UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Mar 20, 2014

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0126695.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0126695.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0126695-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0126695-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0126695-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0126695-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0126695-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0126695-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0126695-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0126695.ris

Full Text

 ABORTION DISPLAY NIXED
UBC Lifeline will not show their annual Genocide Awareness
Project photo display this year, opting for other events instead
HOCKEY COACH FIRED
Sports review gives men's hockey five years to raise
new funding but gives coach Milan Dragicevic the boot
SECOND SWEAT LODGE MAY BE BUILT ON CAMPUS P9 AMS SERVICE
KATE GU _IS, FIELD HOCKEY STAR P5 UBU ROI IS A RIOT P8 ON 1 HE PURPOSE OF JOKE CANDIDATES P10 // Page 2
WHAT'S ON i    THIS WEEK, MAY
THURSDAY  20
WOMEN AND WAR
IN AFGHANISTAN
5 P.M. ©ALLARD HALL
Author, historian and humanitarian Ann Jones will talk about
women's rights in the course of
thewarin Afghanistan and what
that means for the future. Free
FRIDAY ' 21
INTERNATIONAL DAY
OFFORESTS
9 A.M.-8 P.M. @ 2424 MAIN MALL
Come celebrate trees with the
Faculty of Forestry and the UNA.
They will be screening a variety of
forest-friendly films and holding a
tree-planting ceremony with the
grad class of 2014. Coffee and
cake. For more info, see forestry,
ubc.ca. Free
OUR CAMPUS//
ONE ON ONE WITH THE PEOPLE WHO MAKE UBC
SATURDAY ' 22
UBC HOLI
11:30 A.M.-3:30 P.M. @ MACINNES FIELD
Holi is an Indian festival of colours
celebrating spring and the triumph of good over evil. Participate in Colour Wars and throw
coloured powder as each other.
Photographers be warned: the
powder may get in your gear and
may be hard to clean out.
$5 per colour packet
ON
THE
COVER
Initially the cover was going to focus more on the redactions, but that
wasn't the main point ofthe feature. So we went with nodes! Node
power! Design by Ming Wong.
^
Want to help run this paper next year?
Run for an editorial position! For details
visit ubyssey.ca/jobs.
^|THE UBYSSEY
MARCH20,2014 | VOLUMEXCV| ISSUEXLIX
EDITORIAL
Coordinating Editor
Geoff Lister
coordinating@ubyssey.cs
Managing Editor, Print
Ming Wong
orinteditor@ubyssey.es
Managing Editor, Web
CJ Pentland
webeditor@ubyssey.es
News Editors
Will McDonald +
Sarah Bigam
iews@ubyssey.es
Senior News Writer
Veronika Bondarenko
vbondarenko@ubyssey.es
Culture Editor
Rhys Edwards
eulture@ubyssey.es
Senior Culture Writer
Aurora Tejeida
atejeida@ubyssey.es
Sports + Rec Editor
Natalie Scadden
sports@ubyssey.es
Senior Lifestyle Writer
Reyhana Heatherington
"heatherington@ubyssey.es
Features Editor
Amo Rosenfeld
features@ubyssey.es
Video Producer
Lu Zhang
video@ubyssey.es
Copy Editor
Matt Meuse
eopy@ubyssey.es
Photo Editor
Carter Brundage
ehotos@ubyssey.es
Illustrator
Indiana Joel
joel@ubyssey.es
Webmaster
Tony Li
webmaster@ubyssey.es
Distribution Coordinator
Lily Cai
cai@ubyssey.es
STAFF
Catherine Guan, NickAdams
Kanta Dihal, Marlee Laval,
Angela Tien, Carly Sotas, Alex
Meisner, Luella Sun, Jenny
Tang.AdrienneHembree^
Mehryar Maalem, Jack Hauen
Kosta Prodanovic, Olivia Law,
JethroAu, Bailey Ramsay,
Jenica Montgomery.Austen
Erhardt, Alice Fleerackers
Nikos Wright, Milica Palinic
Jovana Vranic, Mackenzie
Walker, Kaveh Sarhangpour
Steven Richards, Gabriel
Germaix, Jaime Hills, Jenny
Tan. Kaidie Williams, Rachel
Levy-McLaughlin, Maura
Forrest
BUSINESS
Business
Manager
Fernie Pereira
fpereira@
jbyssey.ca
604.822.668l
Ad Sales
MarkSha
advertising®
jbyssey.ca
604.822.1654
Ad Sales
Tiffany Tsao
webadvertisinc
©ubyssey.ca ~
604.822.1658
Accounts
Graham
McDonald
accounts®
jbyssey.ca
Editorial Office:
3UB24
SO 4.822.2301
Business Office:
3UB23
Student Union Buildinc
6138 SUB Boulevard ~
Vancouver. BCV6T1Z1
Web: ubyssey.ca
Twitter: ©ubyssey
LEGAL
The Ubyssey is the official studentnews-
aaper of the University of Rriti^h Cn-
umbia. Itispublished
andThursdaybyTheUbyssey Publications Society. We are an autonomous,
democratically run student organization, and all students are encouragec
to participate.
Editorials are chosen and written bythe
Jbyssey staff. They are the expressec
opinion ofthe staff, and do not necessarily reflect the views ofThe Ubyssey
Publications Society or the University
of British Columbia. All editorial content
appearing in The Ubyssey is the property ofThe Ubyssey Publications Society. Stones, opinions, photographs anc
artwork contained herein cannot be re-
aroduced with out the expressed, written permission ofThe Ubyssey Publications Society.
_etters to the editor must be under
300 words. Please include your phone
number, student number and signature (not for publication) as well as
your year and faculty with all submissions. ID will be checked when submissions are dropped off at the editorial office ofThe Ubyssey; otherwise
verification will be done by phone.
The Ubyssey reserves the right to
editsubmlss I ir length and clar-
ty. All letters must be received by 12
noon the day before intended publication. Letters received after this point
will be published in the following issue unless there is an urgent time restriction or other matter deemed relevant by the Ubyssey staff.
t is agreed by all persons placing display or classified advertising that if the
Jbyssey Publications Society fails to
aublish an advertisement or if an er-
'or in the ad occurs the liability ofthe
JPS will not be greater than the price
aaid for the ad. The UPS shall not be
•esponsible for slight changes or ty-
aographical errors that do not lessen the value or the impact of the ad.
PHOTO STEVEN DURFEEJTHE UBYSSEY
When she's not handing out copies of 24 Hours, Veronika Bitkina working away at her program at BCIT or painting.
Veronika Bitkina hands
out news and smiles
Tara Chan
Contributor
Stressed and sleep deprived,
students usually use what little
time they have on the bus to
catch up on some shuteye when
commuting to campus. For
most of them, their first interaction off the bus is likely with
Veronika Bitkina, the one who
unfailingly greets and delivers
your newspaper every morning
— even if you ignore her.
Bitkina is one ofthe people
who hands out copies ofthe
free daily 24 Hours at the
main bus loop facing Maclnnes
Field, greeting students with a
cheerful "Have a great day!" and
a smile every morning. Aside
from just being one of those
"newspaper ladies," she's also a
freelance artist, hiker, biker and
snowboarder.
Though Bitkina cannot
disclose how many copies she
has to distribute every morning
or what her hours are like on
the job because it is considered
classified 24 Hours marketing
information, she wants students
to know that she enjoys her job
a lot.
"I have to wake up really early, but I get to see the sunrise,"
she said. "People always walk by
and [with their backs] turned to
the sunrise so they usually don't
see but it's really wonderful. It's
really powerful."
When it rains or snows, she
finds that most students don't
See it if you DARE
l ubu roi I unleashes a hilarious reign of comic terror live
onstage at ubuC and The UBUssey is giving away tickets!
I ubu roi I runs March 20 -April 5,2014
Come to Room 23 in the Subu to claim your tickets
smile or say hi, and usually
choose to ignore her completely. As a response, she smiles
even more in an attempt to
brighten the faces of those
gloomy students.
Bitkina does not mind when
students do not take a copy of
the paper from her — she is used
to it. But what really makes her
day is when people acknowledge
her. She says that it makes her
really happy when students
greet her in the morning even if
they do not care for the news.
When not on the job, Bitkina
can be found either working
hard at finishing up an applied
software development program
at BCIT or painting around
the city or at a nearby studio.
She paints under the alias
Zisel, which is a name from her
childhood and roughly means
"squirrel" in French. In her art,
she uses all sort of materials,
including acrylics, watercolours
and ink, among others. As part
ofthe Burnaby Artists Guild,
her next show is "Fresh Paint,"
an original art exhibition and
sale at the Shadbolt Centre for
the Arts from April 4 to 6.
A quote she likes to live by
is from Russian author Sergey
Lukyanenko, which roughly
translates in English as "Joy
is the result; happiness is the
way." For Bitkina, the result is
important, but the journey is
much more important than the
end result itself.
The next time commuters
pass by her at the main bus loop,
Bitkina wants students to see
her as not just the happy 24
Hour newspaper lady handing
out copies every morning, but
both an artist and a student
who, like them, is also working hard at reaching her own
dreams as well.?!
