4:00 pm in SUB Rm 238
Applications are now being
accepted for positions on
the#tudent administrative
com!|iission.
Applications are available
in SUB room 238.
Application Deadline:
4:00 p.m. Monday
February 12/ 1990
Monday,
[.'■•^r-J.l
Presented by the Graduate Student Society
• Hosted by Mina Shum •
Fireside Lounge Starts at 6:30 pm
February 5      Floating Weeds
Paris, Texas
February 12    Scarecrow
Rumble Fish
February 19   Testament of Dr. Mabuse
Viridiana
For a detailed synopsis of the Films see the Jan/Feb '90
issue of the Graduate at your nearest department.
Fireside Lounge Hours:
Mon. to Thurs.   3 pm - 11 pm        Friday    3 pm - 1 am
All Videos supplied by Video Stop,  Broadway and Alma.
ONE HOUR
10th and Alma Location Only
3665 WEST 10™ AVE.
PHONE 736-5669
>ruary 2,1990
THE UBYSSEY/7 r
Get Your Summer Job Now!
Experienced Tree Planters
April 15 to July 15, 1990
OLIVER & GILTRAP REFORESTATION
"1
L
For 17 years one of the
best paying, best
organized contractors
in B.C.
5337 DUNBAR
VANCOUVER, B.C.
V6N 1W2
Phone:266-9167
RED LEAF RESTAURANT
LUNCHEON SMORGASBORD
Unique Tr.idition.il Chincto   xT
.J
LICENSED PREMISES
10"., DISCOUNT
on cash pick-up orders.
-1 42 Western Parkway,
University Village
228-9114   »—•-
GRADUATION
*»
Graduation application cards have been mailed to 4th year students registered in the
'89 Winter session of the degree programs: B.A., B.F.A., B.Mus., B.Com., B.Ed., B.P.E.,
B.R.E. and B.Sc. All students who expect to graduate this Mav (spring), should
complete and return both cards to the Registrar's Office no later than February 15.1990.
Students in the graduating year of these programs, who have not received cards in the
mail by the end of the first week of February, may obtain cards from the Registrar's
office. They should also check that his/her local mailing address is correct.
Meanwhile, students in Applied Science, Graduate Studies or diploma programs
should obtain graduation applications froim their departments. Those in the remaining
degree programs should obtain applications from the Dean's or Director's Office of
their Faculty or School. Graduation applications are also available in the Registrar's
office.
PLEASE NOTE: EVERY STUDENT WHO EXPECTS TO GRADUATE
MUST MAKE APPLICATION BY THE GIVEN DEADLINE. STUDENTS
WHO DO NOT APPLY WILL NOT BE CONSIDERED!
ESCAPE TO HAWAII TONIGHT
WITH THE TASTE OF
DOMINO'S PIZZA
1) Hawaiian — Bacon or Ham and Pineapple
2) 2 — medium — 8 slice Hawaiians only $14.90
3) 2 — Extra Large —12 slice Hawaiians only $19.99
4) Coke* lj\ —2 cans of coke for $1.00 with any Pizza Purchase
5) Fast Free Delivery in About 20 minutes
r
$3.95
PIZZAS
Come in and pick up our
6 slice 10" Pizza for
only $3.95
- Additional toppings 750
n
$10.00
PIZZAS
Receive any 15" extra Large 12
slice pizza with any single item
of your choice for only $10.00
- Additional toppings $1.50
LATE
NIGHT
SPECIAL
2-10"-6 Slice
Hawaiian Pizzas.
Fast Free Delivery after 9:00pm
for only $10.95.
~l
|_ EXPIRES M APRIL, 90 _L§Xj^S_L5I§*__iUARY_?__l_ __*!_LR___ __°.APRi_:-__P_l
Don't zap the kids!
Fm writing this letter in response to the Jan.23 Ubyssey article "Electrical cable worries parents" (Vol.72, No.30). As a representative of the Graduate Student's Society, I was invited by Ms.
Lucia Fuentes, Chair of Kindercare, to attend two meetings
(Jan.6 and Jan. 18, 1990) which
dealt with the concerns parents
have with UBC's plan to bury two
(a 12kv and a 69kv line), not one,
high voltage lines in close proximity to the Kindercare and Penta-
care yards.
UBC's current proposal,
refered to in the article, was presented to the parents by Mr. Tim
Miner of the UBC Development
Office on Jan. 18. According to Mr.
Miner, the university proposes the
two lines, which are now above
ground, be brought down to a
source box and then buried underground so as to run parallel to the
daycare fence lines. This proposal
requires a loss of 1.5m from the
Kindercare yard and that the
source box be located 0.5m away
from the children's play area. The
problem with this plan is that the
children may continue to be exposed to magnetic radiation. A
consultant to B.C. Hydro stated
that the field of radiation surrounding power lines may extend
to 20 feet whether the lines are
buried or not. The lead sheathing
which will encase the buried lines,
and which was aluded to by Mr.
