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The Ubyssey 1978-11-28

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 UCBC cautioned on tuition
By TOM HAWTHORN
A recommendation by the
Universities Council of B.C. that
tuition fees be raised in direct
proportion to university budget
increases should be treated with
caution, UBC administration
president Doug Kenny said
Monday.
Kenny said the recommendation
was briefly mentioned during a
Friday meeting between education
minister Pat McGeer, UCBC
members, and the presidents of
UBC, Simon Fraser University and
the University of Victoria.
"Unquestionably, we would have
to approach very cautiously any
index or statistical scheme for
determining tuition fees," he said.
The recommendation, which
calls for a directly proportional
tuition fee increase when the provincial government raises UBC's
operating budget, was originally
presented in the council's annual
report last May.
The UCBC is an intermediary
body between the universities and
the   government   which   evaluates
university budget requests and
makes funding recommendations.
Kenny said McGeer called the
meeting to tell the three university
presidents that he wants the
universities to present five-year
budgets to the council.
"The main purpose was to
provide an opportunity to indicate
his wishes and desires that he
receive five-year fiscal estimates for
the university," Kenny said.
"The universities council will be
working with the universities to
fulfill   that   mission   so   that   the
government gets the total fiscal
picture of higher education."
But student board of governors
representative Paul Sandhu said he
was disturbed that the council,
McGeer, and university presidents
met to discuss tuition fees without
student participation.
"The implication is that there
will be a fee formula devised for
these five-year programs. I don't
think anyone should be raising fees
until student accessibility and other
reports are tabled," Sandhu said.
"The only reason is that they feel
students should pay more because
our fees are the lowest in the
country. That's no justification. In
fact, I've never heard UCBC give a
valid explanation for raising fees."
Kenny said he would prefer to
have annual budget reassessments
to complement five-year budgetary
estimates. Total expenditures for
five-year planning can be made
with "pretty sophisticated
guesses," Kenny added.
McGeer's executive assistant Jim
Bennett refused Monday to discuss
the meeting.
Centre in for
petrobucks?
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXI, No. 31       VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 1978   ««ri>48    228-2301
Administration president Doug
Kenny is courting trouble if he
allows a wealthy Alberta business
group to complete funding of
UBC's Asian centre, Alma Mater
Society president Paul Sandhu said
Monday.
"Kenny is throwing his principles
out the door on this. The Japanese
Economic Association has also
provided money for the centre and
they aren't going to like this,"
Sandhu said.
The Devonian Institute of
Alberta is a group of wealthy
businessmen who recently approached the UBC administration
with an offer to complete the project. The centre's construction has
been stalled for lack of funds but
was partially financed in the past by
an independent organization, the
Japanese Economic Association.
Sandhu warned that the Alberta
government may resent the Institute
taking historical artifacts out of
provincial collections to be put into
UBC's Asian centre.
"If the government of Alberta
finds out this stuff is going to UBC
they would be pretty pissed off," he
said.
Kenny said Monday he would not
comment on the matter except to
say that the amount of money
discussed with the institute is
"sizeable."
"I am not really in a position to
talk about this," he said. "It would
not be appropriate at this point in
time. They would prefer that it not
be discussed."
Kenny also refused to say what
kinds of artifacts the institute wants
to display in the centre.
"We're involved in important
discussions and it would be
inappropriate to disclose the nature
of such matters," he said.
The centre's future remained
doubtful until Nov. 7 this year
when the UBC board of governors
approved an authorization from the
provincial government to borrow
the $3.5 million needed to complete
the building.
Since then the institute has offered to provide the centre with
grant money.
IT'S GOING, GOING, gone, exclaims UBC administration president Doug
Kenny as he watches happy faculty and student affairs vice-president Erich
Vogt sail out of Empire Stadium and into orbit over Thunderbirds' football
victory against despised Simon Fraser Clansmen. Vogt and Kenny in particular and UBC students and alumni in general were in high spirits after
—peter menyasz photo
T-Birds demolished SFU 22-14 before 12,000 in revitalized Shrum Bowl action Saturday night. Inventor of bowl, former B.C. Hydro boss Gordon
Shrum, stands with device at left and Thunderbird quarterback Dan Smith
on right. See story, more pictures, on page 8.
'One-man self-help scheme is a scam'
By GEOF WHEELWRIGHT
A self-appointed one-man "self-
help organization" operating on
campus is a dangerous rip-off, UBC
off-campus housing director Dave
Johnson said Monday.
A one-time follower of the Ruth
E. Potter Foundation, Johnson said
organization leader Robert Thompson, a former insurance salesman,
preys upon students who are at a
crucial period in their lives and con
vinces them that his "personal
development program" will save
them.
"People who are at a turning
point in their life are attracted to
him . . . he's not a person anyone
should get involved with," said
Johnson.
Johnson said he lent money to
Thompson during one of his personal development programs and
had to go to court to get it back.
Corrupt campus cops caught
TORONTO (CUP) — It's getting so you can't
trust anyone on campus these days, even the campus
patrol.
University of Toronto students were shocked over
the weekend when five U of T constables were
charged in connection with campus break-ins that
Toronto Metro police say may have netted tens of
thousands of dollars in cash and goods.
Police have seized master keys that would make
offices all over the U of T campus vulnerable. There
may still be more arrests, police say.
Gordon Huff, manager of protective services for
the university, said the university became "quite
concerned about the loss of cash and property" in
the past 18 months.
"We were losing all this cash and property and we
realized something had to be done. It was the normal
thing to ask the Metro police to take over — our
police have limited resources to carry out an intensive investigation."
Also arrested was the wife of one of the university
patrol constables who was charged. The six arrests
followed a five-month investigation by Metro police.
Huff refused to say how much was taken, except
that it was "considerable" and came from buildings
all across the campus.
The university patrol has 43 men in its main detachment patrolling the U of T's St. George campus.
"I did not get the amount owed
me," he added.
Thompson set up a table Monday
in the SUB snack bar with pamphlets and signs on it dealing with
everything from bank policies to
Christ.
Thompson "persuaded" people
to do things for him, but charged
no fee for his self-improvement
program, said Johnson.
Johnson said he and others were
persuaded to lend money to
Thompson and added one member,
(Thompson's girlfriend) was persuaded to buy Thompson a condominium, furniture and a car for
his use.
Thompson's followers were
fascinated with his constant insistence that he was under
surveillance and that the Mafia was
out to exterminate him, said
Johnson.
He said Thompson would see
enemies in parked trucks, try to act
on "secret signals" from cars that
flashed their headlights at him and
all the time remain highly credible.
"We believed every damn word
of it," said Johnson.
Johnson said Thompson led him
to believe there was a large
organization backing his activities
because he had an office in Vancouver's Royal Tower and held self-
improvement seminars at the Century Plaza hotel.
He .said his association with
Thompson lasted for about three
months in 1973 and ended when
Thompson was arrested on welfare
and unemployment insurance fraud
charges.
Johnson said the program involved various "self-improvement activities" conducted by a group of
organization members. Some of
these activities included jogging at
Spanish Banks beach at 5:30 every
morning, soliciting interest in the
group by approaching people in
shops and public places, and asking
people if they wanted to "maximize" their ability to make
money.
