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The Ubyssey Nov 25, 1986

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THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXIX, No. 22
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, November 25,1986
228-23017
"Hot" Putoto mashes Mustangs
By SVETOZAR KONTIC
As is the case so often in sport a
little known player upstaged all the
stars last weekend in guiding the
UBC football team to victory in the
1986 Vanier Cup held in Toronto.
UBC backup quarterback Eric
Putoto played in the shadow of
starter Jordan Gagner all season
long, but 65 seconds on Saturday
afternoon was all the limelight he
needed in leading UBC to 25-23
victory over the University of
Western Ontario Mustangs.
With 69 seconds left in the game
and UBC trailing 23-18, Putoto
marched the team 58 yards down
the field to Western's  four yard
line. There he hit receiver Rob Ros
for a touchdown with only four
seconds left on the clock to give
UBC its first Canadian Intercollegiate Football Union championship since 1982.
"We're happy to win the game
and the national championships.
It's a tribute to all the players who
worked so hard all year long," said
UBC head coach Frank Smith.
Ros scored UBC's first
touchdown of the game at 8:34 of
the first quarter catching a 39 yard
pass over the middle from Gagner
and racing into the end zone to
make the score 10 to nothing for
UBC. Mike Bellefontaine had kick-
Budget delayed
ed a field goal earlier to make it
three to nothing for UBC.
At 12:18 of the second quarter
Gagner tossed the ball five yards to
his outstanding running back Terry
Cochrane who scooted in to give
UBC a commanding 17 to one lead
at halftime. Western's only points
came off a missed field goal by
kicker Geoff Crews.
Cochrane was a workhorse for
the Thunderbirds, returning punts,
rushing the ball and catching
passes. Although Putoto won the
Ted Morris trophy as the game's
most valuable player for his last
minute heroics, Cochrane was surely the heart of the team's offence.
The second half was a complete
reversal of form with Western
dominating much to the delight of a
By EVELYN JACOB
UBC's' Alma Mater Society is
spending money even though its
budget has not been passed by student council this year, violating the
society's constitution, the AMS
director of finance says.
Jamie Collins said Monday the
society's $4.5 million dollar budget
— which is normally approved by
student council in late August —
has not yet been passed because of
failed meetings of the seven-
member committee which gives initial approval of the budget.
And Collins said the society's
constitution says money cannot be
spent unless its budget has been
passed by council.
"We shouldn't be selling beer,
but I'm willing to take the risk,"
Collins said, adding he would
receive less "flack" making sure
services are available to students
rather than adhering to the society's
constitution.
The AMS is presently surviving
on a preliminary budget passed by
council on April 30 which allows
the society to operate for two to
three months.
Collins said if members of the
budget committee had met more
frequently this summer the society's
budget would have passed much
sooner. But he said members are
volunteers, and getting everyone to
meet together was difficult. He added the committee has asked for additional nn»- to the budget which
has also impeded progress.
But Collins doesn't think the
committee has acted irresponsibly.
He said it is doing the best job possible by seeking a clear understanding
of how the AMS operates.
Smokon polluto no moro
A new Clean Air Policy will come into effect at UBC January 1,
safeguarding the right of non-smokers to breath unpolluted air.
Under the new policy, smoking will be allowed only in designated
areas. In the past, designated areas were set aside for non-smokers.
The change represents "a completely different philosophy," said
Wayne Green, director of Occupational Health and Safety.
"The key is whether your used smoke interferes with anyone
else," said Green.
Green received approximately 25 letters, all supporting the new
policy, from the UBC community while the proposal was being
drawn up. The only question raised was whether the new regulations
were stringent enough.
Smoking will no longer be permitted in public places, and areas
designated for smoking will be located where there is enough ventilation to prevent the contamination of the air in the rest of the
building.
A maximum of 50 per cent of restaurant and cafeteria space may
be set aside for smokers.
The new regulations will bring UBC policy in line with the City of
y Vancouver bylaws.
partisan crowd of close to 18,000
spectators.
Early in the third quarter
Western defensive back Kyle Hall
intercepted Gagner at the Western
47 yard line. Shortly afterwards
quarterback Steve Samways hit his
favorite receiver Andy Filipiuk for a
21 yard strike at 3:50 to cut UBC's
lead to 17 to eight.
Filipiuk made a brilliant over-
the-shoulder catch in the corner of
the end zone, beating a hobbling
Mark Norman, Canadian collegiate
football's top defensive player.
A five yard touchdown run by
receiver David Sapungis and a four
yard running score by Hee
Creighton Trophy winner Blake
Marshall gave the Mustangs a 23-18
lead. Both sides also kicked singles.
"The impact on students has
been minimal," he added.
Colin Erb, Student Administrative Council representative
for the budget committee, said in
future budget committee members
should be chosen more carefully by
the student council selections committee. Those that cannot turn up
for meetings should not bother
volunteering for the committee, he
said.
AMS president Simon Seshadri
agrees the primary cause of the late
budget was difficulty getting
quorum on the committee, but said
he cannot "tie budget committee's
hands" and force it to produce a
budget.
He agreed with Collins that
students would be more upset at not
being able to drink beer than at the
society for being late with its
budget.
Collins said he expects the AMS
budget will be presented at next
week's council meeting, but said it
cannot pass until the following
meeting. Budget committee was
scheduled to meet Monday but was
cancelled when the group again failed to reach quorum.
Conference
By JAMES YOUNG
Canadian University Press
The recent first ministers conference in Vancouver failed to make
real progress on economic equality
for women, says Manitoba's
minister for the status of women.
Although   the   federal   govern-
UBC's defence came alive stopping Western on three separate occasions before Putoto's heroics.
Receiver Mike Bellefontaine, who
had been the goat earlier dropping
three passes, made a sensational
catch inside Western's twenty yard
line on UBC's final drive.
"Western played too conservatively and tried to hang on to the
five point lead. Our defence came
up big and we were able to stop the
clock with our timeouts," said
Smith.
Putoto came into the game at the
three and a half minute mark of the
fourth quarter after UBC's offence,
under the direction of Gagner, had
scored only one point in the second
half.
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FOURTH STRING T-'BIRDS practice secret weapon that won Vanier Cup. Strategy was developed by
mechanical engineering faculty. However, the professor in the centre refused to carry the experiment to the golf
level, citing cranial complaint.
to make real progress
ment, nine provinces and the two
territories endorsed a paper on
women's role in the labour force,
Manitoba refused to sign the document.
"Endorsing the statement meant
endorsing no plan of action, said
Judy Wasylycia-Leis as the conference ended at the Hotel Vancouver on Nov. 21. "To end up
with no plan of action, no concrete
recommendations is a major disappointment. I think the women of
Canada will take notice and express
their unhappiness with the situation," she said.
When Prime Minister Brian
Mulroney introduced the paper, he
hailed it as a significant step since
last year's first ministers conference
in Halifax.
"Recognizing the importance of
training and skill development for
women who want to improve their
employment prospects, we agreed
to work together and identify and
remove obstacles that prevent
women from obtaining training,"
Mulroney said.
"The framework for training
highlights a number of measures
governments can take to remove the
obstacles," he said, adding that
special efforts would be required to
help women entering or re-entering
the job market, those needing skill
or upgrading or retraining, and
those wishing to enter non-
traditional occupations.
Wasylycia-Leis was not enthusiastic .
"I saw no words of encouragement in Brian Mulroney's statement
. . . I've heard it all before," she
said.
As the premiers and ministers
gave repiorts on provincial initiatives, many noted the occasion
was the first time women's
economic equality was considered
as a separate issue in the national
conference. They also acknowledged the severe economic disadvantages worae face, noting they earn
on average 64 per cent of mens'
salaries.
Ontario attorney-general Ian
Scott said that while the number of
women in the full-time workforce
has risen from 25 to 44 per cent
since the mid-1960s, women's
wages have not show a
simultaneous increase.
"In the 20 years when the proportion of women in the workforce
almost doubled, the wage gap closed only two per cent," he said.
Wasylycia-Leis said the
framework for job training endorsed by the other provinces was too
narrow to be effective.
