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The Ubyssey Feb 7, 1964

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Array Co-ordinaror's
election
THS UBYSSEY
a preferential
ballup
Vol. XLVI, No. 50
VANCOUVED, B.C., FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1964
48 CA 4-3916
Mitchell
gets post
unopposed
Kyle Mitchell, assistant AMS treasurer, became 1964-65
treasurer by acclamation Thursday.
Treasurer was the only sec-
—don hume photo
FIRST WINNER of UBC Alumni Association's student award is Dean Feltham (right), head
of SUB planning committee. He was presented with the award, made for student service,
academic record, at banquet in Brock Thursday by Board of Governors member Donovan
Miller. In centre is Paul Plant, head of the Alumni association. Plaque will be awarded
annually to a student. 	
To parking lots
Brock  dropoffs'
taken for ride
By MIKE VAUX
Squawk all you like, but you won't be able to drop your
passengers off at Brock in the morning.
Cece Paul,  Sir Ouvry's un
derstudy, says UBC traffic
regulations pro*hibit all student
cars coming on campus from
7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. on weekdays and from 7:30 a.m. to
12:30 p.m. Saturdays.
• •    •
Earlier this week, members
of Sir Ouvry's army were directing student cars around the
entrances to the East Mall, and
refused to allow students in to
let their passengers off at
Brock.
Paul said the extreme traffic
jams outside Brock in the mornings necessitated the restrictions.
• •    •
"Can you imagine 5,000 cars
outside Brock," he said. "It
would be a terrific jam-up."
Paul said the rules were
drawn up and signed by the
Board of Governors, and there
was no recourse to students but
to obey them.
"They'll just have to drop
their passengers off at the perimeter of the campus.
"By   trying  to    get   to   the
Brock Hall, students are defeating the purpose of the carefully
laid-out entry routes to the student lots," Paul said.
Sergeant Doug Thompson,
RCMP university detachment
head, said it is the jurisdiction
of the UBC traffic patrol to enforce the traffic laws on campus.
Mailbox ballot
left at the post
Two students tried to mail
their   ballots   Wednesday.
The ballots for the AMS
elections were delivered to
the AMS office Thursday.
They had been dropped in
a campus mailbox. Election
officials would not count
them.
"How idiotic can some students be," said Ron Pearson, AMS business manager.
"First they put their AMS
cards in the ballot boxes and
now they put their votes in
the mail box. Can't they tell
the difference?"
The votes were not enough
to upset the results of the
election.
ond slate post to go by acclamation.
First vice-president is being
contested by two candidates,
Brian Thorpe, Eng. Ill, and
Bob Cruise, Arts IV.
A third candidate for the
post, Barry McMaster, withdrew his nomination papers
when he found he was ineligible because he wasn't going
into his senior year.
The last-minute entry of 47
candidates for Co-ordinator of
Activities saved the position
from going by acclamation to
Graeme Vanve, Agr. II (see-
story this page and names of
candidates and seconder's
statements  page 6).
Treasurer Mitchell said he
was prepared to fight a campaign right up to the closing of
nominations at 4 p.m.
"I spent about $30 and had
signs and posters made up," he
said.
Mitchell said he would like
to see if UBC students are getting their dollars' worth from
the Canadian Union of Students.
"I would like to also review
the amount of money we give
to intra-mural athletics," he
said. "There are possibilities
it should be increased."
Mitchell has served for two
years as assistant treasurer and
has been a member of the finance committee, treasurer of
Open House 1964 and treasurer
of Homecoming 1962.
Returning officer Denis
Browne said the 47 engineering
KYLE MITCHELL
. . . new treasurer
candidates will be placed on
the preferential ballot in the
usual manner.
That would mean voters
would would have to list their
preferences for candidates on
the co-ordinator's ballot from
one to 48.
The ballot will list names of
candidates in two rows rather
than one long list.
"It would be impossible to
get the damn thing in a ballot
box," snorted outgoing AMS
president Malcolm Scott.
Second slate elections take
place Wednesday.
You think this is bad
Wait until you see the ballot
A PINK
IN THE LINK
(See Page 2)
It's a tight 48-way race for
AMS Coordinator of Activities.
And the engineers, who entered 47 of the 48 candidates
into the race aren't too upset
at all.
"It's partly a gag," said
Golpher Waldron, one of the
candidates, "and partly a protest against the bureaucracy."
Under election rules the
engineers would be allowed
to:
• Put up 282 banners.
O 752 posters.
• Spend  $1,880  on  election
materials.
• Speak   for   hours   at   any
all  candidates meeeting.
The first people to feel the
effects of 47 candidates were
students in the library.
Waldron said the engineers
MALCOLM and MARNIE .
—don hume photo
. they're all (gasp) eligible.
easily obtained the necessary
470 signatures which must go
on the nomination forms.
Then the administration
was hit.
All candidates must have
eligibility forms indicating
they meet the academic standards required for running in
the  elections.
So this afternoon the registrar's office spent more than
three hours processing the
forms.
And they didn't seem to
mind   either.
Waldron talked to one of
the girls at the counter and
the office agreed to process
them.
"After all," the girls
gushed, "We've got nothing
else to do." THE URYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial opinions
expressed are   those of  the editor nnA nnt  no/>AaQariiv +h«D«  «# +i.„   a iko
expressed are those of the editor and not necessarily those of the AMS
?r,^e tL nive„r„sity; Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office, CA
*-SUZ,  Loc.   26.   Member  Canadian   University   Press.
Authorized     as     second-class    mail    by    Post
Ottawa,  and for payment of postage in cash.
Office    Department,
Winner 1963-64 Canadian University Press trophies for
general excellence and editorial writing.
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1964
The big news
It is to be hoped that Mr. Bennett's budget speech
today will contain all the goodies that have been forecast for higher education.
UBC alone has requested about $11 -million in operating expenses, plus an estimated $5 million in capital
grants for next year.
Informed sources say Simon Fraser Academy will
receive a $10 million lump sum to help get the school
open by 1966.
And this does not include Victoria College, Notre
Dame, and any other institutes of higher education which
the Premier may have created in the last few days.
Sources in the capital say it is likely Bennett will
announce a "higher than ever" grant to higher education—in the form of one lump sum—and then he will
set up the long-awaited "independent" finance board to
distribute the money among the various institutions.
The board, if it in fact will be truly independent,
rather than controlled by government stooges, is expected to solve many of the expected problems of inter-
university squabbling.