Johnson said one of the names
associated with Thompson's
organization is the Ruth E. Potter
Foundation which is allegedly a
non-profit organization.
Thompson said Monday the
organization,   named   after   his
See page 2: DEVELOPMENT Pago 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 28, 1978
'Development' hit
From page 1
former wife, aims to to allow people to help themselves.
Thompson said he is working
with Robert Thompson and
Associates International, College
University Student Enterprises, and
Christian Investment Finance International, during his current campus
visit.
Thompson claimed that he is being hunted by major American insurance companies who wish to see
him dead because he does not support their plans and ideas. He added he was once a member of Mutual
Life Insurance in New York, but
realized that insurance was a "big
rip-off" and quit the business.
Because   of   his   anti-insurance
STARTS THURSDAY
views, Thompson said attempts
have been made on his life by insurance companies who fear the effect Thompson's "revelations"
could have on the insurance industry.
"I am one of the most feared
men in North America," said
Thompson.
Thompson describes himself as
self-employed. His business card
lists his social status as "not retired,
just tired, no address, no phone, no
business, no money."
"I'm a 19-year-old with a three-
year-old mind," he said.
the RETURN
■of the Pink
■Panther
United Artists G
I Thurs. Sun 7:00
1 Fri. Sat 7:00 & 9:30
I AMS card must be shown
UBC
Graduation
Portraits
since 1969
Amnyraylt   ^iittiimi tCtiX
3343 West Broadway
732-7446
Phone now for your Free sitting
rd
hair studio inc.
master charge
UNISEX HAIRSTYLES
FOR APPOINTMENT
224-1922
224-9116
5784 University (Nexf to Bank of Commerce?
NOTICE OF
SPECIAL GENERAL MEETING
The President having called for a Special General Meeting following
receipt of a petition duly signed by over 500 active members of the
Society evidencing the members registration numbers;
TAKE NOTICE THAT a Special General Meeting of the members of
The Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia will be
held:
AT THE STUDENT UNION BUILDING BALLROOM
ON THURSDAY THE 18TH DAY
OF JANUARY, 1979
AT 12:30 O'CLOCK IN THE AFTERNOON.
AND THAT it is intended to propose the following resolution as a
special resolution.
The proposed special resolution proposes amendment? to the Constitution and By-laws of the Society and must therefore, pursuant to
the provisions of the Societies Act, be passed in general meeting by a
majority of not less than 75% of those members of the Society who,
being entitled to do so, vote in person at a meeting the quorum for
which is set by By-law 23(1) (a) as 10% of the active members of the
Society (as defined by By-law 2(a)) who are day members.
THE PROPOSED AMENDMENTS TO THE CONSTITUTION AND BYLAWS ARE POSTED AT ALL UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY OFFICES
(NEXT WEEK) AND AT THE AMS BUSINESS OFFICE (SUB ROOM
266), AND ARE ALSO AVAILABLE ON REQUEST FROM THE AMS
SECRETARY/TREASURER. NO OTHER PROPOSED AMENDMENTS
TO THE CONSTITUTION AND/OR BY-LAWS OF THE SOCIETY MAY
BE CONSIDERED AT THIS SPECIAL GENERAL MEETING UNLESS
SUCH AMENDMENTS ARE INITIATED IN ACCORDANCE WITH BYLAW 23(2) AND NOTICE SPECIFYING THE INTENTION TO PROPOSE A SPECIAL RESOLUTION PROPOSING SUCH OTHER AMENDMENTS. TOGETHER WITH THE PROPOSED AMENDMENTS. IS
POSTED IN A CONSPICUOUS PLACE IN EACH CONSTITUENCY
AND PUBLISHED IN THE UBYSSEY NOT LESS THAN 14 DAYS
PRIOR TO THE DATE OF THE MEETING (in the calculation of which
time period the date of giving the notice and the date of the meeting
is excluded).
In order to vote at the meeting a member must be an active member,
and produce a valid student card so identifying the member.
Dated this 23rd day of November. 1978.
-''l.m ^civ -<-.(—if-vi lv
AMS Secretary-Treasurer
223-2050/SUB Room 250
FAMOUS
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24 HR. SHOWTIME INFORMATION — 681-4255     j
WARNING: May ya.a. folk
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DENMAN PLACE
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1:30, 3:25, 5:25, 7:25, 9:25
 DOWNTOWN	
965 GRANVILLE 685 6725
"MESSAGE
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Cap   2:45. 4:55, 7:05, 9:20
Richmond 7:30.9:30
NO MATINEES
WARNING: Some gory scenes-
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THE BOYS
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if they survive...will we?
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HEAVEN CAN WAIT
CAP — 2:00, 4:00, 6:00, 8:00, 10:00
LOUGHEED MALL — 7:20. 9:15 — Mats. Sal. Sun  2:15
2:00, 4:30, 7:00, 9:40
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820 GRANVILLE MALL 669 6000
I «flTHfl CHRISTIES I
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GRANVILLE&GEORGIA 6694442
VAN CENTRE
1:25, 3:30, 5:35, 7:45.9:55
WARNING: Some coarse language.
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j<*CKrflCH0Lsori
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820 GRANVILLE MALL
1:30, 3:30, 5:30, 7:30, 9:30
■ PARK ROYAL	
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from WALT DISNEY Productions
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Escape—7:00 Return —8:35
MATS  SAT  SUN   1:30
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1117 WEST GEORGIA 685 7821
Fine Arts 7:30. 9:30
Sat. 1:30. 3:30. 5:30. 7:30. 9:30
Sun. from 3:30
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WARNING: Some gory violence, coarse
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ft*rcwra
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12th 733 2622
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GUILFORD TOWN CENTRE
STANLEY 7:30, 9:30
Mats. Sat. Sun. 2:00
GUILDFORD 7:30. 9:30
Mat. Sat. only 2:00
MAGIC
44
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l/2mi Wof KNIGHT ST. BR. 278 2710
IN PRAISE OF OLDER WOMEN
FROM STEPHEN MZINCZEY'S MODERN CLASSIC
 CAPITOL 6,
820 GRANVILLE MALL
NEW WESTMINSTER
COLUMBIA
WARNING: Nudity and sex — B.C. DIRECTOR
Cap: 3:00, 5:00, 7:00, 9:00
Columbia: 7:00, 9:00. MAT
Delta Gates: 7:30       Show: 8:00
/   ■li„l,( ■»»        Columbia: 7:00, 9:00. MATS. SAT. SUN. 2:00
 CAPITOL 6,
820 GRANVILLE MALL
WARNING: Occasional Suggestive scenes & Dialogue.
— B.C. Director
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Cap—3:00, 5:15, 7:30, 9:50
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LOUGHEED MALL
LOUGHEED MALL 7:45. 9:40—MATS. SAT. SUN. 2:00
REVENGE OF THE PINK PANTHER
WARNING: Some violence —B.C. Dir.
