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The Ubyssey Nov 5, 1985

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Array THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXVIII, No. 17
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, November 5,1985
228-2301
Waging peace:
The Nanoose Conversion Campaign
Nanoose Bay, Vancouver Island,
is the site of farms, rural subdivisions and a naval weapons testing
range directly linked with the
nuclear arms race. Situated only 26
kilometres from Nanaimo and 48
kilometres from Vancouver, the
bay is the centre of attention for the
Nanoose Conversion Campaign, a
peace group formed in September
1984 to transform the area from
military to peaceful purposes.
Since the visit of an American
submarine in September, Nanoose
is also the location of B.C.'s first
arrests for civil disobedience against
nuclear weapons.
"1 felt it was really appropriate to
be working on something that's
right here at home," said NCC
member Sunshine Goldstream, a
farmer from nearby Hilliers, who
first became concerned with the
range two years ago after reading an
article in a local paper.
"They had one of those maps
where they show ground zero and
that we would be blown to
smithereens if anything happened
adversely here," she said.
The focus of concern for
Goldstream and 15 other active
members of the campaign is the
Canadian Forces Maritime Experimental   Range   (CFMETR),   a
MIRIAM LEIGH . . . arrested.
Story and photos
by James Young
DEPARTMENT OF rfATIOlMAt DEFENCE
MArtOMkt. (MFtWC* A
NO
TRESPASSING
NANOOSE BAY . . . entrance to CFMETR base
facility jointly operated by Canada
and the U.S. The range comprises a
base at Nanoose Bay and 130
square kilometres of Georgia Strait
lined with sophisticated monitoring
devices and installations on nearby
islands.
The purpose of the range is to test
anti-submarine weapons which activists fear may be part of a
developing U.S. first-strike
strategy.
"CANADIAN TERRITORY IS
being used to develop new systems
of killing people," said Laurie Mac-
Bride, who objects to both the
weapons systems tested at the range
and those carried into the bay.
Among the systems tested there is
the anti-submarine rocket
(ASROC), designed to be fired
from a surface ship.
"A system like the ASROC,
which can be either nuclear or conventionally armed, is difficult to
verify," said MacBride.
"It's destabilizing, just like the
cruise."
Another anti-submarine weapon,
the SUBROC missile, has a nuclear
depth charge of up to one-quarter
the power of the atomic bomb
dropped on Hiroshima in 1945.
Even more alarming, said Mac-
Bride, are nuclear-armed
Tomahawk cruise missiles, the sea-
launched version of the cruise
missile tested at Cold lake, Alberta,
in 1984. The weapons are almost
certainly carried into Nanoose on
Sturgeon and Los Angeles class
submarines.
MacBride bases her conviction on
research done by a Hawaiian group
whicli compares the schedules for
submarine fleet construction with
those for the deployment of the
4,000 Tomahawks, 758 of which are
nuclear-armed. She said two LA
class submarines, the La Jolla,
which visited the range in late May,
and the Salt Lake City, which made
three visits in August and
September, probably carried eight
to 12 Tomahawks each. The
missiles have 10 to 15 times the
destructive power of the Hiroshima
bomb, she said.
"A report that came out of the
U.S. Senate last year confirmed
that they were beginning with the
nuclear Tomahawks and later they
BERT THOMAS . . .
120 Hiroshimas
would begin deploying the conventional ones," she said.
She said the U.S. may be bringing
Tomahawks into Nanoose Bay to
test their launch mechanism, a view
supported by New Zealand peace
activist Owen Wilkes, who visited
B.C. in October.
The military importance of the
Tomahawk is underscored by
defense analyst William Arkin of
Washington's Institute for Policy
Studies who said the missile is
"emerging as the most important
and flexible weapon in the U.S.
arsenal" adding it is most likely to
be used at the start of World War
III.
BOTH THE CANADIAN AND
American military have consistently
refused to confirm or deny whether
Tomahawks or other nuclear
weapons are carried into Nanoose.
Armed Forces spokesperson Major
Norbert Cyr denies that the
Tomahawk launch system is being
tested there. But he also says that it
is not a Canadian concern whether
U.S. vessels visiting Canada have
nuclear weapons on board.
"Nuclear capable vessels, be they
armed or capable of being armed
with nuclear weapons are perfectly
welcome to visit Canadian ports,"
Cyr said.
Statements like Cyr's prompt the
NCC to wonder whether Ottawa or
Washington is in charge of the
facility.
"There's a Canadian commander, but it appears that many of
the decisions and day to day operations are controlled from Keyport,
Washington," said MacBride, adding that Keyport is the command
and control center for a network of
Pacific undersea warfare testing
ranges.
The NCC uses various methods
to educate the public about the test
range and has received a fair
amount of coverage from island
media. But the range was largely ignored by mainstream provincial
media until the end of September
when six NCC members were arrested.
When the Salt Lake City, one of
the submarines believed to be carrying Tomahawk missiles into
Nanoose appeared for the third
time, the NCC organized a
demonstration at the base gates.
On September 26, a group of 40
people protested the submarine's
presence. Activist Bert Thomas,
one of those later arrested, read a
letter from the NCC to the vessel's
SUNSHINE GOLDSTREAM . . .
ground zero
commander.
"We believe that the presence of
the U.S.S. Salt Lake City sub is a
violation of the International Law
which prohibits crimes against
humanity," the letter began, referring to the Nuremburg principles
established after World War II.
"We ask you, in the name of
humanity, to take your submarine
away from this place and let it
become a nuclear weapons free
zone."
When ihe commander refused to
meet the demonstrators, Thomas
and five others sat down in the middle of the road, saying they would
not leave until either the commander agreed to speak with them
or took the submarine away from
Nanoose Bay.
At 11 p.m., the RCMP issued the
protestors a warning, and shortly
after midnight the six were arrested
and charged with intimidation, a
criminal offense punishable by a
fine of up to $500 or a prison
sentence of up to six months or
both.
Those arrested included Thomas
of Winnipeg, Sunshine Goldstream
of Hilliers, Brian Mills of Nanoose,
Miriam Leigh of Denman Island,
John Campbell of Lasqueti Island
and Ted Phillips of Quadra Island.
They are scheduled to appear in
provincial court in Parksville on
Nov. 14.
If civil disobedience is the most
dramatic occurence at Nanoose,
then the peace camp is the NCC's
symbol of ongoing presence and
determination. Currently Canada's
only existing peace camp, it is
located, beside the Island Highway
across from the Nanoose rest stop.
BRIAN MILLS . . .
common concern
Three tents, five-metre-high
teepees, are visible from the road,
making them obvious for people
who already know about the camp
and attracting people who are simply curious.
Established April 1, the camp has
already been forced to move twice.
The first site was in an undeveloped
community park but residents of a
nearby subdivision complained and
the Nanaimo Regional District ruled the camp had to move.
"We didn't want to obscure the
camp into a property rights issue
and this is what some of the people
in the community saw it as," said
NCC member Etrian Mills.
The second camp was established
in May and again faced opposition
from neighbours and received a
direct order from Social Credit
Highways Minister Alex Fraser to
move.
The current camp started in early
July is directly opposite the base
range. It is an ideal location to
watch submarines and ships which
dock.
THE CAMP HAS HOSTED
hundreds of people since opening
and even now, as winter approaches, people stop every day to
offer encouragement, bring food or
write comments in the log book.
Many visitors are from the island
itself but there is also a sizeable proportion from the U.S., Europe,
Australia and New Zealand.
Mills sees the international visits
as one of the most positive aspects
of the campaign.
' 'This is one of the beauties of the
nuclear issue, if the nuclear issue
See page 2: NCC
NANOOSE PEACE CAMP
looking towards CFMETR base. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 5, 1985
NCC faces April deadline
ON THE BOULEVARD
From page 1
can be said to have beauties," he
said.
"It is a common concern whether
you live in Australia or New
Guinea, Tanzania or Yellowknife."
With the camp now in existence
for seven months, the biggest
challenge is to keep it open during
the long rainy winter and members
are currently winterizing the teepees
and sleeping areas.
The campaign's effect on politicians is difficult to judge. Perhaps
the most significant response to the
campaign occurred in July when the
federal convention of the NDP
passed an emergency resolution
which condemns the presence of
any nuclear-capable weapons at
Nanoose, demands that the U.S.
Navy not bring nuclear weapons into Canadian waters and opposes
the renewal, in April, of the agreement which allows the U.S. to use
the range.