"You've got to deal with the
issue of women's economic equality
in terms of an integrated strategy,"
she said. "You can't deal with it
while leaving out child-care, pay
equality, affirmative action, job
creation, and education."
She also criticized current training offered through the Canadian
Jobs Strategy program as serving
the short-term needs of private corporations.
"Hudson's Bay got money to do
a program to train women to work
in the sales and clerical fields — it's
not a great use of taxpayers
money," Wasylycia-Leis said.
Members of B.C. women's
groups also were not impressed by
the conference results.
Cindy Shore, a member of the
steering committee of the Women's
Economic Agenda, an educational
and lobby group, said governments
should look at implementing and
enforcing equal wage laws and introducing pay equity legislation for
job categories considered to be of
equal value.
"You can have all the job training and education you want, but the
reality of the workplace is women
go out and get jobs that pay less
than men," she said. Page 2
THE    U BYSSEY
Tuesday, November 25,1986
Students lobby for summer employment
By The Canadian Press and
The Ubyssey Staff
Canada's national student lobby
group and a country-wide coalition
of non-profit agencies are campaigning for a better federal summer employment program for
students.
But the Canadian Federation of
Students and the Save Our Summer
Coalition, which represents about
200 non-profit groups who say they
have been slighted by the federal
funding priorities, are casting
doubts on government response to
their requests.
"We're not getting fast action,"
said Roger Hollander, coalition coordinator and director of the 519
Church Street Community Centre
in Toronto.
"If our groups operated as inefficiently as the federal government,
we'd be sunk by now," Hollander
said.
The federal government was expected to complete and table an
assessment of Challenge 86, its summer subsidy and job creation program, by late September. According to CFS chair Tony Macerollo,
the   government   is   deliberately
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holding back its evaluation of the
controversial program.
"Our big concern is that this is a
stalling tactic, and it certainly
points to some negative concerns
that we have had about the' program," Marcerollo said.
The federal government funded
Challenge 86 with $180 million, less
than Challenge 85's $205 million.
As Well, Hollander says, non-profit
groups — many of which sponsor
summer activities with the
assistance of student employment
funding — were substantially
overlooked in favour.of private sector applications.
Federal statistics show private
sources this year received almost
$2.3 million more than last year,
while the non-profit sector received
about $29.8 million less.
Only one in seven non-profit
organizations received funding
from Challenge 86 in B.C. this summer.
The program provided only two
jobs for Alma Mater Society service
organizations at UBC.
Neil Risebrough, associate vice-
president of student services, said
his only explanation for the change
in government priorities was that
more jobs can be created in the industrial sector than in the nonprofit sector.
"It's a numbers game," said
Risebrough. "Politicians are always
being quoted on the number of jobs
they have created." Jamie Collins,
AMS director of finance, said he
was "distressed" that most service
organizations did not receive
grants.
"By the time the information was
available it was too late to protest
... I had no information why our
jobs were turned down compared to
other jobs and I still don't know
why," he said.
Hollander said many coalition
members were forced to cancel programs and cut services traditionally
offered in the summer because of
government policy changes. Federal
summer employment programs up
to 1984 almost entirely funded nonprofit or public organizations.
The coalition was struck in May
in response to funding changes.
Coalition and CFS representatives fear government will not
make public a negative evaluation
of Challenge 86.
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
UBC needs daycare facilities
By BRAD NEWCOMBE
Daycare facilities for infants aged
three to 18 months are the most
urgently needed and most difficult
to find for parents, says the
graduate student society president.
The graduate student society
wants to establish an infant centre
in the ground level wing of the
graduate centre and is hoping the
UBC administration will recognize
the validity of their proposal, according to president Phil Bennett.
Mab Oloman, UBC child-care
co-ordinator, supports the society's
proposal because it will help "meet
the screeching demand for infant
daycare at UBC and in
Vancouver." She said the demand
for infant care is "completely
unmet" since there are only spaces
for 70 or less children under eighteen months in licensed daycare
facilities in the entire city of Vancouver.
There are currently 12 independent, parent-run daycare societies
at UBC. Ten are located in the
Acadia Family Housing Area, outside of the academic core area of
campus. They serve 285 children
from ages 18 months to 12 years.
There are currently no infant
daycares on campus.
According to Bennett, the major
hurdle is to receive approval in prin
ciple from the university administration. He said the issue for
the administration is whether
daycare facilities belong inside the
academic core area of the campus.
Neil Risebrough, associate vice
president of student services, said
"philosophically, I don't agree that
any part of the graduate student
centre should be used as a daycare
centre." He questioned the
justification for moving away from
designated daycare areas on campus
in the Acadia Family Housing location.
Bennett believes the grad centre is
a more convenient location for
parents, particularly nursing
mothers. The program would allow
12 spaces for infants. Nine spaces
would be available for a full term
on either a full or part-time basis,
and three on a drop-in basis, booked a week in advance.
Oloman stresses few parents can
find 'Mary Poppins as a perfect
caregiver." Reliable, qualified infant care is essential for student
parents, especially during stress
periods such as mid-terms and final
exams, she adds.
Bennett said the infant centre
would be administered like the
others at UBC, namely as independent, parent-run societies.
The grad society is working on a
cost estimate for renovations to the
grad centre which would be required to provide facilities. This
estimate is to be submitted to the
university. Preliminary plans have
been    drawn    up   to   meet    re
quirements for fire and health safety standards. The ministry of
human resources gives final approval for daycare licenses. The
Alma Mater Society has promised
to assist with funds pending administrative approval, said Bennett.
After compiling the necessary information, Bennett believes the
grad society has a strong case to
lobby UBC administration to show
that infant daycare is desperately
needed and can be a viable operation.
Launch warning
By DAVID FERMAN
The United States is pushing the
world to the brink of doom and is
drawing us over "the brink"
because politicians are losing control of their nuclear arsenals, said a
Stanford University computer
science professor Monday.
Clifford Johnson told the
Buchanan A104 audience that
"salvation from technology does
not lie with more technology, but
with the human spirit that shall
forever master its hollow inventions."
Johnson's specific goal is to stop
the Americans' launch on warning
system that would order a
retaliatory nuclear strike before the
detonation of attacking missiles.
Johnson is suing American
secretary of defense Casper
Weinberger saying the "launch on
warning" computerized attack
"usurps the war powers of Congress".
Johnson said "we ought not to
be afraid that the Soviet Union
might suddenly launch a nuclear attack from off-coast submarines and
destroy our capacity to retaliate."
Yet, contends Johnson, the U.S. is
so afraid of this "incredibility that
it continually operates a 'launch
on warning system' that could . . .
result in the unintentional launch of
U.S. land-based Minuteman and
MX missiles. Such a launch would
likely be so massive that even
without the inevitable retaliation, a
world-ending nuclear winter could
very well result."
Johnson explained that the official United States policy is not
"launch on warning", and that
congressional testimony states the
improved technology has reduced
the risk of accidental nuclear war to
acceptable levels.
"I ask, what level of risk of accidental Armageddon could ever be
acceptable ..."
Johnson also argued that
"launch on warning" is unnecessary.
"Over half the U.S. nuclear
firepower is submarine based, and
there are always some 20 or 30 subs
patrolling the oceans. Since one
nuclear submarine could devastate
every city in the Soviet Union,
retaliation is assured.
The key to Johnson's case is Article I, Section 8 of the U.S. Constitution that states "the Congress
shall have the power to declare war
. . . and to provide for the militia to
repel invasion."
Yet in practice, said Johnson, the
president alone would declare war,
if he could be found in time, with
the "launch on warning systerm."
But with constantly diminishing
response times for ballistic missile
systems, Johnson said, the decisions will even be out of the president's hands.
Johnson in turn said the nuclear
hair trigger should be eliminated by
imposing a 30-minute electronic
time-lock on MX and Minuteman
missiles.
THE FACULTY OF applied physics has implemented a new method to reduce enrolment and hence ease the excess of engineers on the job market.
Athletic department mismanaged money
By SVETOZAR KONTIC
UBC's athletic department is not
managing students' money properly
the AMS director of administration
says.
Martin Cocking said Monday
that the athletic department needs a
comptroller to keep expenses within
the budget and not just a bookkeeper to record expenses.