 GUILDFORD	
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GUILDFORD 7:00, 9:10
Mat. Sat. only2:00
WARNING: Altered version
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WEST VANCOUVER 922 9174
j mmm« m      ■*mmimmtmtmi.imVMi>"fi w^yww»       —«-*»nrtin;wiiiiii»wiii«M»*w        ^jf
— LOUGHEED DRIN —
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Park Royal 7:30. 9:30 MAT   SAT  ONLY 2:00
Lougneed Dr. In Gates 7:00        Snow 730 Tuesday, November 28, 1978
THE      UBYSSEY
Pag* II
Theatre students hit department
UBC theatre students are
unhappy about the lack of student
participation in Freddy Wood
Theatre productions, the president
of the theatre students' association
charged Monday.
"There are two (Freddy Wood)
productions that use students this
season and that's all," Chris Smith
said.
"It doesn't seem that it (the
department) is giving students what
they want — more participation."
Smith said the current season's
theatre productions are obscure
plays but added that even if there
were more commercial productions, the student status would not
change.
"They (the department) don't
trust student actors," she said.
"It's a weird season. There was all
that fuss last year and then they
turned around and did this (put on
two productions where students are
used)."
Theatre students complained
repeatedly last year about hiring
professional actors first before
students for theatre productions
and the theatre department set up a
meeting between students and
theatre faculty members last spring
to discuss the situation.
Students understand the theatre
department's policy and situation
as a result of that meeting, theatre
department head John Brockington
said Monday in response to the
complaints.
"The job of university theatre is
to present plays of interest to the
university community at large and
to involve students of the department often, and to the greatest
extent possible," he said.
Brockington said the theatre
casts from students first and any
UNSUSPECTING STUDENTS sign souls away to devil, unaware that
table in SUB is clever attempt by Alma Mater Society to gain signatures on
petition opposing tuition fee increases that will be presented to UBC board
of governors in order to show student opposition to higher fees. AMS is
— ross burnett photo
organizing fight against any tuition fee increase for next year, something
now being discussed as means to deal with perennial provincial government education funding cutbacks.
CITR transmits FM frequency request
By PETER MENYASZ
UBC's campus radio station
CITR has applied to the Canadian
Radio and Television Commission
for a low-power FM band to increase its broadcasting range.
"We could reach the whole
campus for sure, and provide
reasonable reception in the West
End and even in some parts of the
North Shore," CITR president
Darrell Noakes said Monday.
The new broadcasting license,
which would provide the campus
radio station with a frequency of
92.1 MHz, would mean an Alma
Mater Society expenditure of about
$8,000 for new equipment.
A new transmitter would be
purchased and an antenna would be
erected, probably on the east tower
of Gage residence,  said  Noakes.
"We think we need it (the FM
band), and we would like to have
it," he said. "We get a lot of phone
calls from people off-campus who
like to listen to CITR," he added.
Noakes said residents of Gage
Towers and Totem Park have
complained about poor CITR
reception caused by cable radio
transmission.
One problem exists with CITR's
application, which was submitted
Nov. 21.
There are no FM frequencies
available for the Vancouver area.
"There   are   six   frequencies
available for Victoria," Noakes
said. "And we've asked for the one
at the bottom of the list."
"Technically speaking, we could
get bumped if someone else asked
for the same frequency, but that
isn't likely for quite a few years,"
he added.
He said that CITR does not plan
any changes in format or content to
accommodate its increased audience, as students seem pleased
with CITR's current programming.
"The CRTC says that all of our
papers are in order," said Noakes
in reference to the mass of paperwork required for the application.
"Their last hearing in Vancouver
may have scared them a little," he
added. "I'm optimistic that we'll
get the application through. We
just have to wait until they get
around to having the hearing."
The CRTC is the government
agency responsible for the licensing
of radio and television stations.
Their decisions are made after open
public hearings on the applications
they receive.
UBC wins battle of words
The UBC debating club won the
annual University Cup tournament
at the University of Victoria
Saturday for the first time in the
tournament's history.
Previously, UVic was the winner
of every tournament.
UBC won the award for best
team, and members placed first,
second and fourth in the individual
debater category. Eight teams
competed in the tournament, two
each from UBC, UVic and Pearson
College and one from New
Caledonia College.
Members of the winning UBC
team are Richard Clarke, Christine
Preson, "Susan Fisher and Simon
Van Norden. The top debater was
Nathalie Cooke.
This year's tournament debated
the resolution That the Main
Priority of Today's Youth Be To
Change The Values of Their
Society.
Debating teams from universities
and colleges across western Canada
will meet at UBC Jan. 26, 27 in the
McGowan Cup Tournament to
debate the topic That the CBC's
Eastern Elitism Will Be Its Downfall."
AMS task force sets sail
l IM" will soon have its very own task iorce on Alma Mater Society
uuitv.
AMS finance director Glenn Wong said Monday the task lorce will
find oui what students want the AMS lo piovide in services.
"Everyone previously gave us a budget and we were supposed to
make a budget without goals or direction," he said. "Ihe task force
will go around campus and having meetings with undergraduate
societies and find out what they really want."
The AMS budget committee will form the nucleus of the task force,
which received $500 from the student representative assembly Wednesday. Wong will be chairman of the task force, which is designed to
explore the use of AMS funds.
"This is a last-ditch uffoit. As it gets tighter (financially), we're going
to need more definite priorities, so we waste less money."
Wong said the task force will hold hearings in January and added he
.plans io present recommendations to the SRA in February. .
roles not cast through the student
population tend to be filled by
outside actors.
Smith charged that professors are
given "free-reign" in productions at
Freddy Wood and as a result can
put on obscure and experimental
productions.
"Professors want to do what
they want and they are going to do
it," Smith said. "It is an insoluable
problem."
But Smith also said Freddy
Wood cannot host all-student
productions because the theatie
department has to provide for three
crowds: an intellectual, a university
and a general theatre audience. The
department also has a big budget
and professional facilities, so at
times it puts on elaborate
productions that require equity
actors, she said.
The theatre department can
afford to hire equity actors with
such a large budget and hiring
professional actors coincides with
other professional factors of
production, another theatre student
said.
"There is a full professional staff
here of set technicians and
designers," he said, "and if there
are no students good enough for the
lead roles then they (the department) should be allowed to hire
equity actors. If they don't, then
the rest goes to waste.
"As far as a university acting
program goes there is not a lot of
room for complaint," another
theatre student agreed. "It is not
meant to be a conservatory acting
program and this is stressed in the
orientation talk for theatre students
(given by Brockington) at the
beginning of the year."
Another student who also did not
want to be identified said that
students were given sufficient
opportunities to act and that two
student productions at Freddy
Wood each year is satisfactory.
(The Bacchae and All's Well That
Ends Well are both student casted.)
"But," she added, "The Bacchae
wasn't any representation of
student acting. It (the play) was just
such a blatant display of (director)
Donald Soule's ego. I couldn't get
over it."
In a letter 'addressed to The
Ubyssey Friday one reader who
declined to be identified wrote that
The Bacchae was typical of Freddy
Wood productions. Soule directed
the play for egotistical purposes
and overwhelmed the audience with
stage effects instead of displaying
student acting, the author charged
and added that she will boycott all
future faculty productions in
Freddy Wood as a result.