BUTWAIT—
THERE'S MORE
ReadourpastOur
Campus interviews at
ubyssey.ca/features.
k // News
)RS WILL MCDONALD + SARAH BIGAM
DEMONSTRATIONS »
Some attendees showed their opposition to Lifeline's anti-abortion event on campus yesterday.
=HOTO STEVEN RICHARDS3THE UBYSSEY
Pro-life Silent No More campaign comes to campus
Mariam Baldeh
Contributor
On Wednesday, March 19, UBC
Lifeline and the National Campus
Life Network (NCLN) — a network
that supports pro-life clubs such
as Lifeline — hosted the Silent No
More campaign on campus. Four
speakers talked about their experiences with abortion for three
hours outside Buchanan A.
"It brought about a significant
change in my life ... in college and
in my relationships. I began to
smoke and drink and do drugs,"
said Dale Barr, one ofthe speakers
at the event.
Angelina Streenstra said she
lived in a prison of guilt, self-
hatred and depression. "I tried to
start over... I changed my name,
my address, my friends, my job ...
but nothing could erase the memory ofthe abortion," she said.
"I didn't talk about it," said
Elizabeth Sutcliffe. "I felt like
I couldn't talk about it. So now
I break my silence to give other
women the courage to tell their
stories and find healing in finally
speaking out."
Anastasia Pearse, one ofthe
organizers from NCLN, said
the Silent No More campaign is
being brought to seven different
campuses in B.C. According to
Pearse, the goals ofthe campaign
are to educate the public about the
aftermath of abortion and to reach
out to men and women who may be
hurting from the experience.
"It's important to know that
there's hope after abortion. We
see a need to spread this message
on campus, and this campaign
is a beautiful way to do that,"
said Pearse.
Some UBC students disagreed.
"They definitely have the right to
speak and to have their opinions
heard, but I think their techniques
[such as] the loudspeakers ... are a
little invasive," said Sierra Weiner,
a second-year English major.
"Some women have regrets and
for sure, abortion is not a great
experience for anyone, but to make
that a platform for nobody having
a choice is simply not valid."
The AMS Sexual Assault Support
Centre was also present at the
demonstration. SASC invited people
to paint a pro-choice community
mural and handed out buttons that
said "support not shame."
"We're here to convey the politics of pro-choice as a movement
that supports bodily autonomy
and the individual person's choice
in terms of what's right for their
own body. We're not necessarily
pro-life, we're here to celebrate
choice," said Anisa Mottahed,
manager of SASC.
This was one of two events that
will be hosted this year by Lifeline
in replacement ofthe Genocide
Awareness Project, which has
been at UBC annually since 1999.
Their second event, Choice
Chain, will take place once per
week during the last two weeks of
school. Members of Lifeline and
the NCLN will hold up photos of
aborted fetuses and talk to passers-by about abortion.
Lifeline president Kiera van der
Sande said that Lifeline thought
Choice Chain was a more "focused" event for the group to host.
However, according to Lifeline
vice-president John Flores, that
wasn't the main reason for this
year's change. "Our old president
left, and we were kind of in limbo
for a bit ofthe year," Flores said.
"We didn't realize how much logis-
tically would have to go into it, so it
was our bad."
"I think we'll have to re-evaluate after how this year goes. I
wouldn't say it's a definite no that
we'll never do [GAP] again," said
van der Sande.
Pro-choice groups did not think
the changes were sufficient.
"I think still showing the images is triggering," said Mottahed.
"I'm sure there's multiple other
ways to engage in a conversation
from a pro-life stance, and this is
just not necessarily a very empa-
thetic or caring way."
Evelyn Cranston, an environmental geography student and
member ofthe group UBC Activists
against GAP, said "What it comes
down to is that [Lifeline] basically
want to spread these feelings of
shame and oppression... to what is
already a more vulnerable population at UBC and that's why I don't
think there's any place for them." XI
—With files from Sarah Bigam
NEWS BRIEFS
UBC research finds support
for Big Bang theory
A team of researchers that
includes a UBC prof have found
evidence of cosmic expansion
that supports the Big Bang
theory, a model of how the
universe began.
"In its early days, the universe
was so hot and dense it was
opaque," said UBC physics professor Mark Halper, who was part
ofthe research team.
"Forthe first 400,000years.it
was completely opaque. At that
point, 13.8 billion years ago, it became transparent and all that light
has gone in a straight line since."
International happiness day
Today is international happiness day. Mark Holder, a UBC
psychology professor, is part of a
research team that studies ways
for people to increase happiness.
"Traditionally, psychology has
focused on what is wrong with
you and how do we fix it," Holder
said. "We study what is right with
you and how we promote it."
Holdersaid people who prioritize quality personal relationships
are often happier. His study also
found hobbies and spirituality can contribute to feelings
of happiness.
"There is no one-size-fits-all
strategy. What makes one person
happy may not work for another
person," said Holder, xi
AMS»
Services review recommends housing support, selling textbooks
Veronika Bondarenko
Senior News Writer
A review of AMS student services
has recommended some new programs to help students, including
textbook consignment and late-
night shuttle service.
Student services manager
Matthew Duguay and services
review associate Phoebe Scollard
examined the feasibility of bringing in five additional student
services. Duguay presented an
overview ofthe study findings at
the March 12 council meeting.
A service that would help
students find off-campus housing
and learn about their rights as
a tenant was first on the study's
list of recommendations. However, Duguay and Scollard determined running this program
would be too costly for the AMS.
"An off-campus housing
service would be a significant financial burden to the AMS," said
Duguay. "To run a fully effective
service, we'd be looking at a yearly commitment of $100,000, so it
is really not feasible."
As an alternative, Duguay recommended the current VP academic increase lobbying efforts
to encourage Student Housing to
provide more resources to help
students who don't get a spot in
residence find places to live.
The study also looked at expanding the current Speakeasy
FILE PHOTO CARTER BRUNDAGE3THE UBYSSEY
The review recommended that Safewalk provide late-night shuttle rides to campus.
program, which offers drop-in
support and referrals to students
who are struggling with both
academic and personal problems.
According to Duguay, a chat
room that offers students support
services online is both important
and easy to implement.
"We actually think that it's
very viable and very feasible,
simply because it's an extension
of something that we already do
well," said Duguay.
Duguay and Scollard also
examined the possibility of expanding the Safewalk Nightride
Program, which was first
brought in as a response to a series of sexual assaults on campus
late last year, into a permanent
shuttle service that would pick
students up from various locations in Vancouver's West Side
during late hours ofthe night.
"This is really targeting the
window of approximately 1 to 5
in the morning when TransLink
services are very unreliable,"
said Duguay.
According to Duguay, this service would allow students to get
back to UBC safely and would be
feasible as long as set hours and
pickup locations are determined.
But fourth-year history student
Jenna Dur expressed concerns
that such a program would not
really be addressing the core
issues of safety on campus.
"I think that such a service
probably would not be particularly effective as it is generally
relatively easy to get back to UBC
late at night from those areas,"
said Dur.
Duguay and Scollard also
looked at the benefits of operating
a textbook buyback service in the
New SUB. According to Duguay, it
would be most feasible to run the
program as a consignment service
that would only give students
money once a textbooks sells.
"We would take textbooks, try
to sell them on behalf of students
in an office through a website and
an office based in the new SUB,"
said Duguay. "That's the only
model that we thought would
not duplicate services already
available to students in the Lower
Mainland and actually be financially viable."
Although the recommendations originally included the
option of developing a scholarship
database, the university has taken
over the project.
Full details ofthe study will
be presented at the next council
meeting on March 26. It will be
up to council to decide whether or
not to actually implement these
services. XI 4    I    NEWS    I   THURSDAY, MARCH 20,2014
MONEY»
STUDENT JOBS»
Security gearing up for New SUB
=ILE PHOTO KAIJACOBSON/THE UBYSSEY
Former VP admin Derek Moore pledged to reimburse the student artist.
AMS funds student artist
despite budget concerns
Sarah Bigam
News Editor
The approval of a small expenditure for the artist in residency
program stirred up controversy
at an AMS Council meeting on
March 12.
Last year, the AMS budget
committee voted unanimously
to stop funding the program,
but during his time in office,
former VP administration Derek
Moore promised a student reimbursement for the cost of an art
project.
The motion to approve the expenditure of up to $700 to pay the
student back was approved after
25 minutes of open debate and an
in camera session. Councillors
arguing in favour ofthe motion
cited moral and legal obligations,
and councillors against were
concerned it would be a fiscally
irresponsible decision.
"The motivation behind this
is that a student was promised a
specific amount of money for a
project and ... in terms of integrity we believe that the student
should be paid," VP Academic
Anne Kessler said at the meeting.
The motion came to Council
after the AMS budget committee voted unanimously against
paying for the artist in residency
program.
"This is something that we did
not decide to spend money on,"
said Graduate Student Society
president Chris Roach. Roach
chairs the budget committee, but
clarified that he was expressing his personal opinion at the
meeting. "This was due to the
actions of a VP going outside of
their prerogative, going outside
of their authority [and] telling an
individual that there was money
when there in fact wasn't.