"Currently they have a bookkeeper and his job is only to keep
records. He is hopelessly overworked and does a great job despite all
the constrictions," Cocking said.
Cocking listed budget control,
budget presentation and lack of
communication about spending as
the athletic department's major
problems.
"The athletic department has
been functioning so long without
anyone watching them. Students
are paying a hell of a lot and they
have a right to say where the money
goes."
The university athletic committee
was formed in 1985 after a
unilateral decision by the Board of
Governors to impose a $32-per-
student athletic-fee levy.
In an earlier interview Cocking
complained of infrequent meetings
by the committee and the difficulty
of tracing the $750,000 the department gets each year through the fee.
Cocking said the recently released
Men's Athletic Committee budget
— that will be discussed today — is
confusing and not clearly defined.
"This is not what I call a properly
laid out budget. A normal budget
shows both expenditures and
revenues. This budget only shows
what we want to spend," Cocking
said.
Cocking said the MAC, a
presidential advisory committee
directly responsible to senate and
BOG has only released one budget
in the last Wi years.
He said it was not until the UAC
was started that he began seeing
MAC budgets which were not approved by any committee.
"The problem here is that the
university has changed its accounting system so you can't compare
this year's figures to last year's and
directly compare the expenditures.
It is very confusing because there
are no actual figures," said Cocking.
The MAC is comprised of 10 individuals, five of whom are
students. It is chaired by Anatomy
department head, Charles
Slonecker.
"We didn't even know we were
supposed to have five student reps
until we checked a short time ago.
The committee is run primarily by
consensus but approving a budget
entails a vote," he said.
Another problem that has arisen
in the past is teams that go to national championships, like this
year's football team, are not
budgeted for such costs.
"There has to be a flexibility in
the budget for teams that go to national championships. In previous
years the administration was
lackadaisical and simply gave out
money but that is not the case
anymore," said Cocking.
Expenditures for the current year
will not be known until next year
since the UAC only releases reports
every six months.
U.S. citizen doportod from country
By JEFFREY SWAKTZ
Faculty and students in Vancouver
have joined American citizens in
condemning the ordered deportation of writer and poet Margaret
Randall from the United States.
American-born Randall, who
teaches at the University of New
Mexico at Albuquerque, is seeking
repatriation after living for nearly
25 years in Latin America, But U.S.
Immigration court has denied her
immigrant status, arguing that her
writings "go far beyond mere dissent" with American foreign
policy.
Stan Persky, professor of
political science at Capilano College
said, the court decision gives Randall legitimate hope for a successful
R looks like a denial of
^appeal.
funamental freedom," said Persky,
"and this seems to be in conflict
with the American Constitution."
"The fact that this is a writer who
is U.S. born is what has excited a lot
of attention", Persky explained.
Persky also noted Randall has
received support from the writer's
rights group PEN International, as
well as from a number of prominent
American authors including Alice
Walker, Norman Mailer, and Kurt
Vonnemu. Suzanne Rose, a rehab
medicine student and executive
member of UBC's Latin American
Solidarity Committee also criticized
the court decision. Rose said the
deportation order "underscores the
U.S. government's fear of facing
the truth about Central America,
that the people there can sad must
determine their own destiny."
Randall, who left the United
States in the early 1960s, worked as
a writer and editor in Mexico and
Cuba, then moved to Nicaragua in
1979 in time to witness the overthrow of the U.S.-supported
Somoza regime. Her books San*
dino's Daughters and Christians in
the Nicaraguan Revolution document the role of women and the
Catholic left in the Sandinista victory.
Vancouver-based New Star
Books, which has published many
of Randall's works, report no attempt to hinder their American
distribution. "It is rather ironic that
ha books are allowed but she is
not," said New Star editor Janet
Cotgrave. . Page 4
THE    UB-YSSEY
Tuesday, November 25,1986
Pride
This past weekend the UBC football team provided fans with all
the excitement they could possibly want in winning the Vanier Cup
in Toronto. The 'Birds scored with only four seconds left on the
clock in a highly emotional game to gain the victory over a Western
Ontario team that left the field in tears.
We have the best football team in Canadian collegiate football
and it is something to be proud of. They could not have
represented our university any better in Toronto.
Sport is something everyone can unite in. Any student who turned on their television Saturday morning must have felt good about
seeing their team on the field.
There was something magical about those last few moments.
They are moments which will go down in sports history and not be
forgotten for a long time: a backup quarterback who had wanted to
quit football at the beginning of the year coming off the bench to
lead his team to victory; Rob Ros, the veteran receiver who had
retired from football for a season and come back for his last year,
making the final catch.
UBC's surly, rugged coach Frank Smith called every play including the one that gave UBC victory for the first time since 1982.
The list of stars and heroes for the 'Birds is endless. Despite playing in a foreign stadium to the jeers and snowball throwing of a
non-partisan crowd, they had the courage to rise above the ordinary and come back to win the game.
The 1986 UBC Thunderbird football team are champions just like
the 1982 version of the team. The best in the nation.
Iceland wages war against endangered species
Jeff Friesen (Nov. 13) accuses
Paul Watson and the Sea Shepherd
Society of "hypocrisy combined
with acts of terrorism (against)
peaceful people, businesses, and nations". The latter part of this
charge is misdirected, for the
Icelandic whaling business, the people operating this business, and the
nation condoning this business are
not peaceful. They are waging war
against several endangered species
of whales. They slaughter hundreds
per year of fascinating creatures
whose exact populations are
unknown, but are clearly tiny and
shrinking. Icelanders don't need the
meat; most of it is exported or fed
to domestic animals, a shocking
waste when cheap substitutes are
available.
As Jeff points out, human car-
nivory requires some animals to be
killed for their flesh, but cattle,
sheep, etc., are less intelligent, sensitive, reflective, and communicative than whales, and outnumber them by some hundreds of
millions. Surely these are relevant
differences. Preferring beef to
whalemeat does not entail
hypocricy.
Jeff suggests, that the Sea
Shepherd Society "has the main objective of forcing the laws of
sovereign governments to change at
All letters must be brief and
typed on a triple-spaced,
70-character line. They must be
delivered in person with identification shown by 4:30 p.m.
the Friday before publication
to the Ubyssey office, SUB
241k.
their whims". Even if this were so,
it would be irrelevant to the case at
hand. Icelandic law already prohibits the killing of whales for
anything but scientific research.
The Sea Shepherd Society is merely
trying to force Icelandic whalers to
obey Icelandic law. This is normally
the responsibility of the the Icelandic government, but the present
Icelandic government, out of either
ignorance or malice, is helping the
whalers break the law by going
along with the pretense that a
slaughterhouse is a research center.
Peacefully destroying Icelandic
whaling equipment is morally
analogous to peacefully destroying
illegal Chilean government torture
centers.
Nor is the Sea Shepherd Society
acting on a "whim", their factual
claims are carefully researched and
their moral position is sensitive and
rational. Their choice of big, cute
whales rather than fish or insects as
the chief objects of their conservation effort is well justified. First,
for the reasons mentioned above,
whales have stronger rights than
most other animals.
Second, whales, precisely because
they are big and cute, have an image
easier to market to the uninformed
public whose support is vital to the
The Ubyssey reserves the right
to edit for brevity, spelling and
grammar, and libel. Sexist,
racist, and homophobic letters
will not run. If you have any
questions or comments, or just
want to shoot the breeze, drop
by SUB 241k, or call us at
228-2301/05.
conservation movement. Oxfam
advertising employs the same principle when it uses pictures of cute
starving kids rather than ugly starving kids. Third, because whales are
large and often at the top of their
food chains, they require vast areas
of ocean to maintain genetically
diverse   breeding   populations.   If
these areas are kept clean and free
of unsupervised exploitation then
all the smaller, less flashy creatures
who also live there will have a better
chance of survival.
Finally, if Jeff is concerned about
the Icelandic economy, he should
certainly support the Sea Shepherd
Society. You can't hunt an extinct
species. If whale populations are
allowed to recover their former
abundance then a small but profitable whaling industry could be
reestablished and continued indefinitely.