"I could have easily written a
letter like that myself," one of the
theatre students said. "The whole
thing (The Bacchae) was contrived,
people just did what they were told
and nobody had any responsibility.
"It wjis technically well coordinated but there was certainly no
chance for creativity on the
student's part," she added.
Another student said she agreed
with the person's charge in The
Ubyssey letter that productions are
for "the egos of certain members of
the theatre department."
"At least 50 per cent of the
directors are doing it for themselves, and you have to ask whether
their (UBC professors') purpose is
to direct or to teach us."
But a change in the way plays are
produced would mean a change in
the whole theatre philosophy, she
added.
The theatre department does not
fulfill certain responsibilities to the
students, another student said.
"For example, a requirement for
the first-year acting course is that
we (the students) have to audition
for a main-stage, Freddy Wood
production. Pag* 4
SSE Y
Tuesday, November 28, 1 978
Break ties
A poor idea which has been receiving increased attention as the
academic and fiscal year wears on is the concept of tying tuition
fees to the university budget. Under this scheme, which was
discussed at the Universities Council of B.C. meeting on Friday,
tuition fees would be required to make up a specific proportion of
the university's budget. When the budget increases, so would
fees.
The long term effects of such a policy on tuition fees and student
budgets would be disastrous.
Necessarily, as the province grows so will UBC, but
demographic surveys indicate the university student population is
levelling off and is actually declining in some provinces.
Tying fees to budgets will mean a de facto increase in tuition fees
and will save education minister Pat McGeer and his successors
from the unpopular decision to raise fees, blaming the increases on
an impersonal fiscal mechanism instead.
McGeer, the man who brought you the new, improved auto insurance rates, is merely extending the Socred "let the user pay"
philosophy (which has had and is continuing to have such a
disastrous effect on the ferry system, tourism and municipal
finance) to higher education finance.
Finding a way to pass a provincial government responsibility onto students has taken a little longer than the much-used tactic in
other areas, but it was bound to come.
The decisions to raise tuition fees are being made now in Victoria
and in UCBC offices. In fact, the only segment of the university
community not actively involved in the issue are the people who
will be hit hardest — students and potential students.
To date, some Alma Mater Society politicos have begun to protest higher fees and are starting a petition campaign. But those involved in the campaign are few and this battle will require the full
resources of the AMS.
A full-scale anti-tuition fee increase campaign, like the one
managed two years ago is needed.
The people involved then succeeded in pressuring the government to downgrade an anticipated 40 per cent increase to 25 per
cent.
AMS politicos are currently examining their collective navels,
mulling over the society's constitutional set-up.
The constitution issue is of marginal concern to many students
but a proposed fee hike touches the thin pocketbooks of most
students now on campus and those to come in the future.
THE UBYSSEY
NOVEMBER 28, 1978
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year by the Alma
Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the
AMS or the university administration. Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey
publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial office is in
room 241K of the Student Union  Building.  Editorial departments, 228-2301; Advertising,
228-3977.
Editor: Mike Bocking
In a rare Monday afternoon practice, the Ubyssey football team showed off the miraculous skill that has kept them at the bottom of their league.. As
quarterback Mike "the Snake" Bocking called the signals, halfback Tom "Flash" Hawthorn rushed for several spectacular one-ya'd gains. Fullback
Geof "Scythe" Wheelwright moved down several members of the defensive squad, including middle linebacker Steve "Speedy" Howard and safety
Heather "King" Conn. Wide receivers Bill "Spike" Tieleman and Kevin "Spoke" Finnegan ran beautiful pass patterns through the defensive
backfield, but were outsmarted by defensive backs Don "Butch" Mclntyre and Paul "The Thug" Wilson, who b'oke up the plays by breaking The
players' legs. Petei "Foot" Stockland thumped out several ten-yard punts, and field goal specialist Peter "Two-left-foot" Menyasz barely missed
breaking several SUB windows. Coaches Vicki "Guts' Booth and Fran "the Brain" Maclean shouted encouragement, and team spiritual leader Verne
"Sky-pilot" McDonald prayed to the great coach in the sky for a chance to play the only team the Ubyssey Pesshogs could beat - the AMS
Hacksaws.
\
./
Letters
Nuke argument blown to pieces
I refer to the letter by Karl Erd-
man, Nov. 23, about nuclear
energy. In my opinion one can also
lie by omitting important facts. So
let's add some facts. Of necessity I
will refer only to some parts of his
article and give only uncomplete
answers (trying not to lie by doing
so).
I) Of course alpha, beta and
gamma rays are not "radioactive
particles" (and Maureen McEvoy
did not claim they were). But our
scientist Karl Erdman, might know
that in many cases the isotopes
resulting from decay are radioactive
again.    One    can    also    observe
r.
Short Elvis lives
After reading your review of
the Elvis Costello show I felt
compelled to return a few notes,
to the scene of the crime, so to
speak. It was the most dismal
account of the evening that I
encountered anywhere. It totally
missed the point, dwelling on
Elvis "Declan McManus" Costello's psychological makeup
rather than the statement that he
makes through his music.
Sure, it's swell to know that
Elvis plays a Fender Jazzmaster,
is short and wears glasses like
Woody Allen, doesn't smile a
hell of a tot, but who cares?
It would appear to me that by
simply categorizing Elvis a "new
wave act," you're giving him the
write-off simply for the period
of his emergence into the music
scene. Yes, he is new, different
and vital, but still totally
removed from people such as
Devo or the Clash, although
they're excellent bands in their
own right.
Getting back to the music,
you only need look as far as the
Cheryl Tiegs, Suzanne Sommers
and Farrah Fawcett lookalikes
on this campus to know that a
song like This Year's Girl is
important and relevant. The
voluntary censorship of local
stations such as CFMI, CKLG
and CFUN will keep Radio
Radio from getting any air play;
count on it.
And then there's I Don't
Want to Go to Chelsea, a classic
tune about the artist as product,
that you couldn't even be
bothered to mention, even
though it's an integral part of
Costello's show.
Sure this guy's intense, he's
got something to say. Your
review however, showed that
he's obviously not getting
through. The 5,500 that were
there on Friday night I'll take
over any of you "crazed"
Fleetwood Mac, Chicago and
Steve Miller fans. Have fun at
the Queen concert. Aw, you all
make me ill.
What's the use?
Stan Jones
science 3 J
"cascade    effects"    (radioactivity-
caused by radiation).
2) Of course coal contains radioactive material, like everything else.
But for understanding Karl's
figures, let's think about what
happens to the released radioactivity and above all, how our
scientists "measure" the "radiation
dose" caused by nuclear plants.
Many of the radioactive isotopes
released by nuclear plants are
accumulated in high concentrations
in vegetation and animals '(e.g.
iodine I3l up to 3.5 to 10 million
times compared to the air content in
the surrounding area).
Within the organic tissue the biologically high efficient alpha and
beta rays can damage genes,
whereas you can hardly detect them
in the open air or water (they are
short range rays. Ask Karl Where
and how they derived their comparative figures.).