"I don't think it's fiscally
responsible for us," said Roach.
The AMS is currently running an
$800,000 deficit.
Some councillors were concerned about the possibility of
the AMS encountering a similar
situation in the future if the expenditure was approved.
"Quite frankly if we just pay
this it sets a precedent," said
Roach. "For me, even if it costs
$1,000 to show this isn't what
an executive can do, it's worth
it because it stops the precedent
from happening."
Others voiced concerns about
the AMS's legal obligation to pay.
"A contract is a contract,"
said Michael Begg, the Council
speaker. "Writing just is evidence
of what the contract is."
"I am very concerned about
this individual putting us in a
small claims court," said AMS
President Tanner Bokor.
Kessler, as well as new VP
admin Ava Nasiri and Science
Undergraduate Society representative Paul McDade, maintained that the AMS has a moral
obligation to pay.
"We're all students here," McDade. "If you're a student, [and
an] organization comes to you
and says we'll pay for your costs
... and then later the organization
... says we're actually not going
to pay you, as a student that's
devastating."
"[$700] is not nothing, but it's
practically nothing," said McDade. "This is completely absurd
to me. I'm a little bit offended by
it."
Nasiri has been in office since
February, at which point she met
with the student, who had been
waiting for this money since
mid-November.
"He was very kind, he was
very patient, he wasn't rude at
all, he wasn't aggressive — he
could have been, because he had
all these questions that went unanswered and he just was kind of
ignored for a while," said Nasiri.
Bokor said the previous
executive team was aware ofthe
situation.
In the end, Council approved
the motion 23 for, with four
against and four abstaining.
Moore did not reply to requests for comment. XI
Veronika Bondarenko
Senior News Writer
With the opening ofthe New SUB
approaching, AMS Security plans
to hire more guards and expand
on their current operating plans
in order to increase security in the
new building.
Shaun Wilson, manager of AMS
Security, said they hire an average
of three to four guards a year. Next
year, the number will go up to six
to meet the increased demands of
the New SUB.
"There will be a greater need for
security in terms of more events,
more going on, so we'll definitely
want to add to the pool of security
guards," said Wilson.
AMS Security will try to select
their guards from the student
body, but may open up the job to
the general public if no available
candidates can be found.
"We'll put out our hiring plan
through all our student channels
several times before we consider
going on Craigslist and hiring
just from the general public,"
said Wilson.
According to Wilson, only
current students have been hired
to work as guards in the last three
years. But some ofthe guards
hired prior to that or who have
recently graduated still work for
AMS Security.
All guards employed by AMS
Security are members of COPE
378, which means they have to pay
what averages out to about $20 a
month in union fees. Employees
are given first pick of shifts based
on seniority.
Still, Wilson said since the vast
majority of guards are students,
they limit the total hours one person can work to 20 hours a week.
Aside from hiring more
guards, AMS Security also plans
to increase training for specific events and create a system
where several guards would
both patrol the building and sit
at an open counter in the AMS
Security office.
"We plan to have more security coverage because in the New
SUB, we'll have a lot more square
=ILE PHOTO PETER WOJNARJTHE UBYSSEY
AMS Security will hire more guards next year for the New SUB.
footage to cover — we'll have more
floors, more rooms, and more
events happening within," said
Wilson. "Our goal is to have AMS
Security as visible as they are in
their uniforms right on the main
floor in the security office."
Fourth-year economics and
political science student Rafeh
Ahmed agreed the additional
guard presence would be bene
ficial to student security in the
New SUB.
"It'll help prevent the AMS
property from being vandalized,
especially around the bathrooms,"
said Ahmed. "Especially given the
delicate infrastructure in place at
the New SUB with glass walls and
such, additional security would be
necessary to protect against drunk
stupors." XI EDITOR  NATALIE SCADDEN
// Sports + Rec
HOCKEY »
Men's hockey head coach fired
RSDAY,MARCH20,20
FIELD HOCKEY »
Jack Hauen
StaffWriter
Milan Dragicevic had been at the
helm ofthe UBC men's hockey team
for 12 years, was named Canada
West Coach ofthe Year in 2012, and
led his team to the playoffs nine
times, making it as far as the conference semifinals on three occasions.
But that wasn't enough to save his
job.
The Thunderbirds, despite
usually making the playoffs, have
struggled in recent years, and when
the university reviewed the team
earlier in the year, there was a
possibility that they might not have
seen another season as a varsity
team. As it stands, they are now in a
"hybrid" stage, where the team will
have to find sources outside ofthe
university to fund them. Though
they knew the team was in trouble,
the firing of a head coach the players
have played under for their entire
UBC careers came as a surprise.
"Most ofthe guys were shocked,"
said team captain Ben Schmidt. "But
they knew things were taken down
to Athletics with the program up
for review, so I'm sure [they] knew
there was a possibility of this. After
that's digested, it's not as much ofa
shock."
The Thunderbirds barely
scraped into the playoffs this year
after a gargantuan midseason
push saw them string enough wins
together to qualify, mainly due to
Regina's equally large collapse at
the end ofthe season. The teams'
records were tied, and the 'Birds
squeaked in due to their superior
goal differential. UBC won the first
round against Saskatchewan, but
fell in the second to top-ranked
Alberta, something not uncommon
in years past. The team's apparent
inability to perform raises questions about their future.
Kate Gillis leads the way for
UBC and Field Hockey Canada
FILE PHOTO KOSTAPRODANOVIC3THE UBYSSEY
After 12years at the helm ofthe T-Birds, UBC
men's hockey coach Milan Dragicevic was
released from his duties on Monday.
According to Schmidt, next
year will be a "transition year"
due to the hybrid model. It's
not yet clear what that means,
but the higher-ups at UBC are
looking to put a plan in place for
the future. "I'd assume that that
has to do with getting sponsorships, getting alumni involved
and making the changes that
came from our review," Schmidt
said. "There are a lot of things
that were proposed, and now
they're trying to act on some of
those things to see if they'll be
possible."
Dragicevic moves on from his
role at UBC with a record of 122
wins, 195 losses, nine overtime losses and nine ties. His playoff record
was 10-21. But while his team has
had a record of mediocrity throughout the years, he leaves behind a legacy of helpfulness and team spirit.
"Milan's a good guy," said
Schmidt. "He really helped guys out
academically, and he worked to get
guys tutoring, to get guys [on the
team]. The next guy coming in will
have some big shoes to fill. All the
guys are thankful for Milan's commitment to the program." XI
Jack Hauen
StaffWriter
In November 2013, the UBC
women's field hockey team captured their third straight CIS title,
becomingthe first team in history
to capture three McCrae Cups in
a row. Present for the two of those
championships was fourth-year
student Kate Gillis, a stalwart ofthe
UBC and Canadian national teams,
and Field Hockey Canada's Player of
the Year in 2013.
Though she's grown attached to
the city and people in it, she wasn't
always a Vancouverite. "I grew up
in Kingston, [Ont.]," she says. "Then,
when I was 17,1 was scouted for the
national team, but I had already
committed to Boston College. I
decided to defer for the year."
In 2008, Gillis' father, Mike, was
signed by the Vancouver Canucks
to become general manager after
the firing of Dave Nonis. "One thing
lead to another, and my family
moved out to Vancouver. I went to
Boston College for two years, but I
just had to come back to play for the
national team full time, so I transferred to UBC."
Gillis has had a busy field hockey
career, since she plays for Team
Canada and UBC. Sometimes the
play ofthe two teams overlaps,
which makes for a confusing season
at times. "This season was a bit of a
weird one in that [the national players] were away [from UBC] for about
five weeks with the national team,"
she says. "We didn't know what to
expect when we got home. It was
definitely tough on our teammates
stepping in for us, but we came back
for the tournament. In the end, we
played really well and won every
game pretty handily. It was really
fun to be back with the girls and just
play that nice, calm attacking game
that we're used to."
That calm style of play is a needed
break from the high-stress situations that can arise from playing
on Team Canada. At the national
level, everything a player does is
analyzed, but at UBC, Gillis is able
to relax and play the game in a more
relaxed environment.
She has nothing but good things
to say about the group she plays
with. "The girls are amazing. Since
we're away so much with the national team, it's great to come back
to. It's not just school, you have this
second team of friends — it's a nice,
inclusive, happy team."
With that team, Gillis will
continue to play in the Vancouver
Women's League, since the CIS season ended in early November. The
quarterfinals are coming up, and
Gillis is hopeful the team can pull
off a championship in both leagues.
After that's done, Gillis will
rejoin the Canadian team for a wild
ride during the summer. The end
of April will see the women head
to England, then Ireland at the
beginning of July. After that, it's
off to the Commonwealth Games
in Scotland toward the end of July.
It's a busy schedule, but Gillis is no
rookie when it comes to travelling
the world and playing the sport
she loves.
"I went to the last Commonwealth Games in India, and it was
just an amazing experience. It was
like a mini-Olympics. [We were]
in this athlete village with tons of
different sports and athletes and
countries."