It will also nicely exempt the Socreds from criticism
they have received in the past because of higher education policies—after all, then it will be the nasty finance
board that is cutting UBC short.
We await the Premier's announcement hopefully,
with our hands clasped firmly around our wallets.
Mud-trudgers
Well, the parking boys are at it again.
Their uniformed guards are prohibiting student cars
from driving along East Mall to load or unload passengers in front of Brock Hall and the library.
The parking officials, however, refuse to take any
responsibility for building a sidewalk down East Mall
from C-lot, or for providing something other than mud to
park in. It seems to us the lack of proper facilities is the
big reason why students insist on driving right to Brock
to drop off and pick up their car pools—after all, why
should everybody have to slug through the slop?
Traffic and parking authorities usually shift the
blame for the hopeless facilities on to buildings and
grounds, which seems to us to be pure procrastination.
We'd suggest parking and B and G get together soon,
and spend a little of that $5 fee they're gouging from the
students on student facilities.
A large, high, and dry sidewalk should be built on
the East Mall immediately, and a loading zone for at
least 50 cars provided on the east side of the East Mall
in front of the stadium.
There's lots of room, and a large need.
A pink link
It disturbs us to see that the Communist Party has
gained a 50-per-cent increase in seats in the UBC Model
Parliament.
Last year, they got two.   This year, it's three.
More disturbing, however, is the fact that 40 people
who voted in Brock Hall, the very seat of student government, were Communists. Brock bureaucracy is shocking
enough, but When it's infiltrated with Communists . . .
what is the world coming to?
We think it's high time the RCMP started investigating the political activities of students. Root out those
subversives at any cost.
UBC will not be a safe place to study until this pink
tinge is completely eliminated.
-The  Ontarion,   Ontario   Agric.   College
LETTERS
You too, R.Q.
Editor. The Ubyssey:
Your Quixote didn't waste
any time jumping on the
tickey - tackey band - wagon,
did he? Well, it was predictable, but his closing line surprised me. It would better
have read: "He's laughing
about us."
T. BROWN
Science i
• •    •
Ragged Reds
Editor. The Ubyssey:
I see with great delight that
Peter Shepard has introduced
a literary orientation to student council.
At the meeting two weeks
ago, he chose to read to his
fellow councillors selections
from the RGGU newsletter,
the Iconoclast.
Unfortunately, he found
that its quality contrasted
poorly . . . perhaps, with his
own engineering undergraduate society's journalistic efforts.
I wonder if it would be too
much to expect that he would
enlighten his colleagues with
a recital from his own engineering newsletter.
Probably not, for one must
realize that our busy student
councillors seldom have time
to pursue aesthetic interests
such as are catered to by Mr.
Shepard's journalists.
Ah, well, isn't it nice that
someone has come out with a
publication which can be read
to councillors, whatever the
reason.
I mentioned all of this to
one of the RGGU executives,
but his only response was,
"For Pete's sake, we aren't
all sheep."
I wonder what he meant?
DENNIS   FORKIN
Arts II
• •    •
Carried away
Editor, The Ubyssey:
At least one more poor campus male is now able to keep
dry on rainy days since presumably he is now using my
old umbrella. Since it was
clearly marked with my name,
address, and phone number, I
thought it might be returned
following its removal from an
umbrella rack outside the
Humanities section of the Library.
However, I have waited in
vain and finally decided that
if I wished to keep dry I
would need to steal or purchase another. I resisted doing the former (why I don't
know, since I understand
many umbrellas are obtained
in that manner) and followed
the latter course and am now
$5 poorer.
By the way, I still use the
racks in the Library, but I
park my new umbrella by a
$9 model with the hope that
the thief is a discriminating
one.
R.  E. MOREHOUSE
Grad. Studies
•    •    •
Draft stew
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Re Beating the Draft by
U.S. university students. I
would venture to suggest that
this is the attitude that breeds
those who are beating learning (defined by Webster as to
gain knoweldge and skill (in)
by study; to find out, to discover).
Their involvement is just
not there if such a simple, but
magnificent, privilege of contributing to one's total environment through pursuit of
knowledge and skill is charad-
ed by such people pretending
to be students.
Furthermore, I would suggest to these people to devote
all their energies in experiments dealing with the crossbreeding of animal life and
plant life: Why? I hear that
the U.S. Army does not want
vegetables either.
JOE WAI
Arch. V
EDITOR
Associate	
News	
Managing. _
City	
Photo....	
Critics
Sports   .
Asst.  City -
: Mike Hunter
Keith  Bradbury
Dave Ablett
George   Railton
__ Mike   Horsey
 Don Hume
 Ron Riter
Denis Stanley
Richard  Simeon
Jack
ORNSTEIN
There's an old saying that
you 'are' what you eat. For
example, if you eat too much,
then you are too much, or if
you eat a lot of fish you'll be
smarter (and thus able to swim
better).
Well, last night before re-
tiring, I watched the late movie
on TV till it threatened to get
exciting and prevent sleep altogether. I ate sliced bananas
with sugar and milk. So now
we can add to the old saying
—you also dream what you
eat.
I dreamed that all the greats
of the world were there. A
woman who was the image of
Jean Paul Sartre, an old school
teacher, Nathan Noodles, the
Grand Inquisitor, and Toby
Morantz (a girl), etc. I was
there too, of course, busily
taking pictures of everyone as
they ate bananas and milk in
various ways—peeled, diced,
sliced, and fried. (Toby's specialty is NOT fried bananas!)
Why is it that bananas make
you thirsty for only one thing
—-milk? Funny I didn't dream
about cows or milk bottles.
Funnier still, about the effeminate containers.
Then I took out a girl named
Marlene in Minneapolis. (She
was called Virginia in Vancouver). She was attractive, intelligent and good-humored so
I figured I might make it with
her—i.e., make her. So one
day the conversation accidentally centred on sex.
(I asked her if she had ever
heard oi it).
That's where bananas come
in again. She told me in all
seriousness that she didn't like
physical contact with males
but that peeling bananas (no
kidding!) thrilled her no end.
Well, even at the best of
times, I'm nobody's banana so
I split the scene, (NOT the
banana) and every Valentine's
day I mail her a bunch of —
bananas.
Then they have this female
banana (Chick Keeta? or Donna Mikeeta?) who does TV
commercials. You think the
government would study her
in some university (e.g., Alabama—then Jolson could sing
"She's a banana from Alabama").
The same goes for that
talking salmon who's not good
enough for a certain company.
They figure he's beat because
he always has sunglasses on.