Kurt Preinsperg in the article, is
not a shield but a conductor. The
potential health hazard to the
children remains if this plan is
approved, and consequently the
parents of the children attending
Kindercare refuse to accept it.
Mr. Preinsperg's comment in
the article that the "proposal that
Tim Miner presented strikes me
as eminently viable and I would
really hope the Kindercare people
would go along with it"is annoying
to say the least. The Jan.6 meeting I refered to above was held
with Ms. Fuentes and both AMS
Board of Governor's representatives, Mr. Tim Bird and Mr. Preinsperg. During that meeting Ms.
Fuentes described the concerns of
the parents, the documentation
they had to support their concerns
and their proposals for two alternative routings of the powerlines,
both of which are very reasonable.
Mr. Preinsperg left this meeting
about ten minutes after it started
to go and confer with Mr. Miner
before Ms. Fuentes was close to
completing her presentation. It
was obvious that Mr. Preinsperg
felt his time was being wasted listening to a concerned and well
informed student and that only a
representative of the university
could provide him with the true
facts.
At the second meeting I attended, Jan. 18, Mr. Miner, Mr.
Preinsperg, a number of Kindercare parents and two representatives ofthe UBC Childcare Society
Executive, Ms. Mab Oleman and
Mr. Glen Drover, were present.
Mr. Preinsperg asked a number of
inane questions that showed his
ignorance of the situation, which
could have been remedied had he
bothered to listen to Ms. Fuentes
at the Jan.6 meeting he was in
such haste to leave. In addition,
the proposal presented by Mr.
Miner, which does not lessen the
potential hazard to the children,
was apparently supported by Ms.
Oleman and Mr. Drover. This
surprised me as I had expected the
Childcare Society Executive to
support the parents in their attempt to secure as safe an environment as possible for children attending Kindercare. Instead, Ms.
Oleman and Mr. Drover seemed to
bend over backwards to support
UBCs plan, even though the parents have two viable alternatives
that could potentially save the
university money and provide a
safe environment for all those concerned.
It is my understanding that
the Kindercare parents primary
concern is for the safety of their
children. There is no conclusive
evidence that magnetic fields do
cause cancer in young children,
however, there are studies that
show a correlation between exposure to such fields as those surrounding power lines (overhead or
buried) and an increased susceptibility of exposed children to diseases such as leukemia. I feel that
the Kindercare parents have every right to be alarmed that their
children are, and may continue to
be, exposed to such a potential
hazard. These people should not
be expected to wait for ten years to
see if their children will provide
the conclusive evidence, one way
or another.
Morven McLean
Graduate Studies
"When I read that CUP
crap in the paper, there's
no way I'm going to walk
into the office and volunteer my precious time to
them."
—Canadian post-secondary education critic Linda
Frum on student papers
North of the 49th.
Help The Ubyssey produce great steaming fetid
mounds of Canadian University Press crap. Grab a
pitchfork in Room 241K,
SUB, today.
On
Professionalism:
A
Series
From
Black &
McDonald
"If a man
empties his
purse into his
head, no one can
take it from him;
an investment in knowledge
always pays the best interest."
-Beryamin Franklin
Black & McDonald Limited
Canada's largest independent electrical & mechanical
contracting organization
St. John's • Goose Bay • Halifax • Montreal • Ottawa • Toronto • Hamilton
London • Kitchener • Winnipeg • Edmonton • Calgary • Vancouver
8/THE UBYSSEY
February 2,1990 Ll_l_.. _." ohmon    .."11"   ~ "" " 1
Students help Third World
by Hai V. Le
Have you ever given the water
used at home any thought? I have,
since coming back from Ghana.
Water is crucial to human survival, but safe water isn't — and it
can kill.
Before going overseas, I did
not know very much about the
needs of people, especially of children, in the developing world. I
had read about them in magazines
and seen some World Vision documentaries, but they did not mean
much until I saw —and experienced — them first-hand.
Despite the
immunization, I
was stricken with
typhoid during
my stay. The
cause: contaminated rain water.
For three
days, I plotted
body temperatures and analyzed the fever
pattern — with
the help from a
book called
Where There Is
No Doctor. I correctly determined the cause,
bought some
chloramphenicol,
and saved myself
from a certain
death: my body
temperature was
hovering around
39.4 when it was
brought down
and I was too
weak to sit — I
might not survive
the trip to the
hospital 12 km
away.
The difference between life
and death — in
my case — is only
abit of knowledge
and 40 cents or
less. Not much, is
it? But when
people are poor,
illiterate, and far
from a health ^^^^^^^
post, a minor ill- ^^^^^^^
ness like diarrhea can kill. I met a
woman who had lost a child due to
diarrhoea. Had her son not have to
drink lake water, he may live.
Typhoid isn't the only dreadful water-borne disease: cholera,
dysentery, Guinea Worms, and
diarrhea, to name just a few.
Although in the developing
world, one child dies every six
seconds from diarrhea, there are
hopes. People are learning — with
help  from   organizations   like
Perspective
Unicef — primary health care,
nutrition and literacy skills. But
all that can't be had if people working for a better world give up
because the needs are so great.