India's not the only place Gillis
has brought her skills; the list
includes Europe, the USA, and, of
=HOTO ARJUN HAIR3THE UBYSSEY
Her dad may be the GM of the Canucks,
but UBC's Kate Gillis has made a name for
herself in the Canadian field hockey circuit.
course, all over Canada. Her favourite place away from home, however,
is a bit farther away.
"I love Australia. I actually ended
up living there for seven months.
I went down on exchange to the
University of Melbourne and played
for a field hockey team there. That
was great."
As for the atmosphere down
under, "it's pretty similar to Vancouver, but sunnier. The people are
great, and it's such a field hockey
hotspot — people just refer to it as
'hockey.'"
After her university career is
over, Gillis' plans aren't set in stone,
but she knows her future will
contain "a lot more field hockey,"
along with a generous helping
of philanthropy.
"I've been involved with the
Canucks for Kids Fund, and Promotion Plus, which promotes girls and
women in sport, so I'd definitely like
to take that route through athletics.
I don't think I'll ever let that leave
my life." XI
T-BIRDS 5-ON-5
TEAM CAPTAINS
IAN
PERRY
Volleyball
&
1. Who would you say you are most like in
terms of leadership style?
[Former Manchester United captain] RoyKeane,
because 1 get stuck into
challenges and setthe
tone.
1 can't think of a specific individual, but if my
leadership style could be
summed up in one phrase,
it would be "my teammates
come first."
Liam Neeson in The
Grey. He's mildly compassionate but does
whatever it takes.
Prison Mike from The
Office, because 1 like his
style.
1 find trying to compare
myself to another person's
leadership style very difficult
because 1 believe everyone
leads in theirown way.
2. Let's pretend that the 'C you wear didn't
stand for captain. What other C-word would
describe you?
Curls — probably the
most functional gym
exercise there is.
Caring orcompassion-
ate.
Coffee. I crush about a
litre each day.
Casanova.
Charismatic, committed,
comedic, confident, caring
and challenging.
3.There's been talkamongst graduating UBC
athletes about "leaving a legacy." What legacy
do you hope to leave as captain?
4. Who is your favourite Disney villain?
I reckon the guys would
say my legacy is the
"extended warm-up."
Going backtomy
childhood with
Heffalumpsand
Woozles from Winnie the
Pooh.
From the moment I
became a Thunderbird,
I played with my whole
heart every time I stepped
onto the field. I hope that
the girls behind me will do
the same.
hated every Disney
villain, especially Scar
from the LionKingl
Legacy seems daunting.
I hope I have made a few
life friends along the way.
Not being the last captain would be a plus.
My fa vou rite movie was
Foxand the Hound so I'll
take the bear.
Being a part ofthe women's hockey turnaround
team that won more than
onegame...
Gaston from Beauty and
the Beast.
To be remembered as someone who captained theteam
to its first [CIS] title in 30 years.
Apart from success, I want my
legacy to be known as someone who was loyal, and made
others around him better.
Gaston from Beauty and
the Beast. Guy is large.
5. If you were to write an autobiography, what
would it be called?
How to Lose a Trophy.
The Kickass Life of Being
Awesome.
Live, Love, Laugh.
This Is Your "Caps" Speaking...
Buffalo Is in Effect. FEATURES    |   THURSDAY, MARCH 20, 2014
Behind the storm: Internal Sauder emails
go behind response to rape cheer
Information compiled and text written by Arno Rosenfeld, Features Editor
When we broke the story about an offensive cheer being sung at the Sauder School of Business's FROSH orientation last fall, it unleashed
a storm of anger and negative attention on the university. UBC has since formed a task force to combat systemic oppression and university leaders have issued strong condemnations of the cheer and what it represents. As part of our ongoing coverage ofthe incident, The
Ubyssey requested emails sent between Sauder and university officials in the days following the cheer. After a long and often convoluted
process (see info box at right), the university released around 600 pages of emails, about half of which were redacted — or entirely blacked
out. It appears the blacked-out emails contained most of the strategic decisions made by the university, but what remained was of enough
interest that we believed it warranted being presented to you, our readers. We'll walk you through some of the emails below, and you can
find more online at ubyssey.ca in the coming days.
Where it all besan
The Ubyssey published our article on the Sauder rape cheer
at 6 p.m. on Friday, Sept. 6,2013. Around 10 p.m. that night,
Leanna Yip, Sauder's head of communications emailed Sauder dean Robert Helsley the article.
Between 12:42 a.m. and 11:40 a.m. Saturday morning, 50
pages of emails were sent by Sauder and university administrators, all of which were given to The Ubyssey completely
blanked out.
nity reaction
While it appears strategic discussions following the immediate aftermath of
the article's publication were entirely redacted by the university, many emails
from community members — parents, student, faculty, alumni —were
turned over to The Ubyssey and show a range of emotion responding to the
rape cheer revelations.
I sure hope we have a strong public response.... I also think we need to seriously
revisit just what we are teaching [student
leaders] about leadership, diversity and
inclusion. Which may be nothing at all, I'r
afraid to say
I work in product quality at lululemon
athletica, who earlier this year pulled back
our main product from the floor due to
sheerness.... Needless to say, I can relate
to the PR nightmare and heated conversations you may feel like you're in right now.
Until the next big "scandal" pulls the media •££
attention away, I wish you all the best.
encouraged^ g       .nbraS.
IwasonT
words from someone of authority to
say: "We are sorry."
Media strategy
The rape cheer received attention from local and national media, and even
received international coverage. It appears that UBC's media strategy was —
you guessed it — redacted, but there were still some interesting bits thrown in,
including a summary of how the story was covered in the Chinese press.
*   Both Sing Tao and Ming Pao [have] provided coverage daily... All stories are neutral in tone and in line with coverage from the English press. Notable items below:
Ming Pao's first story on Sunday quotes Enzo Woo as
saying he was not authorized to speak publicly on the University's instructions. The Sing Tao story quoted Ubyssey
reporter Arno Rosenfeld saying the paper will continue to
cover the issue. Today's Sing Tao story also quoted Prof.
Toope saying...
"I have not apologized because I don't know what we
should apologize for. All we know is something happened,
but we don't know who's responsible."
Sunday quotes COS Pr
What's missing:
Six months afterthe Ubyssey issued a request
for the disclosure of emails sent and received
by Sauder dean Robert Helsley regarding the
FROSH rape cheer, UBC has responded. The
request was made in accordance with the B.C.
Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA), which guarantees the right of
individuals and organizations to access (limited)
communications and documents of public
officials and bodies.
UBC provided around 600 pages of correspondence and documents, but redacted over
309 pages, citing sections 13(1) and 22(3) ofthe
FIPPA. According to the letter attached to the
information provided bythe university, "information that reveals advice or recommendations
made by or for a public body" is withheld under
the terms of section 13(1) of the act. Section
22(3) protects individuals' privacy through the
censoring of "information... presumed to be an
unreasonable invasion of an individual's personal privacy."
Section 13(1) eliminates the obligation of
public institutions to disclose any advice issued
to or by Helsley and the Sauder administration
regarding the rape cheer scandal, so long as the
consultation involves a public government body.
This subsection does not, however, allow for
the withholding of certain information, such as
"factual material," official reports of committees
or councils and plans or proposals approved or
rejected by head of a public body, in accordance
with section 13(2) of the act. Additionally, 13(1)
does not apply to any records that have existed
more than 10 years.
Section 22(3) outlines disclosures deemed to
be an "unreasonable invasion of a third party's
personal privacy," including information that is
part of an investigation into a possible violation
of law, relates to occupational or educational
history, consists of personal recommendations
or evaluations about a third party, or personal
information that would allow forsolicitation (such
as a full name, phone number or home address).
UBC claims the information redacted under 22(3)
includes "identifying information of alumni or
other members of the public."
In addition to sporadic censoring of the
provided records, six pages were not provided
in the disclosure as the Commerce Undergraduate Society has yet to determine whether or not
they are obligated to provide it under the FIPPA.
Of the other withheld pages of documents and
correspondence, the university states that "there
was no reasonable way to redact these records
[meaning selective censorship ratherthan complete withholding]."
Under section 52 ofthe FIPPA, The Ubyssey
has the right to appeal UBC's disclosure to the
information and privacy commissioner. This
appeal must be performed within 30 days ofthe
receipt ofthe original disclosure.
The Ubyssey will be appealing.
—Austen Erhardt
To: Schmidt, Randy (Public Affairs)
Subject: THIS MORNING: CBC Radio interview request 8:10 a.m.
"""""""lent
Hi Randy.
Wniild Robert IIcMlA lv.iMiil.iMi; luia.i. iimim,'jm- r.uiin immi.-ii uitli Kick Cluffim The Early
lim- inn: nir:,! ;i: Kid ;i m " 1 iiii.I.t.ijii.I ill,- Sjimlei Sclicii! nl liih'mcw will he releasing a report into «.
CZ
Please lei UK In.™- Iioliiiv 7;i.m. Yi.iiLiiii reach me at flH-fri2-M24.
CBCjJ            5em;"                                         i!Ma'^^M^~~'-, —
I                                                                           FVK THIS MOWING; CBC todto^'n*^
CliiJ            I W men, kaatl J™"? ^^%Zi^%™ej^ (wa,, and 1 ^ m
CKjUb—_Jij!!!5!___                                                                       """' '*" an'tllm9 new a sa, ^
«...