(Actually he's blind).
So let's not forget the banana. It's got huge yellow
streaks down its back (it needs
a bunch for security) but it's
great with a glass of milk or
as a column on a frosty Friday.
Next week, a dissertation on
fried matza (unleavened
bread) with the titillating title
'Ma, the matza's playing havoc
with the halvah'.
To be followed by 'She was
only a girl from Winnipeg but
you should see her loaf. MEAT
loaf that is!
Asst. News Tim Padmore
Senior Maureen    Covell
REPORTERS AND DESK: Lorraine Shore, Mike Vaux, Al Donald, Christine Blyth, Al Birnie,
Tom Wayman and the rest in their
tickey-tackey little boxes.
SPORTS: George Reamsbottom,
Janet Currie, Bob Banno and others
who   Burpy   forgot.
Trip to Ottawa winner. Mike Horsey. Arts IV and city editor of the
land of milk and Horsey. Friday, February 7,  1964
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
LIMBERING UP for limbo, dancers prepare for West Indian
carnival tonight in Hallmark Hall, Forty-first and Fraser.
Above dancers and steel band will provide entertainment
for the dance, held to mark harvest time in the West
Indies.    Tickets are on sale at AMS.
McGoun debaters take
sides with angry ones
The UBC debating team
"This house should look back
How about
a bubbly
ambulance?
A fountain, a loan fund, a
subscription for library journals and an ambulance again—
were among suggestions for
the annual grad class gift discussed Thursday by a class
meeting.
The fountain would be
placed In front of the new student union building.
Prof Lionel Thomas, of the
school of architecture, has said
he would be willing to design
it.
The loan fund would be
available to all students in
last year with satisfactory
standing. Selection of applicants would be shared by the
grad class executive and Dean
Gage's office.
The donation to the library
would be aimed at rectifying
shortages in periodicals.
Last year an ambulance was
suggested for the gift but the
administration turned down
the offer.
The administration claimed
it would be too costly to maintain and operate it.
A decision will be made at
the grad class general meeting
later this month.
DEBBIE'S
Shoes Styled1
for
Campus
Stacked  Heels
on
y  $9.95
801 Granville
MU 4-7044
will be trying to prove that
in anger" Friday.
They will be arguing for
the resolution against the University of Manitoba in the annual McGoun cup debating
competition.
Peter Hyndman, Law I, and
Bonnie Erickson, Arts IV, will
debate for UBC against Joe
Moffat and Jim Smith of Manitoba.
Judges are professor emeritus Col. Harry Logan, former
External Affairs Minister Howard Green and Rev. D. S.
Kimmitt of St. Anselm's Anglican  church.
Erickson and Hyndman
have already convinced Victoria College that the house
should look back in anger.
The win made them eligible
to meet Manitoba in the final.
The McGoun cup has been
emblematic of debating supremacy among Western Canadian
universities since  1923.
The debate begins at 8:30
p.m. Friday in Brock. Admission is free.
AUTHORS   AGENCY
Bring     your    manuscripts,     stories,
articles, books, songs, poems.
Free Advice and Help
1065 E.  17th Avenue
TR 6-6362
WORSHIP ON CAMPUS
EVERY SUNDAY AT
St. Timothy
Lutheran Church
Pastor H. Fox, CA 8-8166
11:00 Worship
10:00 Bible Study
Hut L4 — East Mall
Oil the waters
McAfee seeking
sweet harmony
Achievement  of harmonious relations with the  university administration is the chief goal of AMS president-
" elect Roger McAfee.
Ten co-eds
honored
Ten co-ed campus leaders
will be honored Sunday at the
annual initiation of Delta
Sigma Pi, the Women's Honorary Society.
All were selected for their
outstanding contributions in
the fields of scholarship,
leadership and service.
Initiates are:
Mildred Crystal, Comm. IV,
secretary CUS, treasurer AUS;
Tove Monson, Nursing IV, pres.
Panhellenic Association; Donna
Pearson, Home Ec. IV, pres.
Home Ec, US; Pat Nichols,
Arts IV, pres. Women's Athletic Association; Barbara Robertson, Science IV, pres. Big
Block Club; Joan Walton, Educ.
V, vice-pres. Education, US;
Mary-Lee Magee, Soc. Work I,
past chairman CUS; Kathy
Hobson, Ed. V., past vice-pres.
Education, US; Donna Morris,
Arts III, senior editor The
Ubyssey, pres. Fort Camp women; Maureen Covell, Arts IV,
senior editor The Ubyssey, associate editor Campus Canada.
Pakistan scenes
Dr. Wainman is showing
slides on Pakistan 8 p.m. tonight at IH House.
"Some of Malcolm Scott's remarks have caused tension in
our relations with administration," McAfee, a first-year law
student, said Thursday.
"There exists at present a
misunderstanding between
council and the administration," he said. "I'm going to
try to clear it up." McAfee declined to state the actual nature
of the misunderstanding.
McAfee said he is "very confident" the Student Union
Building Referendum will be
approved by students. The referendum, not yet definitely
scheduled, will ask students to
approve a $5 fee increase.
"We've talked about this
thing long enough," McAfee
said. "Now is the time for action."
McAfee also emphasized the
need for quick completion of a
report on financial aid for students. He said also that UBC
membership in the Canadian
Union of Students would be reviewed during his term.
"Students are vitally interested in these matters," he
said. "The large turnout proves
this election was not issueless."
Jungle sex
How do elephants make love
in a swimming pool?
They take their trunks off
first.
Double Breasted Suits
Converted to
Single Breasted
Slacks Narrowed
UNITED TAILORS
549 Granville St.
AUSTIN DEALERS
TWO LOCATIONS
10th AVE. AND     1585 MARINE OR.
ALMA NORTH VAN.
RE 3-8105   YU 7-8121
GORDON BROS.
ETHNIC
AUTHENTIC
TRADITIONAL
HOMESY
TRITE
MUSIC
not to be heard here ■
but there is
CONTRIVED
CIVILIZED
STUDIED
BIG-CITY JAZZ
Fri., Sat., Sun.
Open from 9.
live jazz • 3623 west broadway ■ re 8 6-11 Page  4
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday,  February 7,   1964
Critics' Page
theatre
Thuvman Club
qosUk (x)Ud&
I must admit I was sceptically braced for a very amateurish production of Oscar
Wildes' Lady Windemere's
Fan, which members of the
campus Newman Club gave
a two-night stand at the weekend.