Nick Sleigh
graduate student
Tories in cahoots with Socreds
r
THE UBYSSEY
November 25. 1966
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Friday
throughout the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and are not necessarily those
of the administration or the AMS. Member Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is SUB
241k. Editorial department. 228-2301/2305. Advertising
228-3977/3978.
Opening: Gordon Clark races dawn the SUB hallways: (dubbedI, "The halls are aKva with the sound
of lawsuits, - ", he is elbowed out of the way by cub reporter Svetozar Kontic. "Frank Smith is God!"
he blusters. Michael Groberman looks around before stuffing 10 more ballots into the manila envelope.
"What the hef was that?" cry Diane Lister and Chew Wong, perceiving a voting irregularity. Malcolm
Pearson flies across the room. "North Bay is mine," he bellows. Jennifer Lyall explains to Brad
Newcombe, "if I have to spend one more new year in Nanaimo..." Rick Hiebert begins taking notes.
Evelyn Jacob valiantly defends her hand-picked returning officer to Steve Neufeld and James Young,
quietly assured she will see North Bay. David Ferman insists that North Bay in December does not
merit this heat.
Ken Dickerson's criticism of
UBC Liberal President John
Whyte's letter regarding the fond
farewell of Dr. Pat McGeer
deserves our attention and obviously needs clarification. Knowing that
Mr. Dickerson is a devout Tory and
a political buff, I am surprised that
he did not know that both Dr. Pat
McGeer and Garde Gardom were
kicked out of the Liberal party
before they subsequently joined the
Socreds.
Instead of talking about ex-
Liberals one would think that Mr.
Dickerson would acknowledge the
close historical and contemporary
ties between the Conservative party
and the Socreds. After all, any
political buff knows that the Ontario Tory Blue Machine gives more
than moral support to the Socreds.
In Allan Fotheringham's affectionate account of the Tories, Look i
Ma ... No Hands, he speaks of "a
reporter (who) discovered the
remarkable invasion in 1981 of the
inner circles of the B.C. government by a clutch of Ontario Tories,
complete with pinstripe suits and
bumps on their knobbly foreheads
that are meant to indicate intelligence and organizational
guile."
Fotheringham further states, "It
was not so much an invasion, really, as a recruitment — a Lend Lease
program equivalent to the Marshall
Plan, which rebuilt Europe after the
War. The Big Blue Machine, for interesting and the usual devious
reasons, was trying to resurrect the
fading reputation of Mini Wac, the
one and only Premier of
Disneyland-with-Mountains, Bill
Bennett. If the socialist horde is
beating at the gate — with
capitalism in peril — who better to
come riding to the rescue ..."
While Brian Mulroney remains
remarkably silent, it is John Turner
who, despite the fact the provincial
Liberals do not have a seat, is not
afraid to criticize the Social Credit
government and their ill conceived
education policy. During UBC
clubs week I enquired about the
Provincial Conservatives and was
directed to the next booth. "But", I
said,    "that   booth   is   for   the
Socreds." Mr. Dickerson's fellow
comrades in the Conservative party
replied, as I looked at posters of
Brian Mulroney grinning in my
direction, "It's the same thing!"
John Pennant
World waits passively
The world passively watches as
our elected leaders casually brush
off potential opportunities to create
a lasting peace. I speak of the lost
opportunities in the non ratified
Salt II treaties and the wasted efforts of the Icelandic summit.
How long are we prepared to
watch the guillotine blade slowly
being raised above our heads? It
seems that the public cares more
about threats of censorship of their
favorite TV programs than they do
about their right to life in this
nuclear age.
What should peace groups do to
educate this listless apathetic country? Should we apply to the depths
of the Canadian heart and say that
nuclear war could prevent Hockey
Night in Canada and Saturday morning cartoons?
Just think of the catastrophic effects the Star Wars anti-satellite
lasers could have upon MTV, TSN
and all your favorite "Live from
Dullsville USA" programs. What
would happen to your late night
rituals if David Letterman couldn't
lull you into dreamland? No
Sesame St. for junior (how will he
ever learn the alphabet) no soaps,
no Miami Vice, what about Mr.
Rogers? In short, a nuclear war
could have direct influence on your
viewing pleasure.
Even if Reagan's "Defensive
Shield" were to miraculously blow
every made in USSR flying greeting
card out of the sky, chances are the
world would be too boring a place
to live. Without satellite TV what is
there? Yes kids its up to you to join
the campaign to prevent the demise
of the Institution of Public
Pacification — Don't let uncle Ron
mess with my free choice of programming! A Nuclear War would
just be too costly in terms of lost air
time alone. Radio would not escape
it's unholy grasp either — only the
really small stations might survive
eg. CITR. "Oh my God! Not that!
That's serious! What can I do?"
Thought you'd never ask. This
week is nuclear awareness week.
Take the time to find out how you
can prevent the threat of loss of TV
to those nuclear cowboys. Then
join up with the posse of your
choice and storm Ottawa with you
complaints. It's free, no postage
necessary to write your favorite
airhead in a pinstripe suit. The end
of those great "viewer discretion is
advised" movies is at hand. Let's
band together this nuclear
awareness week and protect the
things we love and need.
Greg Beatch
grad studies
Pres speaks
I noted with interest your article
on the call for a debate on the
publication the Engine of Recovery.
I am delighted to" be part of a
university where free and open
discussion is encouraged.
Although you were mistaken in
stating that I would attend a Faculty Association debate, I have met
with some departments to discuss
the challenges and opportunities
facing the University.
I have appeared in many forums,
both within the University and in
the media, to discuss the challenges
and opportunities facing UBC.
David W. Strangway
president Tuesday, November 25,1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Student and student housing politics bizarre
To most of those whom it does
not concern & the few that it does:
I started as the president of the
Acadia HighRise Tenants Association (AHTA) a couple of years ago,
in UBC family housing, but I don't
pretend to be responsible to or
represent anybody but me. This letter is here to blast at the flying
bullshit from those other so-called
representatives who pretend that
they do.
Less than 2"lo of our Acadian,
UBC campus, community tenants
ever show up at even our best attended meetings. We usually
operate with less than 1 °/o participation.
This situation is typical of student politics. The UBC general student Alma Mater Society (AMS)
has not had quorum for more than
twenty years. What has provoked
me to write this letter is that the tiny
and vocal minority active in student
politics not only pretend to be
responsible representatives, but also
expect me to subscribe to this
pretense.
There is no name in political
science for a supposed, representative democracy that in fact has no
real powers and in which less than
95 Vo of its members ever participate.
Student and student housing
politics is a bizarre type, really it is.
It is a fact that students have no real
power. Students living in university
residences have very few legal
rights, and students in general at the
university have even less. Actually
the provincial government
established and controls the university through the Board of Governors appointments and the university administration.
It is a fact that more than 95% of
students do not participate in student politics, and this is a realistic
attitude because student politics are
never more than recommendations.
The University Act gives sole power
to charge fees to the Board of
Governors, and then, like Big Daddy doling out the allowance, the
Board gives the student fee money
to the so-called student "government" to play with.
In Canada there are only two
levels of real democracy, the federal
and provincial; the rest are a sham.
Democracy sort of starts out at the
top with the Crown and then
trickles down, but it does not get
very far.
Students have no rights and no
power. Student politics in practise is
actually a totally corrupt,
degenerative and derivative form of
"democracy" which has its roots in
the affairs of colonial administration. Student politics is merely
children playing games. It is a funny
little game that gets played by certain personalities that like to go to
boring and useless meetings, where
they pretend to represent the 99%
plus of students who do not care
what they are doing because none
of it really matters much.
My personal reaction to those
student politicians who try to
behave as if they were responsible
representatives is that I choke on
their bullshit and I regard them as
jerks.
My point is that this bullshit is
bad. The only way for students to
really participate in student politics
is to gain real power for students.
This is not easy because the provincial government is the real source of
all the power in the university. The
student politicians who pretend to
serve the student interest actually
do a great disservice when they pretend to be responsible representatives, because the 95% of students
who do not participate know that it
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is all bullshit anyway, and having a
bunch of jerks ardently pretending
it is not just makes it worse.