The needs are there but they can
be chipped away.
With that in mind, I have
invited many organizations to
fund some of Unicef s water projects in Sudan.
Three quarters ofthe amount
Individual Contributions:
Anonymous Donor $40
Metals & Material Graduate Society $25
Mike Lee (AMS President) $20
Chung Wong (UBYSSEY Editor) $20
Tim Bird (Board of GovernorRep.) $20
Roger Kanno (Education student)  $20
$145
Students Associations:
The Alma Mater Society $500
Emily Carr Students Association  $300
S.F.U Students Association  $200
Langara Students Council  $ 50
$1050
Campus Societies:
Engineering Undergraduate Society  $365
Forestry Undergraduate Society  $200
Graduate Students Society  $200
Agriculture Undergraduate Society  $153.58
Arts Undergraduate Society  $150.+ $$
The UBYSSEY  $111.17
Commerce Undergraduate Society  $100
Dentistry Undergraduate Society $100
Education Undergraduate Society  $100
Rehabilitation Medicine U.S  $100
Nursing Undergraduate Society     TBA
$1599.75
Other Contributions:
UBC students  $501.40 +
Emily Carr Students     $144.26
Subtotal:
Matching funds from the Canadian
International Development Agency:
Matching fund from the recipient country
in terms of labor, land and other resources: $6880.82
Total:   $13761.64
will fund Unicef water projects in
the Kordofan region of Sudan and
the rest health programs in other
African countries.
Each well costs approximately $400. Each is fitted with a
sturdy handpump of the India
Mark II design. Each pump is intended to serve about 200 people
and women are trained to repair
and maintain it.
Where wells are dug, Guinea
worms are eradicated and the inci
dence of diarrhea decreases.
Why Sudan? Sudan, one ofthe
poorest country in the world and
where only 10% of rural population have access to safe water, has
been plagued by a series of disasters: droughts and floods, famines
and locusts, civil strife. Such factors have entailed enormous suffering for the people.
Although our contribution
isn't much, it boosts the morale of
the people working on these projects tremendously, knowing that
we care — and will have changed
the lives of many people for the
better.
I have written to
President Strangway urging him and
the UBC administration to demonstrate a
commitment to
change for a better
world by matching
the amount UBC students contribute to
this very worthwhile
project. But I have
not heard from him
yet. Let us hope for
the best. (Pharmacy
Undergraduate Society was also invited, but has yet responded.)
There are many
good causes. We all
have to take a stand
on where our contribution goes. The
physical, mental and
emotional development of children is a
great humanitarian
cause: Children are
tomorrow's leaders;
they deserve a
chance.
Let us not stay
blind to the despair
felt by others who
share a part of this
planet.
If you care,
please drop off your
contribution at the
Ombuds Office in the
SUB concourse. Every dollar will go directly to the project.
Imagine that if
everyone gives one dollar, soon we
will have $26,000 — or at least
50 wells. Once dug, a well will be
there for future generations to usa.
Imagine the grief, sorrow, and
deprivation that will be averted.
I will inform you through all
the campus newspapers when I
get more information.
I will likely get corporate
sponsorship for a three week visit
to Sudan — and possibly Ethiopia
—to see the work.
$645.66
$3440.41
$3440.41
SILKSCREENING
(1 WMk delivery on stock Hems)
OYE SPORTSWEAR & DESIGN
* T-SHIRTS    7.35 EACH
•SWEATSHIRTS    13.50 EACH
* POLO SHIRTS    13.95 EACH
pLus many more styles ...
(Based on 25 units per style/design)
PRICE INCLUDES:  1 colour print, garments, set
up. screen & artwork .... puff printing & flash cure-
ing (.33 extra) .... solid coloured fabrics may vary
in price .... additional colour printing by qurtation.
Call: (Ask for Kenneth) 875-6879
Monday - Saturday    10 am - 6 pm
Open Saturdays/Sundays/Evenings by appointment
5SSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS
-sssssssssssssssssssssss
The School of
Urban and
Regional
Planning
Queens University
at Kingston
Planning for people and
places. It could be your
future.
The two-year program of studies
towards the master's degree In
Urban and Regional Planning prepares students for professional
careers In city planning, land and
real estate development, housing
and human services policy planning.
The School of Urban and
Regional Planning offers an interdisciplinary program. Qraduates
with an honours degree in arts,
social sciences, humanities,
engineering, natural sciences,
etc., are eligible for admission.
The curriculum consists of a
core of planning courses and
specialization in (1) land use planning and community development; (2) housing; or (3) program
planning for human services.
Other fields of specialization can
also be arranged by the student.
Please write or telephone the
School of Urban and Regional
Planning, Queen's University,
Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6. (613)
545-2188.
OFFICE FOR WOMEN STUDENTS
PROCRASTINATION
Find out why you procrastinate
and how to stop it.