Normally, such attempts by
non-theatridal groups to hit
the stage are — mildly put —
busts.
Newman's Fan was a happy,
albeit  surprising, exception.
This become obvious the
moment the curtain went up
on the improvised stage in St.
Mark's College lounge, revealing a masterful set of a 19th
Century drawing room, complete with period furniture,
which had an air of permanence and realness often lacking  in  professional   sets.
And there was acting to
match this shell.
• •    •
Kathy Townsend, with marvellous flair and humor, played the Duchess of Berwick,
who delightedly lets poor Lady
W. know that all London is
talking about her husband's
affair with a lady "not of
society"
Lome Dickson, as Mr. Cecil
Graham, gave an accomplished
and suave rendering of Wilde's
elegant   aphorisms.
Martin Chataway was a mature, attractive Lord Winde-
mere. Maureen Fountain gave
dignity and understanding to
the disillusioned Lady W's
role, a difficult one that tended
to drag a little during the
soliloquies.
• *    •
. Mel Maglio turned a small
part, the butler, into one of
the hilarious highlights of the
play with his perfectly pompous stance and facial expressions.
On the technical side, the
scene changes took far too
long, causing distinct restlessness during the three intermissions. Perhaps they were
using  union  stagehands   .   .   .
But the production was surprisingly and enjoy ably professional and it is hoped their
original success will spur the
Newman Club — and others —
to  further  efforts  on stage.
—Stephen   brown
(Do/da waAJwiU
not bu hid
If you liked Doris Day in
Move Over, Darling you'll
love Mai?riage-Go-Round. I'm
not sure if they've made the
movie yet, but I'm sure Doris
was/will be great in the role
of the wife outwitting the
blonde, big-titted bombs hell
who's trying to steal the husband.
Excuse my language, but I
always have a strong reaction
to   comedies   that   deal   with
quote sex unquote in which
you know that nobody is going
to get laid.
There are some fairly funny
conventional gags, revolving
around Kinsey, etc. The
trouble is that the play is
beamed not at intelligent
theatre-goers, but at the great
middle-income blah who have
been married for twenty years
would like to screw around,
daren't, and get their feeble
kicks vicariously from comedies revolving around  sex.
The action of the play is in-
interrupted frequently by the
two principals, husband and
wife, who address the audience
directly from lecturns, commenting on the on-stage near-
shenanigans in which they're
involved. The wit is about on
a par with a McGoun Cup try-
out and the technique something less.
•    •    •
Marriage - Go - Round is presented by the Vagabond Players at the Metro Theatre. Directed by Hans Hartog, and
with Earl Matheson and Gertrude Dennis in the lead roles,
it is a competent, assured production. Alf Smeed's set contributed greatly, but trouble
with lighting interfered with
one's enjoyment of it.
Dale Irvine, as the bosomy
Katrin, fills her role admirably
and Peter Jaenicke completes
the small cast which worked
well together.
The next Metro production
is Juno and the Paycock by the
always good Emerald Players.
I advise you not to miss it.
—ken hodkinson
cinema
(pauUm Jicud
/cjutica cJtiik
Pauline Kael is probably one
of the most outspoken critics
on just about anything you
can think of. When she was
looking over the Cinema 16-
UBC brochure she said, "Have
you ever really seen a Russian
movie that doesn't bore you?
You know, in Eisenstein's
Battleship Potemking you keep
waiting and waiting for the
Odessa steps sequence." . . .
and about the famous director,
Torre Nillson . . . "He's so
charming a person: he can get
away with anything. His films
are really awful."
•    •    •
When asked about the so-
called New American Cinema,
Pauline Kael winced and replied, "What New American
Cinema.
The filmmakers in this
group are very nice people but.
they're so untalented. Stan
Brakhage is a pleasant enough
person and a hypnotic speaker
but he makes terrible movies."
She also managed a very
nice dig at the downtown
critics — "Are your local re
viewers the same deadbeats as
before?" (The answer to this
question is, unfortunately, yes.)
After a while we got back to
one of Kael's pet subjects —
the American film industry.
"I thought Irma La Douce
was atrocious, heavy, dull and
stupid—sleazy without style. I
was amazed when I found that
audiences liked it. I am gradually developing a theory that
the success of a film does not
depend on the quality of the
film. It could even be the reverse. A good movie will draw
an audience all right but a
small audience. Billy Wilder
has that feeling for touching
the vulgarity that people will
laugh at."
The Cardinal: "This is really
an awful movie. Catholics
ought to scream at having their
face made so  dull.
Miss Kael then proposed a
question to herself which she
answered very quickly.
Pauline Kael will be outspoken in Bu. 106 at noon today.
"What American movies are
worth seeing? Hud is about the
best. 1963 was a slim year and
about the worst that I can remember. There aren't really
any American movies made in
Hollywood now. Hud is about
it."
From here Miss Kael got
back on to the subject of
critics. "Hollywood likes critics that are bought and stay
bought. The mechanism is
simple; the newspaper critic
doesn't even know that he is
being bought. He goes to visit
PAULINE KAEL
. . . Frisco film critic
the location of the film at the
film company's expense. This
may mean a lovely trip to
Paris, or Stockholm in
Sweden.
When he comes back he
feels naturally disposed toward the film. All those charming people who worked on it
made him feel very important.
Naturally he says something
very nice about the film. It
would almost be ungentle-
manly if he didn't.
•    •    •
American critics are not exactly bought but they are very
pleased to sell themselves.
She concluded with English
critics.
"The English oversell their
own movies. If you read the
English papers you would expect a masterpiece when you
went to see This Sporting
Life. It is a lot less than that."
—eihel bloomsbury
potlatch
RAVEN, UBC's own littlemag goes into hibernation,
sometimes for years at a time.
It hasn't been seen for some
time, so the Creative Writing
Dept.'s house magazine, Potlatch, is welcome as partially
filling the gap.
It's twenty - three mimeographed pages contain three
short stories and ten poems,
which is not "God's plenty",
but then it only costs 20c and
does have a very attractive
cover.
Nothing in it really stands
out. Graeme Matheson, in A
Reading From Whitman satirizes the "you don't have to
understand it, you just have to
dig it" school. He packs a lot
of controlled grotesqueries into
three and a half pages.
Dena Balva offers satire also.
The Bath parodies symbol-
soaked stories stacked with
significance: "The cross was
gone. He felt there was a hidden  meaning  somewhere."
On the whole, her attempt is
successful.