Our problem is how to gain more
real power for students when we
have none and can not claim or
demonstrate any popular participation. The solutions I have been
working on involve legal arguments
aimed at the federal and provincial
government.
Revenue Canada has not yet
decided whether the Rhino Bursaries I created last year were legal,
and Elections Canada has not yet
responded regarding my argument
that the 18 year old restriction on
voting rights is unconstitutional. If
I win either of these cases, the
reader will probably hear about it
again. But, for now, at least I am
trying to do something real to give
students some more real political
power.
At present, student organizations
such as the ATA or the AMS are
part of the entrenched problem and
are not going to provide radical
solutions to their powerlessness that
students truly need.
Blair T. Longley
arts 3
. «r< ■„';-'
tMmtm
Douglas Day symbol of racism
The celebration of Douglas Day
this past Wednesday, November 19
by the Law Student body is nothing
less than an affront to the Native
peoples of this province.
The cold, rainy, miserable day of
November 19, 1858 is well known
by law students as the official inception of English Law into the colony
of B.C. It indeed was a miserable
day for the native people of this
province — then a majority of the
population — who lived by their
own laws on their own lands and
had ceded nothing of their
sovereignty to anyone and certainly
not to the colonial government of
B.C.
Douglas Day was the highwater
mark of the subjugation of our people to live on reserve lands, according to foreign laws, under foreign
British Colonial power. It was the
continued suppression by colonial
powers of aboriginal indigenous
cultures in British Columbia. We
don't think of November 19, 1858
as a day of celebration but a symbol
of racism and European colonialism. Perry Shawana
Pres.,
The Native Law Students
Association B.C. Chapter
,B\CS-
9®m?:
m^mm»«
f^Os
tf£S
»*'%8&''fl8   .—aUD^*1
**
St
tH>ttrt
uisw
3545 W.4TH AVE.
7331173 Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 25,1966
tween classes
TODAY
rruocNT* fom peace and mutual
DISARMAMENT
Film:   "Th*  Space  Batwnn"   —   from  the
"Mane* of Cmd* S*ri*>." noon, SUB 211.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Co-opsuppsf, 6:00 p.m., Lutheran Csmpus Cen-
tra.
NEWMAN CLUB
♦2.60 Tuesdays - ma*a and dinner, 5:00 p.m.
man; 9:00 p.m. dinner, St. Mark'a CoMaga, St.
Mark's CoMaga Music Room.
COALITION AGAINST SEXISM ON CAMPUS
Meeting, noon, SUB 206.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Discussion on Hinduism and Christianity, noon,
'    Brock 304.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Intermediate Cantonese class, noon, Buch B326.
PRE-MEDICAL SOCIETY
Lecture on "Narcotics," guest speaker Ms. J.
Willis, noon. Wood 1.
UNITED CHURCH CAMPUS MINISTRY
Informal worship,  all welcome,  regardless of
denomination, noon, Lutheran Campus Centre.
JEWISH STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Lunch, noon, Hillel House.
UNDERWATER HOCKEY
Practice, everyone welcome, 7:00 p.m., UBC
Aquatic Centre.
WEDNESDAY
STUDENTS FOR PEACE AND MUTUAL
DISARMAMENT
Film: "Keeping the Elephants Away," from the
"Defense of Canada Series," noon, SUB 215.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Bible study and fellowship, 7:00 p.m., 1868 Knox
Road.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Beginner's Mandarin class, noon, Buch B325.
AIESEC AND ECONOMIC STUDENTS'
ASSOCIATION
Business   speakers,    noon-2:30   p.m.,   SUB
auditorium.
UBC SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Noon hour concert: Stephen Bosweli, guitar,
noon, UBC School of Music Recital Hall.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Soup 'n Study, noon, Lutheran Campus Centre.
UNITED CHURCH CAMPUS MINISTRY
Film, potluck and discussion on Guatamala, 6:00
p.m., Lutheran Campus Centre.
CINEMA 16
Film    presentation:    "Anais    Observed,"    film
biography of writer Anais Nin, 7:00 p.m. and
9:30 p.m., UBC SUB auditorium.
UBC SQUASH CLUB
Club shirts pick-up, noon, SUB 241E.
JEWISH STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION AND
HILLEL HOUSE
Dinner, 6-7:00 p.m., Hillel House.
JEWISH STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Arab-Israeli dialogue, 4:30 p.m., Buch A102.
GRADUATE STUDENT SOCIETY
Music night, Avi Gross, 8:30-1:00 p.m.. Grad
Centre Lounge.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Aerobic classes, 5-6:00 p.m., SUB ballroom.
THE UBYSSEY
General staff meeting and voting for CUP National
Conference applicants, noon, SUB 241K.
THURSDAY
STUDENTS FOR PEACE AND MUTUAL
DISARMAMENT
Film: "A Long Way From Home," noon, Buch
B228.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Conversations!   meeting,    everyone   welcome,
noon. International House.
AYN RAND CLUB
Video presentation:  Socialism-Fascism,  noon,
Henry Angus 215.
From Letterman to Richmond!
THE COMEDY
SHOPPE
at The Skyline
presents
AMAZING
JONATHAN
Thurs., Nov. 27—Sun., Nov. 30
Call 278-5161
for showtimes, tickets
SKYLINE AIRPORT
HOTEL
3031 No. 3 Road, Richmond
fa
A rather unique restaurant
A restaurant
for people who understand
that Lamb with Basil and
Rosemary doesn't mean chops
with the people next door.
We are pleased lo offer a FREE
ENTREE of Lunch or Dinner
when a second enlree of equal or
greater value is purchased.
SUNDAY BRUNCH
Also Available
g»^
4473 W. 10th Ave., 228-881
open 10 am-midnile daily
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Beginner's Cantonese class, noon, Buch B326.
UBC SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Collegium Mueieum Enssmbtes: John Sayer.
Ray Nurse and Morna Russell, directors, 8:00
p.m., UBC School of Music Recital HaH. AIM.
University Chamber Strings: John Loban, director, noon, Radtal HaH.
INTEGRITY IN ACTION
A talk given by George Hanson, professions! actor, singer, conductor and public speaker,
noon-1:30 p.m., Buch B22S.
SIKH STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Final general meeting of semester, noon, SUB
119.
PEOPLE'S FRONT
C Boyiau, National spokesperson speaks
against tha Canadian stats's support for racism
in South Africa and in Canada, noon, Buch
B223.
OAYS AND LESBIAN8 OF UBC
General meeting, noon, SUB 213.
ENTREPRENEURS CLUB     ,
Workshop: Ideas to Reality, noon, Angus 425.
AMNESTY INTERNAL OF UBC
Rim on human rights — everyone welcome,
noon, Buch B212.
GRADUATE STUDENT SOCIETY
Theatre sports, 6:00 p.m., Grad Centre ballroom.
ANARCHISTS OF UBC
General meeting, noon, Rm. 237 SUB.
NATIVE INDIAN STUDENT UNION
General meeting, noon, NISU lounge, 3
buildings behind Scarfe.
UNIVERSITY CHRISTIAN MINISTRIES
General meeting: Speaker Robb Powell, noon,
Scarfe 210.
We want you to become part of
one of the longest running and
most outstanding traditions on
campus. We want to give you the
skills that make a dynamic news
reporter or photographer with the
training to enter the tough job
market. We challenge you to
come to The Ubyssey office (241k
SUB) and make a difference.
hot flash
Paul Watson, high profile anti-
whaling activist, and Doug Collins,
North Shore right-winger, will clash
in debate Friday, Nov. 28, SUB
Auditorium, noon. Come see the
sparks fly.
Community Sports
offers a 10 /O discount off
regular prices of all merchandise
to all UBC students, staff £r faculty
FIVE MONTH SKATE
SHARPENING PASSES FOR
3355 W. Broadway
$33.00
733-1612
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK FROM 9:30 A.M.
Daily Wear Contacts
$99
.50
complete
Extended Wear Contacts
$179
.98
complete
STORE HOURS:
Monday/Thursday 9 a.m.-6:00 p.m.
Friday 9 a.m.-8:00 p.m.