Some facts: Dr. Sadao Ichikawa,
a biologist, found (by using plants
as detectors) that surrounding
nuclear power plants there is an
increase in the mutation rate during
the time of growth of the stamen
hairs which was at least as high as
that caused by 300 millirem in the
laboratory. However, official
scientists have "measured" 7.5 to
8.7 millirem per year.
A group of Heidelberg biologists
recently found that the International Commission for Radiological
Protection recommended the lowest
available numbers (out of a wide
range) for computing the estimated
radiation dose caused by plants.
Probably much too low.
3) Deaths from nuclear technol
ogy (Karl's "0 in nuclear power
plants" is not only actually wrong
but leads readers astray): Contamination by nuclear technology is
not only dangerous for workers (in
years past 20 to 50 per cent of
uranium miners died of lung cancer
(Helen Caldicott, biologist, New
Age, Dec, 1977); it is also a threat
to all living things.
The effects to following
generations by genetic mutation is
most hidden and treacherous. You
might know for example, that
plutonium is concentrated in the
testicles and ovaries of humans.
In the Laguna Pueblo reservation
near Grants, a uranium mine in
New Mexico, more than 100 babies
(for comparison: the tribe's work
force is about 600 people) were
born in recent years which suffer
from some form of birth defect;
(disclosed this month by a staff
member of a U.S. senate committee
on Indian affairs (New Times,
Nov., 78).
Probably because these people
use to live in heated, sealed, concrete
apartments, if one is to believe
Karl.
4) The "knowledge" of our
faithful scientists: e.g.: The other
day I read in the New Scientist that
the assumptions that were used to
derive concentration limits for
plutonium (Pu) in water ire
suspected  to  be   wrong:   Chlorine
changes Pu4 (hardly incorporated)
to Pu6 (very well incorporated) by
oxidation.
5) Karl "forgot" to quote the
actual total costs of nuclear technology. Who knows them?
In the end a "polemic" questian
(referring to the unsolved waste
problem). Would you start driving
a car downhill if the only thing you
have heard is that the car perhaps
might have brakes or at least there
are some engineers that should be
able to develop and provide th«m
during your trip?
Gerhard Steinmt tz
Road to ruin
To pay $1 a gallon for gas or
50 cents a trip on the bus is barely
acceptable under normal circumstances but when the majority
of the roads west of Blanca begin to
resemble the Alaska Highway, rage
sets in to the degree that commuting
via helicopter becomes more and
more feasible.
Whoever, in their infinite
stupidity, decided that an extensive
overhaul of the major arteries in
question around campus was
necessary, should personally pay
for all the flat tires and suspension
work which students and B.C.
Hydro will incur. The campus can
best be described as an inverted
speedbump.
Students using the south exits in
and out of campus are faced with
massive traffic slowdowns in addition i:o playing hopscotch with 18-
inch potholes, in various B lots.
If the Trans Canada railroad
took as long to build as it does :o
complete the construction of these
roads, B.C. would still be a colony
of England.
Dean Neumann Tuesday, November 28, 1978
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
Letters
Concentrated power frightens
In his article on nuclear power on
Thursday, Nov. 23, professor Karl
Erdman correctly argued that as
with any other poisonous substances, concentration of
radioactive materials at particular
locations should be taken into
account in the assessment of their
effects on living organisms.
It is unfortunate then that he
quite failed to carry his argument to
its most important conclusion,
namely that it is the very concentration of these materials at power
plants, as well as during transportation and at sites of waste disposal,
that have aroused public and
scientific concern.
Surely it is obvious that persons
working at nuclear installations,
and the population in surrounding
areas, run the greatest risk of harm
should leaks occur (as they already
have; see for example R. Gilette's
paper in Science, volume 181, page
728, 1973).
The article by B. L. Cohen in the
June 1977 edition of Scientific
American, which is recommended
by professor Erdman, is similarly
deficient in not considering the
effects of high local concentrations
(he prefers to envisage the 'worst
case' situation where radioactive
material is spread as a powder with
equal thickness across the surface
of the continent or deposited in the
rivers), as well as in discussing the
effects of radioactivity only in
terms of deaths from cancer.
It is worth repeating that immediate or subsequent death from
the effects of gamma radiation is
only one of the known hazards; the
possibility that genetic mutations
caused by such exposure is one that
Assistant learns
As an assistant to the director of
the recent production of The
Bacchae at the Frederic Wood
Theatre, I learned a number of
valuable things beyond new techniques in set design and construction.
First, I learned that all acting
does not have to be realistic. In
today's theatre (as anyone who
mentions "the peculiarities of
Brecht's style" should know) there
is a place for masks, choruses,
dance, even loud sounds.
Second, I learned that a theatre
production is a composite effort.
Thirty intelligent and enthusiastic
students, especially if encouraged,
provide a unique input. Professor
Soule does not come to rehearsals
with a fixed production concept.
Ideas from the cast are suggested,
tried out, rejected, accepted.
This sort of forum is more to the
point than training actors —
something the present theatre
department B.A. program is not
designed to do. Schools such as The
Playhouse Acting School train
actors.
Third, I learned about a kind of
courage that is involved when a
group of people create something
unusual and then, despite some
serious last-minute emergencies (the
show must go on even in the Freddy
Wood Playpen) expose it and
themselves to public criticism. We
put our names in the program.
Betty Tully
the general public, ignorant or not,
is well advised to fear.
These effects, especially at low
dosage, can only be quantitated by
years of careful study during which
humans living and working with
ionizing radiation will be used as
guinea pigs, and for professor Erdman to blithely quote comparative
accident statistics for 1969 is
thoroughly misleading.
Because no one is thought to
have died as a result of the use of
nuclear power in 1969 it does not
mean that in the wrong hands the
technology is not dangerous.
Analysis of risk in this connection
has thus far relied on the statistics
of random events, such as the
failure of components. How can a
proper statistical argument be
based on so few observations taken
in such a short time, especially
when the possibility of malicious
human intervention (as from a
terrorist group) has never been, and
probably can never be included?
Furthermore, we have no reason
to believe that the resource and
energy industries, which have
shown such appalling lack of
concern for the health and safety of
workers in the past (as in the coal
mines which professor Erdman
justly criticizes will apply measures
devised for human protection,
especially where profits suffer in
consequence.
Prof Erdman falls into a trap
which is all too easily set for the
academic scientist in assuming that
means which exist will
automatically be applied. This is an
especially dangerous premise in
countries like India and Argentina,
to whom Canada has sold nuclear
reactors, and who simply do not
have the technical expertise (nor,
perhaps, the political will) to deal
with them in the rational manner
which the academic scientist might
wish or envisage.
In conclusion I might add my
own voice to the voices of those
who have criticized the initial article
by Maureen McEvoy of Canadian
University Press (Ubyssey,
Thursday, Nov. 16) in making the
point "that the issues which are
central to the nuclear power debate
are not complex and scientific as
much as ethical and political.
The twentieth century has shown
us how the science created by
disinterested 'pure' scientists can be
used to concentrate power in ever
fewer hands; the issue of nuclear
energy is crucial to the reversal of
this frightening trend.