•    •    •
Of the poems, I liked Frogs
by Peg Roberton, but not her
untitled first poem which
catalogued unsuccessfully and
her third poem which left too
much unsaid.
Rona Murray's two poems
had some forceful images but
they lacked an original point-
of-view. Bob Flick's first poem
amused but revealed nothing
further on subsequent readings; his second poem defied
my efforts to follow his line of
thought.
The most accomplished
poems were Florence McNeill's
Interior August, despite a vile
first line: and News Item,
which seemed the best thing in
the rriagazine: fiercely committed to a world threatened by
war yet never losing its balance, maintaining itself as
poetry  throughout.
Potlatch is on sale at the
Bookstore and in Bu. 171.
—ken hodkinson
calendar
• The $500 MCA Scholarship
in Playwriting will be awarded
to a returning graduate or
undergraduate who shows
promise in writing drama for
stage, cinema, radio, or television. Send plays and covering letter to Creative Writing
Department by March 1.
• Two photographic exhioi-
tions at UBC Fine Arts Gallery, Feb. 11 through Feb. 29.
Lonely in Crowds — Denes.
Devenyi and Prints — Bob
Flick.
• Prof. Roy Daniells will officially open the Shakespeare
Festival Monday, Feb. 10 at
12:30 in New College of Education Auditorium.
• Much Ado About Nothing,
by William Shakespeare, 7:30
p.m. Feb. 10 in Freddy Wood
Theatre. (Student night.)
• A panel of professors will
discuss Much Ado About Nothing, 12:30 Feb. 11, Old Arts
100.
• Second student night of
Much Ado About Nothing,
Tuesday, 7:30 p.m., Freddy
Wood Theatre.
• Special Events present Al-
hsrto Gonxale* Munox Ponce,
guitarist, noon Tuesday, Freddy Wood Theatre.
• John Gutman, music director, translator and lecturer,
will lecture in QE playhouse,
Monday, 2 p.m. Presented by
Vancouver    Woman's    Musical
Club.
• Prof. Brents Sterling, U of
Wash., lectures on Antony and
Cleopatra: Plutarch, Daniel
and Shakespeare, 8:00 p.m.,
Tuesday in Bu. 100. Friday, February 7,  1964
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
STORY-TELLER PHILIP HANSON returns to Vancouver to perform Twain's Huck Finn, 8:30 p.m.,
Monday, at Queen Elizabeth Theatre. • The one-
man show's one-night stand will be performed
without props or costumes. He has won acclaim
in major U.S. cities and campuses as one of the
best of one-man theatre.
Gerd Stern
Gerd Stern, part two, has hit the ultimate in on-
the-roadism.
The San Francisco poet-artist has captured with
sound and sense and sight all the kaliedescope of
signs and sex symbols that all The Others tried to
portray in mere words in their books.
Stern's tools were simple: slides, tape recorders, and a movie.
The performance started with a series of three
slides projected onto the big Auditorium screen, one
slide placed above the others. Strips of newspaper
headlines, fragments of road signs, bits of advertising
material appeared in seemingly unfathomable order.
Occasionally, however, some of the words in the
slides on the screen would form a sentence with
"dirty" connotations, and the Frosh in the audience
would laugh.
Background to the slides was two tape recordings, one giving a relentless telephone-time message,
the other a jumble of popular songs, snatches of
radio programs, and a test sequence for a communications device.
Suddenly, Stern switched into sex. He projected
a movie, composed of alternate sequences of freeway travel and the sex act.
What gave the movie its shocking impact was
Stern's use of a woman's gasps, sighs, moans, etc. as
soundtrack.
It was unbelievably impressive.
But Stern had more effects available. He switched
back to showing the same slides as before, in a slightly altered sequence and a different arrangement of
the screen.
Then Stern switched back to a repeat of the sex-
act movie, and the concept of repeated chaos provided an emphasis that raised his overall exhibition
to another level.
He closed the performance with further slides,
complete with the background tapes.
Just as knowing whether the arrangement of the
slides may have some significance for Stern, knowing the actual meaning of that particular time is not
necessary to grasp the total impression of what
Stern was trying to say.
Like the loud laughter of the Frosh sitting two
rows back, Gerd Stern makes a comment on life.
And because it's the life of the Frosh, or Stern's
life that is exhibited, by what they say is no reason
to disregard the message they give:
Live.
—r, tommy wu
A.M.S. BOX OFFICE OPENS MONDAY 12:30- 1:30
Starts   Feb.   24 for 7   Performances
U.B.C. AUDITORIUM - 8:30 p.m.
SPECIAL STUDENT PERFS. FEB. 24, 25 and 26: Tickets 75c at A.M.S.
OPENING PERFORMANCE
FEB. 24
SAVE 50c
TWO TICKETS—$1.00 at A.M.S
ALSO FEB. 26 THROUGH 29
TICKETS:   $2.50     $2.00     $1.50
(All Seats Reserved
Orchestra directed by: Bev. Fyfe
Choreography: Grace MacDonald    "
Entire production directed by James Johnston
THE
INCORPORATED   2*9    MAY   1670.
Invites you to consider an executive career in retail merchandising.
Our Training Programme offers a challenging and thorough framework in which you can make rapid advancement tuned to your personal drive and ability.
A career with "The Bay" can lead you to any of the major cities
between Victoria and Montreal. As a merchandise executive you could
be sent on buying trips  to markets  in North  America,  Europe and Asia.
Retail Merchandising will enable you to use your abilities to manage
people, to judge demands of customers, to administer the operations
of a department, to be creative and imaginative; it will challenge
your  initiative and  drive  in   the  ever  changing world  of   retailers.
Graduates in Commerce, Business
Administration or Arts are eligible
£or  our  Training  Programme  of:
• Initial  rotation  programme  showing  you the  major  sales  supporting
departments   such   as  Advertising   and   Display.
• 2  year  classroom   course   in   merchandising   which   supplements   on-
the-job training.
• Training     under    an    experienced     Department    Manager    in    Sales
Management, Buying  and  Department Administration.
Make an appointment now with your Placement Officer to see our
Representatives for full details or come in and see us in the store. Our
Personnel Office  is  located  on the 5th floor.
Interviews will be
conducted on Campus
February 10th and 11th Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday,  February 7,   1964
ELECTION STATEMENTS
ACTIVITIES
CO-ORDINATOR
RICHARD ATKINSON, Eng.
II; DAVID BOWERING, Eng.
Ill; IAN BURGESS,  Eng.  II;
JAMES CAVERS, Eng. II; C.