Saturday 9 a.m.-5:30 p.m.
MAJOR CREDIT
CARDS ACCEPTED
(Offer Valid Until Dec. 8/86)
You won't get to graduation
without one.
Buy it. Or rent it
by the week or month.
=M=] =
BUSINESS
MACHINES
Eyeglass Boutique
3305 WEST BROADWAY
(at Blenheim)
VANCOUVER, B.C.
732-0008
BUY 1 PAIR DAILY OR
EXTENDED WEAR CONTACT LENSES
GET 2nd PAIR FOR % PRICE
Additional 20% Off For Students On This Offer Only
THE CLASSIFIEDS
|RATES: AMS Card Holders-3 lines, 1 day $2.75; additional]
lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $4.75, additional lines, .70c. Additional days, $4.25. and .65c.
I Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a. m. the day |
before publication.
Publications Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders over $10.00. Call 228-3977.
11 - FOR SALE - Private
IBM SELECTRIC 3 Typewriter. Complete
with correcting tape. $450 OBO. 734-4777.
PORTABLE TYPEWRITER. Sharp PA 1000.
Display correction, memory system as well
as 5 ribbon cassettes &■ thermal paper.
$250. 732-9806.
1976 RED MINI. Runs well, great gas mileage
and a fun car to drive. Perfect 4 student.
Ph. 732-6470.
1979 PONTIAC CATALINA, V8, 305, 4 dr.,
P. brakes, P. steering, air cond., stereo, excellent condition. Ph. 943-0429.
20 - HOUSING
GAGE. TOTEM PARK, PLACE VANIER &
FAIRVIEW CRESCENT: room and board,
and room only: Available for men & women
in the student residences. For information,
apply at the student housing office, 2071
West Mall, Ponderosa Bldg., or call
228-2811, Weekdays: 8:30 a.m.-4:00 p.m.
SPACIOUS 2 BR bsment suite with pvte.
ent. bathrm, fridge & stove. Avail. Jan.1
1987. Near UBC gates. Ideal for couple with
children (enclosed play area in backyd.) Only responsible, N/S applicants considered.
No pets. $600/mo. incl. util. Call Mark
222-1004 aft. 6 p.m.
STUDENT WANTED: Bsmt. room, home of
elderly lady. Incl. breakfast & dinner, nice
area, 10 min. to UBC, N/S, avail Dec. 1
$250.00 266-6327.
ROOM FOR RENT in shared house with
Spanish-speaking family. Female student
N/S. Richmond. 277-1453.
ROOM AVAILABLE for month of
December in shared house, w/d, big kitchen, fireplace. 1% baths. $250/mo. or
$10G7week. 733-6790.
30 - JOBS
35 - LOST
LOST—Gold/silver men's Seiko Lassale
watch, bathroom (M) Buch B211, Fri., Nov.
21. Reward if found. Ph. Lyndon 253-9478.
70 - SERVICES
PREGNANT? 731-1122
Free Tests — Confidential Help
A-1 VANCOUVER INSURANCE BROKER.
Autoplan, medical ins. for students, tenant
insurance. 2065 W. 4th Ave. 731-3164.
The more choice store. Now at 1250 West 6th. 736-9111
BRAND NAME RIBBONS & SUPPLIES •OPEN SAT»WE DELIVER
THE ANGLICAN STUDENT
MOVEMENT AT UBC
presents
CHORAL EVENSONG
7:30 p.m. Alternate Sundays
SUNDAY, NOV. 30th
following the service.
Dr. John Conway
will lead a forum
on "The Jewishness
of Christianity"
Everyone is Welcome
ST. ANSELM'S CHURCH
University Blvd.
75 - WANTED
ANY    WITNESS    to    cyclist-ca
Westbrook & Univ. Blvd. morn.
731-8537.
accident
Oct. 7. Ph.
80 - TUTORING
ENGLISH    TUTOR:
(Ph.D) will tutor or g
Phone 594-0960 after
G.
ive
SIX
Harding-Russell
help with essays.
$10/hr.
85 - TYPING
MINIMUM   NOTICE  REQUIRED-Essays,
term   papers,    resumes,   theses,   reports,
UBC location (Village! 224-2662.
AD1NA WORD PROCESSING for resumes,
essays, theses. Discount for students. 10th
& Discovery. Phone 222 2122.
CP HOTELS CHATEAU LAKE LOUISE has
temporary positions available for the
Christmas season. Subsidized meals &
shared accommodations are available. Interested applicants should forward their
resume and letters of reference to the personnel office, Chateau Lake Louise, Lake
Louise, Alberta, T0L 1E0.
EXP. BABYSITTER required to look after 2
children (3, 5) 1 day/wk (Mon. or Tue.
7:45-4:15 beg Jan. '87. Phone 438-8876.
OPPORTUNITY TO EARN money on a
commission basis selling used cars as well
as lots of time to study. Approx. 4 hrs./day.
Call Hank, 736-0855 between 5:30-6:30
p.m.
JUDITH FILTNESS. quality typist. 3206 West
38th Ave. 263-0351.
WORD    PROCESSING    SPECIALIST.    U
write,   we  type  theses,   resumes,   letters,
essays. Days, evenings, wknds., 736-1208.
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST. 30 yrs exp.
Wordprocessor & IBM typewriter. Student
rates. Dorothy Martinson, 228-8346.
WORDWEAVERS — word processing
(multi-lingual). Stud, rates. Fast turnaround. 5670 Yew St. at 41st. Kerrisdale.
266-6814.
ACADEMIC and BUSINESS WORD
PROCESSING/TYPING. Quality work,
very reas. rates. Days/evenings. 263-4862.
UNIVERSITY TYPING - Word processing.
Papers, theses, resumes, letters, P-U &del.
9 a.m.-10 p.m. 7 days/wk. 734-TYPE.
WORD PROCESSING. EDITING, writing:
resumes, theses, papers, letters. Pick-up El-
delivery avail. 324-9924.
TYPING? YOU BET! Theses, papers,
essays, whatever. Experienced, reasonable.
Short notice. Kits area. June 738-1378.
THE   GOOD   WORD   PROCESSING   CO.
Spelling,  grammar expertise.  Days, eves,
wknds. Stud, rates. Call Nancy 266-1768.
WORDPOWER-Editing. proofing & word
processing professionals. Xerox copies.
Stud, rates. 3737 W. 10th at Alma
222-2661.
STUDENT/FACULTY RATES: $1.50/pg.
dble spaced text. Equations & tables:
$14/hr. Resumes: $5/pg. 50 personalized
form letters only $35. Cerlox Binding &
photocopying. Fast professional Sen/ice.
Jeeva's Word Processing, 201-636 West
Broadway. 876-5333 M/C & VISA accepted.
ON-LINE TYPING SERVICES - Fall special.
Fast, professional results @ $1.10/dble-
spaced pg. In-town or Richmond drop-off
or pick up. Glenna 277-0410 (24 hrs.)
WORD PROCESSING - Experienced,
reasonable. UBC location. Heather,
228-5528 or 261-7652 after 5 p.m.
K.E.R. WORD PROCESSING. 1633 E. 12th
Ave. Using IBC-XT with Word Perfect. Call
Kerry Rigby at 879-2895.
YEAR-ROUND. Expert essay, theses, typing
from legible work; spelling/grammar corrected. 738-6829, 10 a.m.-9 p.m., King Ed.
bus route.
TYPING. Fast and accurate. $1.50/pg.
Rachel, 224-0866 or 228-3881. Satisfaction
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TYPING. Quality work at reasonable rates.
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WILL DO TYPING in my Kits apartment.
Undergrad. degree and small
business/executive-clerical experience.
Reas. rates. Prof'l appearance. Don
734-1715. Tuesday, November 25,1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
Book decries deterrence as myth
By JAMES YOUNG
The concept of strategic bombardment with atomic weapons in
case of war . . . is the keystone of
our military policy and a foundation pillar of our foreign policy as
well.
— U.S. Democratic Senator Brien
McMahon, July 1949
The reason the superpowers have
not blown up the world yet, so the
public understands, is thanks to the
nuclear stalemate known as deterrence — neither country will launch
a first strike attack for fear of
massive retaliation.