.
«  1 THURSDAY, MARCH 20,2014    I    FEATURES
The Commerce Undergraduate Society
der administration
vs.
The CUS, Sauder's undergrad society, has a close relationship with their faculty's administration, but those ties were strained by the rape cheer.
Emails show Sauder communications director Leanna Yip informed CUS leadership she was unable to help them deal with their media strategy
regarding the crisis because it posed a conflict of interest for Yip and the Sauder faculty. The CUS retained a local PR firm, Peak Communications,
on Yip's recommendation.
Sauder dean Robert Helsley also requested a list of all "privileges" the CUS received from the faculty — things like building access and staff
resources, presumably with an eye toward rolling those back as punishment for the cheer.
Associate dean Darren Dahl reached out to FROSH co-chair Jacqueline Chen, who received significant flak after being quoted in the initial
Ubyssey story. She replied with a heartfelt email accepting responsibility for dealing with the backlash. (In another email not directly related to the
rape cheer, Dahl seemed hesitant to let the CUS lower their student fee.)
We would like to stress that we will do
whatever it takes moving forward to
ensure that this mistake is never again
repeated.... —CUS President Enzo Woo to
Sauder administration, shortly before he
was pressured to resign
MvFroshee Passed Out
Try to wake them up
Lay them on their
side
Get help
Tell an exec
It has definitely been rough with all the
media attention and commentary, but
at this point I wish it were all directed
to me and not to any of my peers or my
school.
Despite what the public says, [FROSH
leaders] are the most inspiring group of
students I have ever met....
The entire school consists of such amazing people that I cannot stand to see the
pain I've brought.
—FROSH Co-Chair Jacqueline Chen to
Sauder associated dean Darren Dahl,
whose reply is entirely redacted
Other bits and
ileces
Some emails simply offer insight into the personal feelings
of Sauder and university staff. In addition to expressing
thoughts about the cheer, several articles from mainstream
publications that touched on rape and sexism in society were
exchanged between high-level administrators.
The Dean and University leadership
became aware of [the FROSH incident] last
night and have moved swiftly to deal with
the problem.
We will obviously have a chance for a full
debrief at our Whistler meeting in a few
weeks.
—Sauder Faculty Advisory Board (FAB) chair
Paul Hollands to FAB members, including
Lawrence Sauder
I have about 50 of these at the moment.
Coming in quickly
—Patricia Stevens to university spokespeo-
ple and administrators, referring to emails
from a Change.org petition calling on UBC
president Stephen Toope to respond to the
cheer
It's been a very difficult week.... I have
no illusions about how difficult this will
be, but I honestly believe that with hard
work and dedication, good will come of
these terrible events.
Sauder deah Robert Helsley to [redacted]
Do you happen to know what disciplinary measures were taken in the St.
Mary's case?
—Sauder dean Robert Helsley to UBC
spokesman Randy Schmidt, regarding a
similar cheer at a Halifax university
Forgetting the reputational side of
things, it's sad to think people think the
song was at all funny
...I understand that the song had been
"sung" for many years. Was the faculty
aware ofthe song? Any ramifications
there?
—[Redacted]
Thought you might appreciate this
piece in the Globe today.
—UBC spokesperson Randy Schmidt
to Sauder dean Robert Helsley,
including the article "Making frosh
week empathetic and inclusive:
experts argue that extra rules and
additional training may not prevent
student leaders from participating
in hazing"
Just in case you hadn't seen this in the
Globe this morning. Food for thought
in terms of our response to the broader
issues raised in the frosh chant.
—UBC spokesperson Lucie McNeill to
university administrators
"h^'h'V°NlvouU "*"**■«. a,.™, '"'Om'h'C0Sf'0w"**m""i™.naBmv.
• Subject: Gender equity
-- Interesting read
Hi both,
Saw this over my cup of tea
this morning. With the update from the CUS FROSH
still bouncing around in my
head. I thought you would
find this quite interesting.
—[Redacted] to Sauder dean
Robert Helsley and adviser
Katriona MacDonald, including link to "Harvard Business
School Case Study: Gender
Equity" II Culture
INDIGENOUS CULTURE »
RHYS EDWARDS
New sweat lodge proposal for UBC Campus
Current spaces deemed too exclusive for public
a
Aurora Tejeida
Senior Culture Writer
Indigenous UBC students may
soon be getting a new sweat lodge
on campus — provided they can
obtain permission.
Representatives of UBC's First
Nations House of Learning met with
members ofthe Indigenous Students
Association (InSA) on Friday, March
14, to discuss the possibility of building a new lodge on campus.
The proposal for the lodge was
put forward by Shawn Shabaquay,
the president of InSA, a student
club on campus. Among the main
incentives for the creation ofthe
new lodge is to allow UBC students
an opportunity to practice and learn
about indigenous culture while
creating a sense of community.
The Ubyssey spoke to Line Kesler,
the director ofthe First Nations
House of Learning and senior
advisor to the president on aboriginal affairs, about the proposal, and
why it's taken so long to determine
whether they will endorse it.
"There are all kinds of reasons
why people establish and practice
sweat lodge activities. They range
very widely and in communities it's
common to have quite a few lodges
— even more in the Prairies, where
this tradition comes from," Kesler
said. "Pretty much everybody has a
sweat lodge and people do different
things according to their family's
customs."
While it's true that there are
already two sweat lodges on
campus, both located in the House
of Learning, the proposal alleges
that their exclusivity has made
it difficult for students to participate. Whether or not it's true,
this is an issue that Kesler said is
being investigated, while logistical and safety issues are being
PHOTO STEPHANIEXU3THE UBYSSEY
Two lodges already exist on campus at the First Nations House of Learning, though they
are gender specific. The new proposal would allow for a co-ed lodge.
discussed regarding the proposed
sweat lodge.
"This particular proposal has two
aspects that require us to look into it
further. One of them has to do with
the land availability," said Kesler.
This is an especially challenging
issue since the First Nations House
of Learning has limited space, and
this space currently includes the
existing lodges.
"Thinking about the space,
we do want to have discussions
with the existing lodges to see if
they can either meet the needs
of students or potentially share
the space, but we haven't had
those discussions in detail and we
will be undertaking them soon,"
said Kesler.
Unlike the two existing lodges
— one for men and one for women
— the newly proposed sweat lodge
would follow a different set of
traditions and guidelines; among
them, the stipulation that it would
be a co-ed lodge.
"We're not thinking that there
could only be one sweat lodge on
campus," said Kesler. "But in this
case, since we're talking about an
activity that involves some level of
safety issues, both physical and in
human relations terms, we want to
make sure that these issues have
been addressed adequately." These
concerns range from physical safety
to appropriate conduct during lodge
activities.
Kesler said lodges can be run in
many different ways. Some operate
as a social gathering for cleansing,
while others emphasize practices
involving cultural traditions and a
deeper sense of spirituality. In both
instances, participants usually tell
stories. There are healing lodges.
People who participate in these
lodges often have a specific problem
they're looking to resolve, making
their experience a therapeutic
process.
"Our concern is that that requires
a high level of training," said Kesler.
"In some circumstances, some
people might reveal certain things
about themselves thinking that it's
in confidence, but there's very little
way in which we can guarantee that
someone would not abuse the vulnerabilities that they're exposing."
The issue, he explained, is even
greater in a setting where participants are not familiar with the practice. According to the proposal, all
participants who do not have prior
experience with sweat lodges would
have to attend a workshop, which
would be held once a semester if
they wish to attend a sweat.
Shabaquay, who cites five years
of training in his proposal, would
be responsible for the sweat lodge
and for any potential misconduct
happening on site. Since Shabaquay
did not attend the meeting on Friday, whether or not he is prepared to
take on this responsibility is an issue
that will have to be discussed later
in the week.
"That's a leadership issue and
whether someone has adequate
preparation and training and so
forth," Kesler said. "Before we go
ahead, we want to make sure that
the person responsible has the
experience and the judgment that's
necessary."
But there are other concerns
being considered. According to
Kesler, this is the first time a group
has proposed a new sweat lodge,
and with it a set of different cultural
protocols that will determine how it
is run. While some traditions allow
lodge structures to be shared, other
traditions don't allow that.
"If we are sayingthat we recognize there are multiple traditions
and there's a situation in which
other people might then propose
additional lodges — in a community
setting this happens all the time,
that's why there are so many sweat
lodges in some communities — we
RSDAY, MARCH 20,20
cannot physically accommodate that
here," Kesler said.
"There are significant cultural
issues to what is being proposed,"
he added. "We want to seek further
consultation with the aboriginal
community on campus before making a final determination."
Safety issues aside, Kesler made
it clear that the First Nations
House of Learning supports any
interest in wanting to learn more
about or experience cultural
traditions.
"The issue is how to go about
doing that in a way we can support,"
he said. "We also want to make sure
that if we're supporting the use of
a lodge that it has an educational
mission, and that they offer cultural
support for students."
Depending on the outcome ofthe
next meeting, the ISA will be able to
submit their proposal for funding.