NDP MP Jim Manly (Cowichan-
Malahat-The Islands) will present
two petitions supporting NCC's
goals to parliament beginning
November 19, as well as sponsoring
a private member's bill in support
of a public inquiry.
Regardless of whether the
government heeds NCC's call for
an official government inquiry into
the   range,   the   Gabriola   Island
Peace Association is organizing a
"People's Inquiry Into CFMETR,"
to be held in Nanaimo on January
18 and 19.
Participants will include Dr.
Rosalie Bertell, an expert on low-
level radiation who recently appeared in the film "Speaking Our
Peace," Major-General Leonard
Johnson (Ret.) of Generals for
Peace and Disarmament and
Robert Aldridge, a designer of the
Trident missile system who is now a
peace activist.
One of the areas examined by the
inquiry will be how CFMETR can
be "better used for peaceful productive purposes." Suggestions
such as converting the facility to a
marine research station or a search
and rescue facility will be examined
and a concrete alternative presented
to the federal government.
Facing the NCC are the general
problems facing most peace activists: working on a low budget,
shuffling time between work, family and peace commitments and the
possibility of burn-out for individuals shouldering broad responsibilities. However, the NCC is also
faced with the specific task of making the test range a national issue
before the agreement is due to be
renewed in April.
Asked how he feels working on
something often perceived as a local
issue, Thomas said: "The Salt Lake
City had something like the
equivalent of 120 Hiroshimas on it.
That's not local. It concerns me and
everyone else on this planet."
hair and suntanning co.
SUNTANNING   -   10  Sessions   -   $39
HAIR — 15% off any hair service
with presentation of ad. Expires Nov. 16
5784 University Blvd. Ph. 224-1922
(in UBC Village) % Blk. Away    224-9116
FOR VERY BEST
SANDWICHES
ALSO
Homemade Fresh
Meat & Veg. Samosas,
Cornish Pastry, and
Chicken Pies
IN SUB LOWER LEVEL
Open daily 7:30 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
OPEN EARLY
OPEN LATE
• passport pictures
* specialty papers
* volume discounts
's copies
5706 University Blvd. 222-1688
M-Th8-9        Fri 8-6       Sat 9-6       Sun 11-6
i ft month filled with excitement and special
. Am evertts»from author visits to fashion shows.
M   V from product days to our annual book sale!
Here are }ast a few items happening in Week #i
featuring the NOVEMBER BOOK SALE and
PRODUCT DAYS! '
228-4741
NOVEMBER BOOK SALE - NOVEMBER M5
MON
L KJ ELiO
WED
THURS
FRI
SONY
DAY
Sony's featuring the latest technology in portable movie
cameras. A Sony sales rep will
be at the Electronics Shop to
answer all questions. Many un-
advertised Specials.
NOVEMBER BOOK SALE
SHARP
DAY
Demonstrations include microwave ovens, and audio/video
products. A Sharp sales rep
will be here to answer
questions.
NOVEMBER BOOK SALE
STAEDTLER
DAY
Last Quarter of Anniversary Year
Staedtler is featuring 30% off all their
products for one day only.
JOSTEN'S DAY
A losten's sales rep will be present to
display rings and take orders that day
NOVEMBER BOOK SALE
NOVEMBER
BOOK
SALE
NOVEMBER
BOOK
SALE
STAEDTLER
DAY
In our Book Sale this year the
emphasis is on first rate works
of literature. We have included:
• publishers' remainders and
special editions •"hurt" books
from some of the finest publishers, at reduced prices
•a large selection of children's
books SALE ENDS NOV. 15th.
"LAST QUARTER OF
ANNIVERSARY YEAR"
featuring the old and
new-from pencils to
plot pens, pencil
sharpeners to electric
erasing machines, drawing boards to drafting
tables-ALL STAEDTLER PRODUCTS on
sale at 30% off. ONE DAY ONLY.
1835-1985
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 6 Tuesday, November 5, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Office occupation officially over
By KAREN GRAM
Canadian University Press
Vancouver students, inspired by
the Okanagan students' occupation
of premier Bill Bennett's Kelowna
office, demonstrated outside
universities minister Pat McGeer's
office, and Victoria students briefly
Books slow
By DEBBIE LO
Many reputable but less popular
books and journals wil disappear
from UBC library shelves in the
new year because of budget cuts.
The libraries were hoping for a
four per cent acquisitions budget increase this year to keep up with inflation which has driven book
prices up about eight per cent annually for the past few years.
The zero per cent increase in
the $3.75 million acquisitions budget
this year will limit the purchasing
power of the libraries and will force
the cancellation of several of its
least borrowed journals said head
librarian Doug Mclnnes:
The UBC library system's
budget is about $15 million per year
including the campus medical
libraries.
Mclnnes said they will conduct a
six month review of the current collection to identify the books and
journals least used.
He said some areas will see more
cuts than others but "every
discipline" will be affected, adding
fewer copies of popular titles could
make up the purchasing shortfall.
"It will affect the libraries most
seriously in 1986-87," he said.
He estimated the libraries need an
11 per cent acquisition budget increase next year to allow them to
keep up with the rising costs of
maintaining a current collection.
Campus libraries are not able to
meet the demand for materials in
new areas, especially interdisciplinary areas where new journals are published yearly, he said.
"The reduction affects the quality
of research and teaching."
He said it is important for universities to keep up with newly published information. "We can't do it
here when we're in the process of
eliminating."
UBC's reputation as a research
library in North America fell to
18th last year from fifteenth in
1982-83 based on figures from a
composite index of university
libraries.
UBC administration president
David Strangway, who replaced interim president Robert Smith Friday, said libraries are "absolutely
crucial to universities," adding
UBC's collection is "superb".
SFU head librarian Ken Dobb
could not be reached for comment.
Library acquisitions funding at
Capilano College has dropped from
$80,000 in recent years to $20,000
this year.
Langara College has been able to
maintain a modest book purchasing
budget, librarian head Linda Prince
has said.
occupied Bennett's Victoria office
last Friday.
The Okanagan college students
lifted their occupation Sunday
when it became obvious Bennett
would not agree to attend a public
forum on education.
About twenty students arrived
outside McGeer's office last Friday
to stage what one participant called
a "concern-in." But McGeer's staff
had been warned in advance and
locked all the doors.
"I think it is damned disgraceful
that even constituency secretaries
lock their doors to, students. It
shows a symbolic gesture that the
doors are closed to students," said
Tom Ewasiuk, student council
member at Simon Fraser University.
Ewasiuk said they were there to;
support the students in Kelowna.
He said they had the same demands
as the Kelowna students "because
the crisis is province-wide."
"The whole issue here is accountability. It's quite ludicrous to think
our elected official is not accountable to the people who elected
him."
Neither Bennett nor McGeer
have met with students in the past
four years.
In Victoria seven students
presented   a   brief   to   Bennett's
secretary urging the premier to ensure the safety of the Kelowna
students and grant a public meeting
on education.
Rosemin Keshvani, UVic student
council president, said the students
delivered the brief to the premier to
"make sure the government and the
people of B.C. know we are concerned for the safety of the students
at Okanagan College and to let
them know the premier should in
fact meet with his constituents in a
public meeting."
Keshvani said they were concerned for the Kelowna students safety
because of an alleged assault of a
demonstrator by a former director
of the constituency association.
The UVic students also sent a
telegram to the premier expressing
their support for the Kelowna
students.
In Kelowna, the students abandoned the occupation Sunday evening after six days "to allow our
MLA to reconsider the advice he
has received in regard to refusing a
public meeting."
"Part of the reason for lifting the
occupation is to relieve the pressure
on Bennett. It was clear while we
were there he was unable to make a
decision so we pulled out," said
Richard Bell, a student council
employee.
Ken Soehn, one of the protestors,
said they finally accepted Bennett's
offer to meet privately on Remembrance day, to set a date for a
public meeting. The students |had
originally refused the offer.
"We'll see what comes of it. If
our demands aren't met we're
prepared to do it again," he said.
Soehn said the students had to
(leave Bennett's office because a
guard posted at the door prevented
them from coming and going between classes. The guard allowed
students to leave but not to re-enter
the office.
"While a public meeting with
Mr. Bennett is important, the time
and effort put into our schooling
must take precedence."
Tickets clawed up
jt^*™
MEXICANS . . . cope with the earthquake.
angus fraser photo
UBC students lioned up for football tickets in SUB mane concourse
Monday morning, some of them for
more than an hour and a half.