But Queen's University history
professor Robert Malcolmson
thinks deterrence as practiced, is
an illusion, preventing nuclear
holocaust like smoking prevents
lung cancer.
In his recent book, Nuclear
Fallacies: How We Have Been
Misguided Since Hiroshima,
Malcolmson argues that while the
public accepts deterrence as an article of faith, military strategists use
the term elastically and have planned since 1945 to use nuclear
weapons in ways which are "sensible," "controlled," "flexible" or
"limited."
"In actual historical experience,
in the circles that truly count — the
military and bureaucratic elites —
important chunks of deterrence
thinking never became universally
accepted," writes Malcolmson.
Malcolmson describes secretary
of defense James Forrestal suggesting this to journalist Walter
Lippmann over lunch one day in the
spring of 1948.
rwm CHRISTMAS^
FAIR
November 24 -
December 19, 1986
SUB Main Concourse
Display Area
ONLY
THIS WEEK!
COME SEE US
NOV. 24-28
at the
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S.U.B. Main Concourse
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Nuclear Fallacies states that plans
for nuclear weapons use are based
on the illusion of "controllability,"
with strategists recently writing that
the U.S. "must possess the ability
to wage nuclear war rationally."
Malcolmson, however, summarizes the view of independent
observers, who see any use of
nuclear weapons as "a veritable
cosmic stab in the dark, a desperate
roll of the dice with apocalyptic implications."
The book also examines the fundamental contradiction in deterrence theory, namely the production of weapons that are not supposed to be used — this defies
thousands of years of military
thinking which defines weapons as
instruments of victory and soldiering as an active, aggressive profession. Here, Malcolmson quotes
former U.S. admiral Gene LaRoc-
que:
"Military men have always been
unsatisfied with the limitation of a
purely deterrent policy which
strikes them as too passive, too inflexible, too limiting, too
demoralizing and even too immoral."
Another theme is the dynamic of
the arms race. Here, Malcolmson
says the U.S. actively chose ongoing
competition soon after 1945 when it
first entertained the fallacy of a
continued technological and
numerical superiority over the
Soviet Union.
Together with the fear of falling
behind expressed in illusory
"missile gaps" or "windows of
vulnerability", this quest for
superiority has sustained the arms
print
Nuclear Fallacies: How We Have
Been Misguided Since Hiroshima
By Robert W. Malcolmson
McGiH-Queen's University Press
(1985)
152 pages
$8.95 paperback
race to the present, with the Soviet
Union eventually catching up to any
U.S. innovation.
Myth surrounds the assumption
that politicians currently direct the
military and scientific
establishments. Malcolmson refers
to "technological creep," the
phenomenon        that new
developments in weapons labs
determine military strategies and
then acquire political justifications.
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT—C.A. FIRM
ARTHUR ANDERSEN & CO.
If you are a 2nd or 3rd year accounting student with
academic and leadership abilities and are interested in professional employment with a C.A. firm May to August
1987, please submit your resume (UCPA form is suitable)
and a copy of your most recent transcript of marks by
December 17, 1986 to the Canada Employment Centre on
Campus, Brock Hall.
All resumes will be acknowledged. Campus interviews will
be held in mid-January.
Additional information is available at the UBC Canada
Employment Office.
.kJ^ON PEACE^'
and
CO-EXISTENCE
AN INNOVATIVE WAY TO FOSTER
PROSPECTS FOR PEACE IN THE MIDDLEEAST
SPEAKERS: WALID MULAH—
Coordinator Arab-Israeli Dialogue groups, Jerusalem
RONNY BRAWER—
Founding member of Progressive Zionist Caucus, New York
WED., NOV. 26
4:30 p.m., Buchanan A102
SPECIAL DINNER FOR ALL GUESTS AT
HILLEL HOUSE FOLLOWING DIALOGUE—$3.00
 sponsored by Hillel & P.Z.C. J
Paramettes
ChewaOW »
Multivilamns plua snon
(orChidran
*
Paramettes
Paramettes
EPfoessertal    ™
W   vitamns pt\M Iron
torAiUtS
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Paramettes
11 Vitamers
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Paramettes
d
UNIVERSITY
PHARMACY LTD.
Your
Choice
$4.99
224-3202
 ..   . _.    . Proscription Service
5754 University Blvd. Mon..Sun.: 9:00 a.m.-l0:00 p.m.
(In The Village) Holidays: 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.
"In short, we inhabit a world in
which the military-technological tail
is commonly wagging the political
dog," he writes.
As for the future, Malcolmson
advocates greater political control
over weapons labs through simple
measures such as test bans or the
restriction of facilities producing
enriched uranium or plutonium.
* Malcolmson also argues that a
combined civilian-military alliance
against nuclear weapons will be
more effective than a solely civilian
peace movement — some hope for
this can already be seen in the appearance of nuclear disarmament
groups made up of veterans or
former military officers.
Another proposed solution is
joint U.S. and Soviet staffing of
communication centres to minimize
misperceptions in times of crisis and
reduce the likelihood of accidental
nuclear war.
What makes Nuclear Fallacies
worth reading is the wealth of
material that gives 40 years of
historical perspective to our current
nuclear dilemma.
But an overabundance of quotations   in   proportion   to   original
material, complex sentences, and
long paragraphs combine to give
the book a dry academic quality.
The book's biggest difficulty,
however, is the failure to really explore the question implied by the title, namely the mechanisms by
which the public has been misguided in its understanding of American
nuclear strategy and foreign policy.
^IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII^
1 FULL LINE OF 1
|   STERLING SILVER   =
1* NECKCHAINS *1
2 BRACELETS • ANKLETS   |
= See Our Stunning Selection =
= AT THE CHRISTMAS FAIR =
= SUB Building Nov. 2-Dec. 12 |
= Monday thru Friday 9:30-4:00 =
S ALL PRICES SPECIALLY S
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| FINE CIRCE 1
|      SILVER SUPPLY      |
= Distributors call 736-2670 |
illllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllli
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AMS WHISTLER LODGE
...all year round
CHRISTMAS BREAK TICKET SALE
(DEC. 21-JAN. 4)
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 26
SUB 212 * 10 a.m.-3 p.m. *
Total of 4 Tickets per person allowed
(any combination allowed i.e.:
one person 4 nights or 4 people one night, etc.)
Proper I.D. required for each ticket holder
For more info —call 228-5851
For other dates, tickets on sale as usual at
AMS box office  * CASH ONLY *
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OPEN 7 DAYS FROM 4.00 p.m.
MON.-SAT. to4a.m. Sun.ft Holidays to 2a.m. Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 25,1986
UBC V-ball team trounces UVic
By DIANE LISTER
The Thunderbird men's
volleyball team was victorious on
the island this Sunday, trouncing
the UVic Vikes three games to one.
The first game saw rookie setter
Neil Withington come off the bench
to pace the 'Birds to an easy 15-6
win over UVic. Veteran setter Rick
Kaufmann was back in the line-up
for the second game, as the 'Birds
allowed the Vikes to roar back and
win by a score of 15-6.
The third game was hard-fought
by both teams, with the score being
tied at 11-11 for 16 side-outs, or
losses of serves, before the 'Birds
finally scored four quick points to
win 15-11. The fourth game, like
the first," was easily won by a score
of 15-6.
'Bird captain Shane Bellman led
the squad with 22 kills, 13 digs, and
2 stuff blocks, while 6'6" power
hitter Greg Williscroft had 24 kills
and 12 digs. Middle blocker Kevin
Hooge provided tough defence at
the net with six stuff blocks.
This was the team's third match
in the Canada West League; they
now have a 2-1 record, and last
week were ranked fourth in the
country behind U of Winnipeg, U
of Manitoba, and U of Saskatchewan .
"If we are able to maintain this
ranking, we will be guaranteed a
spot in the CIAU playoffs," coach
Dale Ohman said.
The Vikes, with a zero win-three
loss record so far, and a fairly
young squad, are not expected to be
contenders for the Canada West title this year.
Ohman predicts the battle for top
positions will be between the 'Birds,
the very strong U of Saskatchewan
Huskies, and the U of Calgary
Dinos.