V. CHUNG, Eng. II;  ROGER
COOTE,   Eng.   II;    RONALD
DAVIES,  Eng.  Ill;  JOHN  J.
EMERY,     Eng.     II;     VERN
ERICKSON,    Eng.    II;   WILLIAM  FANE,  Eng. II; FINN
(NICK)   FENGER,   Eng.   Ill
JAMES K. GARDINER, Eng
III;   PETER  GERICKE,   Eng
II; ALFRED HAYDEN,   Eng
II; PETER HEMMES, Eng. II
EDISON   INOUYE,   Eng.   Ill
WARD   JOHNSON,   Eng.   II
EDWARD S. KATAI, Eng. Ill
DAVID    LEVANG,    Eng.    I
CARLO   de   LUCA,  Eng.  II
MARTIN McDOUGALL, Eng
II;  RONALD MAAS,  Eng.  I
BRUCE MURDOCH, Eng. II;
ALLAN  MURRAY,  Eng.  Ill;
IAIN OGLE, Eng. Ill; ROGER
POOLE,   Eng.   I;   JOHN
POSTLE, Eng. Ill; HOWARD
RICE-JONES,   Eng.  II;   RONALD ROBERTS, Eng. II; WILLIAM   ROBINSON,   Eng.   II;
C. J. ROGERS, Eng. Ill; KEN
RYCAR, Eng. Ill; DAVID L.
SAXTON,   Eng.   IV;   COLIN
SMITH,     Eng.    Ill;    PHILIP
SUNDERLAND,     Eng.     Ill;
WARREN  THOMLINSON,
Eng. II; HARRY THOMPSON,
Eng. IV; GORDON TOVELL,
Eng.  Ill; CORNELIUS  VAN-
DERGUGTEN, Eng. II; RENE
VERMETTE,   Eng.   IV;   ROBERT   WALDRON,   Eng.   Ill;
BRIAN  WALLACE,  Eng.  II;
LEN.  H.   WALSH,   Eng.   Ill;
ROBERT WARMAN, Eng. II;
STEVE WHITELAW, Eng. Ill;
DAVID  M. WILLIAMS,  Eng.
Ill;     RANDOLPH     YOUNG,
Eng. III.
I believe that my candidate (fill in the blank) is the
man best able to fill the job
as AMS Co-ordinator.
freethought
criticism
and satire
Is Lee Harvey Oswald
Alive In Argentina?
J Jul fisati&t
35c Censored
What does the job of AMS
Co-ordinator entail?
The Co-ordinator must get
down to brass tacks, keep the
ball rolling, keep his nose to
the grindstone and his shoulder to the wheel. He must not
get off the beaten track or
beat around the bush.
If he can take the situation
in hand, play it by ear, all the
more power to him.
In previous elections the
candidates have, to all intents
and purposes, had similar platforms, and voting was merely
a matter of six of one and a
half dozen of the other.
On the other hand, my candidate (fill in the blank) has
a good head on his shoulders,
and, if you will bear with him,
governmental stagnation will
all be water under the bridge.
GRAEME
Vance
Co-ordinator of Activities is
a position which demands a
familiarity wth student organizations, and the ability to
deal with these organizations
on an impartial basis.
As assistant co-ordinator
this year, Graeme Vance has
carried out many of the coordinator's duties.
He has the energy and ability to handle the position as
well as the experience to do
it well.
With these qualifications in
mind, it is my pleasure to
second the nomination of
Graeme Vance for co-ordinator.
GEOFF   ATKINSON
Arts IV
Dirty poke
What's black and blue and
rings doorbells?
A Scienceman of course!
No, a punched out Avon
lady.
FIRST VICE
BOB
Cruise
The position of first vice-
president is one of unusual
importance. It requires unique
talents and a capacity for
hard work.
Bob Cruise has displayed
both. He has a record of solid
experience: Open House Vice-
Chairman, CUS Public Relations' Officers, and Treasurer's
positions with Arts US and
Homecoming.
Bob will bring to student
government a desire for hard
work and a spirit for constructive improvement. A crucial
year lies ahead. That's the
kind of thinking we need.
PETER S. HYNDMAN
Law I
BRIAN
Thorpe
I second, with great assurance, the nomination of Mr.
Brian Thorpe for the position
of First Vice-President.
A sense of direction is absent in our student government; a new standard must be
defined. Secondly, the estrangement between the AMS
and the university administration must be arrested.
Brian Thorpe is, I believe,
an exceptional candidate, well
qualified to meet this challenge. He has an outstanding
scholarship record in the
Faculty of Engineering and
he has proven his ability for
leadership.
I urge you to vote action,
support Brian Thorpe.
MICHAEL DAVIES
Law  III
1964 GRADUATES
IN LIBRARY SCIENCE
A Federal Government Selection Teami will be on
campus, to interview graduates interested in a career
as a Librarian in the Federal Civil Service from
February 10 to 12
Further details available from the Director of the
Library School.
BOOoeeoeeGeoeeeeoooooeoeoeooeooeeeeeeeseo-eoefl
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temporarily located at
THE KITSILANO THEATRE 4TH & ARBUTUS
FEBRUARY 11 -15
EMERALD PLAYERS
present
Sean O'Casey's
JUNO  AND THE  PAYCOCK
DOORS  OPEN:  7:30  P.M. CURTAIN:  8:30  P.M.
Tickets   $1.25   to  $2.50  available   at  Theatre
Open   Days   12:30  -  5  p.m.,  736-9915,  736-4828
Students admitted two for the price of one
tl
Postgraduate Opportunity,
Pathological Chemistry, U. of T.
Three Postgraduate Fellowships ranging from $2000-
$3500 per annum will become available during 1964 in
the Department of Pathological Chemistry, Banting Institute, University of Toronto, 5. Applications are invited
from students with a sound undergraduate training in
the Chemical or Biological Sciences or in Medicine. Interested students may write to the Head of the Department for further details.
Western Canada's Largest
FORMAL WEAR RENTALS
Tuxedos
Full Dress
Morning Coats
Director's Coots
White & Blue Coats
Shirts & Accessories
Blue Blazers
OVER 1,700 GARMENTS
10% UBC Discount
rs TO CHOOSE FROM
E. A.  LEE  Formal Wear Rentals
623  HOWE  (Downstairs) MU  3-2457
2608 Granville (ot 10th)       4683  Kingsway (Bby.)
21 3-6727 (by Sears) HE 1-1160
Iva Soreback
I keep my finances in good
shape with a growing
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Your Campus Branch:
The Administration Building: MERLE C. KIRBY, Manager
a big step on the road to success is an early banking connection
 U7-BB
Food   for   thought!