Nearly 300 tickets had been sold
for the CFL western final after only
two and half hours on sale at the
AMS ticket centre. The B.C. Lions
will fight for a berth to the Grey
Cup with the winner of the Winnipeg and Edmonton game in two
weeks.
"The best seats are gone but
there are still seats available," said
ticket centre clerk Brenda Lee. "Its
going to sell out," Lee said.
The line up for tickets extended
from the ticket centre all the way to
the SUB doors for most of the morning.
"If I had missed a class, I'd be
way up there in the line-up," said
Hans Birker, science 4. Birker was
at the end of the line at 9:30 a.m.
"I have a class at 10:30, but
depending on how long it takes . . .
if I have to miss a class, so be it,"
said Martin DeJonge, arts 1. "All
you have to do is sacrifice food for
a week to buy tickets," DeJonge
said.
"I'm using my student loan to
buy tickets," said Mike Bouliere,
applied science 2.
"My parents are buying them for
me," said Sheila Branscombe, arts
3. Branscombe had been waiting for
an hour and a half before the ticket
centre opened. "I'm missing
classes," she said.
"The Bombers are going to come
here and win," said Murray Otter,
graduate studies. Otter had been
waiting an hour before the tickets
went on sale to buy two. "My
wife's supporting me," he said.
Lee said tickets would have sold
faster but the computer can only
work at a certain rate.
"Its always this way for football
games," Lee said. "Its probably the
most popular event," Lee said;
Mexican students further aid after 'quake
By ANGUS FRASER
Special to The Ubyssey
MEXICO CITY — Students
from Mexico City's high schools,
colleges and universities swarmed
into the most damaged districts to
play a major role in rescue efforts
following the major earthquakes
here two months ago.
Manuel Roman, a student leader
and ambulance driver said for the
first five days after the earthquake
about one million students aided
the rescue effort in districts such as
the Zona Rosa and Moreles to help
recover people buried in the rubble.
Instructors at the Autonomous
Technological Institute (ITAM) say
25 per cent of the school's students
are still working in the barrios
hardest hit by the quake. -
Warren O'Brian at Mexico City's
English language daily, The News,
saw the student effort start immediately after the quake hit.
"Within two hours of the first
shock a medical team had arrived
from the university to administer
first aid to the survivors. Two hours
later a team of student engineers
had arrived and began dismantling
ruptured gas lines and fallen
wires," said O'Brian. He added official government response didn't
arrive until later that evening.
With up to 70 per cent of all
government buildings collapsed or
too badly damaged to be habitable,
the government effort during the
first 36 hours after the quake was
almost non-existent in many parts
of the city, he said.
The government campaign to
promote a positive public image
despite the catastrophe further
hindered the public response, he
said.
It was not until the second quake
36 hours after the first that president de la Madrid conceded the
problems outstripped the governments resources.
In the barrio Tepito, known for
its poverty and black market, the
students have been almost solely
responsible for looking after the
people's medical needs, supplying
adequate drinking water and
sheltering the displaced.
To date the only signs of government presence in Tepito are a
military field hospital and fire
trucks dispensing water.
Keegstra kept from speaking in Lethbridge
LETHBRIDGE, Alta. (CUP) —
Because of objections from faculty
and threatening phone calls,
University of Lethbridge has
cancelled a seminar that was to have
featured Jim Keegstra, convicted of
promoting hatred against Jews.
U of L education professor Colin
Thomson said he invited Keegstra
to speak Oct. 18 to his class on
racism in Canada.
"I have a Keegstra file I use as a
textbook," Thomson said. "It
made sense to me to have him attend a class in person to be
challenged by the students."
Thomson said nearly 250 other
students and faculty wanted to at
tend the seminar so it was moved into a bigger hall. No media were to
attend and only the fifteen students
in the class would have been allowed to question Keegstra.
"I couldn't let Keegstra bring his
Neo-nazi philosophy here without
challenging it," said U of L
sociology professor Dean Frease,
spokesperson for the U of L ad hoc
Committee to Fight Racism.
"The whole format of the
seminar was bizarre," Frease said.
"We were to sit there for 75
minutes with no objections from
the audience. This would hav infringed on my freedom of speech."
U of L dean of education Eric
Molosch said Keegstra's visit was
strictly a class project.
"It was not an open forum for
Keegstra to spout his views,"
Mokosch said. "Keegstra would
have been questioned by the class.
We do not share his beliefs and the
class would have made that abundantly clear."
Frease said the seminar was a
perfect platform for Keegstra to expound his racist philosophy.
"I don't think Keegstra would
not spout his views," Frease said.
"If Thomson wanted to maintain a
classroom atmosphere he should
have limited it to a class instead of
renting a hall."
Thomson said he and his students
were threatened with physical harm
unless the seminar was cancelled.
"Anonymous phone calls can be
most unpleasant," Thomson said.
"One caller offered to burn a cross
in my front yard."
Thomson said he is disappointed
the seminar was cancelled.
"We lost a chance to do a real
public service," he said. "Apparently my students' intellectual
and academic courage is to be circumvented by a 'let's not ruffle
feathers' approach to learning and
teaching and to the pursuit of
truth."
Delores Campos, a literature student, said the government only
became involved in Tepito's plight
when the newspapers began criticizing the lack of any official visible
aid.
The residents of Tepito said the
government is deliberately depriving them of basic amenities such as
medical aid shelters, and drinkable
water to force them to move to
other districts.
On Friday, Oct. 12, the government announced a plan to
rehabilitate the rundown tenement
districts at the capital by replacing
them with new low-cost housing
units.
Argentinian doctor and local
hero Julio Rul (Rico), who arrived
in Mexico city a day after the first
earthquake said the medical
students who came to help had no
practical experience before the .earthquake.
Rico said the first rescue teams
were composed solely of students,
then the general practitioners to
deal with the immediate wounded,
and finally the psychologists to deal
with earthquake related mental .illnesses.
"They (the students) were very
well organized among themselves,"
he said.
At the Canadian Embassy in
■ Mexico city press officer Jean
Pierre Petit praised the student
body for their "organized and
diligent approach" to dealing with
the problems associated with the
earthquake. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 5, 1985
THE   UBYSSEY
Save the future
PagQrj
Events since 1945 show that not enough people
remember the holocaust during World War II which
saw at least six million Jews, three million Gypsies and
tens of millions of Russians and other innocent
civilians butchered.
Perhaps a little knowledge of history might have
prevented more recent horrors such as the murder of
nearly half of Cambodia's population during the
1970's.
The need for decent people to remember past
atrocities becomes even clearer when we see people
like Keegstra and Zundel trying to deny history entirely.
Holocaust awareness day on campus this Thursday,
Nov. 7 in the Scarfe building is vitally important
because a society that forgets its past is doomed to
repeat past mistakes.
Letters
Astrology has dark side
I find it fascinating that the advocates of last weeks feature article
on astrology can advise us with full
confidence that "it works, whether
you believe it or not''; and yet at the
same time emphatically state
"astrology is not a belief system,
but a symbol system for understanding our reality." Come on friends,
which is it? Can one really use
astrology in one's life and then say
"I don't really believe in it."
You can have the former without
the latter only if you are naive.
If you admit to and advocate the
use of astrology without
acknowledging the power source,
you are in the same position as
Hansel and Gretel at the witches
house. The treats are nice, but who
is this lady and why is she giving all
these nice treats to me?
Who is behind astrology? To not
ask the question is folly. This is
where authors Rasic and Stewart
leave the track. They are all for tapping into the supernatural world
with the naivete of a curious junior
high computer hack without realizing the network they are tuning into
has its origins in hell.
Historic Christianity acknowledges the reality of the supernatural world and the forces of
good and evil. Paul in his letter to
the  Christians  in  Ephesus  writes
about the battle against the spiritual
forces of wickedness and darkness.
Astrology is another door or entry
point into the supernatural world.
Before you walk through, do so
with your eyes open. The upbeat article on astrology would have us
believe it will improve the quality of
life and help us understand reality.
Realize that behind the pragmatic
hook of "it works", is the father of
lies, Satan himself.
A restored relationship with
Jesus Christ is the true blueprint of
the soul and as Christmas fast approaches, the wise still seek him.
Robert McKenzie
Inter Varsity Christian Fellowship
Tuition lottery Nov. 22
Attention all students!
The AMS Tuition Fee Lottery is
still on! The lottery has been held
over one month in order to raise
more money for the AMS Bursary
fund and prize money.
I understand the initial campaign
was not seen by many students, and
for this I apologize. But now, we
are planning to make sure most of
you know about it before the new
draw.