Date:   Tuesday, February 13, 1990
Time:    12:30-2:20 pm
Place: Women Student's Lounge, Brock 223
Pre-Register at Women Students' Office,
Brock Hall 203 • Enquiries: 228-2415
mm
Ubyssey Staffers:
Interested in
attending the
spring WRCUP
Conference? If
so, you have until
noon Monday to
sign up.
Screening
questions will
also be posted at
this time.
Finding news
stories at UBC:
a workshop.
New reporters and
old hacks welcome.
Come share your
knowledge and
frustrations.
Wednesday,
February 7 in SUB
room 241k at
2:30p.m.
Arts Students ...
Lets Talk
Ifyou have problems with professors, courses or
just anything university related. We can help.
Come to the Arts Ombudsoffice in Buch A104
(Arts Undergrad Office) Mon 12:30-1:30 or any
time to make an appointment
HILLEL HIGHLIGHTS
HilleVs Famous
Hot Lunch
Tuesday, Feb. 6, 12:30 PM
Wednesday, Feb.  7,12:30 PM
Torah Study Group (with Rabbi David Bassous)
Thursday, Feb. 8, 12:30 PM
SOVIET JEWRY DAY
Discussions with recent Soviet Jewish immigrants and
experts on the current situation under Giasnost
For more into: 224-4748
^
MAYOR
^ Gordon
Campbell
Speaking in
the STJB-Auditorium
Wednesday,
February 7th.
12:30 p.m.
PRESENTATION / DISCUSSION
Sponsored by the Students Non-Partisan Club
February 2,1990
THE UBYSSEY/9 Lower quorum
Currently, ten per cent ofthe student body must vote in
favour of a proposal in order for a referendum to reach
quorum. Last week's elections included a referendum to
lower quorum to ten per cent ofthe student body voting either
way.
In an albeit minor way, referendums are a form of
participatory democracy for students outside the power
structure (ie. the AMS student council) to make decisions
for the students' society.
Areferendum to lower quorum was supported 1,528 for
and 559 against. The referendum failed because it did not
meet the present quorum, approximately 2,200 votes.
Barely that number voted at all in this year's elections,
let alone in favour of a particular proposal.
In effect, the present quorum, which is functionally too
high, negates the one forum for participatory democracy.
Though opponents say the proposal is no way to address student apathy, lowering quorum would make a
student's vote more meaningful. It might actually moye
students to shake off their cobwebs and get out to vote in
larger numbers.
Before dismissing this as overly Utopian, keep in mind
that the last two RecFac referendums reached quorum with
a total of $15,000 in funds to publicize them. Those figures
alone indicate that other, less expensive, solutions must be
found to address student apathy.
And considering the "ten per cent applied to voter
turnout" formula is used by governments throughout Canada for various referendums including those on pub plebiscites and zoning proposals, it is our present quorum formula that is the unusual one.
Protect quorum
How can five per cent of the student population be a
valid decisive base representation of a whole population?
Quorum is put in place to ensure that students are
fairly represented on a referendum. To lower quorum so
that merely five per cent of the student population can
make a decision that affects the thousands of students on
campus, violates the fundamental principle of quorum.
Apolitical standard founded on democracy is devalued.
Quorum becomes cheap to those who wish to lower it,
possibly even for their own purposes.
If there is a failure to reach the current ten per cent
figure for quorum, one has to confront the reasons—apathy,
poor campaigning, or just a lack of importance in the issue.
Lowering quorum to substantiate voter support is
unacceptable and demeaning.
Voter .support should be secured by raised awareness
onreferendaissues. Inadequate campaigning should not be
solved by lowering quorum—by twisting the meaning of
democracy—but rather to plan a better campaign.
A cut in quorum will not get more people to vote if they
don't care to begin with. It will only pave the way for block
voting for minority groups and special interest groups.
Lowering quorum is an insult to the intelligence ofthe
student population.
oh yeah, thanks for voting for autonomy, buthellwelost
anyway.
theUbyssey
February 3,1990
The Ubyssey is published Tuesdays and Fridays
throughout the academic year bythe Alma Mater Society
of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions
are those ofthe staffand not necessarily those ofthe
university administration, or of the sponsor. The Ubyssey is published with the proud support of the Alumni
Association. The Ubyssey is a member of Canadian
University Press. The editorial office is Rm. 241k ofthe
Student Union Building. Editorial Department, phone
228-2301; advertising, 228-3977;   FAX# 22&6093
NO EXIT. A film by Greg Davis. Based on the play by J.P. Sarte.