MANAGEMENT
CAREERS
for GRADUATES
(Commerce,  Business Administration, Arts)
• Investigate the attractive careers
opportunities in today's highly
specialized facets of the vital
MEAT PACKING INDUSTRY.
• 12 months individualized training
for successful applicants with
Burns &   Co.   Limited,   National   Meat
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• Arrange now through your placement
office to meet our representative on
February 20 and 21 st, 1964
(Applications filled out and left with
Placement Office in advance insure most
valuable   use  of   interview  time).
Undergraduates
Ask our representative about
Summer Employment
Burns
Serving Canadians with Quality Meats Friday,  February 7,   1964
THE      UBYSSEY
GEORGE'S
EYE VIEW
OF BIRDS
By GEORGE REAMSBOTTOM
The UBC athletic office has
announced the decision to
pull out of the WCIAA for
two years.
For hockey this means a
chance to become a big time
college sport.
Thunderbird manager Bill
Sturn visited several top
American college centres to
explore the possibility of
lining up games over the next
two years.
After talking to coaches
and athletic directors he is
confident at least four colleges will play UBC next
year.
• •    •
North Dakota, Colorado,
Gonzaga, and the top college
team anywhere, Denver, are
the four he considers in the
bag.
Besides the possibility of
playing other American colleges, the Birds also plan to
continue the Hamber Cup
series with U. of Alberta Golden Bears, probably the best
college team in Canada.
Top calibre competition
such as this should pack the
Thunderbird Winter Sports
Centre for every home game
next year, especially if the
strong rumour that Vancouver's Canucks are heading to
San Diego holds true.
There is one catch—where
" will we find the hockey players to compete with such
strong  competition?
• •    •
Part of the answer is over
in Europe right now. Five
Olympians; Ken Broderick,
Terry O'Malley, Barry McKenzie, Al McLean and Bob
Forhan are expected to return
next year.
Another possibility is ex-
pro Gordie Tansley, runner-
up for the rookie of the year
award in the Western Hockey
League two years ago, who is
ineligible under W.C.I.A.A.A
rules this year but will be
eligible  next season.
Several of the current
team such as Peter Kelly,
Ken Cairns, Al Merlo and
Ralph Lortie could also make
next year's club.
• •    •
But there are so many
"ifs" involved that at least
five more high calibre puck-
sters will have to be lured to
UBC. This means the athletic department must be able
to offer something comparable to the scholarships
American  colleges offer.
Since UBC officially
frowns on athletic scholarships, some other methods
will have to be employed.
One method used in the past
was giving interest free loans
payable after  graduation.
• •    *
These were made available
through the defunct UBC
quarterback club which obtained the money through ex-
grads  and the B.C.  Lions.
Perhaps a new club to
raise money from downtown
businesses and the alumni
would be the answer to stemming the southern flow of top
Canadian athletes in not only
hockey but all varsity sports.
Page 7
Hockey Birds
new threat
By GEORGE REAMSBOTTOM
Enthusiasm and scoring punch have made the Thunderbird pucksters a new threat to the WCIAA championship.
The Birds have a nucleus of
some of Canada's best college
players. Until two weeks ago
they were acting like a bunch
of individuals instead of a
team. Now they are a "new
team" says hockey manager
Jim McArthur.
Friday and Saturday night
UBC will play U of Manitoba
Bisons. Both teams are tied for
third place and a two-game
sweep of the series would give
either team a good chance to
win the championship.
T'Birds have two more losses than league leading U of A
Golden Bears but have two
games left with the Bears to
be played in Edmonton.
Two weeks ago the Birds
split their series with Manitoba. Playing in Winnipeg UBC
lost the first game 7-9 but
came back the next night to
win 4-2.
Game time at the Winter
sports centre both nights is 8
p.m. and 'A' cards are good.
Friday night the broomball
champions Ubyssey led by
speedy reporter McAfee of the
Sports Department will take
on student council led by fat
and french Scott.
The major event will take
place during the second and
third period break.
Avid fans from both levels
of Brock have decided to
throw their weight on one side
or the other.
JIM McARTHUR
. . . new team
Soccer joes
near laurels
The Soccer Birds play Car-
lings-St. Andrews at Kensington park Sunday and a win
will ensure UBC first place in
Mainland soccer's top division.
Coach Joe Johnson will use
the same team which won last
Saturday. Game time will be
2 , p.m. T'Hawks play Wallaces at Powell St. Grounds.
Birds meet
B.C. team
Albert Laithwaite puts his
weakened Rugby team against
the B.C. under-25s this Saturday.
The under-25 B.C. team has
been formed to oppose the New
Zealand All-Blacks on their
visit here.
Playing for the under-25s
are four of the Bird's top
players; Tim Cummings, John
Grange, Dick Hay and Fred
Sturrock.
Despite losing four of his
top players to the B.C. team
coach Laitwaite believes his
team has a good chance to
win. He hopes the Bird's faster backs and peak physical
condition will counter the
under-25s greater weight and
experience.
Game time is 2 p.m. at Varsity stadium and 'A' cards are
good.
THE SKI BUM
The Thunderbird S k i
Team continued its steady
improvement in the Northwest Inter-collegiate circuit
last weekend with a third
place in a seven team meet
in Banff.
Tom Jenkin led the Alpine team with a fifth place
in the giant slalom on Saturday.
Friday he had a freak fall
because of rocks on the
downhill course, ruining
what promised to be a second or third place time.
•    •    *
In Nordic events, Denis de
Jong placed seventh in the
jumping, an event usually
dominated by Norwegian
imports on the University of
Washington and Montana
State College teams.
Compared with the Missoula meet two weeks ago,
the results at Banff showed
consistent progress by the
team, and prospects are good
for a strong finish at Crystal
Mountain, Washington, Feb.
15-16, in the last college
meet of the current season.
On Sunday the Alpine
team is entering the Tyrol
giant slalom on Mt. Seymour, giving all racing enthusiasts a chance to support
the team in local competition.
•    •    •
Fifteen VOC members
made a successful trip into
the Sky Pilot region east of
Britannia  last weekend.
This area is popular among
sumer hikers and affords
good skiing terrain for those
with enough energy to do
the necessary preliminary
hiking.
An Alpine Club cabin provided an overnight base for
the trip, and good snows rewarded the group for its efforts.