The proposal would need official
approval before March 31, as they're
looking for a full donation of $9,725
from UBC's equity enhancement
fund. Vi
What is a sweat
lodge?
Sweat lodges are sites for purifying sacred ceremonies, the
purpose of which is to cleanse
oneself. The cleansing purpose
refers to both the physical
aspect, through sweat, but
also spiritually, emotionally and
mentallythrough prayerand
introspection. Lodges also
serve as a place of worship,
healing and celebration.
The way in which sweats are
practiced varies greatly from
community to community and
even from family to family. The
experience can be physically
difficult, but it is ultimately
meant to create a shift in consciousness forthe participant.
FESTIVAL »
UBC gets dirty for Holi
PHOTO COURTESYJUSTIN LEE
Soumya Gupta
Contributor
What makes for a good celebration?
Food, music and people that you
truly care about. Add colours and
waterguns to the equation, however,
and you have Holi.
Traditionally celebrated in India
as a religious festival, in recent
decades Holi has become a more
secular international phenomenon, renown for its colour wars and
colour runs. This Saturday, the UBC
Indian Students Association (ISA-
UTSAV) will host a Holi celebration
at Maclnnes field. The event is open
to all students, regardless of their
background or faith.
"Holi stems from Holika, who
was one ofthe demon sisters in the
Hindu manuscript. In addition to
throwing colours, there also a tradition of burning an effigy of her the
night before," said Anjali Bohlken, a
specialist in Indian Politics at UBC.
"Holi is about triumphing over the
evils, and rejoicing with colours."
"In the Indian culture, it's an
event that basically wants to cele
brate life, being with your loved ones
— celebrating how fortunate you
are to be a part ofthe community,"
said Sheena Ahmed, the treasurer
and sustainability coordinator of
UTSAV.
Originally from Pakistan, Ahmed
celebrated Holi for the first time
here at UBC last year. "I was reluctant at first. You know because you
hear the classic horror stories about
Holi: The colour stays in your hair
for days, your nails will never be the
same again and so on. I guess I was
just being paranoid, because I went
there and it was a blast."
The same thing is happening
again this year. UTSAV will provide
Indian music, along with traditional
snacks and a lot of colours for guests
who attend it.
"You don't have to buy colours
if you don't want to," said Supriya
Gupta, the events coordinator for
UTSAV. "People come with their
own colours, water balloons, water
guns, you name it. It's how you want
to celebrate it."
Holi goes against the norm of a
lot of festivals — it's about dressing
down in old clothes, with the goal of
getting as messy as possible.
"To see the looks on people's
faces when you walk into the bus all
covered in hues of pink and purple
— [it's] simply priceless," said Gupta.
Holi is UTSAV's biggest event
ofthe year, but don't expect a lot
communication. "People get to
know each other here without even
uttering a single syllable. It is more
like, 'Oh, I just put a tub of water
over you. So hey!'" said Gupta. V
UBC's Holi celebration will take place
from 11 to 3:30 p.m. this Saturday,
March 22, at Maclnnes Field.
at the Chan Centre
Shane
Koyczan
Spoken Word Poet
"I sit before flowers hoping
they will train me in the
art of opening up."
- Shane Koyczan, "The Student"
Wednesday March 26 2014
Two Performances! 12:00pm + 6:30pm
Telus Studio Theatre {Chan Centre at UBC}
Tickets: $27 I $22 {UBC faculty/staff} I $15 {students}
TICKETMASTER.CA I  1.8S5.985.ARTS (2787)
Chan Centre Ticket Office {in person only) I CHANCENTRE.COM
'CHAN CENTRE THURSDAY, MARCH 20, 2014    |    CULTURE
THEATRE»
Riot in the auditorium
Notorious Ubu Roi rounds out UBC play season
Rachel Levy-McLaughlin
StaffWriter
In 1896, the premiere of Alfred
Jarry's Ubu Roi lasted the length of
a single word: "Merdre!" ("Shit-
ter!"). The audience erupted into a
riot that lasted 15 minutes, and the
show was not attempted again in
the lifetime of its author.
UBC Theatre is tackling the
absurdist—and quite absurd—play
from March 20 to April 5 in the
Frederic Wood Theatre. Hopefully, the performance will make it
further than one word.
Director Ryan Gladstone is
following the guidelines of Jarry,
the French pioneer of Absurdist
theatre. Jarry deliberately shocked
and appalled his audiences—he
wrote play to challenge and
disrupt society.
"What we looked at was what
was so wonderful about that first
production," said Gladstone. "It
was something the audiences
had never seen before, and it was
shocking and it was unique, so I
was trying to find a way to create
that."
"Our show does its best to create
an equivalent in our modern day
theatre aesthetic," said Sarah Harrison, BFA acting student and cast
member, "to create something as
shocking as what Jarry did."
"This is a beast of a show," said
Naomi Vogt, another BFA student
and cast member. "You have to be
an exceptionally brave director to
take it on."
Harrison and Vogt play Mere
and Pere Ubu, who both conspire
to take over Poland through trickery, treachery and deceit. Slowly,
Pere Ubu kills off every high-ranking Polish official in order to claim
their land, property and treasure.
With many twists and turns along
the way, Ubu Roi is a story of
avarice and gluttony to a level of
absurdity — pun intended.
For the UBC production, Gladstone took inspiration from the
creation ofthe play, and added an
entirely new first act. According to
Gladstone, the play was originally
invented by an adolescent Jarry
in order to mock a particularly fat
MAGE COURTESY NANCII BERNARD/UBCTHEATRE
In the spirit of the original, UBC Theatre's revamped production of Ubu Roi aims to shock.
and idiotic physics teacher at his
school.
"I was pretty inspired by that
story, and the idea that it came out
of childhood and adolescence," said
Gladstone, who has set Ubu Roi in
a new, modern context.
"So the setup is that we're 16
graduating school girls, and our
final farewell to the school is
this play that we all feel strongly
is a story that needs to be told,"
said Vogt. "We've highjacked the
auditorium, and we've done this
against the knowledge of our
teachers and parents."
This context is what drives the
entire show: cast, set, storyline,
characters. The cast is comprised
of 16 females, each of whom plays
a girl in the all-girls academy. The
set itself is a pile of junk, intended
to look like the girls have scrambled and fumbled to make some
semblance of a set.
"It has everything, plus the
kitchen sink", said Deb Pickman,
UBC Theatre's communication and
marketing specialist. Indeed, the
set does include a kitchen sink-
plus four pink flamingos, some
destroyed bed frames, blankets,
shards of wood and a stop sign.
Though seemingly disorganized, the set is highly intentional,
planned chaos, taking the production crew well over 400 hours to
create and perfect.
The show-and UBC Theatre's
particular production of it—strives
to challenge every notion of theatre
convention. "Any ideas you have
about the art Alfred Jarry tried to
create, or even what theatre UBC
typically produces—throw that
information away, because it won't
help you here," said Vogt. "I've
never seen a play that resembles
what we do in this show.
"We promise surprises." 'ffl
Ubu Roi plays at the Frederic Wood
theatre until April Sth. Tickets available at theatre.ubc.ca
BOOKS »
Apocalyptic author
Creative writing
professor makes
cold war a reality
in her new novel
Olivia Law
StaffWriter
"The day goes down in fire. Sooty
clouds crush the sun to a red stain
at the horizon."
So begins UBC assistant
professor and creative writing
alumna Nancy Lee's latest novel
The Age. Set in 1984, the book
tells the story of Gerry, a teenage girl who is obsessed with the
idea of nuclear war breaking out,
joining and rallying with a peace
group in order to confront her
post-apocalyptic fantasies.
The novel, 12 years in the making, is Lee's second novel following
the international success Dead
Girls in 2003. "Writing is always
difficult, but I'm grateful to my students who I draw so much inspiration from," said Lee. "When you're
writing for such a long period you
can become quite discouraged, and
I often found myself wondering
whether I should continue or not."
However, Lee's students in the
creative writing program provided
her with the motivation to finish
and publish her new dystopian
fantasy. "When you're surrounded
by young people who are excited
about their ideas and blossoming
into writers, it's exciting."
The ideas behind The Age are
a combination of Lee's personal
views growing up and entirely
fictionalized concepts. "I grew up
in a time where my generation was
without a set context for ground
war. We all had the idea that it
was something that would happen
instantaneously, like pressing a
button."
"In Grade 8,1 remember being
asked by a teacher how many
people in the class thought they'd
live past the age of 25. Only half of
us put up our hands," said Lee. "I
think we were all obsessed with the
idea ofthe world ending within our
lifetime."
Lee's novel seeks to explore how
this sort of anxiety shapes the per-
=HOTO COURTESY NANCY LEE
Nancy Lee's latest book comes after a 12
year respite from writing.
son one could become. "It comes
down to the metaphor [of] being
alive — how do you continue to live
with that knowledge when you
know ofthe destructive potential?"
Joining the creative writing
department as an MFA student in
1998, Lee has been closely involved
ever since, experiencing many
changes in her time at UBC. The
publication of The Age comes at a
propitious time for the department;
last Saturday, it celebrated its 50th
anniversary with a gala event. The
department also recently debuted a
new minor program, opening creative writing up to students from
all disciplines.