Nadene Rehnby, Ted Aussem and Chung Wong are trapped in a
newspaper office for eternity. They become immortal in a state of
perpetual hell. The film also features Rick Hiebert as God and Joe
Altwasser as the Devil. Don't forget to look for these other fine
features, coming soon to a theatre near you. Martin Chester's A
CLOCKWORK KEITH. Keith Leung lives in a nightmare fascist future world where he is just a number, his mind programmed into a
instant teller machine. Warren Whyte and Rebecca Bishop are the
two revolutionaries that seek to liberate Keith from the clutches of
this dehumanized society, ruled by the ruthless Franka Cordua-
von Specht and Colonel Hao Ii. Mark Nielsen and Carla Maftechuk
star in RE-WRITE THAT LEDE, based on journalist John Gray's
memoirs, adapted to screen by Otto Lim, directed by Dale Fallon,
produced by Yukie Kurahashi Enterprises. And for you action
freaks, Paul Dayson and Michael Booth are two gun blazing heroes
in THE ANARCHIST AND THEMERCENARY, with EmieStelzer
as the evil Controller of Earth Sector 1. Executive producers Hai V.
Le and Don Mah. Cinematography by David Loh. Written by
Christina Chen and Frank Barrieau. Directed by Mike Hill.
EDITORS
Jo* Altwasser • Franks Cordua-von Specht
KorUiUur* • Nadeno Rehnby • Chung Won*
f-Sr-£LECTIONS —tm-"^'
Letters
M-l-C  K-E-Y...?
What is wrong with
Disneyland? Oh, I mean
UBC. When I look at the list
of candidates for the upcoming elections I am confused.
Am I to laugh because for
AMS President I am expected to choose between
Goofy, Mickey Mouse and
Donald the Quack (Oops, I
mean Duck), or should I cry
because for Vice President I
am seriously requested to
choose between Scrooge
McDuck of the far-looney-
toones-right and a host of
other right-wingers who
couldn't but look moderate
compared to the competition. This is like the last
federal election where just
to be in favour ofthe status
quo was radical policy.
Why is none ofthe caliber of a Mike Lee or a Vanessa Geary running? Currently we are faced with a
situation where no matter
who we vote for we are going
to be stuck with a group of
character that better belong
on $0.59 McDonald's
glasses than in the AMS.
Next year all progressive and moderate types are
going to be forced to set up a
watchdog group that will
monitor Student Council for
more Karl Kottmeier types.
What a shame! Next year
we will all regret the
Disneyland invasion of student government and wish
we had put forward a group
of decent, honest, and serious candidates.
John Richmond
Philosophy 4
Al policy
clarified
We would like to respond to the Jan. 19 letter
about a Native Canadian
who was kicking the Amnesty International cage
display in SUB concourse.
The author asked if we had
become so farsighted that
we could "feel the hurt of
prisoners of conscience yet
could not feel or sense the
existing oppression right in
front of us." It was indeed a
The Ubyssey welcomes letters on any Issue. Letters which are not typed will not be accepted. Letters over 200 words
may be edited for brevity. Please be concise. Content which Is libelous, slanderous, racist, sexist, homophobic or
otherwise unlft for publication will not be published. Please bring letters, with Identification, to our editorial office.
Room 241K, SUB. Letters must Include name, faculty or department, year of study and signature.
sad and ironic reminder
that Canada is by no means
a country with a clean human rights record. In the
course of European colonization and settlement, Canada's aboriginal peoples
were often systematically
denied fundamental human
rights such as freedom of
belief and of community.
The resulting social inequity suffered today by Natives in our supposedly
"equal opportunity" society
should be of concern to all
Canadians.
Our purpose in writing
is to clarify Amnesty International's (ATs) position on
Native rights. Part of Amnesty's mandate is that its
members do not work on
behalf of people in their own
country. This is to maintain
ATs role as impartial international observer, and has
helped Amnesty gain worldwide respect. Although AI
cannot address the institutionalized poverty and high
unemployment faced by
Canada's Native peoples,
this does not invalidate the
work we do internationally.
Most often, the people we
work for are depending
solely on international pressure to alleviate their situation. The right to free
speech and protest is virtually non-existent under the
regimes of their countries,
whereas in Canada it is the
right and freedom, and indeed the moral obligation, of
any Canadian to express
opinions about, and to support our Native peoples'
struggle for equality and
identity.
I. Vaisanen
AgSci2
I. Simpson
AIUBC
AMS oops
Hi and thanks for voting on that referendum
question in the elections
this week.
But through all the
bureaucratese, do you know
what you just voted on?
Here, let me translate.
The new wording ofthe
referendum section of the
AMS bylaws reads, "Areferendum of the Society shall,
subject to these Bylaws, be
acted upon by the Society
where a majority, or such
greater percentage as may
be required by the Society
Act, of the votes cast in the
affirmative."
So far, so incomprehensible. The bit about "these
Bylaws" is self-referential
and useless; the bit about a
"greater percentage"
doesn't apply to the vast
majority of referenda. Take
them both out. Oh, and the
"Society" is just the AMS.
What have we got now?
"An AMS referendum shall
be acted upon by the AMS
where a majority of the
votes cast in the affirmative."
Shorter, at least. Now,
if a referendum is "acted
upon," that just means it
passes. "Majority" means
"most," and "where" is
multisyllabic for "if." And a
"vote cast in the affirmative"
is a yes vote.
So what have we got?
"An AMS referendum
shall pass if most ofthe yes
votes."