Yesterday's Canada West results
release has the Huskies in top spot
with a four-zero record. The 'Birds
and Dinos each have a two-one
record, however, UBC has the
higher games won to games lost
ratio, and squeak by Calgary in the
standings to take the number two
position.
'Birds Greg Williscroft currently
leads the entire league with 69 kills.
UBC rugby
ups record
The UBC rugby squad improved
their season record to 10 and three
this past weekend with a sound 31
to three thrashing of the Tsawwas-
sen team.
The victory, on a wet and muddy
Tswawwassen home field, puts UBC
ahead of even last year's successful
pace. The team's fitness level and
strong second half efforts have accounted for some very impressive
wins over powerhouse teams such
asKATS.
Wingers Owen Walsh and John
Devlin each tallied two tries for
UBC. Roy Radu added another,
and Craig Bruomwell supplied a
three point drop goal on a difficult
wide angle kick.
Tsawwassen's point came very
early in the game on a lone penalty
kick. They were never able to
capitalize on later opportunities, opting to run with the ball on
numerous kicking situations.
Despite the win, coach Barry
Legh was disappointed in his team's
lethargic performance. Legh said
the lack of game consistency kept
the score much lower than it could
have been.
"This type of play could be
crucial when the 'Birds come up
against the tough Meraloma squad
in two weeks," he said.
UBC play their home games at
Thunderbird Stadium with covered
seating during the rainy season.
Next match is against the "Scribes"
club team this Saturday afternoon
at 2:30 p.m. in John Hendry Park.
Round bailers on a roll
By CHEW WONG
Last night the men's basketball
team stayed on the winning track
rolling over Saint Martin's College
from Washington State 87 — 71.
Once again the UBC back-court
filled the basket up. The high
scorers for the 'Birds were Paul
Johansson and Al Lalonde with 24
and 21 points respectively. Bob
Phillips netted 16 for Saint Martin's
in a losing cause.
Although Saint Martin's led
17-16 mid-way through the first
half, the game was never in question. UBC controlled the tempo
and the boards from start to finish.
Aaron Point was the man in the
paint again for the 'Birds with 10
rebounds.
The win over Saint Martin's is the
sixth straight for the Basket 'Birds
and gives them a lot of momentum
going into the tough University of
Alberta tournament this weekend.
The UBC men's basketball team
downed the University of Western
Washington Vikings 85-81 last
Thursday night at War Memorial
Gym.
Paul Johansson bagged a game
high 29 points for the 'Birds while
Dale Harris tallied 18 for Western
Washington.
UBC led from start to finish in a
chippy and poorly officiated game.
The last five minutes of the jame
were dragged out for 30 minutes
because of a flurry of intentional
fouls committede by the Vikings.
"It was poor reffing, but it's also
the way Americans play," saic" co-
captain   Paul   Johansson.   "'  ley
don't like to lose to Canadians."
UBC forward Aaron Point continued his impressive play on Thursday — scoring 16 points and
reaching out for a team high 10 rebounds.
"I thought it was one of our
poorer games as a team," Point
said. "We didn't run our set patterns very well."
The 'Birds meet the Dinos this
MEN'S
WOMEN'S
Friday in Calgary, and the team has
VOLLEYBALL STANDINGS
VOLLEYBALL STANDINGS
been preparing for the match for
MW ML GW GL P
MW ML GW GL P
several weeks.
Sask.
4   0   12   2   4
Vic.                       4   3
12   0   4
"This  weekend's  showdown  is
B.C.
2   1     7   4   2
Calg.                     2   1
8   3   2
quite crucial to us," Ohman said.
Calg.
2   1     6   5   2
Sask.                      2   2
7   8 2
The   squad   then   travels    to
Alta.
2   2     8   6
B.C.                       2   2
6   7   2
Lethbridge to battle the Pronghorns
Vic.
0   3     0   9   0
Alta.                      1    3
3   9   1
on Saturday night.
Lethbrdg.
0   3     0   9   0
Lethbrdg.              0   3
0   9   0
. -«*.,*..#» . , 1-z^mmm^.d^,    ■ ^ . ~-„ - •     -.'•—'
^^■;f^^?*&m*mmr&??*- ~'^^ ^1"
__jLjjmtmj__i™^^    oJw-jaea- - ^sy&ss&'m*" ■*, ^.           ***- -1;■. ■        ■<•                *,?—*. -^^^^
*3**wN   ,
< ' '<&W" ^iJ^llSJSJSJSJSJSJSJSJSJsW*^!:
^rl^J^Tr^^ *'' $0sk^
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ij^"*" ^S^^^^ifWW^                         ^
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— doug field photo
FREE LIKE a bird but dumb like a brick ponders fotog of local high cliffs enthusiast as he parts ways with the earth
and sails out over breakers near Spanish Banks. Craft later plummetted to earth while fotog changed lenses, leaving readers with inaccurate impression that big kite flying is peaceful and safe.
Vanier Cup statistics
VANIER CUP
UBC 10   7   1    7-25
Western 1     0 14   8-23
YARDSTICKS
Wes
First Quarter
FG Bellefontaine 22 5:08
TD  Ros 39 pass from
(Bellefontaine    convert)
UBC -
UBC -
Gagner
8:34.
West — Single Crews 55 15:00
UBC
22
144
305
442
21-38
2
8-38
0-0
7-45
UBC
Gagner
12:18
Second Quarter
- TD Cochrane 5 pass from
(bellefontaine   convert)
Third Quarter
West — TD Filipiuk 21 pass from
Samways (Crews convert) 3:50
UBC — Single Bellefontaine 30
7:20
West — TD Sapunjis 5 run
(Crews convert) 10:50
Fourth Quarter
West — Marshall 4 run (Crews
convert) 0:12
West — TD Ros 4 pass from
Putoto (Bellefontaine convert)
14:56
Attendance — 17,847
First downs 23
Yards rushing 205
Yards passing 264
Net offence 469
Passes made-tried      16-33
Interceptions 3
Punts-average 5-33
Fumbles-lost 3-1
Penalties-yards 4-50
Individual
Rushing: Western — Stewart
10-80, Marshall 11-75; UBC -
Cochrane 15-69, Geremia 4-26.
Receiving: Western —
Wolkensperg 4-112, Spriel 3-64,
Filipiuk 4-45; UBC — Bellefontaine
5-99, Munro 4-86, Ros 4-67,
Cochrane 7-51.
Passing: Western — Samway
16-33, 264 yds, 1 TD, 2 intercepts;
UBC - Gagner 17-29, 254 yds, 2
TDs, 3 intercepts, Putoto 4-9, 51
yds, 1 TD.
ALL-STARS
Offence
Running Backs — Brian Walling, Acadia; Blake Marshall,
Western Ontario
Quarterback — Tony Harris,
Bishop's
Inside Receiver — Tim Kar-
bonik, Calgary
Slotback - Paul Shorten,
Toronto
Wide Receivers — Ken Evraire,
Laurier; Wally Zatylny, Bishop's
Centre — Pierre Vercheval,
Western Ontario
Guards — Craig Watson,
Calgary; Louie Godfry, Guelph
Tackles — Rocco Romano,
Concordia; Leo Groenewegen,
UBC
Defence
Tackles — Andrew McConnell,
St. Francis Xavier; Richard
Jolicoeur, Ottawa
Ends — Paul Gedies, Western
Ontario; Rob Kalvaitis, McMaster
Linebackers — Matt James,
Western Ontario; Leroy Blugh,
Bishop's; Pat Jancsy, St. Francis
Xavier; Jack Beetstra, UBC
Defensive backs — Mark Norman, UBC; Chuck Wust, Acadia;
Jake Vaughan, Bishop's; Sheldon
Weindauf, Alberta
ffi^illiiillBi^fe
AUTHOR   VISIT
BEST-SELLING AUTHOR
JEAN M. AUEL
WILL BE SIGNING COPIES OF
"The Mammoth Hunters"
IN PAPERBACK ($6.95) AT THE
UBC BOOKSTORE ON TUES., NOV. 25
BETWEEN 3 and 4 P.M.
Call 228-4741
mm BOOKSTORE

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