The draw is held every year in
order to raise money for the AMS
Bursary Fund. This fund provides
monies to needy students. At present, the lottery is one of the largest
contributors to the fund, that is
why we want to raise more money.
At the same time, a prize or prizes
of $1500.00 can be won by a student
who purchases a ticket. We even
have a trip for two to San Francisco
and other prizes for the individual
Agnostics arrogant
In response to Kent Moore's letter, Agnosticism saves marks (Nov..
1), I would like to expose the futility
of agnosticism.
The statement that "nothing is
known or can be known about the
existence of God" is simply absurd.
One would have to commit intellectual suicide to dismiss the empirical
and historical evidence for God.
Anyone who seeks God will find
him.
Agnostics seem to regard the Bible as a write-off as far as providing
any evidence for God, presumably
because its writers were biased. In a
court of law however, most
witnesses are biased yet their
testimony is not dismissed or even
necessarily false. The purpose of
cross examination is to test the
validity of the witness's testimony.
If the same procedure were applied
to the Bible and the New Testament
accounts   of   Jesus   Christ,   the
agnostic's presupposition would be
annihilated.
The agnostic's real problem is arrogant pride (we all have some) in
refusing to acknowledge God. She
is then left with the task of suppressing the truth. The agnostic is
the escapist by refusing to look life
and death straight in the eye. The
agnostic runs away from the facts
of the life, death and resurrection
of Jesus Christ — solid facts of
history, and buries his head in the
mundane; eating, sleeping, term
papers and finals. Too often death
comes unexpectedly and the gift of
eternal life, and personal relationship with God through Jesus Christ,
is forfeited forever. I beg you —
please don't let that happen.
I invite Kent and anyone else who
would like to discuss these things,
to stop by our club office in the
SUB, room 216E.
Kirk Durston
UBC campus crusade for Christ
or group who sells the most tickets.
It is the best way to support
needy students and at the same time
get an excellent chance to win
money for yourself.
Now that you know what the lottery is, here are the essentials you
should know aobut buying or selling tickets:
• tickets are only $ 1;
• You can buy as many as you
like;
• The tickets can be purchased
through the AMS Box Office, from
a booth on the concourse in SUB,
or from your undergraduate society;
• The draw date will be Friday
November 22nd at 12:30 in SUB;
• People who purchased tickets
for the October 26th draw should
hold on to their tickets! If they have
been thrown out, contact Jonathan
Mercer, AMS Vice President at
228-3092 for further information
(don't worry, you're still eligible to
win);
• If you wish to sell them, contact the same person as above;
• There are only 10,000 tickets,
so buy yours now!
The lottery is a great way to show
you   care,   so   buy   a   ticket   for
yourself or someone else, and invest
in the AMS Bursary Fund.
Good Luck!
Jonathan Mercer
AMS vice-president
THE UBYSSEY
November 5, 1985
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Friday throughout
the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff
and are not necessarily those of the administrataion or the
AMS. Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's
editorial office is SUB 241k. Editorial department,
228-2301/2305. Advertising 228-3977/3978.
Quiche. Let's make quiche crooned mysteriously scarved Karen Gram. A black wooly mouse with incredibly fuzzy whiskers vaguely resembling Jame Young squeaked, "with cheese too?" "Of course,"
said Erika Simpson who was too busy pushing papers to come to the dinner party that night. Norm
Rawin also missed the event. He was busy watching a lesson in preventative senility. Steve Kontic the
newman with the new beard waltzed in and out smiling, unlike Charlie Brown. Gordanna Rasic felt the
conversation at the event was too dull and left for more interesting company at the bus loop. .Debbie
Lo apologized profusely for beinglate and late again. Joel Silverman and Sarah Millin avoided the
whole affair to plan for higher political aspirations. Angus Fraser called "Simon" and as always
Stephen Wisenthal was quick to respond with a yeees. Lise Magee's green eyes enticed the crowd to
enjoy the rum cheesecake. Pqrst.
NOT SINCE: ORSON WELLES PANICKED
AMERICA WiTH HIS 1938 RfitDIO BROADCAST OF "WAR OF THE WORLDS" HAS
THERE B&N ANYTHING, LIKE IT.
A COMIC STRIP PUBLISHED IN A VANCOUVER
NEWSPAPER LAST MONTH SENT HUNDREDS
SCRAMBLING TO THEIR PHONES TO DETERMINE
WHETHER THE UBC MESON FACILITY COULD
TRIGGER GLOBAL NUCLEAR WAR £Y ACCIDENTALLY
LETTING- URANIUM-23S UNDERGO NUCLEDR PE7W-
AT/ON,
ALTHOUGH THE COMIC STRIPS INTENT HAD
CLEARLY BEEN TO CRITICIZE THE ONTARIO
CENTRALIZED NEWS COVERAGE OF THJS PROGRAM, ITS AMAZING EFFECT WAS TO PROVIDE
THE UBC MESON FACILITY WITH MORE TELEPHONE INQUIRIES IN THREE WEEKS THAN IT
NORMALLY y^^ , , , %
Receives in     6ry\       MJ^
PROFESSIONAL ANALYSTS THEORIZE THAT THE
FEAR OF GLOBAL DESTRUCTION IS NOW SO
STRONG AMONG MANY PEOPLE THAT EVEN AN
OBVIOUSLY RIDICULOUS STATEMENT IN A
COMIC STRIP CAN TRIGGER THEM INTO ■
ACTUALLY PICW&UP THEIR PHONES AND..
ANP..AND..       /^aV
Caj^    "
INACyCLoTrW.
OH MY GOD!  OID YOU READ THIS
weekend's "bloom county*?!
in two months halley's comet
will collide with the earth and
DESTROy^CIV/LlZAT/ON.'
WE'RE ALL
DOOMED i
FOR HEAVEN'S SAKE FEEL FREE TO PHONE
THE UBC ASTRONOMY DEPARTMENT AND DEMAHD
MORE INFORMATION I THE NUMBER 'S ON YOUR
SCREEN.      ~~~
TVE      \
GOTTA GO
CHARTER
A SPACE
SHUTTLE
CALL NOW-
228-2217
AND WE JUST
GOT THE NEW
U0URMACSET
LAST WEEK...
fOrT|   THE/tig" J.Q.-.2 MOUTHS f
t
Union president fears drastic university downsizing
I would like to take this,opportunity to reply to the
letter from Steve McJannet published in the Ubyssey,
Tues., Oct. 29, 1985.
Your position appears to be one of narrow self-
interest and fundamental contradiction. You state
you are very concerned about the lack of funds made
available to the University by the Social Credit
Government, and the erosion of services this policy
of restraint has brought about, and will continue to
bring about. Massive lay-offs will not, I assure you,
cause any improvement in the servicing of students,
or to use your phrase, the 'raison de'etre' of the
education system. (I will ignore your rather trite
remark about the nature of 'union work' — 'three
men on a hoe', etc. — as this perhaps is rooted in an
unwillingness or inability to deal with the world outside the safe confines of banal cliche and simple prejudice.)
Although at some point you do seem to recognize
the true source of the problem, you have chosen to
place the blame on a specific group which, alone,
hasn't the power to fundamentally change the situation. This, I think, is a very convenient (and
somewhat cowardly) way of letting yourself off the
hook. I applaud my fellow CUE members the
courage of their convictions in working to rule and
bringing this intolerable state of affairs out into the
open.
Our union has made an attempt to cooperate with
the University Administration with regards to the 'efficiency study' now being conducted by the
American company Ritchie and Associates since that
company first set foot on this campus. We have been
hoodwinked as to the purpose of the study, and the
methods employed in carrying it out. We view this
exercise as not only and isolated problem that we
must address, but one which we recognize as a symptom of a much more far-reaching and dehumanized
system of control. I will not go into greater detail
here, as this has been covered at some length in this
newspaper — but, we find difficulty with the fact
that the University Administration has cited 'inability to pay' under the Compensation Stabilization Program guidelines when we demand payment of already
agreed upon incremental increases, when what could
amount to $4 million can be found to pay Ritchie and
Associates. The Administration has told us that this
study will not necessarily cause layoffs, and if jobs
go, they will attempt to accomplish it through attrition, etc.
We have asked that this be guaranteed in writing.
The university has refused. The administration has
already cut back staff (both through attrition and
non-filling of funded positions) however, the volume
of workhas not decreased, as is abundantly clear, for
example, in the Payroll Dept. — there are two
reasons why people (particularly students) are not being paid on time — staff cutbacks, and now, the 'efficiency' study being conducted in that area. The
greatly increased workload — and the consequent
amount of overtime worked — coupled with the barbaric and archaic nature of the study have literally
made the employees ill. Is this necessary? Is this productive?