This weekend 30 VOC
skiiers are heading south to
Stevens Pass for one of the
club's larger events.
They'll not be in want of
By TIM ROBERTS
snow judging from last Saturday's reports.
Busloads of Seattle students were refused permission to drive into the area
because of avalanche danger,
and only later were cars allowed to proceed at their
own risk.
Mt. Baker is now under 18
feet of heavy powder snow.
Chains are required, but
the roads are in good shape.
Both the Chute and Pan
Face are open, something we
have seldom seen in past
years.
As a result of the 1968
Olympic site decision of 10
days ago, Banff is a sad
town. A sign on a ski shop
door in town epitomized the
gloom, "We joined the wake
early." Beneath were two
broken ski tips and a wreath
with "Banff, 1968 Olympics"
draped across.
•    •    •
A parade of lugubrious individuals trudged down the
main street led by a man
beating an empty metal basket.
Flags read "Sorry, Banff,"
and "Try again in '72" but
few people seemed to think
there was much chance.
Varying opinions were offered as explanations for the
failure to get the Olympics,
no particular one sounding
more convincing than another.
One thing is sure, Whistler Mt. is again in the running for the 1972 Olympics,
and the Garibaldi Olympic
Development Associa tion
will be determined to avoid
the same fate as Banff.
UBC lifts up
BC championship
B.C. Champions, UBC
weightlifters, will defend their
reign Saturday at the Central
YMCA at 2 p.m.
Coach Andy Hinds will take
seven team members to the
meet.
There's a rewarding future for you as a
CHARTERED ACCOUNTANT
Learn how and why, February 10 to 21
During this period, mamb«ri of Th* Institute of Chartered
Accountant! of B.C. will bo at UBC to interview students who expect
to graduate in 1964. Arrangements for interviews may be made
through Mr. Hacking at the University Placement Office. Earlier interviews may be arranged by telephoning the Secretary at MUtual
1-3264.
YOUR OPPORTUNITY TO JOIN A CHALLENGING AND
FAST-CROWING PROFESSION
Chartered Accountants play a decisive role in Canadian business.
industry and government. Many have attained executive position! «f
considerable stature and Influence; their training and experience
enables them, as one writer has put it, "to disentangle the threads
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CA. training offers interesting employment with practising
chartered accountants. Your work "on location" will introduce you
to a wide range of industrial, financial, commercial, service and governmental operations.
The Institute of Chartered Accountants
530 BURRARD ST., VANCOUVER 1
MU 1-3264 Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday,  February 7,  1964
'tween classes
Students bleed next week
Blood Drive Feb. 10 to 21
Armories 9:30 to 4:30.
• •    •
PRE-SOCIAL WORK
Mr. Emery Barnes from the
Narcotic Addiction Foundation
in Bu. 202 Monday noon. Last
chance to sign up for CNIB
field trip.
• •    •
SUS
Crystal Ball, Science formal
tonight at The Villa Motor
Hotel. Tickets $3.00  a  couple.
• •    •
CHINESE VARSITY
Dr. J. Wood speaks on
"China — 3rd World" in Bu.
100 Monday noon. Dr. S. Kato
will speak on Artistic World
of the Chinese in La. 104. Tuesday noon.
• •    *
SPECIAL   EVENTS
Last minute tickets for
Julius Caesar matinee Feb. 8,
available at Special events office.
• •    •
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Films: Goemons, Monsieur et
Madame Curie, noon today in
Bu. 205.
• •    •
HOMECOMING '64
Applications are now being
recieved for the '64 committee.
Box 47 AMS.
• •    •
SPECIAL EVENTS
Presents Spanish guitarist
Alerio Ponce Tuesday noon in
the new Freddy Wood Theatre.
• •    •
IFC
Frosh vs. Grad Studies. Resolved that Polygamly is the
Epitome of Martial Relationships. Tues.  noon Bu.  217.
• •    •
ARCHAEOLOGY CLUB
Film: Portage Bu. 204 noon
today.
• •    •
FINE ARTS CLUB
General meeting Monday
noon Lasserre 301.
• •    •
ITALIAN STUDENTS
Dinner 7:00 p.m. Monday in
IH House. Tickets available
from members of the Italian
Section. 	
PROFESSOR JOHN WOOD
. . . third world
PSA AND IH
Idd-ul Fitr celebration, Saturday Feb. 15 at 7:30 p.m. IH
House. Cultural programme,
refreshment and films on Turkey, UAR, Pakistan, Indonesia.
Tickets $1.00 at IH House.
AIESEC
Talk and slides on Egypt,
India and Lebanon by Mr.
Steubbe of the BCAA in Chem.
150 today at noon.
• •    •
FUS
Frosh Council meeting next
Tuesday noon cancelled because of Frosh-Grad Studies
debate.
• •    •
NEW DEMOCRATS
Movie on the History of the
Labor Movement in Bu. 224
today. Admission 25 cents.
• *    •
BIOLOGY CLUB
Dr. Scofield will speak on
Distribution Patterns in Plants
noon  today in Bio.  Sci.  2321.
• •    •
ITALIAN CLUB
Film "Santa
giore" in Arts
noon.
• *
GERMAN  CLUB
Film:   "Berlin
everyone loves" noon today in
Bu. 203.
Tow trucks slip
past Ouvry's eye
Sir Ouvry Roberts couldn't
keep up with his traffic control Tuesday.
At 12:35 p.m., Sir Ouvry,
speaking at his last lecture
said that he had tried to do
away with the tow-trucks on
campus.
"In the past four months
the tow-truck has been on
campus only three times," he
said.
At 12 o'clock, seven student cars had been impounded from the visitors lot behind  the  Memorial  Gymn
Maria    Mag-
100   Monday
—   The   city
VOLKSWAGEN
Repairs — Inspections
BA Service Stn.
Dunbar and 30th Avenue
CA 4-7644
1
THE IDEAL PLACE
TO MEET
YOUR FRIENDS
Try Our Delicious T-Bone
Steak with Coffee
$1.35-Ifs Really Good
Full Course Meals
within your income.
DO-NUT DINER
4556 West 10th Ave.
Why does she
feel at ease in
any company
any time of
the month?
CANADIAN
Because she
uses Tampax
internal sanitary
protection.
It's the
modern way.
the nicer way,
the "feel-fresh"
way, the
invisible way,
the comfortable
way, the better
way!
After all,
shouldn't
it
be
the only way?
TAMPAX
CORPORATION LIMITED, BARRIE, ONT.

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