If most of the yes votes
what?
The new wording
doesn't say. In fact, it seems
that Council voted last
Wednesday to remove the
verb from the referendum
question — as if to guarantee that no useful legislation
ever appears on the matter.
So what happens now?
Another referendum?
David W. New
Science 3
The Fantasy
Accord
Last week, upon being
made aware of Premier
Vander Zalm's proposed
amendments to the Meech
Lake Accord, I was saddened to find that he would
support the idea of twelve
distinct societies in Canada.
One would have thought
that once the two gods of
Canadian constitutional
law (Bill and Lillian) put
their heads together, the
result would have been
more constructive. For instance, everyone knows that
the only distinct society in
Canada is Fantasy Gardens. With the deadline to
pass the accord creeping
ever so close, there is no
doubt that all the First
Ministers would agree that
Fantasy Gardens must be
officially protected in the
Constitution. Why? Because they feel secure knowing that if they're ever bored
on a Friday night, they can
always crank call Bill for a
few laughs. It may be the
one thread that could hold
this great nation of ours
together. I would think that
the "Fantasy Garden
Amendment" would be
enough to break the Meech
impasse. Goodness knows
that once that impasse is
broken, we can all sleep
much easier. Except for Bill.
Between the crank calls and
the pizzas delivered to his
drawbridge, hell be a very
tired man, living in a very
distinct society.
John Topping
Arts One
We don't do
that
I refer to the letter from
J.T. Binfet (Education) in
your January 5, 1990 edition. I find it disturbing that
no attempt seems to have
been made to check the
facts. A simple telephone
call either to Dr. Rove at the
Animal Care Centre, or to
myself at the S.P.C A. would
have sufficed. No, the
S.P.CA. does not provide
animals for research purposes, either alive or dead.
Michael Weeks
Executive Director
B.C. S.P.C.A.
The Ubyssey
desperatelyneeds
cartoonists.
artists,
aid writers.
Pff tySUE> 2HK
10/THE UBYSSEY
February 2,1990 11*"
immwopiNioN
Capitalism 't ain't
perfect
Now that communism in
Eastern Europe is dead or dying,
does capitalism stand vindicated
as the best economic system?
"Capitalism" is widely dispersed ownership of the means of
economic production under competitive market conditions. Those
who favor capitalism stress its
many virtues. They stress the
miracle of the market in which
capital tends to find its most productive uses and countless economic decisions are coordinated
with no central bureaucracy. They
stress that capitalism tends to
allocate economic rewards in
rough proportion to people's contributions and thus provides incentives to creativity, risk-taking
and plain hard work. They stress
that capitalism allows a high degree of political freedom combined
with widespread prosperity.
Impressive virtues indeed for
an economic system. Clearly, capitalism liberates tremendous productive energies by harnessing
human self-interest. But it is
guilty of major evils as well.
For example, there is the
predatory stranglehold of big corporations on the economy of a
world in which billions are starving. There is the overproduction of
luxury items for some and a lack of
life's essentials for others. There
are chronic social tensions created
by immense wealth and poverty
existing side by side.
There is the overemphasis on
material values together with
waste and discontent resulting
from artifically created desires.
There is the concentration of economic power which translates into
political power and privilege.
There are the alienating conditions of work for many, the deformation of human personality and
the erosion of human relationships. There is the emotional upheaval and pervasive sense of insecurity associated with the capitalist climate of relentless change.
Perhaps worst of all, there is
capitalism's economic growth
imperative which threatens to
overwhelm the earth's ecosystem.
Surely the choice of the best
economic system is far more complex than the simple dichotomy
between capitalism and communism suggests. We do not yet have
clear ideas about the optimum mix
of private and public ownership.
But surely, what we must aim at is
fundamentally clear: a society in
which all can satisfy their needs
for food, shelter, health care, education, security, respect and freedom.
We do not need obituaries of
communism that glorify the capitalist alternative. We need clearer
ideas of how to improve and humanize capitalism and render it
less environmentally destructive.
Kurt Preinsperg
BoG representative
Stop the hatred
cycle
This is my second and last
year at UBC as a student in the
faculty of education. The recent
decision of the AMS to allow the
Lady Godiva ride to proceed is an
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V\artu callirJ^ -Jroft apartrieNt
t03...,^iMt ArvXr-iks.., listen. (WCMWr
hose Weird Hotses l-feld you aho
/ V-r.-the ones -from-the basement
1   -*°   * -_ 7 y—
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Graphic: The Underground
indication of their support of the
degradation of women, I pay fees
to the AMS: I do not expect my
money and support of votes to
contribute to my own oppression.
To those people who supported
this display of woman as a commodity I say: you need to take
responsibility in the fact that you
are specifically contributing to my
physical, spiritual, emotional, and
mental dis-ease on campus, and to
my life in the larger culture in
general.