Would it not be better for us all to perhaps use our
collective energies to combat the Socred's education
policies — rather than passively accepting it, as both
the University Administration and students seem to
be doing? As stated in an article The Sun (Friday,
Oct. 25/85 pg. 1) there is now a great deal of public
support for criticism and change. Why is the UBC
student body so silent? — Even junior high school
students are actively protesting the government's
policies. As you stated "the quality of our education
is suffering here and now" — the reduction in services that will result from the apparent direction the
university administration has chosen to take will not
lead to better quality education in the Province.
Quite the opposite — my fear is that this University
will be downsized to such an extent that the level of
scholarship now available to students will disappear
entirely and that university education will be nothing
more than 'job training'. Is that what university level
education is? Is that what we want it to be? Do we
want education made available to the narrow segment of society who can 'pay their own way'? Believe
it or not, 'union people', as you call us, have children
too and want them to have a future in this'province
— let's be very clear about what the real issues are
here.
In closing, may I say I welcome an open forum in
which one can freely express one's opinion.
However, I do feel it is one's responsibility to base
those opinions upon complete and unbiased information. In that spirit, if you should need any further information, please feel free to contact me or the CUE
office.
Kitty Byrne
president,
Canadian University Employees
Consul's letter defends injustices
I was delighted to see a response
to the Philippine consul general's
letter in Tuesday's Ubyssey,
Privileged Del Mundo mixes
Filipino issue. The Filipino or
Filipina who wrote this is clearly
well informed, and deals with the
problems of the Philippine situation
in a very responsible way.
Speaking as a Canadian who has
recently returned from an extended
visit to that country, I think there is
yet more to be said about the consul
general's letter. It reminded me of
statements that came out regularly
in the government controlled press,
damning the protestors by insinua-,
tion without making direct accusations that could be countered.
Some of those insinuations need
to countered, however. Del Mundo
says "many student demonstrators
with clenched fists . . . were
iconoclasts who knocked down all
that stood for the establishment but
had no constructive alternatives to
present." The original article reported the visit of a representative of the Student Christian
Movement of the Philippines. That
group, along with most of the rest
of the "militant legal opposition",
is a member of a very broadly based
umbrella organization (called
BAY AN) that does in fact suggest a
very detailed program of alternatives. It is BAYAN that now coordinates all the major demonstrations nationally, and groups
belonging to BAYAN are bound to
its program. To say that the opposition as a whole presents no constructive alternatives is nonsense.
Another insinuation Del Mundo
makes is about statistics. She suggests that because the source is not
named, they cannot be trusted. She
further goes on to offer a handful
of cases which seem to suggest that
the statistics have been exaggerated,
or that the only people arrested and
imprisoned are violent. Two can
play at that game, and although I
could name just as many cases of
gross injustice off the top of my
head, that would not prove my
point any better than it proves hers.
Statistics can be used to prove many
things, and must be treated
cautiously.
For that reason, it seems to be appropriate to look at the interpretations of well respected human rights
organizations which make it their
business to look at these issues
responsibly. Certainly the statistics
your reporter quoted are consistent
with those I have seen in Amnesty
International publications, as well
as those of respected monitoring
organizations in the Philippines
themselves. Even Ms. Del Mundo
never refutes them directly.
The fact is "disappearances" and
extrajudicial executions are happening daily in the Philippines; this
happens to non-violent advocates
of human rights who oppose the
government (such as the priest
Father Romano, an important
BAYAN official); and for all the
government rhetoric the situation
seems to be growing worse, rather
than better.
Another typical tactic of the Marcos government is to justify the
violence by saying that the only
alternative  is  communism.   From
A*
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604-224-2441
this distance it is easy to believe that
kind of generalization, and the
Marcos government would encourage it in order to keep itself in
power. There are indeed communists present in the Philippines,
but the vast majority of the opposition — even in the underground army, according to its statements
which have been published abroad
— are merely concerned citizens
from a broad spectrum of political
persuasions. The options are
neither as limited nor as threatening
as the Marcos government would
have us believe; they cannot justify
their violence that way.
I think the most dangerous insinuation of them all, however, is in
Del Mundo's final comment; that
because the differences between our
culture and theirs are so great, we
are unable to make an informed
decision. Essentially, she tells us to
mind our  own  business,  and let
them mind theirs.
But it is our business. She talks
eloquently of "the years of struggle
to wrest our economy from the grip
of foreign control" without
acknowledging that we are the controllers. Furthermore, the fact
human beings are arrested, killed,
or "disappeared" this way is an offence against humanity itself. It is
not that we need to go in and sblve
their problems for them, but rather,
that we need to understand the part
we are playing in creating and maintaining those problems.
There is a supporting role for us
to play right here in Canada,
without ever challenging the
sovereignty or independence of the
Filipino people. Perhaps we indeed ought to be minding our t>wn
business a little more.
Stephen Fetter
VST 3
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736-3388 Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 5,1985
(/y/&ti
TODAY
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration for fall term of classes, noon, SUB
208.
UBC SPORTS CAR CLUB
General meeting and movies, 7 p.m., SUB 211.
NATIVE LAW PROGRAM
Series   of   lectures,    noon,    Curtis   Building
101/102.
MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY
Slide shows talk on the Stein Valley,  noon,
Museum of Anthropology, Theatre Gallery.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Practice, noon, party room and 12-5 p.m., SUB
ballroom.   *
UKRAINIAN STUDENTS CLUB
General meeting (new members welcome) and
discussion of Whistler weekend, noon, SUB 224.
NETWORK
David Kilgour M.P., on "Human Rights Violations in U.S.S.R.", 12:40 p.m., SUB 212.
Shades of Orwell ...
The biggest dailies
might have colour cartoons of Nancy and
fTlary Worth, but they
wouldn't give you this.
For free yet.
Karen Gram, B.C.
bureau chief and
fieldworker for Cana^
dian University Press,
will present a seminar,
"The Politics of
Language", on
Wednesday, Nov. 6 at
noon in SUB 241K.
fill Ubyssey staffers
and prospective journalist types welcome.
We need news and
feature writers,
graphic artists,
photographers and
that rare breed willing
to help put the paper
to bed in the wee
hours.
The University of British Columbia
FREDERIC
WOOD
THEATRE
presents
LOVE
FOR LOVE
by William Congreve
Directed by Arne Zaslove
NOVEMBER 6-16
x iffii'i mmii
4 —Special Previews-
J      NOV. 6th & 7th
i    2 for the price of 1
*    regular admission
nimnmnii
Curtain: 8 p.m.
Student Tickets: $4.50
Box Office    Room 207
FREDERIC WOOB THEATRE
Support Your
Campus Theatre
UNDERWATER HOCKEY
Drop in game, 7 p.m., UBC Aquatic Centre.
UBC PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVE CLUB
Special speaker, noon, SUB party room.
JSA/HILLEL
Hot lunch, noon, Hillel House.
UBC ENTREPRENEURS CLUB
General meeting, noon, Angus 226.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Letter writing campaign, noon, SUB 237A.
CIRCLE K
General meeting, noon, BUCH D351.
WEDNESDAY
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Aerobics,   5:30-6:30  p.m.,   SUB   basement   1,
Plaza South.
FILM SOCIETY
Film: Russ Meyer's "Beyond the Valley of the
Dolls"    -    rated   X,    7:30-9:30   p.m.,    SUB
Auditorium.
NDP CLUB
Rosemary Brown:  The Decline of Social  Services, noon, BUCH D121.
INTEGRITY IN ACTION
John   Stubbs:   "The   East-West   Connection,"
noon, BUCH B221.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Practice, noon, SUB party room.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Gallery night, 4:30 p.m., Gallery Lounge.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration for fall term, noon, SUB 208.
ANARCHIST CLUB
Meeting, noon, SUB 224.
INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS STUDENTS
ASSOC.
Office   hours,   11:30-12:30   p.m..   International
House, main floor.
THURSDAY
CHRISTIANS ON CAMPUS
Bake sale and fellowship, noon, Angus 328.
TEACHING ASSISTANTS' UNION
Workshops with Dr. Walter Boldt, 1-2:15 p.m.,
Grad Centre, 2nd.floor lounge.
CO-OPERATIVE EDUCATION
Information meeting for first year engineering.
students,   noon,   Computer   Science   Building,
room 200.