John Aplin
Chuck you Farley
I am writing in response to
Charles Slade's letter of Friday,
Nov. 24. Sure Charlie! Ignore those
disgusting warnings from doctors.
All you have to do is avert your
eyes. It is much harder to ignore the
fact that someone is smoking at the
next table in the ritzy restaurant
you can only affford to visit once a
year. Your New York steak tastes
like tobacco smoke.
I am not accusing you personally,
Charlie, as you may well be more
considerate   than   the   average
smoker.
People should be free to choose
"the pleasurable life of a smoker,"
but they should not be forced to
choose that life.
Unfortunately, my choice seems
to be to put up with cigarette smoke
in my lungs, or to remain at home
for the rest of my life. By the way, I
do know some very considerate
smokers.
Robyn Beck
arts 4
SMEDTLER DAY
NOVEMBER 29,1978
from 10 a.m. — 3 p.m.
AT
THE UNIVERSITY
OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
BOOK STORE
HIGHLIGHTS!
* Demonstrations On:
MARS 700 TECHNICAL PEN
MARS LETTERING EQUIPMENT
MARS FINELINE (0.5 mm) LEADHOLDERS
* Questions answered on all
MARS products
* Staedtler Day Specials Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 28, 1978
iH*Z <! '•%'i»y *#-<. £&',JZ44?t,, ~? ">, /
t» ■:,<,/■■#
'Tween classes
TODAY
YOUNG TRUTCHKEYITES
Jonestown punch party, 8 p.m., Trutch House.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
General meeting, noon, SUB 130.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
Testimony meeting, noon, SUB 224.
CSA
Sports night, 7:30 p.m., Thunderbird Winter
Sports Centre gym B.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Supper with important business and programming for next term, 6 p.m., Lutheran Student
Movement.
BAHA'I CLUB
Informal discussion, noon, SUB 113.
UBC TRACK AND FIELD TEAM
Practice Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday at
3:45 p.m., meet in foyer of War Memorial Gym.
PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Guest lecture by Barry Ledwidge, noon, Angus
104.
CHARISMATIC CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Prayer and sharing, noon, SUB 213.
M.F.A. STUDENT PRODUCTION  -
UBC THEATRE DEPARTMENT
The Great American  Desert one-act  play with
free admission, noon, SUB gallery.
WEDNESDAY
INTERNATIONAL TRUTCHKEYITE
ASSOCIATION
Official close to birthday season, 6 p.m., Trutch
House.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Lesbian drop-in, noon, SUB 130.
OPEN HOUSE COMMITTEE 79
First general meeting, noon, SUB 206.
CSA
Lecture   of   some   observations   of   economic
development in China, noon, Buch. 320.
WORLD UNIVERSITY SERVICE CANADA
General and informational meeting, noon, International House board room.
VARSITY OUTDOOR CLUB
Slide show, noon, Chem. 250.
Hot flashes
Open season
on UBC campus
Doug Kenny revealing himself?
Not quite. UBC will uncover its
dark, innermost secrets in this
year's soul-baring session, Open
House 79. The university will be
open to the public and other
curious spectators who wish to
discover what goes on behind closed doors. Faculty and student
representatives are invited to attend
the first general meeting at noon
Wednesday in SUB 206.
Cocke adds life
NDP education critic Dennis
Cocke will be on campus Thursday
to tell us how the Socreds are
wrecking higher education.
Festivities begin at noon in SUB
207.
War is hell
Most people first heard about
Cambodia after it was invaded by
American troops in 1970. It was an
ignominious beginning.-
David Chandler, a research director for Southeast Asian Studies for
Monash University, will speak on
the Tragedy of Cambodian History
at noon Thursday in Buch. 106.
to vin' spoonful
If twinkies are a turn-on, then
make sure you attend The Great
American Desert.
There will be two showings of
Joel Oppenheimer's one-act play in
the SUB gallery at noon Wednesday and Thursday.
PUBLIC
228-6121
FRI. & SAT.
7:30 p.m. - 9:45    p.m.
SUNDAY
1 :00 — 3:00 p.m.
STUDENTS
& CHILDREN     .75
ADULTS $,   2S
THUNDERBIRD
WINTER
SPORTS CENTRE
Student Admin. Commission
1978 — 1979
APPLICATIONS ARE NOW BEING RECEIVED
For positions on:
THE A.M.S. ART COLLECTION COMMITTEE
At the A.M.S. Business Office, Rm. 266, S.U.B.
Applications close 4:00 p.m. on FRI. DEC. 1
APPLICATIONS MAY BE PICKED UP AT ROOM 246 & 266 S.U.B.
GREBB DUNHAM
HIKING BOOTS
Half steel
shank, medium
weight—rough
out leather.
PACKS & BOOTS snooo
SPECIAL only 9B3
PACK&
BOOTS SHOP
3425   WEST   BROADWAY,   Tel.   738-3128
710 YATES MALL VICTORIA 383-2144
THURSDAY
Women's drop-in, noon, SUB 130.
PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVE CLUB
Caucus for model parliament, noon, SUB 213.
UBC NDP CLUB
MLA Dennis Cocke speaks on How the Socreds
are wrecking higher education, noon, SUB 207.
LIBERTARIAN SOCIETY
General meeting, noon, SUB 224.
UBC SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
Playing    works    of    Stravinsky,     Rossini    and
Beethoven, noon, Old Auditorium.
FRIDAY
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Women's     drop-in.     noon.     SUB     130
BLACK & LEE
TUX SHOP
NOW AT
1110 Seymour St.
688-2481
OPTIC
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ARBUTUS VILLAGE
733-1722
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ALSO GARAGES,
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CLEAN-UPS
Playing this week—8:30 p.m.:
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Wednesday
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Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Publications Office. Room 241, S U.B., UBC. Van., B.C. V6T 1W5.
5 — Coming Events
35 - Lost
85 —Typing
BAZAAR — Exotic desserts, biggest
clothing sale, craziest, lowest prices
Jewish Community Center, 41.-1 and
Oak St. Sunday, Dec. 3—11:00 a.m.-
3:00 p.m.
50 - Rentals
ALL WOMEN AND MEN welcome at
the Gay Winter Disco. Friday, 1 December, 8:30-1:00 a.m. Grad Centre
Ballroom. S2.00 with AMS card; S2.50
without   Licensed.
10 — For Sale — Commercial
AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY — Single
room, $125/mth. Kitchen facilities-
Priority to 1st and 2nd yr. students.
KS (Kappa Sigma) Fraternty, 2280
Wesbrook. Ph. 224-9679, ask for Greg
or Mike.
65 — Scandals
PROFESSIONAL TYPING on IBM collecting typewriter by experienced
secretary.   224-1567.
TYPING — 75e per page. Fast and accurate by experienced typist. Gordon,
685-4S63.
TYPING: Essays, theses, manuscripts,
reports, resumes, etc. Fast and accurate service. Bilingual. Clemy, 324-9414.
COMMUNITY SPORTS. Excellent prices
for ice skates, hockey, soccer, jogging
and racquet sports equipment. 733-
1612, 3615 West Broadway, Vancouver,
B.C.