DONT YOU PEOPLE GET
IT??? Women do not like being
treated as objects. This is an attempted mutilation not just of
women, but of the concept of
woman. If the engineers need to
parade a naked woman around on
a horse in order to give them spirit,
Society to blame for Lepines
The January 12th "Perspective" column by GA. Brown,
eventually leading to the conclusion that Mark Lepine was a
victim and that women need to
change more than men, is so full
of error and self-delusion that it
demands refutation.
Brown states "males are at
least as likely to be victims of
male violence as females." This
may be true for fully reported
crimes like murder and mugging
but he ignores the fact that many
rapes and most domestic violence (almost exclusively males
assaulting females) go unreported. Brown says that to address male violence properly,
"We would do better to understand it better before pointing
fingers." This is the same type of
argument used by industrial
polluters always demanding
more study instead of making
any real emission cuts. Brown's
reasoning would have us refrain
from taking any action until
every aspect of sociology and
behaviourology has been made
an exact science. We cannot wait
that long.
Brown says that, "Society
puts far more pressure on males
than on females to succeed in
publicly visible ways." The truth
is that men are expected to
achieve steady employment and
that's about it. These days,
women are expected to work just
as hard for less money, be ideal
wives and mothers, and look
beautiful all the time as well. So
who's really under more pressure? Brown claims that pressure to succeed financially forces
men to claw their way to the top
positions of power and status,
thus explaining the lack of
women in these positions. This
completely ignores the violent
opposition that men have consistently directed against the first
women to enter any male dominated profession. Try reading the
biographies of the first women
medical students.
Brown even tries to excuse
Mark Lepine on the grounds of
social pressure and "the force of
his testosterone level." Lepine, 25,
would not have anywhere near as
much testosterone in his system
as an average 18 year old. Brown
goes so far as to blame women,
Perspective
calling them "women who use inflammatory rhetoric to make even
more strident demands for reverse
discrimination." Is asking for
equal opportunity and equal pay
reverse discrimination?
A more plausible reason for
Lepine's behaviour can be found in
our society's attitudes towards
violence and women. Lepine was
an insane criminal but society
helped make him one. Our society
worships violence. Look at boxing
and hockey. Most television dramas show that solutions come
from the barrel of a gun (eg.
Hunter, The Equalizer). Large
numbers of people actually pay
money to watch Jason and Freddy
hack their way through their supporting casts. University research
has shown that watching violence
causes, on the average, a greater
tolerance of violence. Therefore,
we could try reducing, by legislation, the amount of violence people
are exposed to on TV and in movies
by altering the rating system to
guarantee that significant violence automatically gets an X rating.
Strong enforcement of equal
opportunity laws would speed the
achievement of gender balance
in top corporate and government positions. Once such a
gender balance became normal
the laws would no longer be
necessary because equality
would have been demonstrated.
We can also demand that
elementary schools treat boys
and girls equally. The way it is
now, at an early age, boys play
football and girls become cheer
leaders. Elementary-age children are too young to make in-
telligentrole choices. We should
encourage children of both sexes
to choose freely activities in line
with their interests instead of
influencing them, by providing
different sets of opportunities,
to take stereotypical roles. This
could alleviate problems that
Brown points out such as the
tendency for men to keep their
problems to themselves rather
than talking about them, as well
as the male desire for control.
Sexism in advertising portrays women as sex objects who
are less intelligent and much
more superficial than men. If
everyone concerned with equality make a note of which ads
offended him/her the most and
wrote a short note to the company president saying that,
"Due to the sexist nature of your
advertising, I will no longer buy
your products," and then stuck
to that promise, advertising
would change in a hurry.
We must accept that there
are inequalities and injustices
in our society and that if we
want to prevent the creation of
more Mark Lepines we must
change both the way we think
and the images with which we
are surrounded.
Greg Wellman
Math-Physics 3
they certainly need to re-evaluate
their concept of themselves. If, in
order to gain self-esteem one
needs to cut up the soul of another,
the power that one is trying to gain
isdebased. The AMS should not be
an accomplice in this mutilation of
women. They should apologize for
their decision, rescind it, and educate themselves about the misogyny in their student society, on
this campus, and in our society. To
do otherwise wouldbe stating that
women enjoy this violence against
their spirit. Stop the cycle of
hatred: one does not need "hard
data" to prove the harm against
another. It is enough when one
spirit says: this hurts me, stop it.
Evelyn Almassy
Education
HOT FLASH
HATE HURTS...
discussion of
discrimination by
appearance.
SUB Conversation
Pit 12:30 pm
Friday
NOTICE OF AMS
ANNUAL GENERAL Kjjkl
MEETING
Tuesday, February 13 th
12 Noon
Council Chambers
(SUB 206)
ALL STUDENTS WELCOME
Special Issue
Writers wishing to contribute
to the February 20th issue of
The Ubyssey concerning low
income and communal efforts
to solve them call Cathy Lu at
874-5501 or Chung at 228-
2301
DISCOVER THE
COMPETITION
7 Days    S    -	
a week pss^s low low prices
F8.6 p=vi*5= free services
Sat-Sun    ==-== =A.      , ...