FILM SOCIETY
Film:   "A   Passage   to   India,"   7   p.m.,   SUB
Auditorium.
STAMP CLUB
Stamp talk, noon, upstairs International House.
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB
General meeting, new members welcome, noon,
HEBB 12.
UBC MARXIST-LENINIST STUDY GROUP
Discussion, noon, BUCH B223.
JSA/HILLEL AND NETWORK
Holocaust   Awareness    Day,    programs   from
12:30-9:30 p.m., Scarfe Building.
AMS WOMEN'S CENTRE
Free   films:   Speaking   Our   Peace   and   Rub-
blewomen, noon. Woodward IRC 4.
GREAT LAW TRIALS
ON THE SILVER SCREEN
"To Kill a  Mockingbird,"  noon.  Law Faculty
Building, room 101/102.
PUNCHLINES!!
Tomorrow — Wednesday
November 6 — 12:30 p.m.
SUB AUDITORIUM - FREE
•••••••••••••••••••••-a-****
UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
FACULTY OF DENTISTRY
DENTAL EMERGENCY CLINIC
J. B. Mcdonald Building, 2199 Wesbrook Mall
Clinic Hours:
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday 1:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Thursday   9:30 a.m. to 12:00 Noon
Phone for appointment: 228-2112
After Hours:
Go to the Emergency Department of the Health Sciences Center
Hospital at 2211 Wesbrook Mall.
VI
CPcAifrfflusicalfy Speaking
THE VANCOUVER SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
Rudolf Barshai, Music Director and Principal Conductor
presents        RUDQLF
BARSHAI
Conductor
ALEXIS
WEISSENBERG
Pianist
ERIC MCLEAN Hs
Saturday, Nov. 9    8:30 p.m.
Monday, Nov. 11    7:30 p.m.
THE ORPHEUM
Programme:
Symphony No. 1 Brahms
Piano Concerto No. 3
Rachmaninoff
Sponsored by      CDASr [?
TICKETS NOW! at allVTC and CBOOutlets, Eaton's, Woodward's
(VTC and Orpheum service charges applicable)
$8 to $28-1 /3 off for students and seniors
TO CHARGE BY PHONE: 280-4444 Eaton's, MasterCard, Visa
NEXT CONCERT BY THE VS0-THE JUBILEE SERIES
Sunday, Dec. 1, ,2:30 p.m. — Monday, Dec. 2, 8:30 p.m.
Tuesday, Dec. 3, 7:30 p.m.
Rudolf Barshai, Conductor    Cecile Ousset, Pianist
Music by Liadov, Prokofiev, Stravinsky
Tickets at all VTC Outlets — $8 to $27.50
(VTC and Orpheum service charges applicable)
UBC DANCE CLUB
Thursday bronze class, noon, SUB Ballroom.
EAST INDIAN STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Bowling night, 7 p.m., SUB bowling.
ENVIRONMENT INTEREST GROUP
Lecture   on   fisheries   policy   in   B.C.,   nooi
Geography room 212.
PRE-DENTAL SOCIETY
Dental students lecture, noon, IRC 5.
FIRST YEAR STUDENTS COMMITTEE
General meeting, noon, SUB 260.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Meeting, noon. International House Lounge.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration for fall term of classes, noon, SUB
208.
UBC ANARCHIST CLUB
Meeting, noon, SUB 237.
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
Meeting, noon, Brock 302.
INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS STUDENTS
ASSOCIATION
Office hours, noon, International House, main
floor,
INTERVARSITY CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Lecture on Romans, noon, CHEM 2501.
I-THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional
lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $4.50 additional lines, .70c. Additional days, $4.00 and .65c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the
day before publication.
—-"—
Charge Phone Orders over $10.00. Call228-3977.
COMING EVENTS
• ••••••••••••••••••"A-*******
t *
% NEW YORK SELTZER presents.{
*
20 - HOUSING
MORE THAN JUST A PLACE TO LIVE.
Conversation, comradeship & more, participation in campus activities. We've just
renovated & still serve the best food on
campus. Come look us over. Sigma Chi
house, 5725 Agronomy R. Room & board
on campus. 224-3381.
ATTRACTIVE SUITE west of Dunbar, 1
br,, $350 incl. telephone & utilities. Ph.
228-1256 or 687-6637 (office).
25 - INSTRUCTION
LEARN TO FLY. Personal flight instruction,
private commercial sight-seeing. Call Allen
734-2977.
30 - JOBS
PERSON NEEDED TO WALK DOG around
noon hour. 12th & Sasamat area. 228-9841.
EXPERIENCED BABYSITTER for 2 children
in my home. References needed. 224-0287.
AVERAGE $50 PER HOUR.Outgoing
responsible performers to deliver Stip-A-
Grams in Vancouver area. Exc. pay Effun.
Car req'd. No nudity. 224-6633.
CP   HOTELS   CHATEAU   LAKE   LOUISE
is now taking applications for Xmas
employment. Positions available from Dec.
20 to Jan, 5. Please send resume 8- letters
of reference to peisonnel office Chateau
Lake Louise, Lake Louise, Alberta, T0L 1E0.
40 - MESSAGES
CHANCELLOR BOULEVARD ACCIDENT.
Would the student on the bicycle who
withnessed a red MGB sports car go off the
road Thurs., Oct. 31, 11:30 a.m. please
contact Lynn, 224-4102 or 273-6606.
BILLY. DONT LOSE MY NUMBER! It's
228-3811 and we are VOLUNTEER CONNECTIONS. If you do lose the number,
come to Brock Hall 200.
YOU: Br. hair, bl. eyes, plaid skirt, arms
full, late for Wed. 2:30 class, 3rd floor
Buch. Me: Br. hair and eyes, glasses, red
sweater, held door for you. You're the most
appealing thing since clam 8- garlic pizza. I
hope to hold doors for you again someday.
70 - SERVICES
DOUBLE DATE
ADVENTUROUS! Discover Doubledate.
You Fj- a friend, with someone else & a
friend. A friendly foursome having fun.
Hot Air Ballooning, Texas BBQs, Boat
Cruises.
736-4444
GREAT MEALS ON CAMPUS.
Nutrition with flavour & variety, prepared
by a camp cook. Eat at the Sigma Chi
Fraternity House those evenings when you
just have to get caught up on studies &
home is too far away. 5725 Agronomy
Road. 224-3381. Call the cook at noon & let
him know that you're coming to dinner!
30T A PROBLEM? Need to talk? Drop by
SPEAKEASY on SUB Concourse or ph.
228-3700. Confidential, anonymous.
70 - SERVICES
ACADEMIC   WOMEN'S   ASSOCIATION
November Meeting — Report on Nairobi
by June Lythgoe and Jane Gaskell
November 6th. 12:30 Buchanan 316
Everyone Welcome.
11 - FOR SALE - Private
'76 DODGE ASPEN station wagon, Exc. running cond. New tires. Perfect students car.
$1900 obo. 922-5318 eves.
SKI BOOTS for sale, size 10-11. Koflach
CE Racing, used 6x last year. Any offers?
Call Doug 738-6488.
1972 MG MIDGET, looks great and runs
great! Light blue, lots of new parts. $2500.
Call Steve 224-9700.
'73 VEGA Htbk. For $350 obo. Rusty but
runs. Leave name and number with person
at 224-9720.
RECYCLE
All metals — jars — bottles — newspapers
7 days a week til 6 p.m. 327-2315.
80 - TUTORING
TUTORING IN
ENGLISH
Private Assistance for students
at all levels.
W.S. Parker, B.A., M.A.
733-4534
85 - TYPING
WORD    PROCESSING    SPECIALIST.    U
write, we type theses,  resumes,  letters,
essays. Days, evgs., wknds. 736-1208.
WORD WEAVERS - Word Processing.
(Bilingual) Student rates. Fast turnaround.
5670 Yew St. at 41 St. Kerrisdale 266-6814.
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST. 30 years experience. Student rates. Photocopier.
Dorothy Martinson, 228-8346.
UNIVERSITY TYPING-Word processing.
Papers, theses, resumes, letters, P-U & del.
9 a.m.-11 p.m. 7 days/wk. 251-2064.
WORD PROCESSING (Micoml. Theses
rate, $1.50/dbl. sp. pg. Tables & equations
(Chem., Engineering, etc.) at $14/hr.
201-636 W. Broadway. 876-5333 IJeeva).
WORDPOWER-Editing, proofing & word
processing professionals. Xerox copies,
student rates. 3737 W. 10th Ave. (at Alma)
222-2661.