"What we're finding is that
students from all faculties want to
take writing as both an academic
challenge and an outlet for self
expression," said Lee. "We get
great combinations — physics and
creative writing, Sauder students
taking poetry courses, engineers
writing for children — this is
giving everyone a really rounded
university experience, a reprieve
from the other ways they have to
think. It's so important to be able
to learn craft-based skills to retain
creativity."
In her first year as a professor
at UBC, Lee expressed gratitude
towards the department and their
support. "It's a very exciting first
year, with so many new opportunities opening up," Lee said. "It's a
great program which allows students from so many backgrounds
an outlet to express their creativity." Vi
MUSIC »
Composers experiment
in CIRS laboratory for
weekend concert
Gabriel Germaix
StaffWriter
The UBC Centre for Interactive
Research on Sustainability (CIRS)
can now add "concert hall" to its
long list of accolades.
Be it forward-looking and inspirational or simply extravagant,
on March 22, CIRS - the brick-coloured, glass-floored building
on West Mall — will be musical
and nothing else. For their 40th
anniversary, the Vancouver New
Music Society (VNM) will perform
in the hall ofthe greenest building
in North America. According to its
organizers, the performance will
combine classical instruments with
new technology to create future-inspired "sonic art."
Giorgio Magnanensi, artistic
director at the VNM, decided to
make light central to his artistic
presentation. "The UBC [CIRS]
building is a very beautiful, resonant building," he said. The glass
floors allow the space to be unified
while the performers, who are to be
split up in several groups, will perform in guided harmony, following
the instructions of four composers
who have been invited by Magnanensi. The concert, entitled Sound
Space Architecture, will feature
two newly commissioned pieces by
Canadian composers Jordan Nobles
and Howard Bashaw, which will be
performed along with two recent
compositions of Canadian composer John Oswald and Texan sound
artist Scott Smallwood.
"The Resonance Prism,"
Howard Bashaw's new musical
experiment, follows the theme
ofthe evening by appropriating
the space with music. Clarinet,
electric guitar and cello are to be
expected, alongwith live electronics and drums. Magnanensi
=HOTOVADIMBULITKO/VANCOUVERNEWMUSIC
Vancouver New Music composers integrate a variety of unconventional sounds into their
work. Pictured: Texan composer Scott Smallwood recording a pumpjack
commented on the setting of
the installation.
"Howard's piece works with the
metaphor ofthe prism, of prismatic
light... as a spectral field," Magnanensi said. The work corresponds
with Magnanensi's ambition to
invite the audience to experience
different kinds of resonance.
"The musicians will be scattered on the floors, and on the
main ground there will be a larger
ensemble," Magnanensi said. Each
group will form the architecture
ofthe "sonic prism" Bashaw seeks
to create.
"I designed a set of 10 'graphic
scores,' kind of like panels, that
are sequenced in a narrative," said
Bashaw, who formerly taught in
the UBC Faculty of Music, "more
to inspire the musicians than...
to actually prescribe." During the
performance, Bashaw will invite
the audience to walk between the
groups of musicians in order to
witness "different kind of reflections or refractions that take
the form of music in rhythm, in
harmony."
Magnanensi is equally thrilled
by the interactive potential the split
setting in the glass building can offer. "The space is not a music venue
per se, and so everyone [is] encouraged to move around so they can
create their own performance," he
said. "They will play with the way
they receive sound while moving
in a large space that offers many
different perspectives."
It remains to be seen whether
UBC students will take interest in
the contemporary music experiment. Magnanensi said last year's
performance, a percussion concert,
attracted few of them. "Usually
students from the school of music
are not coming down in hundreds. I
think there is a general lack of curiosity in music institutions," he said.
Perhaps, by performing outside
of a music institution, the VNM will
have more luck this year. U
Sound Space Architecture will be
performed this Saturday at 8pm at
the CIRS Building, 2260 West Mall. II Opinions
$OpO YOU flflNiC
YOU U. £* iT^TjM
THE WALL  THM
pji**».M/'iVSE.
REDACTEPj
Redactions inhibit understanding.
LAST WORDS//
UBC FREEDOM OE
INFORMATION
REQUESTS: WHERE THE
SUN DON'T SHINE
We pride ourselves on digging
deep into the issues at UBC. One
ofthe tools we use to do that is
the Freedom of Information and
Protection of Privacy Act, which
outlines how the public can access
public documents, while protecting the privacy ofthe public.
A Freedom of Information Act
(FOI) request forms the basis
of our cover story today, about
Sauder's response to the rape
cheer last September. But there
are holes — massive holes. Our
request turned up hundreds of
pages of emails. Of those, more
than two thirds were redacted
in their entirety. UBC claims
these redactions are justified by a
section of the act that allows the
university to redact policy recommendations made by the school.
The second half of that section
outlines exceptions to that rule,
many of which could be relevant
to these documents. The problem
is that redacting the documents in
their entirety forces us to appeal
their redactions.
We don't know what the context of those redactions is, but we
do know the appeal process can
take years, especially if the university appeals the independent
body that governs these records
in the court system. It's convenient for the university to be overly
judicious with their redactions
because they know we won't be
seeing any other parts for months
or years to come. And if the
university decides to appeal the
decisions to court, it could cost
both the university and our little
paper thousands of dollars to
reveal what really went on behind
the scenes.
If the university wanted to be
transparent, they would come
forward with documents like
this. Instead, students are left
asking questions about what
the university is hiding behind
its redactions.
SCANDALOUS ART
When compared to the AMS's total
$800,000 deficit, spending $700
for no reason may not seem like a
lot of money. But the artist in residency kerfuffle does not signify
good things.
The budget committee voted
unanimously to not fund the program, but former VP admin Derek
Moore decided he'd pay a student
to do this anyway. The question of
whether to go through with this
payment or not came to a vote on
March 12.
Obviously, when the AMS
promises to reimburse a student,
that's what they should do, and
they should do this because it's accountable, not just because they're
scared of a lawsuit. So it's a good
thing that, in the end, Council
voted overwhelmingly (23 for, four
against) to pay the student back.
However, the arguments of
those councillors who were
against the motion should also be
taken into account. This decision
should not set a precedent. Exec-
... ANP VEAH,
THAT t*(A5 HCW X.
Mtt'AteCDHV
LOVS CF STA*\P
LUU-SCTMLi-.
<«0-    lTO!W(
MAN-
LLUSTRATION RHYS EDWARDS/THE UBYSSEY
utives should not be promising
money they aren't authorized to
give, especially when the AMS is
in a deficit.
YOUR AMS?
A review has recommended that
the AMS lobby UBC to provide
more resources to help students
find off-campus housing and
learn about their rights as a tenant. We agree.
Every year, hundreds of
students at the bottom of the
waiting list are unable to get into
on-campus housing. Since UBC
doesn't have room for them, they
should help them out. And theoretically, UBC, which has much
more resources than the AMS,
should be able to run this service
more effectively.
We also agree that having a
permanent shuttle service for
Safewalk would be a good thing.
If demand for Safewalk keeps
up, this is a good way of getting
students around quickly and
securely.
However, having it only pick
up students from specified hubs
might be kind of missing the
point. The shuttle would pick up
at busy locations like libraries, so
students at odd locations would
still have to walk alone to get to
these hubs. But the whole point
of Safewalk is that people don't
have to walk anywhere alone at
night.
So, we like the idea of retaining the shuttle, but the AMS
should consider doing on-call
drives at least some ofthe time. 31
II
Interested in being the
linions and blog editor
ixt year?
're holding elections for the 2014-2015 Ubyssey
(torial board. For full job descriptions, go to
^ssey.ca/jobs.
litions papers due Friday, March 21,5 p.m.
WITHE
ViUBY
UBYSSEY
A vote for joke
candidates should be a
vote for apathy
ALEX KILPATRICK
Op-Ed
Joke candidates are nothing
new at UBC, but the Harsev
Oshan-running-as-Rob Ford gag
missed the whole point.
It's actually pretty easy to run
a good joke candidate. You run a
goat in an election to equate the
other candidates to a goat. They
have to run against a goat. They
have to compete with a goat.
That's funny.
Sometimes it gets a little more
complicated, like when The Syrup
Trap ran an air-headed, disconnected, trust-funded caricature in
the AMS elections. Winnie Code
was like her fellow candidates,
Oshan and the eventually victorious Tanner Bokor, but without
the ability to pretend that she's
normal. She had nothing in common with her electorate, but she
was bad at hiding it. She almost
arrived on campus in a Bugatti.
We thought that was funny. Parallels, or whatever.
Alex Bucci, the other Syrup
Trap-affiliated candidate, was
a buzzwordy ideologue with
delusions of professional grandeur. He had unfeasible plans that
went way beyond the VP finance's
portfolio and he ran on them as a
platform. He dressed and behaved
like an asshole. We thought that
was funny.
Some of us put on our political
theory hats and talked about joke
candidates as a voice for the apathetic, the disenchanted. "A vote
for Winnie is a vote for not giving
a shit," was the line.