11-6 |=?5*b=-s laser printing
UNIVERSITY VILLAGE 2ND FLOOR 2174 W. PARKWAY, VANCOUVER, B.C. PHONE (604) 224-6225
February 2,1990
THE UBYSSEY/11 £E__L_1
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______
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Library faces more cuts
by John Gray
UBC librarians' recent wage
increase will not come without a
price.
The recent wage increases
awarded to the librarians by a
labour arbitrator will now be
funded by a reduction of existing
staff.
UBC libraries will have to cut
$305,000 from their 1990/91 salary budget to make up for the wage
increase.
The cuts must be made because of a decision by the administration that all budget overruns
must be made up by the libraries.
"The administration has indicated that any differences in budgets between what the university
has   set   aside   and   what   was
awarded by the arbitrator is to be
carried by the individual budgetary unit" said Bill Watson, acting
university librarian.
Library budgets were either
frozen or cut in the eighties because of the provincial government's restraint program. Similarly, wages of UBC librarians and
support staff fell well behind those
of other librarians both within the
province and the rest of the country.
Brenda Peterson, the information and orientation officer for
Main Library said, "I am very
upset about these cuts because the
library has had it's budget cutback
or frozen for the last 10 years"
"The recent arbitration award
given to the librarians reflected
how low our salaries had fallen in
relation to other librarians."
"It is my understanding that
these cuts will be made without
layoffs but through attrition and
retirement," she said.
But even without the loss of
any jobs immediately, library
service will be affected.
Said Watson: "We will attempt to protect the library from
any evidentiary cuts."
But according to Peterson,
"Libraries are very labour intensive organizations and so the
fewer librarians that we have the
less service that we can give."
The actual form ofthe cuts are
yet to be decided.
Main Library in better times
I
Wed. February 7th • 8:30 am to 8:30 pm • one day only
ALL
STAEDTLER
PRODUCTS
40-60
%
OFF
Including these Super Specials
MARSMATIC 700 stainless steel
TECHNICAL PEN SETS
4 PEN SET
Reg $85.98
SPECIAL$42.99
7 PEN SET
Reg $135.00
SPEC1AL$59.95
All other pens and accessories 40% of).
TOPSTAR HIGHLIGHTER
6 fluorescent colours
Reg $2.65
SUPER SPECIAL 890
RONO DRAFTING TABLE
31"x42"
Reg $247.50
SPECIAL
$129.95
All other drafting tables 40% off.
BOARD COVER 31" x 42"
Reg $31.50  SPECIAL $16.95
MARSGRAPHIC 3000 DUO
SET of 10      One marker — two rjps.'
Reg $29.50
SPECIAL$14.95
SET of 20
Reg $59.00
SPECIAL$29.95
SET p(8Q8* Art Case r
Reg $265.95 SPECIAL $132.95
MARS MICROGRAPH 0.5,0.7,0.9 mm
SUPER LEADS
Mlanniii „Nwvfi__
Reg $1.25
SPECIAL 590
MARS QUICKBOW #552N 09
COMPASS SETS
Reg $69.95
SPECIAL
$34.95
All other compasses 40% off.
RETRO PENCIL #778 cas
Reg $6.95
SPECIAL $3.48
<srretro O.S
MARS #526 50
PLASTIC ERASER
Won't damage
your paper I
Reg98«
SPECIAL 480
AQUARELL PENCIL SETS
ttsmm
___flH
SET of 12
Reg $12.98
SPECIAL$6.95
SET of 24
Reg $25.98
SPEC,AL$12.99
ELANCE PEN #42075
Gold-plated ballpoint^
Reg $7.95
SUPER SPECIAL $3.95
PARKER TYPE REFILL
#458 Fine or medium
Reg $2.99 SPECIAL $1.39
STICK PENS #430
Reg $5.99/box of 10
SUPER SPECIAL $1.99/box of 10
POLO PENCIL .05 #776 cas
A proven winner
Reg $1.79
SPECIAL 890
pdlom-
Items sold out may be purchased at sale price if paid in full on Staedtler Day.
All sales are final. No refunds or exchanges.
19 15-1990
F__
ANNIVERSARY
Are you interested in:
1) consulting students looking
for volunteer jobs
2) promoting volunteerism within
the UBC community
3) public relations, or
4) advertising??
Volunteer Connections
is accepting
new members!!
We offer interview and communication training as well as an opportunity to explore various community programs and organizations.
For More Information
phone 224-8043
or come to an Orientation Meeting on
Feb 6th, 12:30 in Brock Hall, Rm. 106
BOOKSTORE
5200 University Boulevard • Vancouver • 228-4741
A MUSICAL COMEDY BY
ROGER 0. HIRSON, Music and Lyrics by STEPHEN SCHWARTZ
Director & Choreographer: JIM HIBBARD
Musical Director WILLY SWOZDESKY
25-FEB. 3 U.B.C. AUDITORIUM
BOX OFFICE 228-6902 —
12/THE UBYSSEY
February 2,1990

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