11 — For Sale — Private
'72 FORD. % ton p.u., 60,000 miles,
AM-FM radio, good shape. $1,995
o.b.o.  224-0466.
VW BEETLE. Kxc. body, 3,000 miles on
new brakes, trans and reconditioned
'72 motor, converted to 12 volt, working heater, radio, good snow tires.
738-1935. $850.
15 — Found
BROWN LEATHER GLOVES (6) parking
Student Union Bldg. Phone 736-4753
after 6:00 p.m.  Mon.-Thurs.
20 — Housing
UNFURNISHED Bachelor Suite available. $175 month. Includes utilities
Catch car ride with me near VGH.
Hob 874-1292 or 731-8979. Non-smokers please.
DEAR  MYRTLE:  Dec.   6,   11:30  a.m.  H.
YOU DON'T HAVE TO BE GAY to come
to our Christmas Ball, Friday, 1 December 8:30-1;00 a.m. Grad Centre
Ballroom. $2.00 with AMS card; $2.50
without.  Full Facilities
GET OUT OF TOWN
PASSPORTS
70 — Services
FAST,     efficient
rates. 266-5053.
typing.     Reasonable
FOR   ACCURATE   TYPING   on   an   IBM
Selectric Correcting Typewriter, call
986-2577 after 2:00 p.m. Rush work
accepted.
99 — Miscellaneous
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USE
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED Tuesday, November 28, 1978
THE      U BYSSEY
Page 7
Hoopsters split with Bears
By DON MacINTYRE
The UBC Thunderbirds basketball team saw a 10-point half-time
lead disintegrate as the visiting
University of Alberta Golden Bears
plucked victory from the brink of
defeat, downing the 'Birds 70-68
Friday at War Memorial gym. The
Canada West Intercollegiate loss
was the fifth straight for the young
UBC team.
UBC's sporadic efforts cost them
a win Friday, but in Saturday's
rematch they hung on to beat the
Bears 70-63.
The rebounding strength of the
taller Alberta team allowed the
Bears to take control in the second
half of Friday's contest.
UBC attempted to nullify the
Alberta height advantage by using
the full court press. The press is
designed to keep the opponent's big
men in the back court where they
will not be as effective. This
strategy worked well for the 'Birds
on occasion, but not well enough to
completely extinguish the visitors'
natural edge.
Alberta also had trouble adjusting to the "hands off rule on
defence to which B.C. referees
strictly adhere. The Bears fell into
early foul trouble, but were able to
recover their composure before the
situation became desperate.
Ultimately, it was the ability to
score from the inside that spelled
doom for the hometown hoopsters.
Alberta's Pat Rooney claimed
the game's high scorer honors,
popping in 21 points and collecting
10 rebounds. Rooney barely beat
out teammate Jim Bonin, who
managed 19 points. One other
Bear, 6'6" Tom Groat, dropped 14
to become the other Bear to find
double figures in Friday's  game.
Groat also did real damage on
the boards, helping Alberta
dominate at both ends in the second
half.
Big man for the 'Birds was centre
Bob Forsyth with 18 points, but the
fact that only four of those points
were scored after the half-time tip-
off tells the story.
Coach Mullins next takes the
Thunderbirds down south for a
two-game exhibition swing.
2.904 W. 4«« AVE.    733-37J3
'An eating experience not to be under
estimated as one of the best mexican restaurants north of California.' Thats what
it is all about!
OPEN TUES.-SUN.
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Samples and size range also.
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Number One in Mexico.
Number One in Canada.
LEGISLATIVE INTERNSHIP PROGRAMME
Office of the Speaker
Legislative Assembly of British Columbia
INFORMATION MEETING
University of British Columbia
November 30, 1978 - 12:30-1:30
Student Union Building, Room 211
Competition for the 1980 Legislative Internship Programme is now open.
WHAT'S INVOLVED:
WHO:
HOW MANY:
DURATION:
DEADLINE FOR
APPLICATIONS
Working with Members of the Legislature, doing
research and assisting with matters administrative,
legislative, political (constituency concerns) — providing first hand experience of the political and policy
process for the intern. During the internship there will
be regular seminars on provincial government and
politics conducted by faculty from the three universities,
as well as an opportunity to work in a government
ministry.
Majors or Honours graduates in Political Science,
History, Economics or Sociology from the University of
British Columbia, Simon Fraser University and the
University of Victoria.
A maximum of 10 Legislative Internships.
January 1st - May 31st, 1980.
February 1st, 1979.
All interested students are cordially invited to attend the above meeting. Those students
unable to attend may obtain complete information from the participating departments on
campus.
LENORE
NEVERMORE
By
DOUGLAS BANKSON
An M.F.A. Thesis Production
Directed By
BILL MURDOCH
NOV. 30-DEC. 2
8:00 p.m.
Tickets: $3.00
Students: $2.00
TICKETS: Room 207
Frederic Wood Theatre
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE Pag* 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 28, 1978
UBC beats Clan
By PAUL WILSON
The Thunderbirds proved they,
are the best university football team
in the province, downing the Simon
Fraser University Clansmen 22-14
at Empire Stadium Saturday in the
seventh Shrum Bowl* game.
The turning point in the game
came when the Clansmen faked a
punt on third down with seven
yards to go. Rick House's rushing
attempt failed and UBC took over
on SFU's 20-yard line with just over
three minutes to play in the game.
This set up a touchdown pass to
Chris Davies from quarterback Dan
Smith, which secured victory for
the 'Birds.
"You really have to give the
defence a lot of credit for that
touchdown," said Davies Saturday.
"They got us the ball to set it up. 1
was just open deep on the touchdown.  The defence,  though,   has
played great all year and they
played great again tonight."
UBC played a passing game, in
contrast to SFU, which relied on a
strong running game, led by
halfback Rick House and fullback
Kevin Snider. UBC gained 258
yards in the air of 391 yards total
offence while the Clansmen rushed
for 252 of 390 yards total offence.
Davies was the top receiver,
catching eight for 154 yards and
two touchdowns. Smith usually
sent Davies in motion to try to
confuse the defensive backs.
"We'd have lots of motion in the
backfield and the Clansmen just
couldn't adjust," said coach Smith.
The 'Birds were less successful in
contacting the SFU rushing. House
gained 94 yards in 14 carries. Snider
ran 12 times for 77 and quarterback
Nelson Martin ran nine times for 45
and the Clan's  only  touchdown.
CHRIS DAVIES
—peter menyasz photo
caught two touchdown passes
The 'Birds managed to limit the
Clan rushers to short gains but
several times it appeared SFU was
about to break it open for the
touchdown. Only last-man tackles
by defenders prevented the score.
In the first quarter UBC place
kicker Gary Metz and SFU kicker
Walter Passaglia each kicked field
goal attempts wide, after which the
score was tied 1-1. Metz attempted
a 33-yard boot while Passaglia
came close on a 41-yarder.
Cornerback Jack Hirose intercepted a 25-yard pass by Martin
on UBC's 25-yard line to start a
'Bird drive for UBC's first major.