"A platform we can lounge on,"
was another.
Really, though, we just thought
the elections, the candidates, the
process itself, was kind of a joke,
and we wanted to get in on that.
We like jokes.
But where does the joke end,
and where does the candidate
begin? When does Alex Bucci
stop being a fiction, a joke, and
start being a guy you can vote
for? Where, exactly, is the divide
between Philip He and Jon
Snow?
What, God forbid, would have
happened if Winnie actually won?
Some ideas were tossed around.
She was goingto enforce a dress
code. She was goingto add
bullshit bylaws to everything.
She was going to either defund
Safewalk, or buy them Lincoln
Town Cars and chauffeur hats.
She wasn't sure.
She sure as hell wasn't going to
govern, however. That wasn't her
thing.
At The Syrup Trap, our thing is
the Chuckle Test, which is this: if
something makes you chuckle, it
passes the Chuckle Test. Responsible Leadership™ fails the
Chuckle Test, and the Chuckle
Test is our God. We live and die
bythe Chuckle Test. If Winnie
had won, it would have been by
the grace ofthe Chuckle Test,
not by the democratic will ofthe
people.
The plan, then, was to make as
many jokes as possible with Winnie in office, and then hand the
AMS over to whoever's job that
is after a week or so. Maybe there
would have been another election.
Maybe different, better people
would have run. Maybe that's not
our problem.
Here's what we did know:
votes for Winnie and Alex were
votes for jokes, not for them as
leaders. That was pretty obvious.
We didn't think people were
hearing Winnie's comments
regarding kegels and entrusting
the AMS to her. We thought they
liked her jokes. We thought they,
too, didn't give a shit about the
AMS elections. With Winnie
and Alex, they were given an
alternative to voting, not to the
candidates.
This is what Oshan doesn't
seem to understand. Jokes, even
jokes about politics, are apolitical.
Votes for joke candidates don't
represent a mandate to govern;
they represent either the exact
opposite of that, or nothing at
all. They represent a rejection
ofthe available candidates, or a
total absence of opinion. If they
have a political function, it's not a
positive one.
Joke candidates turn this:
3 Candidate A
3 Candidate B
3 Candidate C
Into this:
3 Candidate A
3 Candidate B
3 Candidate C
3 Fuck This/These People
Not this:
3 Candidate A
3 Candidate B
3 Candidate C
3 Whoever Made This Joke
Should Run the AMS. XI
Alex Kilpatrick is a writer for The
Syrup Trap.
=ILE PHOTOS CARTER BRUNDAGE/THE UBYSSEY
Syrup Trap writer Alex Kilpatrick argues that while Winnie Code and Paul Bucci, candidates in the last AMS election, actually exemplifed the role of a joke candidate, Harsev
Oshan's Rob Ford in the AUS election missed the point. THURSDAY, MARCH 20,2014    |    GAMES    |   11
CROSSWORD
ACROSS
1
2
3
4
'
'
7
8
'
,.
11
12
13
14
'S
"
17
,.
"
20
21
^m  > i
■ 23
■ 24
25
2G
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
3G
37
38
39     1                   ■ HI
41     1                   ■ 42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
■ so
51
52
S3
54
55
56     1       H57
58     1
59
■
GO
Gl
G2
G3
G4
65
_
GG
1
"
CS
"
"
71
"
"
MUZZLE COURTESY BESTCROSSWORDS.COM. USED WITH PERMISSION.
DOUBLE SUDOKU
Here's two times the numbers fun for those upset that the crossword gets
published more often. Easy on top, intermediate on the bottom.
6
1
7
4
3
6
1
9
7
8
3
1
9
4
3
8
2
8
6
9
4
6
7
1
1
2
8
6
9
1
7
2
4
9
6
7
7
3
3
5
2
8
1
2
2
3
7
7
4
9
9
8
6
2
1
8
1
9
4
7
6
1- Snow conveyances
6-Comparison word
10-The jig !
14-Apartment sign
15- Only Just Begun
16-Fork feature
17-Hersey's bell town
18-PartofQ.E.D.
19-Be that may...
20-Ribbon worm
22-Roofing stone
23-FolksingerJoan
24-Mobile home
26-Bell and Barker
29- Greek goddess ofthe earth
31- Period
32-Nabokov novel
33-Makes a boo-boo
34- Degrees in a right angle
38-Horse hair
40-Female pronoun
42-Identical
43- First name in aviation
46-Singles
49-Covered vehicle
50-Getting on
51-Actress Sommer
52-Nav. officer
53-Violent whirlwind
57-Flying start?
59-Reflection on death
60- Persevered
65-Uris's" 18"
66-For men only
67-Legend maker
68-Ovid, e.g.
69-Get up
70-Smalldrum
71-Town near Padua
72-Breezed through
73-Clearthe board
DOWN
1-Ollie's partner
2-Rich supply
3-Jack of "RioLobo"
4-StarinCygnus
5- Where junk may be held
6-Small pincers
7-Mother of Ares
8- -garde
9- Can be used to catch fish orsurf!
10-Sicilians, e.g.
11-Agave fiber
12-Join forces
13-Tire (out)
21-Eye drop
22- Dress often worn by Hindu
women
25-Cartoon dog
26-Baby's cry
27- Brother of Hoss
28-Completely without madness
30-...who lived in__
35-Gutter locale
36- Counterfeiter catcher
37-Cravings
39-Stretch
41-Expanded
44-Now me down.
45-Find the sum of
47-Squeezes (out)
48-Arranged in order
53-City near Phoenix
54-Mixed bags
55-Sublease
56- Eye-related
58-Academy award
61- Facilitate
62-Big brass
63-Greek god of love
64-Venture
66- Lady of Sp.
MAR. 17 ANSWERS
c
A
L
v
'■
T
E
R
S
0
C
L
E
0
R
E
L
%
L
E
S
p
1
E
R
0
0
N
A
"N
E
V
E
R |n
E
V
E
R
T
W
1
X
T It
E
i  |o
N
E
R
S
1 3
A
M
0
s Id
1
E |
S
N
E
E
R
E
D Im
1
S
D \E
A
L
T
E
R
E
S
a If
0
S
E In
0
0
E
C
A
D H'3
T
R
E
p H"t
0
R
Y
L
E
T lo
L
D
3 H -
i
0
T
T
A
E
V
0 IT
V
E
s |'o
a
T
M
E
A
L
|1
E
s H'a
B
Y
s
M |
A
T
T
A
r I'd
D
e H'a
Y
E
R
S
P
R
1
V
A |ST
E
E
Y
"E
1
*R
E
A
P
E
1
N
E
r
E
L
E
T
O
R
C
A
X
M
A
S
u
R
E
D
°
"T
0
E
S
do n like grammer??! cause da ubyssey
is always lookin for volunters to help
proof-awesome, right?
Matt Meuse | copy@ubyssey.ca
UBC's Transportation Plan
Public Open House - April 2 and 3,2014
Add your voice to the development of UBC's Transportation Plan!
In 2013, we reached out to and heard from the university community on issues related to on-campus
transportation, whether by foot, on wheels or by public transit. Your feedback has helped us identify
opportunities to better address how we get around on campus, and draft a Transportation Plan for the
Vancouver campus that will update and replace UBC's 2005 Strategic Transportation Plan.
Please join us at one of our upcoming public open houses to learn more and offer your thoughts
and ideas about the draft Transportation Plan, and the planning process to date.
Dat
AprM2, 201
, April 3, 2<
~0pm-7:0C
30am -1:3
House, 3385 Wesbrook Mall
oyer, 6138 Student Union Boulevard
can't attend in person?
a quick online questionnaire will be available
from March 24 to April 4 at planning.ubc.ca.
For more information on UBC's Transportation Plan, please visit: planning.ubc.ca
For more information on the consultation process, contact: chris.fay@ubc.ca
This notice contains important information which may affect you. Please ask someone to translate it for you.
o| #*|-fe SSf n|S 4= Si^ #s*tga.7|-#oH ai^qcf.
9£!m °I«H =l a* a^=fe 4if« £-s|§W7| uf-iHcf.
a place of mind
THE   UNIVERSITYOF   BRITISH   COLUMBIA
campus+community planning
^UZZLESCOURTESYKRAZYDAD.. USED WITH PERMISSION. THE 7TH ANNUAL AMS
ILftCC
TAtTY
ADVENTURE CLUB  DAN MANGAN * BLACKSMITH
SHAD I THE CRACKLING I REBEL ON A MOUNTAIN   I    MGH!  I  SINCERELY HANA
UNIVERSITY BLVD.*
GAGE
RESIDENCE
13 MIN. Q
025;033'043
'049/480
THUNDERBIRD BLVD.
IL9CC
TAtTY
"ATTHEWS FIELD
TUESDAY APRIL 8, 2014
MATTHEWS FIELD I 2:30 - 9:00 PM
19+ I$15 - $30
TICKETS AVAILABLE ATTHE
AMS OUTPOST (SUB) &
GOODNIGHTS.ME/BLOCKPARTY
►
►
lANr®,
CiTR
1«1.9fm/CITR.ca

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0126695/manifest

Comment

Related Items