EXPERT TYPING: Essays, t. papers, fac-
tums, letters, mscpts, resumes, theses.
IBM Sel II. Proofreading. Reas. rates. Rose
731-9857,224-7351.
JUDITH FILTNESS, quality typist. 3206
West 38th Avenue. 263-0351.
EXPERT essay, theses typing from legible
wk. Spelling/grammar corrected. 738-6829,
10 a.m.-9 p.m. King Ed. bus ne.
TYPING/WORD PROCESSING. Experienced typist. Reasonable rates. Call
Mari-lou, 421-0818 (near Lougheed Mall).
MINIMUM NOTICE REQUIRED. Essays &
resumes, 222-4661 (before 1 p.m.) 732-0529
(5-7 p.m.).
TYPING &■ W/P: Term papers, theses,
mscpts., essays, tech. equa., letters,
resumes. Bilingual. Clemy 266-6641.
MY WORD! (PROCESSING) on IBM-PC +
(hard drive). 12th Ave. & Commercial. Call
Kerry Rigby: 876-2895.
TYPING/WORD PROCESSING. Experienced typist. Reasonable rates. Call
Mari-lou, 421-0818 (near Lougheed Mall).
NORTH VANCOUVER. Fast service, carefull
atten. to academic detail, $1.40 dbl. space
page. 985-4929.
EXPERT WORDPROCESSING - Fast and
accurate. Rachel. 731-1970.
PDQ WORD PROCESSING. Essays,
theses, letters, resumes. Days,
eves./wknds. Quick turnaround, stud,
rates. 731-1252.
TYPING & WORDPROCESSING. Special
student rates. Efficiency guaranteed. Call
Gail at 732-8311 or 266-2879.
WORD PROCESSING/TYPING. Student
rates. Ideal for students on North Shore.
Days, eves., weekends. 985-8890.
FOR
FAST RESULTS
USE
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED Tuesday, November 5, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
By ERIK A SIMPSON
About 50,000 trees are felled
every day to supply paper for the
Thomson Empire's newspapers.
The Thomson Company and the
Southan Company are two giant
corporations bent on carving up
Canada's newspaper businesses between them: In terms of newspapers
owned Thomson ranks first in
Canada, and second in the United
States. Annual revenue from the
Thomson Empire totaled more than
$8 billion in 1983, giving it the fifth
highest revenue among Canadian
companies. The Empire is on a par
with companies like General Foods,
Xerox, and Pepsi Co; and considerably ahead of firms like Coca-
Cola, Johnson & Johnson, and
General Motors.
How many companies do Roy
Thomson, and his son and successor Kenneth, control?
How did Roy Thomson make it
from unsuccessful radio salesman
to Canada's wealthiest man and a
Lord in England's Parliament?
The Thomson Empire, by Susan
Goldenberg (Methuen Publications,
Toronto, 1984) digs into every cranny of International Thomson
Organizations Ltd.
ITOL has established itself with
interests in oil and gas, book selling, travel agencies, and defence industries.
Long chains of ownership are
painstakingly detailed. For example, the story is told of how Simpsons was sold to Zellers, Zellers was
sold to the Bay, and the Bay was
sold to ITOL. Goldenberg also explains how ITOL acquired its
newspapers including the Globe and
Mail, the Ottawa Journal, the Winnipeg Free Press, the Lethbridge
Herald, the Victoria Times, the
Daily Colonist, the Vancouver Sun,
and the Vancouver Province. (Later
the Sun and Province were sold to
Southam Inc.) She also examines
the frequent labor disputes and
scandals including the incident in
1980 when with no advance notice
Thomson shut down the Ottawa
Journal.
Goldenberg's lengthy book
reveals the Empire has many contradictions. "Decentralization and
entrepeneurship are encouraged yet
executives are under the strain of
having to work out budgets to the
last four decimal points." Writes
Golderberg, this restrain, she says,
generates caution rather than
risktaking.
There are some surprises. For example, 80% of ITOL's profits
come, not from newspapers, but
from holdings in North Sea Oil.
And one can't help being astonished Canadians tolerate Thomson
takeovers when the Chairman of
the Royal Commission on
Newspapers, Thomas Kent comments "Nobody at Thomson cares
about newspapers — they're run by
accountants whose common
criterion is the bottom line."
Goldenberg is adept at documenting the Thomson's family's gigantic interests. But she flags when she
tries to pinpoint the characteristics,
experiences, and strokes of luck
which helped make "this little man
.with glasses as thick as the bottom
of glass jars" become a Canadian
magnate.
Goldenberg proffers snippets
about Thomson — for example,
ihomson would celebrate buying
another paper over a hamburger at
MacDonalds and he carried his own
luggage to escape tipping porters.
But Goldenberg never adequately
explains why suddenly, between
the age of 50 and 76, Thomson
managed to become a business
phenomena.
The reader's curiosity is whetted
But we never find out very much
about the man who once said: "For
enough money I'd work in hell."
Atwood intriguing
MARGARET ATWOOD . . . critical acclaim gets better.
Thomson tale only
whets appetite
By NORM RAW IN
Margaret Atwood is one of
Canada's cultural trophies. While
such authors as Leonard Cohen and
Irving Layton are criticized for
"getting religion" or "getting
senile," Atwood seems to be just
'getting better."
There is something in her writing
that satisfies the Canadian reader's
image of herself, and the international reader's image of the Canadian. There is something unsettling
about that sort of sweeping accep-
lance.
Before her name had been uttered from the stage of the Frederic
Wood Theatre last Friday, Atwood
had won the crowd. Her talk was
concerned with the state of Canadian literature, but from the joy
that the audience gained from her
rather personal way of discussing
the subject, most of her listeners appeared to be concerned with
Margaret Atwood.
Atwood is an unusual figure on
the Canadian literary scene. Her
books are discussed academically as
well as being popular successes. She
is brash and politically-minded but
she does not seem to offend. She
has been accepted both in Canada
and abroad as a major literary
figure, and there is an earnestness
about this acceptance that suggests
that it will endure.
She is an intriguing spokesperson
then, for the Canadian literary
community in its struggle to retain
its identity.
The focus of Atwood's talk was
on a book she wrote in 1972 called
Survival. As an organized critical
study of Canadian literature it was
unique. Even Northrop Frye, who
had offered Canada's contribution
to the critical cannon, managed to
write his classical — The Anatomy
of Criticism (1957) — without mentioning a single Canadian text. Frye
published a collection of essays on
Canadian literature shortly before
Survival appeared, but the essays
were not directly related to one
another, and there was no effort
made at creating a "context" in
which to understand Canadian
literature.
The relationship between
literature and criticism is a shaky
one. Atwood claims success for
Survival, suggesting that it did help
to popularize/and legitimize Cana
dian writing. But she is ultimately
skeptical, fearing that the character
of the Canadian cultural community might be lost if it is ignored. Her
image of the paralyzed artist —
unable to produce without an audience — is a striking one. It is with
this point that her position as a
cultural critic and her experience as
an author fuse to create a valuable
perspective.
Literary criticism in Canada
makes sense when it is linked with
cultural criticism, because the notion of our urge to submerge
ourselves in other cultures is a
longstanding concern. Atwood opposes this urge without being
chauvinistic. She is interested in the
way that cultures interact, but she
emphasizes that with no distinct national cultures there can be no interaction.
In this land of supposed doubts
and indifferences about art, a plea
for respect for the writer is striking
when it comes from Margaret Atwood. She has gained both respect
and popularity as a writer, and
possibly her fortune sets her a
special place from which to judge
the society that has chosen her.
Visit The
Ubyssey
SUB 241k
Applications
are now
being accepted for
five (5) positions with the
STUDENT
ADMINISTRATIVE
COMMISSION
(SAC)
SAC is the 10 member body of the AMS
responsible for implementing policy set
forth by AMS Students' Council.
Applications open  until Wed.,  Nov.  13,  4 p.m.
Application forms available/returned at SUB 238
TELEVISION
Join us lor a
live audience taping 01
Downtown Saturday Night
starring Pat Bullard!
You'll get
rock music, real guests,
mega comedy, dumb
contests, silly prizes
and a talking host.
Tickets are Free!!
(Tax included.)
For this good time call
662-6603-or visit
CBC Reception at
700 Hamilton Street.
ft
^SATURDAY
N-1 -S-'H T
is broadcast
Saturdays at 9:30 pm, on
CBC 2/Cable 3 ,;£$:. Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 5, 1985
Field hockey season ends sadly
The Canadian university field
hockey championships were held in
Toronto this past weekend and
UBC's women fared worse than
many had hoped.