After three running plays, one
penalty and two long passes to
Davies and split end Barry Muis,
fullback Gord Penn ran one yard
for the major. Metz added a
convert.
Eight minutes later Passaglia
kicked a 36-yard field goal to
narrow the margin to 8-4. But UBC
marched back with seven completed
passes. Smith connected on a nine-
yard pass to Davies for his first
touchdown, which Metz converted.
The Clan scored its only major of
the game when Martin capitalized
on an interception by SFU
defensive back Steve Harrison on
UBC's 26. Harrison scampered 14
yards before Bernie Glier brought
him down. Two plays later Martin
ran four yards for the score.
After Davies scored the insurance
touchdown, converted by Metz,
Passaglia, brother of kicker Lui
Passaglia of the Canadian Football
League's B.C. Lions, scored
another field' goal to finish the
Clan's scoring for this season.
The victory marked the end of
UBC's most successful football
season. It finished with a 10-3
record, won the WIFL conference
title for the second time in three
years, appeared in its first national
final College Bowl and won the
Shrum Bowl for the first time in six
meetings.
The Shrum Bowl was cancelled in
1971 after UBC was waxed 42-0 by
SFU. The best UBC had done
previously was the 1969 Mud Bowl
which ended in utter confusion and
a 6-6 tie.
The game was played before
12,000 enthusiastic fans, led by
UBC engineers disguised as
gorillas.
Coach Smith said he thought the
crowd really helped the 'Birds.
Swim team takes to pool
By KEVIN FINNEGAN
UBC swim coach Jack Kelso just
laughed when asked about the new
$5.7 million Aquatic Centre. For
one who used to train in the infamous 20-yard antique pool in
Ocean Falls, the new splash-pond is
a dream come true.
"This is one of the finer centres
anywhere," said Kelso, who along
with Ralph Hutton and Sandy Gilchrist formed the nucleus of the
pulp-town swim team that has won
over 50 medals for Canada in international competition.
Kelso won six medals in the 1962
Commonwealth Games and the
1963  Pan-Am  Games,  and  later
coached at the University of
Oregon while working on his
master's degree.
Kelso, who says he is glad to be
out of the rat race of age-group
coaching, emphasizes that
swimming takes second place to
studying at UBC.
"I don't have them by the short
and curlies," he said.
Kelso has some impressive help
both in the water and on the deck
for his first year at UBC. Former
Canadian national team members
Wendy Hogg (nee Cook) and Paul
Hughes are swimming on the team
while in education five.
Doug Hogg, Wendy's husband and
Women's Sports
UBC hosts the Thunderette basketball tourney Friday and
Saturday, playing games at 6 p.m.
and 8:30 p.m. in the War Memorial
Gym. At UBC on the weekend, the
Thunderettes lost 80-61, 88-33 to a
strong University of Alberta squad.
*     *     +
The gymnastics team heads to
Seatttle University this weekend to
compete in a dual meet.
The Thunderette soccer team
takes on the Hustlers at 1 p.m.
Sunday at Collingwood Park.
The Thunderette volleyball team
showed new strength on the
weekend in Edmonton, when it
took first place at a tourney hosted
by the University of Alberta. UBC
won all five of its matches. The
University of Saskatchewan
finished second.
a former national coach, is training
while his eligibility is being considered. Don Liebermann, a former
member of the Rhodesian national
diving team, is both coaching and
competing for UBC.
Hogg, who represented Canada
in two Olympics and set the world
100-metre backstroke record at the
1974 Commonwealth Games, sees
the relaxed atmosphere of
university competition as a way of
easing out of swimming.
"It's not the same commitment,
and I finally have time for other
things," she said.
Hughes, a veteran of the 1973
World Championships and the 1974
Commonwealth Games, is
swimming close to his fastest times.
"Paul loves to train," said Kelso.
"He has a particular tolerance for
pain and agony."
Hughes, however, finds
university swimming low key and
more enjoyable.
Kelso hopes to have UBC among
the top three swimming powers in
the CIAU within two years, and
was encouraged by the results of a
dual meet at the University of
Alberta this weekend. While the U
of A won the meet 342-314, the
UBC women's team defeated the
Edmonton women 181-144.
SPORTS
GORD PENN
— ross burnett photo
ran in first UBC touchdown
UBC beats rowers
7-0 in rugby action
The Thunderbird rugby team
tightened its hold on first place in
the Vancouver Rugby Union with a
7-0 win over Rowing Club at
Brockton Oval Saturday.
To defeat the Rowers, which is
the only side to win against UBC
this year, the Thunderbirds altered
strategy slightly and used only two
forwards in their lineouts, rather
than the usual seven or eight. This
enabled the 'Birds to get the ball
out to the backs more quickly and
forced the Rowers to constantly
chase the ball out to the wing.
"They are bigger and stronger,
but they're a bunch of old men,"
explained outside-centre Andrew
Bibby. "We wanted to make them
run a lot and tire them out."
The plan worked and the Rowers
could generate little offence in the
match. However, their defence held
them in the game.
All the scoring came in a four-
minute stretch late in the first half.
Preston Wiley hit a 15-metre drop
kick from a dead run at the 39-
minute mark. Shortly after, UBC
won a lineout and Rob Greig made
an excellent run up the middle
before flipping the ball to Bibby,
who sauntered the last five metres
for the try.
The second half was a rough
defensive battle, with several
players being warned about their
conduct. The Rowing Club added
three missed penalty goals to the
pair they missed in the first half.
The 'Birds picked up several
injuries. Greig received a badly
mangled hand, Robin Russell was
hurt near his right eye and Dave
Whyte was spiked in the back.
The 'Birds next game is 2:30 p.m.
Saturday at Thunderbird Stadium
against PoCo.
Pucksters drop two
— Pinos roll on
The UBC Thunderbirds hockey
team spent the weekend recovering
from defeats handed them by the
University of Calgary Dinosaurs in
Calgary. The 'Birds slipped below
.500 for the first time in the first
half of the Canada West Universities Athletic Association season.
The Thunderbirds' record now
stands at 3-5 after losing 2-0, 4-2.
Despite having many power-play
opportunities in both games UBC
could manage only two goals.
Limited goal-scoring has been a
problem that has plagued the T-
Birds all year. Even the more
consistent, experienced players
have been subjected to scoring
droughts in conference play.
In over-all scoring, for example,
Rob Jones leads all point-getters
yith 14 goals and seven assists, but
in conference play Jones has
totalled   only   eight   points.   No
player has yet surpassed  the  10-
point mark in conference play.
UBC coach Bert Halliwell's
hopes of being at .500 at Christmas
are dwindling. The 'Birds don't
play another conference game until
after the holidays. There are still
three non-conference games between now and Christmas and the
chances of being even by Dec. 25
rides on the outcome of these contests.
The first of these games will be
played this Friday against the North
Shore intermediates at the Winter
Sports Centre. On Dec. 21 the
'Birds fly north to take on a team
from Nelson and on Dec. 22 they
face Trail in Trail.
The Japanese national team has
cut short its tour plans and will not
play a previously-scheduled Dec. 5
game with the 'Birds.

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