Low scoring results in their first
two matches in Friday's pool play
knocked the Thunderbirds out of
championship contention early in
the national championships and
coach Gail Wilson's team was forced to content themselves with a 2-0
victory  over   Dalhousie  to  finish
fifth out of six teams. The University of Toronto Blues ended up
defeating the University of New
Brunswick by a 1-0 margin to mark
the first time in four years the national title has been out of British
Columbia. Last year the University
of Victoria Vikettes won the title.
In UBC's first game they played
to a scoreless draw with the third
ranked York University Yeowomen
despite outplaying them and then
lost a crucial contest to the Univer
sity of New Brunswick Reds (1-0)
which all but sealed their fate. With
only the top two teams in the pool
making the semi-final and UNB
already ahead of UBC and York,
UNB and York proceeded to play
to a scoreless draw where both
teams were content to play a defensive game which allowed them to
rest up for the semi-final rounds
while ensuring that they edge UBC
for the pool's only two playoff
spots.
Unfortunately, the weekend's
results will provide little consolation
for a young Thunderbird team over
the winter months. Regardless, such
honours as winning the Canada
West title away from the University
of Victoria, beating the Vikettes
soundly three weeks ago by a score
of 3-0 and fending off a challenge
from a rising University of Calgary
squad will be very important as
season highlights.
Soccer 'Birds win
The Thunderbird soccer team
defeated the Laurentian University
Voyageurs by a 3-2 score Saturday.
With the win UBC advances to the
CIAU national final against the
Concordia University Stingers.
Laurentian drew first blood in
the opening half when Dave Ten-
nant headed home the first of two
goals. Kevin Reilly tied the game up
by halftime but Tennant again
scored what looked like the winning
goal at the 67th minute. However,
UBC fought back and first year
player Gregor Young got the
equalizer five minutes later.
The winning goal by Kevin Reilly, who has been the team's leading
scorer, was the result of some fine
footwork by Mike Malana who had
been dazzling the Voyageurs with
his ball control skills all game long.
He passed a through ball to Reilly
who deked the Lautentian goalie to
find himself with an open net, into
which he promptly deposited the
ball. The 'Birds defence then shut
down a fierce Laurentian comeback
until the final whistle.
"We were very lethargic in the
first half and let (Laurntian) control
and dictate the play in the
midfield," said UBC coach Joe
Johnson after the game. However,
after adding some strategic changes
for the second half, UBC took control of the match, he said.
In the nets, Brian Kennedy made
four saves while allowing two goals
(the most he has given up all
season) for UBC while Laurentian
goalie Paolo Toscana allowed three
goals on ten shots. Overall, a strong
and hustling young Ontario squad
almost overcame UBC's superior
skills due to a slow start by the
Thunderbirds. UBC will have to get
off to a fast start on Saturday afternoon against Concordia or else they
may find themselves behind the
eight ball once again. Game time
this Saturday afternoon is 2 p.m. at
O.J. Todd field by the traffic and
security office. Admission to the
final is free for UBC students.
CafrMfM
A POET
A WRITER
A COFFEE
DRINKER
NOW A FRENCH
CAFE
Alma at 5th
732-1454
10 a.m.-10 p.m., Tues.-Thurs.
10 a.m.-11 p.m., Fri.-Sun.
Jackets, pants
hats & deck boots
SPECIRLTIES
UE5T
4564 W. 10th Ave.
university gates
228-1112
A WINNING SEASON is just what the doctor ordered as UBC medical
student Jonathan Pirie is one of many standouts on the UBC soccer team
going to the national finals this weekend.
Footballers beat American opposition
The UBC football club administered a good old fashioned
31-0 whipping to Montana on
Saturday evening in Bute.
The 'Birds started scoring in the-
exhibition match when Jordan
Gagner and receiver Mike Bellefon-
taine connected on a 17 yard pass at
1:35 of the second quarter. Gagner
and Bellefontaine combined again
at 11:45 of the same quarter on a 27
yard pass.
Matt Pearce made the score 24-0
at 4:04 of the third quarter on a 1
yard run. Then Terry Cochrane
closed out the scoring on a run at
14:21 as there was no scoring in the
fourth quarter.
Running back Matt Pearce had
another exceptional performance
carrying the ball 26 times for a total
of 165 yards. Fullback Mass
Geremia did well to compliment
with 14 rushes and 121 yards.
UBC had 23 first downs in the
game compared to 11 for the op
position. The 'Birds amassed 275
yards rushing to Montana's 78 and
210 yards passing with only 88 for
the home team.
Bypassing all the silly permutations and combinations UBC must
either win or tie Calgary to make
the playoffs. The game will be
broadcast beginning at 11:45 Saturday morning on CITR 102FM
(Cable 100).
Cross country
running 'Birds
placo wall
Ed Booth, riding a wave of success throughout the cross-country
season, dazzled with a 3rd place
finish at the Canada West crosscountry meet Saturday in Victoria.
The field was one of the deepest
seen in many years at the Conference meet so Booth's time of
31:03 over the 10km course was
outstanding. Carey Nelson of the
Vikes broke the field open with one
km remaining. He was pursued by
his teammate Keith Butler and
Booth. Nelson won in 30:40 with
Butler second .5 seconds ahead of
Booth.
UBC assistant coach Paul
Williams said, "Ed showed a lot of
poise when it was evident that the
two Vikes were helping one
another."
Booth's third place finish
qualifies him for the CIAU Crosscountry Championships in Sherbrooke Nov. 9. The men's team was
followed by Joel Siverman 32:11
(15th), Oein Fehy 32:16 (17th),
Larry Nightengale 33:21 (31st),
Scott Kent 34:12 (35th), John
Newlands 34:18 (37th), and Bill
Goodman 35:53 (43rd).
The women's race was won by
first year prodigy, Brenda
Shakelton of the Vikes. Sue
Kainulainen was UBC's top finisher
completing the up and down five
km course in 18:20 for a respectable
ninth place.
Fredrique Schmidt placed thirteenth, six seconds behind her teammate. The women's team also included Vici Agar 19:06 (20th), Cara
Haffenden 19:19 (24th), Linda
Diano 20:06 (31st), Anita
Hildebrand 20:18 (33rd), and
Sharon Keogh 20:23 (35th).
/
for men & women
Hi-Lights
Women: 29.95
Men: 19.95
Our basic cut still 6.95
3621 W. 4th Ave., Van. 733-3831
University of British Columbia
NOVEMBER 7, 1985
SCARFE EDUCATION BUILDING
12:30-2:15 P.M.
SCARFE 100
2:30 3:30 P.M.
SCARFE 100
3:30-5:00 P.M.
SCARFE 1226
3:30-5:00 P.M.
SCARFE 1024
SCARFE 1023
5:00-7:00 P.M.
7:00-8:00 P.M.
SCARFE 100
8:00-9:30 P.M.
SCARFE 100
KEY NOTE ADDRESS
by Mr. Manuel Prutschi, National Director,
Joint Community, Relations committee
"CONTEMPORARY ANTI-SEMITISM IN
CANADA: The Zundel and Keegstra Trials"
Film: WARSAW GHETTO (1978)
This film is compiled from photos in SS
Reichesfuehrer Himmler's album, and from
films taken by Germans themselves as a
record, for propaganda purposes, of their
occupation of Warsaw from 1939.
SEMINAR GROUPS
1. Reverberations of the Holocaust on
Survivor Families.
Dr. Robert Krell, Associate Professor,
Department of Psychiatry, UBC.
SEMINAR GROUPS
2. Teaching the Holocaust
Evelyn Neaman, Graduate student,
Curriculum Instruction,
Faculty of Education, UBC.
3. Advisability of Prosecution: The Zundel
and Keegstra Trials in Depth
Mr. Manuel Prutschi
DINNER BREAK
Film: AVENUE OF THE JUST (1982)
This extraordinary film pays tribute to the
Christians who saved Jewish lives during the
Holocaust. Several personal experiences
are recounted.
KEYNOTE ADDRESS by Arthur Waskow
Director Shalom Centre, Philadelphia
"TURNING BOMBS INTO PLOWSHARES:
Preventing a Global Auschwitz"
Co-Sponsored by: Jewish Students' Association/Hillel
The North American Jewish Students' NETWORK
UBC Chaplains
SFU Chaplains
We gratefully acknowledge the generous assistance of the Murrin Foundation
For further information call 224-4748

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